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World: Humanitarian Funding in Asia-Pacific in 2016

ReliefWeb - Press Releases - 1 hour 34 min ago
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Australia, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Cambodia, China, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Germany, India, Indonesia, Japan, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nepal, Philippines, Republic of Korea, Sri Lanka, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, Timor-Leste, United States of America, Viet Nam, World

World: Humanitarian Funding in Asia-Pacific in 2016

Sri Lanka - ReliefWeb News - 1 hour 34 min ago
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Australia, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Cambodia, China, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Germany, India, Indonesia, Japan, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nepal, Philippines, Republic of Korea, Sri Lanka, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, Timor-Leste, United States of America, Viet Nam, World

World: Humanitarian Funding in Asia-Pacific in 2016

Philippines - ReliefWeb News - 1 hour 34 min ago
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Australia, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Cambodia, China, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Germany, India, Indonesia, Japan, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nepal, Philippines, Republic of Korea, Sri Lanka, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, Timor-Leste, United States of America, Viet Nam, World

World: Humanitarian Funding in Asia-Pacific in 2016

Nepal - ReliefWeb News - 1 hour 34 min ago
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Australia, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Cambodia, China, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Germany, India, Indonesia, Japan, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nepal, Philippines, Republic of Korea, Sri Lanka, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, Timor-Leste, United States of America, Viet Nam, World

World: Humanitarian Funding in Asia-Pacific in 2016

Myanmar - ReliefWeb News - 1 hour 34 min ago
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Australia, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Cambodia, China, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Germany, India, Indonesia, Japan, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nepal, Philippines, Republic of Korea, Sri Lanka, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, Timor-Leste, United States of America, Viet Nam, World

World: Humanitarian Funding in Asia-Pacific in 2016

Indonesia - ReliefWeb News - 1 hour 34 min ago
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Australia, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Cambodia, China, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Germany, India, Indonesia, Japan, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Malaysia, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nepal, Philippines, Republic of Korea, Sri Lanka, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, Timor-Leste, United States of America, Viet Nam, World

Peru: Perú: Emergencia por temporada de lluvias - Ayuda humanitaria bilateral recibida por el Gobierno, al 28 de marzo de 2017

Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Argentina, Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Israel, Japan, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Republic of Korea, Uruguay, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of)

AFECTACIÓN

Damnificados: 124mil

Afectados: 813mil

Categories: RSS feeds

Peru: Perú: Emergencia por temporada de lluvias - Ayuda humanitaria bilateral recibida por el Gobierno, al 28 de marzo de 2017

Colombia - Chad - 1 hour 34 min ago
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Argentina, Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Brazil, Canada, Chile, Colombia, Ecuador, Israel, Japan, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Republic of Korea, Uruguay, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of)

AFECTACIÓN

Damnificados: 124mil

Afectados: 813mil

Myanmar: The Socio-Economic Impact of HIV at the Household Level in Myanmar

Myanmar - ReliefWeb News - 2 hours 1 min ago
Source: UN Development Programme Country: Myanmar

The Socio-Economic Impact of People Living with HIV at the Household Level in Myanmar study conducted by the Ministry of Health and UNDP assesses the socio-economic impact of HIV-related diseases at the household level across all States and Regions in Myanmar. It collected data on the impact of HIV-related diseases on income, revenues, economic dependency, consumption, education, health, food security, stigma, discrimination, quality of life, and migration. The study also assessed people living with chronic diseases in order to compare the impact of living with HIV/AIDS with the impact of living with a chronic disease.

Stigma, discrimination, and socio-economic exclusion continue to affect the rights and socio-economic opportunities of people living with HIV in Myanmar. Households with a family member who has HIV, have lower incomes, fewer assets and lower home-ownership, compared to households that are not affected by HIV. They also have more household debt, and their families pay a higher rate of interest compared to families not affected by HIV. There is a high proportion of HIV-affected households led by a single parent; they are particularly economically vulnerable. Children from families affected by HIV are more than twice as likely to have missed school to help their family with household chores or to carry out paid work.

Around a quarter of the households sampled for this report have at least one person who has a chronic disease. Compared to people with HIV, more people with a chronic disease cited bad health. Furthermore, more people with a chronic disease seek outpatient care and fewer are satisfied with their access to health services. In rural areas, the distance to the facility is an important reason why people with chronic illnesses do not seek care. Families with a member who has a chronic disease have higher levels of unemployment and are over two and a half times more likely to have medical bills that they cannot pay for, than families where no one has a chronic illness.

Somalia: East Africa on the brink of starvation

Somalia - ReliefWeb News - 2 hours 8 min ago
Source: Islamic Relief Country: Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, South Sudan

Islamic Relief is stepping up its emergency relief operations in East Africa where more than 20 million people are on the brink of starvation. Severe drought conditions and lack of rainfall is raising fears of famine, equal to or worse than the 2011 Horn of Africa famine that killed 260,000 people in 2011.

“The international community has a moral obligation to rescue the lives of millions of people across East Africa, who are on the brink of starvation,” says Islamic Relief Worldwide’s (IRW) Head of East Africa, Yusuf Ahmed.

His comments come after UNOCHA and the United Nation’s under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator, Stephen O’Brien, visited Somalia last week to assess the extent of the crisis.

Islamic Relief field offices in Kenya, Somalia, South Sudan and Ethiopia are currently conducting needs assessments. Water, food and livestock feed have been identified as urgent needs. Ahmed, who returned recently from a field visit to Ethiopia, said conditions on the ground are particularly harrowing for women and children.

“In Ethiopia, 5.6 million people are directly in need of emergency aid. During the field visit, we came across a mother and her four children who moved away from their pastoral home in search of water and food.”

“After weeks of living on the side of the road, the mother said it was more than 10 hours since she and her young children had any water to drink. You can just imagine their suffering,” he added. Islamic Relief has a long history of working in the East Africa region. The humanitarian relief organisation first responded to the urgent needs of Sudanese families in 1984, who were caught in the grips of a devastating famine.

Last year we delivered a project in Somalia, which saw the distribution of emergency food supplies, medicine and the provision and restocking of animals which the population rely on heavily for milk and meat.

More recently, we implemented life-saving water trucking initiatives to more than 30,000 people in Ethiopia in response to climatic changes. In Kenya, we implemented a £1 million programme, which increased the resilience of households to drought.

We are pushing for long-term solutions in Somalia to break the repetitive cycle of drought and floods, delivering a $5 million borehole project to provide 36 sustainable water supplies across the region and installing underground tanks to store rainwater that currently runs wasted into the Red Sea. Ahmed appealed to Islamic Relief donors and supporters to donate towards the East Africa crisis appeal. “We urgently need humanitarian assistance in the form of emergency relief, cash transfers and medical assistance. Millions of people are in need across the region. Children are going hungry. Women and the elderly are ill and access to no medical assistance. You have a moral obligation to help these people at this very critical stage.”

Somalia: East Africa on the brink of starvation

Kenya - ReliefWeb News - 2 hours 8 min ago
Source: Islamic Relief Country: Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, South Sudan

Islamic Relief is stepping up its emergency relief operations in East Africa where more than 20 million people are on the brink of starvation. Severe drought conditions and lack of rainfall is raising fears of famine, equal to or worse than the 2011 Horn of Africa famine that killed 260,000 people in 2011.

“The international community has a moral obligation to rescue the lives of millions of people across East Africa, who are on the brink of starvation,” says Islamic Relief Worldwide’s (IRW) Head of East Africa, Yusuf Ahmed.

His comments come after UNOCHA and the United Nation’s under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator, Stephen O’Brien, visited Somalia last week to assess the extent of the crisis.

Islamic Relief field offices in Kenya, Somalia, South Sudan and Ethiopia are currently conducting needs assessments. Water, food and livestock feed have been identified as urgent needs. Ahmed, who returned recently from a field visit to Ethiopia, said conditions on the ground are particularly harrowing for women and children.

“In Ethiopia, 5.6 million people are directly in need of emergency aid. During the field visit, we came across a mother and her four children who moved away from their pastoral home in search of water and food.”

“After weeks of living on the side of the road, the mother said it was more than 10 hours since she and her young children had any water to drink. You can just imagine their suffering,” he added. Islamic Relief has a long history of working in the East Africa region. The humanitarian relief organisation first responded to the urgent needs of Sudanese families in 1984, who were caught in the grips of a devastating famine.

Last year we delivered a project in Somalia, which saw the distribution of emergency food supplies, medicine and the provision and restocking of animals which the population rely on heavily for milk and meat.

More recently, we implemented life-saving water trucking initiatives to more than 30,000 people in Ethiopia in response to climatic changes. In Kenya, we implemented a £1 million programme, which increased the resilience of households to drought.

We are pushing for long-term solutions in Somalia to break the repetitive cycle of drought and floods, delivering a $5 million borehole project to provide 36 sustainable water supplies across the region and installing underground tanks to store rainwater that currently runs wasted into the Red Sea. Ahmed appealed to Islamic Relief donors and supporters to donate towards the East Africa crisis appeal. “We urgently need humanitarian assistance in the form of emergency relief, cash transfers and medical assistance. Millions of people are in need across the region. Children are going hungry. Women and the elderly are ill and access to no medical assistance. You have a moral obligation to help these people at this very critical stage.”

Somalia: East Africa on the brink of starvation

Ethiopia - ReliefWeb News - 2 hours 8 min ago
Source: Islamic Relief Country: Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, South Sudan

Islamic Relief is stepping up its emergency relief operations in East Africa where more than 20 million people are on the brink of starvation. Severe drought conditions and lack of rainfall is raising fears of famine, equal to or worse than the 2011 Horn of Africa famine that killed 260,000 people in 2011.

“The international community has a moral obligation to rescue the lives of millions of people across East Africa, who are on the brink of starvation,” says Islamic Relief Worldwide’s (IRW) Head of East Africa, Yusuf Ahmed.

His comments come after UNOCHA and the United Nation’s under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator, Stephen O’Brien, visited Somalia last week to assess the extent of the crisis.

Islamic Relief field offices in Kenya, Somalia, South Sudan and Ethiopia are currently conducting needs assessments. Water, food and livestock feed have been identified as urgent needs. Ahmed, who returned recently from a field visit to Ethiopia, said conditions on the ground are particularly harrowing for women and children.

“In Ethiopia, 5.6 million people are directly in need of emergency aid. During the field visit, we came across a mother and her four children who moved away from their pastoral home in search of water and food.”

“After weeks of living on the side of the road, the mother said it was more than 10 hours since she and her young children had any water to drink. You can just imagine their suffering,” he added. Islamic Relief has a long history of working in the East Africa region. The humanitarian relief organisation first responded to the urgent needs of Sudanese families in 1984, who were caught in the grips of a devastating famine.

Last year we delivered a project in Somalia, which saw the distribution of emergency food supplies, medicine and the provision and restocking of animals which the population rely on heavily for milk and meat.

More recently, we implemented life-saving water trucking initiatives to more than 30,000 people in Ethiopia in response to climatic changes. In Kenya, we implemented a £1 million programme, which increased the resilience of households to drought.

We are pushing for long-term solutions in Somalia to break the repetitive cycle of drought and floods, delivering a $5 million borehole project to provide 36 sustainable water supplies across the region and installing underground tanks to store rainwater that currently runs wasted into the Red Sea. Ahmed appealed to Islamic Relief donors and supporters to donate towards the East Africa crisis appeal. “We urgently need humanitarian assistance in the form of emergency relief, cash transfers and medical assistance. Millions of people are in need across the region. Children are going hungry. Women and the elderly are ill and access to no medical assistance. You have a moral obligation to help these people at this very critical stage.”

occupied Palestinian territory: Palestine: Israel Threatens Imminent Demolition of Entire Community

oPt - ReliefWeb News - 2 hours 14 min ago
Source: Médecins du Monde Country: occupied Palestinian territory

As you read this, the Israeli government is preparing to demolish an entire village in the Palestinian West Bank. Over 80 international NGO’s and human rights organizations are calling for an urgent international response to prevent the demolition of Khan al-Amar village and the relocation of 130 people currently living there – more than half of whom are women and children.

Doctors of the World has been active in Palestine for over 18 years, specifically in the West Bank and the Gaza strip. Our teams are particularly concerned about the psychological impact this demolition will have on the families who will be forced to relocate. “While most of the people we work with are in a constant state of stress, we know this displacement will have serious psychological consequences for the residents of the village – especially for the children who are particularly vulnerable,” reported Itziar de Miguel, head of Doctors of the World’s project in Palestine.

The United Nations has declared that the demolition of the village and subsequent resettling of its residents is a “forcible transfer” that would constitute a serious violation of the Fourth Geneva Convention (Protection of Civilian Persons in Times of War). Oxfam’s Palestine Country Director, Chris Eijkemans, says, “These alarming developments must be seen in the broader context of the continued annexation of Palestinian land by the Israeli authorities.”

In response to the threat, AIDA (Association of International Development Agencies) has called on the European Union, the United States and the rest of the international community to publicly condemn the demolition of Khan al-Amar and all other seizing of Palestinian land being carried out by Israeli authorities. Khan al-Amar is just one of 46 communities in the central West Bank (with a combined population of over 7,000) that the UN believes to be under risk of forcible transfer due to Israeli expansion plans.

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Yemen: Half of all health facilities in war-torn Yemen now closed; medicines urgently needed – UN

Yemen - ReliefWeb News - 2 hours 25 min ago
Source: UN News Service Country: Yemen

28 March 2017 – More than 14 million people in Yemen have no access to health services, the United Nations health agency today said, warning that transportation of medical personnel and treatment for the injured is getting increasingly difficult as this week the fighting enters its third year.

At least 7,719 people have been killed and 42,922 injured since 19 March 2015, the UN World Health Organization (WHO) reported, but the actual numbers are believed to be higher.

“More than half of all health facilities are closed or functioning only partially,” Tarik Jasarevic, a WHO spokesperson, told journalists in Geneva.

Mr. Jasarevic, who was in Yemen in February, said that at least 274 health facilities had been damaged or destroyed as a result of the conflict, and some 44 health workers either killed or injured.

He noted also a shortage of medicines and specialized staff, such as surgeons, many of whom have fled the country.

“For more than six months, health facilities in Yemen had received no financial support to cover operational costs and staff salaries,” the spokesperson said.

As a result, health facilities such as the chemo-dialysis centre in Hudaydah, is on the brink of ceasing operations, as there was no more fuel to run the obsolete chemo-dialysis machines, Mr. Jasarevic noted. Without the facility 600 people with kidney failure would likely die.

The long-term impact of the conflict is also having detrimental effects on the country’s food system and infrastructure.

Malnutrition is on the rise with close to half-a-million children suffering from severe acute malnutrition, with one out of every two children under the age of five stunted in their growth.

This is “a 200 per cent increase since 2014 – when that number was at 160,000 – raising the risk of famine,” said Christophe Boulierac, spokesperson for the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF).

UNICEF estimates that every 10 minutes, at least one child dies in Yemen as a result of preventable causes such as malnutrition, diarrhoea or respiratory tract infections.

In addition to malnutrition, children face malaria and dengue fever, both of which have been on the rise in the past two months. An outbreak of cholera has been contained, Mr. Jasarevic said.

WHO, UNICEF and other UN agencies and their partners are providing aid but resources are stretched. For 2017, for example, the health cluster appealed for $322 million.

Pervasive malnutrition, shuttered schools jeopardize Yemen’s future generations

Meanwhile, Humanitarian coordinator in Yemen, Jamie McGoldrick, denounced a raft of atrocities taking place in Yemen, including reportedly at least 1,540 children killed; 2,450 children injured; and over 1,550 children recruited to fight or to perform military related duties. Moreover, Hundreds of people have been killed in mosques, markets, funeral wakes, schools and hospitals.

“With malnutrition amongst children at an all-time high and at least two million children out of school, the conflict and its consequences is jeopardizing future generations in Yemen,” he said, explaining that more than 11 per cent of Yemen’s entire population has been forced to move from their homes in search of safety and livelihoods. One million of these people have sought to return to their areas of origin only to find destruction and lack of opportunities to re-start their lives.

Stressing that no humanitarian response can meet the increasing needs that the war is causing, Mr. McGoldrick said: “The people of Yemen have suffered long enough […] Only peace can end the suffering and I continue to call on all the parties to return to the negotiating table and to make effective their responsibilities to civilians across Yemen.”

Democratic Republic of the Congo: Statement of the Secretary-General on the death of two members of the Group of Experts on the Democratic Republic of the Congo

DRC - ReliefWeb News - 28 March 2017 - 11:53pm
Source: UN Secretary-General Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo

I am deeply saddened to confirm that the remains discovered by peacekeepers from the United Nations Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUSCO) on 27 March outside of the city of Kananga in the Congolese Kasaï-Central province are those of Michael Sharp (United States) and Zaida Catalan (Sweden), members of the Group of Experts on the Democratic Republic of the Congo missing since 12 March 2017. I convey my profound condolences to Michael's and Zaida's families, loved ones and colleagues.

Michael and Zaida lost their lives seeking to understand the causes of conflict and insecurity in the DRC in order to help bring peace to the country and its people. We will honor their memory by continuing to support the invaluable work of the Group of Experts and the whole UN family in the DRC.

It is our hope that the cause of their deaths will be determined following a more thorough examination. I trust that the Congolese authorities will conduct a full investigation into this incident. The United Nations will also conduct an inquiry. In case of criminal acts, the United Nations will do everything possible to ensure that justice is done.

I urge the Congolese authorities to continue the search for the four Congolese nationals who accompanied our colleagues. The United Nations will cooperate with the authorities in the continuing search.

New York, 28 March 2017

Bangladesh: Bangladesh: Humanitarian Response to Undocumented Myanmar Nationals in Cox’s Bazar - 5 January - 28 February 2017

Myanmar - ReliefWeb News - 28 March 2017 - 11:40pm
Source: International Organization for Migration Country: Bangladesh, Myanmar

Highlights

  • Approximately 74,000 Rohingya s/ Undocumented Myanmar Nationals (UMNs) from Rakhine State have crossed the border into Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh as of 23 February, 2017.

  • New families were spotted in Balukhali, Teknaf and Ukiya host villages. The new arrivals are highly mobile and were reported to be moving between makeshift settlements, upazila and district centres.

  • No official decision from the GOB to grant new land for establishing makeshift settlements (MS) has created a concern. Hundreds of unplanned huts are being built around the MS.

Situation Overview

Within the framework of the ‘National Strategy on Myanmar Refugees and Undocumented Myanmar Nationals in Bangladesh’, the International Organization for Migration (IOM) has been tasked by the Government of Bangladesh (GoB) to coordinate the humanitarian services to the Undocumented Myanmar Nationals (UMNs) and vulnerable host communities in Bangladesh's southeastern district of Cox's Bazar. It is estimated that over 60,000 UMNs are residing in the Makeshift Settlements (MS) in Kutupalong and Leda.

Following an outbreak of violence on the October 9, 2016 in the Rakhine State of Myanmar, thousands of the Rohingyas¹ have fled to Bangladesh. As of 23 February 2017, it is estimated that approximately over 74,000 Rohingyas from Rakhine State have crossed the border and are residing in the registered camps, makeshift settlements, Cox’s Bazar city and in the host villages of Teknaf and Ukhiya districts. Some new families were spotted in Balukhali, Teknaf and Ukhiya host villages. This newly arrived population is highly mobile and moving from the host villages to the makeshift settlements to have access to basic humanitarian services provided by the actors on the ground, which is already creating pressure on resources and other humanitarian needs.

The influx has resulted in construction of new temporary shelters in the Kutupalong Makeshift Settlement (KMS) and in Balukhali village, including on top and at the base of hills in these areas. The new arrivals are in need of basic humanitarian assistance, such as health, water, food, sanitation, shelter and protection against violence in the expanded areas of Kutupalong Makeshift Settlement (KMS), Leda Makeshift Settlement (LMS) and the newly built temporary settlements in Balukhali. The agencies are unable to make a site plan for shelter construction as the decision from the Government of Bangladesh has not formally allocated new land, which has resulted in construction of unplanned huts.

The Government of Bangladesh published and made public statements concerning relocation of the Royingya to Thenga Char, which has raised concerns among the UMNs and the refugees. However, the UN country team has agreed to continue the humanitarian assistance as before while monitoring further developments in the Government assessment and planning.

occupied Palestinian territory: Winter 2017: Living without electricity just an hour and a half away from Tel Aviv

oPt - ReliefWeb News - 28 March 2017 - 11:38pm
Source: Israeli Information Center for Human Rights in the Occupied Territories Country: occupied Palestinian territory

Gazans have been suffering severe power shortages for a decade, ever since Israel bombed Gaza’s power plant in 2006. Since that time, Israel has prevented restoration of the plant, impeded infrastructure repairs and upgrades, and compelled Gaza authorities to purchase only Israeli fuel at a price residents are hard put to pay. As a result, power is supplied on the basis of rotation, and residents receive electricity for only four to eight hours at a time. In 2017, and especially in the cold of mid-winter, it is hard to imagine that in Gaza - not many miles away from Tel Aviv - families must lead their lives without a regular power supply. In accounts given to B’Tselem’s field researchers in the Gaza Strip, local women described the hardships arising from this situation.

Zikra Naji ‘Issa ‘Ajur, 38, lives in Gaza City. A married mother of one, she is project coordinator in a local community center:

We get power in eight-hour cycles. This means that for fifteen days a month, we get electricity in the morning, when I’m at work, and for 15 days of the month, in the afternoon. I work full time so I get home to my son Naji, who’s five years old, only after 3:00 P.M. During the weeks when there’s no electricity in the afternoon, power is restored only at 10:00 P.M. In other words, I come home to a house without power and then it’s many hours before I can do housekeeping chores like laundry, ironing or washing dishes with hot water. Because there’s no hot water, we can’t bathe either. I have to put all these things off until nighttime, which, in essence, is changed into day. I even have to put off Naji’s bath. 

We’re freezing cold, especially Naji, but we can’t heat the house, because there’s a gas shortage on top of the blackouts. Also, I have to cook every day because food can’t be stored in the refrigerator.

I feel like our lives aren’t human any more. We can’t do the most basic things, like bathing, keeping warm, heating food. I waste hours just waiting for the electricity.

Fatimah ‘Atiyyah a-Da’alseh, 28, lives in Khan Yunis. She is married and has three children:

We use electric heaters to heat our house. Now, they’ve become almost ornamental. We can only use them for a few hours a day. The cold affects my children’s health. They’re always getting colds and getting sick. A few days ago, my husband had to take my young son Saed to the hospital, because he needed inhalation. We have the device at home. We bought it because Saed has dyspnea and sometimes needs Ventolin inhalation to breathe, but we can’t use it when there’s no power.

Our lives have turned into a never-ending series of crises and there’s no solution in sight.

We have a hard time entertaining our kids, because there aren’t too many places to go to for recreation in Gaza.

‘Abir Ahmad Ibrahim Barakat, 31, lives in Khan Yunis. A married mother of two, she teaches at an UNRWA school:

The worst problem is that the poor lighting has caused my son Muhammad to start suffering eye pain. We took him to the doctor. He recommended we replace the LED bulbs and get proper lighting in the house. He also recommended not to leave the children for too long in poor lighting conditions and not let them study or read when there’s no electricity. It certainly interferes with their studies.

Sometimes I look at my children and get sad, when I see them shivering from the cold and I’m unable to keep them warm. Sometimes, when it’s particularly cold, we huddle under my coat and I tell them stories. This way I keep them warm and help alleviate the boredom at the same time.

We hope the power crisis in Gaza gets solved and life goes back to normal. We hope the blockade gets lifted and we’ll be able to exercise our rights and have access to basic things like electricity, fuel, medical care and the option to go places. In the meantime, we feel like we’re living in a giant prison.

Yara Sharif Ashur, 18, lives in Gaza City. She is a first-year medical student at al-Azhar University:

We’ve been suffering from problems with the power for years. We get power for eight hours and then get cut off for eight. I get back from school at around 3:00 P.M., tired. I rest for two hours and then get up to study. 

Because of the power outages, my father made an arrangement with someone who has a power generator: we pay him 140 shekels [approx. USD 35] a month to get electricity when the power is out. The trouble is that he supplies electricity only for a portion of the time there’s a blackout, and even then, the electric current is so weak that it’s just enough for lighting.

I usually study at night, when my younger siblings are asleep and it’s quiet, but the electricity from the generator goes out at 10:00 P.M., so I have to study by the light of a flashlight. It’s hard for me to read like that. My eyes hurt, and my vision goes blurry, so I can’t get through all the studies and I fall behind.  Medical school studies take hours of work, so it’s a problem.

I also need to read studies and other material online, but I have trouble accessing the internet because of the power outages. The blackouts also mean that I can’t even always listen to the university classes I taped on my laptop. Sometimes I take the laptop to university to charge the battery there.

Photocopying study materials at the library is also a problem because of the blackouts. Sometimes I have to go a library in a different part of Gaza City, where they do have electricity.

Najah Shawqi Abu Qasem, 27, lives in Deir al-Balah. She’s married and has two children:

We’ve been suffering from power outages for years. We used to get electricity for six hours at a time, but lately, things have gotten worse and sometimes we get electricity for only four hours. I try to do all the housework like vacuuming, laundry and bread baking during the hours when the power is on.

Even when the power comes on only at midnight, I get up and run the washing machine, because otherwise, the laundry piles up, especially the children’s things. I change their clothes more than once a day. I also vacuum and bake cakes for the children at night. The power supply schedule rules my life.

Over the past year, we’ve been using battery-powered LED bulbs for lighting. The trouble is that the battery gets weak after a while, and it takes a real toll on the eyes. My vision has deteriorated because of it, and now I need glasses. It also takes many hours to charge the battery, and sometimes we don’t manage to get it fully charged.

Now, in the winter, the children complain of being cold. When the power is on, I heat their room with an electric heater for a while, and then take it into my room for a little while, before the power goes off again.

Because the electricity comes on only at night, when the children are asleep, or in the morning, when they’re at school or daycare, they don’t get to watch any television.

When I leave the house, the first thing I do is put the cellphone charger in my bag, to charge the phone, in case I find myself somewhere that has electricity.

When guests come and there’s no electricity, I’m embarrassed, because the LED lighting is very weak, and I have to use a floodlight in the living room, but its battery runs out quickly. In the kitchen, I have to use the cellphone’s flashlight, and that shortens the battery’s life.

Because of the disruptions in the power supply, a few months ago there was a power surge that ruined the power converters for the television, the laptop, the refrigerator and the water tank. It cost me about 600 shekels [approx. USD 160] to fix all these appliances.

We don’t have solar water heating, so in addition to heating water for all the housework, we have to heat water and bathe the kids when the power is on. I’m under a lot of pressure during the hours that we have electricity: I dash about, trying to get to all the chores that have to be completed in a short amount of time. 

Maysaa Jaber a-Sultan, 39, lives in Jabalya. She is married and has five children:

I suffer from the power outages like everyone else in Gaza. We live on the sixth floor, so when the power is out and the elevator isn’t working, I have to climb 120 stairs carrying my five-month-old baby Rayan and the groceries. 

Things were even worse in December, when we had power only three hours a day and we were very cold. We have no gas heaters, or any other means of heating the apartment without electricity. 

I have back trouble, and the cold combined with having to carry things up so many stairs makes the pain worse. The children also find it difficult to climb six floors every day with their heavy schoolbags. 

The kids also have trouble working on their school assignments at home. The cold makes it difficult to concentrate and study for exams, and our battery-run LED bulbs don’t give off much light and causes eye trouble. We consulted an eye doctor and he said that trying to read with poor lighting was straining their eyes.

When power is restored it feels like an emergency. I have to rush to get everything done as long as there’s still power:  laundry, ironing, cooking, and heating water for showers. Because the water takes a long time to heat up, we take turns showering, so only one person showers a day. 

When the power is out, our social life and interactions are also put on hold because no one wants to climb six flights of stairs to pay a visit.

Our lives revolve around the availability of power. I’m always exhausted. This situation, together with the cold, make tensions run high at home and at night it’s hard to sleep because we’re so cold. 

Fatimah Khalil Muhammad Diab, 32, lives in Khan Yunis. A married and mother of four, she holds a B.A. in Islamic Education from al-Aqsa University and is unemployed:

These days, when it’s freezing cold, I don’t even have hot water to wash the children’s faces in the morning. It makes me very sad to have to wash their faces with ice-cold water. 

Other people, including our neighbors, light coal and wood burning stoves in their houses to keep warm, but I’m afraid to use them. In the last few days, we’ve heard of cases of fires and asphyxiation. It’s very common. All the fires we’ve heard of were caused by using coal- and wood-burning stoves inside homes. I’d rather be terribly cold than put my life and my children’s lives in danger. I hope our situation improves in the future. 

***All of the accounts were gathered by B’Tselem’s field researchers in the Gaza Strip – Muhammad Sabah, Khaled al-‘Azayzeh and Muhammad Sa’id – who also photographed Zikra ‘Azur, Yara ‘Ashur, Najah Abu Qasem and Maysaa Jaber a-Sultan.**

South Sudan: East Africa Food Insecurity - ECHO Daily Map | 28/03/2017

Uganda - ReliefWeb News - 28 March 2017 - 11:34pm
Source: European Commission's Directorate-General for European Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations Country: Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Uganda

South Sudan

From February to July 2017, Leer and Mayendit are classified in Famine, while Koch county has an elevated risk of famine.

Fews-net, TWG (South Sudan IPC Technical Working Group), ERC (IPC’s Emergency Review Committee)

Sudan

Parts of South Kordofan and Darfur’s Jebel Marra are expected to be in Crisis (IPC Phase 3) between February and September and will likely deteriorate to Emergency (IPC Phase 4) as newly displaced people missed the cultivation season, insecurity has disrupted trade, and staple food prices remain higher than normal. Additionally, in several locations (parts of South Kordofan and North Darfur states) there is limited production due to erratic rainfall resulting in dry spells. Without ongoing assistance to protracted and new displaced populations, the situation is likely to get worst.

Fews-net

Ethiopia

Many poor households in south-eastern Ethiopia will face food consumption gaps and Crisis (IPC Phase 3) with acute food insecurity between February and September 2017, in the absence of humanitarian assistance.
Some worst-affected households in Warder and Korahe zones in Somali Region are expected to be in Emergency (IPC Phase 4) and face increased acute malnutrition between June and September 2017, in the absence of assistance.

Fews-net

Somalia

The food security situation is deteriorating and there is a risk of Famine (IPC Phase 5) in a worst-case scenario in which the April to June 2017 Gu season performs very poorly, purchasing power declines to levels seen in 2010/11, and humanitarian assistance is struggling to reach populations in need.

Fews-net, FSNAU (Food Security and Nutrition Analysis Unit – Somalia)

Uganda

During the lean season (February to June), very poor households in Moroto and Napak are expected to face food consumption gaps and be in Crisis (IPC Phase 3).

Fews-net

Kenya

Large areas of Kenya are facing Crisis (IPC Phase 3) acute food security outcomes and atypical high food assistance needs, mainly in the pastoral and marginal agricultural areas, following the poor October–December 2016 rainy season.

Fews-net, KFSSG (Kenya Food Security Steering Group)

Djibouti

The majority of poor households are expected to remain Stressed (IPC Phase 2) through May 2017, ahead of the lean season.

Fews-net

South Sudan: East Africa Food Insecurity - ECHO Daily Map | 28/03/2017

Sudan - ReliefWeb News - 28 March 2017 - 11:34pm
Source: European Commission's Directorate-General for European Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations Country: Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Uganda

South Sudan

From February to July 2017, Leer and Mayendit are classified in Famine, while Koch county has an elevated risk of famine.

Fews-net, TWG (South Sudan IPC Technical Working Group), ERC (IPC’s Emergency Review Committee)

Sudan

Parts of South Kordofan and Darfur’s Jebel Marra are expected to be in Crisis (IPC Phase 3) between February and September and will likely deteriorate to Emergency (IPC Phase 4) as newly displaced people missed the cultivation season, insecurity has disrupted trade, and staple food prices remain higher than normal. Additionally, in several locations (parts of South Kordofan and North Darfur states) there is limited production due to erratic rainfall resulting in dry spells. Without ongoing assistance to protracted and new displaced populations, the situation is likely to get worst.

Fews-net

Ethiopia

Many poor households in south-eastern Ethiopia will face food consumption gaps and Crisis (IPC Phase 3) with acute food insecurity between February and September 2017, in the absence of humanitarian assistance.
Some worst-affected households in Warder and Korahe zones in Somali Region are expected to be in Emergency (IPC Phase 4) and face increased acute malnutrition between June and September 2017, in the absence of assistance.

Fews-net

Somalia

The food security situation is deteriorating and there is a risk of Famine (IPC Phase 5) in a worst-case scenario in which the April to June 2017 Gu season performs very poorly, purchasing power declines to levels seen in 2010/11, and humanitarian assistance is struggling to reach populations in need.

Fews-net, FSNAU (Food Security and Nutrition Analysis Unit – Somalia)

Uganda

During the lean season (February to June), very poor households in Moroto and Napak are expected to face food consumption gaps and be in Crisis (IPC Phase 3).

Fews-net

Kenya

Large areas of Kenya are facing Crisis (IPC Phase 3) acute food security outcomes and atypical high food assistance needs, mainly in the pastoral and marginal agricultural areas, following the poor October–December 2016 rainy season.

Fews-net, KFSSG (Kenya Food Security Steering Group)

Djibouti

The majority of poor households are expected to remain Stressed (IPC Phase 2) through May 2017, ahead of the lean season.

Fews-net

South Sudan: East Africa Food Insecurity - ECHO Daily Map | 28/03/2017

Somalia - ReliefWeb News - 28 March 2017 - 11:34pm
Source: European Commission's Directorate-General for European Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations Country: Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Uganda

South Sudan

From February to July 2017, Leer and Mayendit are classified in Famine, while Koch county has an elevated risk of famine.

Fews-net, TWG (South Sudan IPC Technical Working Group), ERC (IPC’s Emergency Review Committee)

Sudan

Parts of South Kordofan and Darfur’s Jebel Marra are expected to be in Crisis (IPC Phase 3) between February and September and will likely deteriorate to Emergency (IPC Phase 4) as newly displaced people missed the cultivation season, insecurity has disrupted trade, and staple food prices remain higher than normal. Additionally, in several locations (parts of South Kordofan and North Darfur states) there is limited production due to erratic rainfall resulting in dry spells. Without ongoing assistance to protracted and new displaced populations, the situation is likely to get worst.

Fews-net

Ethiopia

Many poor households in south-eastern Ethiopia will face food consumption gaps and Crisis (IPC Phase 3) with acute food insecurity between February and September 2017, in the absence of humanitarian assistance.
Some worst-affected households in Warder and Korahe zones in Somali Region are expected to be in Emergency (IPC Phase 4) and face increased acute malnutrition between June and September 2017, in the absence of assistance.

Fews-net

Somalia

The food security situation is deteriorating and there is a risk of Famine (IPC Phase 5) in a worst-case scenario in which the April to June 2017 Gu season performs very poorly, purchasing power declines to levels seen in 2010/11, and humanitarian assistance is struggling to reach populations in need.

Fews-net, FSNAU (Food Security and Nutrition Analysis Unit – Somalia)

Uganda

During the lean season (February to June), very poor households in Moroto and Napak are expected to face food consumption gaps and be in Crisis (IPC Phase 3).

Fews-net

Kenya

Large areas of Kenya are facing Crisis (IPC Phase 3) acute food security outcomes and atypical high food assistance needs, mainly in the pastoral and marginal agricultural areas, following the poor October–December 2016 rainy season.

Fews-net, KFSSG (Kenya Food Security Steering Group)

Djibouti

The majority of poor households are expected to remain Stressed (IPC Phase 2) through May 2017, ahead of the lean season.

Fews-net

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