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Pakistan: IMB urges for peak performance to end polio in Pakistan

Pakistan - ReliefWeb News - 27 August 2016 - 9:26pm
Source: Government of Pakistan Country: Pakistan

Islamabad, 25 August 2016 - The International Monitoring Board (IMB) of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative has recognized major improvements in performance of the Pakistan polio eradication programme, a transformation from its position three years ago.

The report of the 13th meeting of the IMB highlighted the year on year improvements for the programme in Pakistan: a 59% reduction in cases, a reduction in the proportion of polio positive environmental samples, an overall increase in campaign quality and a reduction in the proportion of missed children, but voiced concern in reaching the goal of interrupting transmission in 2016 without further intensified efforts.

The Government of Pakistan welcomes the recommendations of the IMB, echoing its call for an intense push towards peak performance across all areas of the programme over the next six months.

Minister for National Health Services Saira Afzal Tararsaid that Pakistan is committed to addressing the remaining challenges and ending polio transmission in Pakistan in 2016.

“The IMB has recognized how far Pakistan has come which is clearly due to the strong political will and commitment shown by the country's leadership which has trickled down to all levels of responsibility and effected change. We must commit ourselves to nothing less than leaving no child unvaccinated and vulnerable to this crippling virus,” Tararsaid.

The National Emergency Action Plan (NEAP) 2016-2017, which is driving programme operations, risk assessment and management, oversight and accountability for the Pakistan programme, lays out an ambitious plan to tackle the remaining gaps, also identified by the latest IMB, report head-on.

“Under the NEAP, Pakistan is focused on improving the capacity and reach of its surveillance system to effectively transform it into a “surveillance system for eradication”, which includes an expanded workforce to meet the needs of the programme, more effective Acute Flaccid Paralysis (AFP) surveillance and more innovative ways to expand environment sampling to detect and respond to circulation,” Prime Minister’s Focal Person for Polio Eradication, Senator Ayesha Raza Farooq said.

She added that the programme is using the Emergency Operation Centres across Pakistan, that have provided an essential platform for Government staff and GPEI partners to come together as ‘one team under one roof’, to ensure key leadership is aligned to the urgency of the task ahead and engaged at all levels of the programme.

The Pakistan programme remains dedicated to strengthening operational collaboration across the shared reservoir areas with Afghanistan and ensuring that gaps in performance across the programme are addressed with urgency.

The Independent Monitoring Board (IMB) was convened in November 2010 at the request of the World Health Assembly to monitor and guide the progress of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative’s 2010-2012 Strategic Plan. The IMB releases quarterly reports to provide an honest and transparent external assessment of the progress being made towards polio eradication.

Pakistan: Polio campaign: Registration of children under five starts in selected UCs

Pakistan - ReliefWeb News - 27 August 2016 - 9:25pm
Source: Government of Pakistan Country: Pakistan

Pakistan is getting ever closer to achieving its target of polio eradication through exemplary coordination and collaboration of federal and provincial governments at political and administrative level.

To ascertain and validate the existing data about children under five years of age, health departments of respective provincial governments are undertaking an exercise to register and validate the numbers of children under five years of age in various UCs of Karachi, Sukkur, Kashmore, Qambar, Peshawar, Quetta block and North and South Waziristan. Community Health Workers and monitors from the provincial health departments are assigned to ensure all houses and children will be reached when the vaccination campaign begins in August.

The health departments requests parents to cooperate with the community health workers from the local neighborhood in the child registration process. This valuable contribution from the parents and community elders will help the health departments determine the exact numbers of children under five years of age in each of these UCs and ensure that no child is missed in the upcoming vaccination campaigns against polio.

Philippines: Research shows Australian volunteers play important role in disaster recovery

TyphoonHaiyan - RW Updates - 27 August 2016 - 9:14pm
Source: Government of Australia Country: Australia, Philippines

26 August 2016

Research released today on World Humanitarian Day shows that skilled Australian volunteers play a unique and important role in responding to overseas humanitarian crises.

The research by Scope Global, a delivery partner of the Australian Volunteers for International Development (AVID) program, examines the work of a team of Australian volunteers who were deployed to the Philippines to work with local counterparts and support reconstruction in areas devastated by Typhoon Haiyan which hit the Philippines on 8 November 2013. Almost 15 million people were affected and more than four million people were left homeless.The Australian Government contributed $40 million in emergency relief to the Philippines to support affected populations. A small, but important, part of the Australian Government's response to the Typhoon was the deployment of the AVID volunteer team.

The volunteer team included engineers, an architect, an urban planner, a construction manager and a communications specialist.

The research released today recognises team volunteering as an innovative and effective approach to addressing complex development and humanitarian challenges.

"Team volunteering enables a critical mass of people with varied skills to work together and have substantial impact on humanitarian challenges," says Simona Achitei, Senior Program Manager for the AVID program at Scope Global.

Together, the volunteers provided guidance and technical expertise to government officials and front-line workers rebuilding public buildings and other structures that had been destroyed in Haiyan.

The team also collaborated with multiple partners to develop a single comprehensive building manual that could be followed to ensure new and restored buildings were more resilient to extreme weather. The manual continues to be used by the local government units in the Philippines.

"We are facing an increasing number of humanitarian crises as a result of climate change, urbanization and conflict," says Jamie Isbister, Humanitarian Coordinator with the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade.

"The Australian Government actively responds to many of these crises and plays a leadership role – particularly within our region. The Australian Volunteers for International Development program is a very central part of how we respond to many of these crises."

The full research report can be downloaded, and videos and publications related to the project can be viewed, on the Scope Global website.

The AVID program supports around 1,300 volunteers every year. Many volunteers work with local governments in the Indo-Pacific region to support disaster preparedness.

Philippines: Research shows Australian volunteers play important role in disaster recovery

Philippines - ReliefWeb News - 27 August 2016 - 9:14pm
Source: Government of Australia Country: Australia, Philippines

26 August 2016

Research released today on World Humanitarian Day shows that skilled Australian volunteers play a unique and important role in responding to overseas humanitarian crises.

The research by Scope Global, a delivery partner of the Australian Volunteers for International Development (AVID) program, examines the work of a team of Australian volunteers who were deployed to the Philippines to work with local counterparts and support reconstruction in areas devastated by Typhoon Haiyan which hit the Philippines on 8 November 2013. Almost 15 million people were affected and more than four million people were left homeless.The Australian Government contributed $40 million in emergency relief to the Philippines to support affected populations. A small, but important, part of the Australian Government's response to the Typhoon was the deployment of the AVID volunteer team.

The volunteer team included engineers, an architect, an urban planner, a construction manager and a communications specialist.

The research released today recognises team volunteering as an innovative and effective approach to addressing complex development and humanitarian challenges.

"Team volunteering enables a critical mass of people with varied skills to work together and have substantial impact on humanitarian challenges," says Simona Achitei, Senior Program Manager for the AVID program at Scope Global.

Together, the volunteers provided guidance and technical expertise to government officials and front-line workers rebuilding public buildings and other structures that had been destroyed in Haiyan.

The team also collaborated with multiple partners to develop a single comprehensive building manual that could be followed to ensure new and restored buildings were more resilient to extreme weather. The manual continues to be used by the local government units in the Philippines.

"We are facing an increasing number of humanitarian crises as a result of climate change, urbanization and conflict," says Jamie Isbister, Humanitarian Coordinator with the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade.

"The Australian Government actively responds to many of these crises and plays a leadership role – particularly within our region. The Australian Volunteers for International Development program is a very central part of how we respond to many of these crises."

The full research report can be downloaded, and videos and publications related to the project can be viewed, on the Scope Global website.

The AVID program supports around 1,300 volunteers every year. Many volunteers work with local governments in the Indo-Pacific region to support disaster preparedness.

Pakistan: Pakistan: Daily Situation Report No. – 48 Monsoon 2016 (1300 hrs 26 August 2016 – 1300 hrs 27 August 2016)

Pakistan - ReliefWeb News - 27 August 2016 - 8:53pm
Source: Government of Pakistan Country: Pakistan
  1. Rivers Flow Situation Reported by Flood Forecasting Division. Annex A.

  2. Past Meteorological Situation and Future Forecast by PMD. Annex B.

  3. Dam Levels: Serial Reservoirs | Max Conservation Level (Feet) | Current Level (Feet) | Percentage
    a. Tarbela 1,550.00 1,541.60 99.4%
    b. Mangla 1,242.00 1,238.75 99.7%

  4. Significant Events. On 27 August 2016 at 1030 hours, Rawalpindi – Sudhnoti Road was blocked due to a landslide at Azad Pattan in Tehsil Kahuta. Efforts are underway to open the road.

  5. Road Situation (NHA and Respective Provinces). All other roads across the Country are clear for all types of traffic.

  6. Railway Situation. Nothing to Report.

  7. Preliminary Losses / Damages Reported.

a. 2 x deaths and 1 x completely damaged house was reported in District Lahore on 26 August 2016.

b. Overall details of losses / damages during Monsoon Season 2016 are at Annex C.

  1. Relief Provided Overall details of relief provided during Monsoon Season 2016 are at Annex D.

  2. Any Critical Activity to Report. Nothing to Report.

  3. Any Recommendation. Nil.

Sudan: Scaling up sanitation and hygiene across Sudan

Sudan - ReliefWeb News - 27 August 2016 - 7:00pm
Source: RedR UK Country: Sudan

For the past six months, a wide range of actors have been working to develop the Sudan National Sanitation and Hygiene Strategic Framework, which will help to speed and scale up efforts to improve sanitation and hygiene services and practices across the country. WASH expert Sarah House explains RedR’s contribution to this vital initiative.

In recent years, Sudan has made progress in the area of sanitation and hygiene - but the country still faces some significant challenges. For example, 29% of the Sudanese population currently practice open defecation. Only 68% have access to an improved water source. Schools are underequipped in terms of latrines and hand-washing facilities, and unsafe disposal of sewage and hazardous wastes are major risks to health.

However, the newly-developed Sudan National Sanitation and Hygiene Strategic Framework (SNSHSF) directly addresses these challenges. Once finalised, it will guide all sanitation and hygiene efforts across the country.

The framework covers the key areas of household excreta disposal and hygiene promotion; institutional and public sanitation and hygiene; and environmental health services. It also looks at a number of ‘cross-cutting issues’ and the ‘building blocks’ of a successful sanitation and hygiene strategy including: legal and policy frameworks; institutional responsibilities; finance; planning; monitoring, review and learning; and capacity-building.

The framework was drawn up through a consultative process led by the Federal Ministry of Health (FMoH), and involving representatives from the Government of Sudan, civil society, the private sector and universities, the UN, development partners and humanitarian donors. The process has been funded by UNICEF and the World Health Organisation (WHO) and supported by a core group of representatives from the FMoH, UNICEF, WHO, Khartoum State and RedR UK in Sudan.

For the past six months, the RedR Sudan team and myself have been facilitating development of the framework. We facilitated an analysis of the current situation and obtained recommendations from sector professionals through a desk review and holding workshops and interviews with people from across Sudan before drawing up a draft. This then went through a review process and is now being revised. The Federal Ministry of Health will then finalise the framework, approve it for use, and finalise the action plan and budget for its implementation.

The framework will enable the Government of Sudan and its partners to speed and scale up their efforts to improve sanitation and hygiene across the country.

The committed and hard-working people involved in the process make me hopeful that Sudan will make significant progress on this critical issue, which affects so many rights and aspects of life.

Sarah House (pictured) is an independent water and sanitation consultant and public health engineer with 25 years of experience in the global WASH sector. Sarah is also a RedR Member and Associate Trainer.

Democratic Republic of the Congo: Crisis Briefing: Humanitarian funding analysis: Displacement, the Democratic Republic of the Congo 23 August 2016

DRC - ReliefWeb News - 27 August 2016 - 6:37pm
Source: Global Humanitarian Assistance programme (Development Initiatives), Start Network Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo

1. Key points

  • According to the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA)’s Financial Tracking Service (FTS) donors have committed/contributed US$323.8 million of humanitarian assistance to the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) since the start of 2016.

  • The United States (US) is the largest donor, committing 41% of the total so far in 2016.

  • The 2016 UN-coordinated Humanitarian Response Plan (HRP) for DRC requested US$690 million from donors to respond to humanitarian needs in the country. The appeal is currently 40% funded at US$274.9 million.

  • 2016 commitments/contributions to DRC have spiked in August and are currently at US$94.1 million, 29% of the 2016 total.

2. Recent humanitarian funding to DRC

Donors have committed or contributed US$323.8 million of humanitarian funding to DRC since the start of 2016. The US is the largest donor so far, committing/contributing US$133.8 million (41% of the total). European Union (EU) institutions and Germany are the second and third largest donors, respectively, committing/contributing US$58.8 million and US$29.3 million. These three donors collectively account for over two-thirds (69%) of total funding so far in 2016.

2016 pledges to DRC make up US$11.8 million, the vast majority of which (US$11.0 million) is from the Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF).

Colombia: FARC rebels to meet in September to ratify peace deal

Colombia - Chad - 27 August 2016 - 6:21pm
Source: Agence France-Presse Country: Colombia

Havana, Cuba | AFP | Saturday 8/27/2016 - 21:38 GMT

FARC rebel leaders will convene in mid-September to ratify the historic peace agreement signed with the Colombian government this week, the guerrilla group announced Saturday.

The Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) said its leaders would convene for "the last conference of our organization while it still has its arms, endorse the peace accords and make way for the transformation of the FARC into a legal political movement."

The September 13-19 conference of 200 FARC delegates -- including 29 members of its central committee -- will be open to 50 international guests as well as the press, an unusual move for the guerrillas.

"Given the historical significance of this event, the people of Colombia and the world must learn first-hand about the conference's developments and decisions," the FARC said.

The Marxist guerrillas will hold the conference in San Vicente del Caguan in southern Colombia, once a FARC stronghold.

The announcement comes three days after Colombian and FARC negotiators presented a final peace accord following nearly four years of arduous negotiations in Cuba, putting an end to their half-century civil war that cost hundreds of thousands of lives.

Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos ordered a definitive ceasefire from Monday with the FARC rebels, and the guerrillas are expected to make a similar announcement shortly.

The conflict began with the founding of the FARC in 1964, when leftist guerrilla armies were fighting to sow revolution throughout Latin America.

Over the years, it has killed an estimated 260,000 people, uprooted 6.8 million and left 45,000 missing.

ag/mdo/oh

© 1994-2016 Agence France-Presse

Sierra Leone: Beyond reintegration towards reconciliation in the post-Ebola context

Guinea - ReliefWeb News - 27 August 2016 - 6:13pm
Source: Conciliation Resources Country: Côte d'Ivoire, Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone

Daniel Tucker
Mano River Region Project Officer

In August 2014 the World Health Organisation declared Ebola a ‘global health emergency’. Two years on, the health crisis has passed but the epidemic caused social divisions and tensions that are still having repercussions today.

Ebola affected everyone. Entire communities were quarantined, markets and schools were closed, inflation soared and people were in a constant state of fear. With little early communication about the disease and how it was spread rumours and misinformation sparked fear and suspicion. People often mistrusted local government officials, health workers and Ebola survivors who quickly became ostracised and isolated from communities.

The need to support the return and social acceptance of these groups was critical throughout the crisis and continues despite the epidemic being declared over – but what is the best approach to take?

Our research and experience during and post-Ebola has shown that attempts to ‘reintegrate’ ostracised individuals back into communities have, in many cases, reinforced stigma and exclusion. By focusing on the needs of an individual, through one-off meetings with community members, the process ignored the collective suffering of the entire community and bred resentment.

Our approach is one of reconciliation. This means creating an ongoing space for community conversations, and looks to understand the interests and needs of all parties, develop areas of common interest and recognise shared experience. Conciliation Resources supports networks of local peacebuilders called District Platforms for Dialogue (DPDs) to work within their communities to discuss grievances and overcome tensions.

It is crucial that strategies for supporting the return of ostracised and isolated groups understand the complexities of this crisis, and that no one was immune from the effects of the Ebola epidemic.

For further information read ‘Beyond reintegration towards reconciliation in the post-Ebola context.’

Sierra Leone: Beyond reintegration towards reconciliation in the post-Ebola context

Côte d’Ivoire - ReliefWeb News - 27 August 2016 - 6:13pm
Source: Conciliation Resources Country: Côte d'Ivoire, Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone

Daniel Tucker
Mano River Region Project Officer

In August 2014 the World Health Organisation declared Ebola a ‘global health emergency’. Two years on, the health crisis has passed but the epidemic caused social divisions and tensions that are still having repercussions today.

Ebola affected everyone. Entire communities were quarantined, markets and schools were closed, inflation soared and people were in a constant state of fear. With little early communication about the disease and how it was spread rumours and misinformation sparked fear and suspicion. People often mistrusted local government officials, health workers and Ebola survivors who quickly became ostracised and isolated from communities.

The need to support the return and social acceptance of these groups was critical throughout the crisis and continues despite the epidemic being declared over – but what is the best approach to take?

Our research and experience during and post-Ebola has shown that attempts to ‘reintegrate’ ostracised individuals back into communities have, in many cases, reinforced stigma and exclusion. By focusing on the needs of an individual, through one-off meetings with community members, the process ignored the collective suffering of the entire community and bred resentment.

Our approach is one of reconciliation. This means creating an ongoing space for community conversations, and looks to understand the interests and needs of all parties, develop areas of common interest and recognise shared experience. Conciliation Resources supports networks of local peacebuilders called District Platforms for Dialogue (DPDs) to work within their communities to discuss grievances and overcome tensions.

It is crucial that strategies for supporting the return of ostracised and isolated groups understand the complexities of this crisis, and that no one was immune from the effects of the Ebola epidemic.

For further information read ‘Beyond reintegration towards reconciliation in the post-Ebola context.’

Colombia: Q&A: Colombia Peace Deal Announced — What’s Next?

Colombia - Chad - 27 August 2016 - 5:51pm
Source: US Institute of Peace Country: Colombia

On the Issues with Virginia M. “Ginny” Bouvier

By: Fred Strasser

After 52 years of armed conflict, the Colombian government and the country’s oldest rebel group, the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC-EP), announced a final agreement last night aimed at ending one of the world’s longest-lasting insurgencies. The U.S. Institute of Peace’s Virginia M. “Ginny” Bouvier, who has studied the peace process from the outset and advised Colombian government officials, civil society and others promoting a political solution to the conflict, comments on the accord and its prospects for ending the country’s decades of unrelenting violence.

In talks that began in Havana in 2012, the two sides have reached understandings on peacebuilding measures that include transitional justice, accounting for the “disappeared” and a plan for demobilizing the rebels’ estimated 7,000 fighters. The historic agreement opens the way for peace after an internal conflict that, in a nation of 50 million, has left 220,000 dead, 7.65 million registered victims and more than 6 million people displaced from their homes.

In a nutshell, what does this agreement mean?

The accord marks the beginning of the end of the FARC as an armed group and of Colombia’s internal armed conflict. This is a tremendous achievement by not only the two negotiating teams and the international community that supported the talks but also by Colombian civil society, which for decades pressed for a political solution.

What comes next?

Today President Juan Manuel Santos will send the accord to Congress with a request to hold a plebiscite on it on October 2. Congress has a month to act. Assuming lawmakers agree, the president will then set the final date for the vote and the precise question to be voted on. The country has been gearing up already to campaign for the “yes” or the “no.” It looks like it will be close.

Why might Colombians reject the accord?

While Colombians overwhelmingly support peace, polls show deep polarization over the accords themselves. Most controversial are parts of the special justice system to be used in the transition. The international community has largely embraced the agreements as striking a reasonable balance for all sides, addressing root causes of the conflict; victims’ rights to truth, justice, reparations and non-repetition of the conflict; and the government’s obligation to investigate, prosecute and punish violations of human rights and international humanitarian law.

Part of the problem is that Santos, who has staked his presidency on ending the war, is unpopular at home, primarily for his handling of the economy. He also faces powerful opponents to the deal in former President Alvaro Uribe, who calls the accord an agreement with terrorism, and Comptroller General Alejandro Ordóñez, who has challenged the agreement’s legality. It will be unfortunate if the plebiscite becomes a political referendum on Santos rather than a vote to move out of the shadows of war.

What about the specifics of the accords?

That’s another problem—people don’t know what the accords say. It will take creative strategies to quickly educate the public on what’s in some 1,400 pages that are particularly complex on the subject of transitional justice. The accords in many respects are premised on a commitment to reconciliation—a hard sell in a country where the FARC has been the enemy for so many years and violence has been perpetrated by a range of armed actors, including state security forces, paramilitaries, and regional elites. But folks here who have been running workshops on the content of the accords tell me that people’s attitudes become more favorable once they know what is in them.

Uribe, meanwhile, has largely hijacked the debate on justice. He hammers home two simple points: FARC militants must face jail time for their crimes and be banned from political office. Those positions win more than 75 percent support in public opinion polls. In fact, the agreement allows prison terms of up to 20 years for victimizers who don’t confess their crimes fully and reduced sentences with alternative restrictions on liberty for those who do.

Could the peace deal fall apart and the nation return to war?

It’s unclear what would happen if the agreement is voted down. Although the FARC has reiterated a commitment to peace in recent months and said it will not return to war even if the accord isn’t approved, the fear I’ve heard is that a strong “no” vote would leave those favoring a military solution with the upper hand. It could also lead to a resurgence of violence in the countryside against social leaders and politicians who have led the charge for victims’ rights to restitution and reparations.

Chief negotiator Humberto de la Calle has said that the team reached the best deal possible for Colombia. They have done an extraordinary job, and I think it would be hard both physically and emotionally to either reach a new deal or to start the process over. Four years of negotiating has taken a toll on the negotiating teams and on the public. Opening the process up again would not find much support in Colombia or in the international community.

While Santos is technically barred from renegotiating the deal, other actors such as the Congress could step in under a constitutional provision guaranteeing Colombians the right to peace. It wouldn’t be easy, but I think those working for peace would find a way forward even if the “no” vote wins.

Perhaps the greatest challenge is reaching a peace agreement with Colombia’s second-largest guerrilla organization, the National Liberation Army (ELN). Although it’s smaller than the FARC, failure to advance from an exploratory phase that began in 2014 to a serious peace negotiation could easily undermine the agreement with the FARC and provide a landing place for disaffected FARC combatants.

So what happens to the FARC now?

While the Colombian public prepares for their plebiscite, some 600 FARC leaders will gather in southern Colombia to assess the deal, probably in the first two weeks of September. If the FARC wins the backing of its constituents—which is widely expected— a formal signing will take place.

At that point, FARC troops will begin their journey to 23 safe zones and eight camps. Over a period of 180 days, the fighters will turn over their weapons to the United Nations, which, under a Security Council resolution, will oversee the bilateral ceasefire and cessation of hostilities scheduled to begin on Monday. The UN also will oversee the decommissioning of weapons, which will be forged into monuments to peace in New York at the U.N., in Cuba, which hosted the peace talks, and somewhere in Colombia. Within six months of the formal signing of the agreement, the FARC will have turned over all arms, and the transformation of the group from an armed organization into a political and social movement will begin.

By the time of the plebiscite, some FARC troops already will have begun to head to the concentration zones. The timing was a major sticking point because of FARC concerns that they would be vulnerable during the transition. But the parties and their advisor found a last-ditch solution using a law that allows the state to suspend arrest warrants during peace processes. By April 2017, the transitory zones will be closed down, and FARC will be reincorporated into civilian life.

The government and the FARC originally set a March 23 deadline to reach a final accord. What were the last sticking points and why were they difficult to resolve?

The final sticking points included when the law granting amnesty for crimes relating to membership in the FARC—not war crimes, crimes against humanity, or genocide, which will be judged in a Special Peace Tribunal—will go into effect. The law would identify which crimes will be considered related to the crime of rebellion.

Another major sticking point related to political participation of the FARC. It was resolved by guaranteeing the FARC 10 seats in Congress beginning in 2018 and a system of “voice without vote” in the meantime.

A third point related to whether reintegration of the FARC would be “hyper-collective” or by individual; a middle ground seems to have been found. Security guarantees were also very sensitive, given the assassination of many FARC leaders following the last successful peace process in the early 1980s.

Finally, there were remaining agenda items that included the process for appointing judges to the Special Peace Tribunal and mechanisms for verifying and implementing the agreements and resolving disputes under the accords.

Are there any behind-the-scenes factors that affected the timing of the agreement?

Both sides would like to have the settlement wrapped up before the end of the Obama Administration rather than take a chance on what might come next. U.S. President Barack Obama has been very supportive of Santos and the peace process.

One of the FARC’s persistent demands has been the return from U.S. prison of Ricardo Palmera, alias “Simón Trinidad,” a member of the FARC executive committee who is serving a 60-year term for his role in the 2003–2008 kidnapping of three U.S. defense contractors. The president has the power to issue a pardon and FARC negotiator Ivan Marquez made an appeal to him in last night’s ceremony in Havana. This might be a good carrot for rapid implementation and compliance with the accords.

Likewise, Colombia needed this process to come to fruition. The public was getting impatient and losing interest at not seeing results; the FARC troops were feeling unprotected; and Colombian presidential elections in 2018 demand that Santos give attention to a tax reform that is waiting in the wings once the plebiscite has taken place.

You have studied peace processes that ended conflicts in many parts of the world. How have the Colombian negotiators broken new ground?

There is no other peace process in the world where victims have occupied such a central role. The transitional justice design here is historic and innovative. It gives priority to truth-telling, but respects the need for justice. The model is innovative in its inclusion of restorative justice and its focus on repairing the damage inflicted on individuals and communities through a process of dialogue and healing. This bears watching, as it could provide new models for other conflict zones seeking to find a way out of war.

Another innovation has been the process’s attention to issues of exclusion. The lesson here is that inclusion only happens when excluded groups demand a place in the process and work to secure it. Women’s organizations pushed hard for and secured two plenipotentiaries at the negotiating table. They also won a gender subcommission to ensure that the accords would have a gendered perspective and consultations in Havana with 18 representatives of women’s organizations and LGBTI organizations, as well as a dozen female ex-combatants around the world.

Likewise, indigenous and Afro-descent groups were, belatedly, invited to the negotiating table, and have been working closely with the teams in the past two months to ensure that the peace accords do not exacerbate conflict in their regions or undermine collective and territorial rights. Word came today that the ethnic delegations invited at the last minute to create a special chapter regarding territorial and collective rights of Afro- and indigenous groups are satisfied that they have been heard. All of these groups—victims, women, LGBTI individuals, Afro-Colombians and indigenous people—are expected to give the accords legitimacy and to be powerful advocates for the peace accord in the coming month.

What dangers lie ahead for Colombia?

The biggest danger would be a failure to carefully and fully carry out a broad, accepted national reconciliation. Almost every family in Colombia has suffered some kind of loss in the conflict and the polarization is intense.

To avoid revenge and future confrontation, and cycles of violence, reconciliation with political momentum is essential. This is why the transitional justice provisions and recognition of historical memory are so important.

What has been the role of USIP in this process?

Reconciliation has to take place on a personal, as well as political level. USIP has done a lot of work in this field. For example, we have supported the creation and training of a national network of women mediators from 12 departments in Colombia, who are in turn training other women in their own regions to mediate for the prevention and transformation of current and anticipated conflicts.

We have funded and provided technical support for a network of regional and local reconciliation committees in 10 of the country’s 32 political subdivisions as models for getting citizens involved in peace and reconciliation. We’ve also supported Catholic and Protestant women to address long-standing divides between them to work for peace and reconciliation. These are just a few examples.

At the end of this 52-month process, which capped a half-century of conflict, what is the most important understanding you’re left with?

Colombia shows that political solutions for violent conflict can be found with persistence, hard work, political will, leadership and dialogue. When violence seems to be on the rise all over the world, a peace deal in Colombia is a much-needed sign of hope and an affirmation that peace between sworn adversaries is possible, and that there is much that can be done to prepare the way, even when there is no peace process in sight.

Democratic Republic of the Congo: DR Congo summit to avoid poll chaos planned for September

DRC - ReliefWeb News - 27 August 2016 - 4:49pm
Source: Agence France-Presse Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo

Kinshasa, DR Congo | AFP | Saturday 8/27/2016 - 20:44 GMT

Crunch talks between the DR Congo government and opposition will start next week, aimed at avoiding political chaos when the president's term expires late this year, an African Union mediator said Saturday.

Congo's opposition had originally spurned the talks, proposed by President Joseph Kabila in November 2015, insisting that several political prisoners must first be released.

Most however still remain in detention.

Former Togolese prime minister Edem Kodjo, who brokered the talks on behalf of the AU, said in Kinshasa that the negotiations will begin on September 1 and last for two weeks.

He added that the release of some opposition figures was a palpable sign that "nothing is closed, nothing is lost, everything is open".

"We are not here to concern ourselves with our own problems, we came here for Congo's future," he said.

Tension has been building for months in the vast mineral-rich nation of 71 million over fears that Kabila will follow in the footsteps of neighbouring heads of state and change the constitution to extend his rule into a third term.

The country's highest court earlier this year ruled that Kabila could stay in office beyond the scheduled December date if no election were held.

Under the constitution Kabila must call elections three months before the end of his term on December 20.

Opposition spokesman and parliamentarian Jean-Lucien Bussa said Kabila's political rivals had agreed to join the national dialogue to "allow the Congolese people who aspire to the first democratic transition in the DRC" to be involved in the presidential vote.

Government spokesman Lambert Mende said: "We have finally found a compromise."

mbb/dom/gw/pvh

© 1994-2016 Agence France-Presse

Saudi Arabia: Yemen cross-border shelling kills Saudi child: civil defence

Yemen - ReliefWeb News - 27 August 2016 - 4:47pm
Source: Agence France-Presse Country: Saudi Arabia, Yemen

Najran, Saudi Arabia | AFP | Saturday 8/27/2016 - 15:28 GMT

A rocket fired from Yemen killed a three-year-old boy Saturday in the Saudi border region of Najran, a civil defence official said, in the latest cross-border attack by Iran-backed Yemeni rebels.

Major Ali al-Shahrani, civil defence spokesman in southwest Saudi Arabia, told reporters a nine-year-old brother of the boy was also wounded when a Katyusha rocket hit their family's home.

The attack came a day after rockets fired from Yemen struck a power station in Najran, marking a rare hit on Saudi Arabia's infrastructure after months of periodic bombardment of the area.

Attacks have intensified since the suspension in early August of UN-brokered peace talks between the Shiite Huthi rebels and their allies, and Yemen's internationally-recognised government which has the military support of a Saudi-led Arab coalition.

Ten people have been killed in Najran since August 16, when a single strike claimed seven lives.

The Arab coalition has also stepped up its air raids in Yemen since the peace talks collapsed.

The coalition intervened in March last year to support President Abedrabbo Mansour Hadi after the Huthis and their allies seized much of Yemen.

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© 1994-2016 Agence France-Presse

Democratic Republic of the Congo: RDC : le "dialogue national" débutera le 1er septembre

DRC - ReliefWeb News - 27 August 2016 - 3:25pm
Source: Agence France-Presse Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo

Kinshasa, RD Congo | AFP | samedi 27/08/2016 - 18:46 GMT

Le dialogue national visant à l'organisation d'"élections apaisées" en République démocratique du Congo débutera le 1er septembre et durera deux semaines, a annoncé samedi à Kinshasa l'ex-Premier ministre togolais Edem Kodjo, facilitateur désigné de l'Union africaine (UA) pour ces pourparlers.

Cette date a été fixée au terme de quatre journées des travaux auxquels ont participé les représentants de la majorité au pouvoir, ceux de l'opposition et de la société civile, autour du groupe international de soutien au facilitateur.

Ce dialogue, voulu "inclusif", avait été convoqué fin novembre 2015 par le président congolais Joseph Kabila.

L'opposition congolaise avait d'abord boudé ces pourparlers avant de les accepter sous conditions, notamment la libération de prisonniers politiques et d'opinion. Des libérations depuis promises par les autorités.

Les 19 et 26 août, le gouvernement a annoncé la libération de plusieurs militants des mouvements pro-démocratie Lutte pour le changement (Lucha, basée à Goma dans la province du Nord-Kivu) et Filimbi ("Coup de sifflet" en swahili) mais la plupart restent en détention.

Leur libération est "le signe palpable que rien n'est fermé, rien n'est perdu, tout est ouvert", a estimé samedi M. Kodjo.

"Nous ne sommes pas venus ici pour nous préoccuper des problèmes particuliers des uns et des autres, mais nous sommes venus ici pour le sort du Congo", a-t-il cependant ajouté.

Une frange d'opposition a participé aux travaux préparatoires au dialogue, tandis qu’un autre groupe, réuni autour de l'opposant historique Étienne Tshisekedi, a refusé d'y prendre part, récusant la légitimité de M. Kodjo.

L'opposition politique a décidé de participer au dialogue pour "permettre au peuple congolais qui aspire à la première alternance démocratique en RDC" d'être fixé sur la tenue de la présidentielle, a expliqué le député Jean-Lucien Bussa, porte-parole de l'opposition dans ces pourparlers.

"Nous avons trouvé finalement un compromis", s'est réjoui de son côté Lambert Mende, porte-parole du gouvernement congolais.

La présidentielle censée se tenir cette année en RDC est aujourd'hui hautement improbable, et la tension monte à mesure qu'approche la fin du mandat du président Kabila fixé au 20 décembre.

La Constitution dispose que "le scrutin est convoqué 90 jours avant l'expiration du mandat du président", soit le 19 septembre.

M. Kabila est au pouvoir depuis 2001 et la Constitution lui interdit de se représenter, mais l'opposition craint qu'il ne s'accroche au pouvoir, d'autant qu'en mai, la Cour constitutionnelle l'a autorisé à rester en fonction jusqu'à l'élection de son successeur.

mbb/dom

© 1994-2016 Agence France-Presse

Nigeria: Nigeria: Feed Borno Report & Update - High-Level Emergency Roundtable on the Humanitarian Crisis in North-East, August 2016

Sahel - RW - SitReps - 27 August 2016 - 3:24pm
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, Government of Nigeria Country: Nigeria

Preamble

As early as March 2016 it was clear that a humanitarian food and nutritional crisis was looming in Borno. Following meetings with His Excellency, Governor Kashim Shettima and the World Food Programme Executive Director, the alarm about a growing food crisis was sounded at the inaugural Rebuild Borno meeting in April 2016. Despite this, denial endured in certain quarters even as conditions deteriorated on the ground. Much work was ongoing behind the scenes by AOA with local and international donor agencies leading up to the 27th June 2016 meeting. Towards the end of June crisis point was reached, and the roundtable was convened within 48 hours by Dr. Alakija in response to the urgency of the situation.

Successful military action had led to a spike in levels of malnutrition being recorded as former captives’ condition became apparent since being liberated from Boko Haram. The rate of malnutrition in Dikwa IDP camp, where team AOA visited in May and expressed the alarm at the conditions there, is actually double that of Bama which has been in the news recently. With rains coming and the lean season upon us, people’s plight has worsened still. A concerted effort is being made but still more needs to be done. The response must be Nigeria “owned and led” and the world will rally round.

Haiti: L’innovation n’est pas un concept nouveau en Haïti

Haiti - ReliefWeb News - 27 August 2016 - 3:16pm
Source: UN Development Programme Country: Haiti

Juste après le tremblement de terre de 2010, plusieurs initiatives novatrices, dont la mise en œuvre des transferts d‘argent numérique et des salles de classe mobiles par le PNUD en Haïti, ont permis à de nombreuses femmes de reconstruire leurs maisons et d’améliorer leurs entreprises .

Le PNUD Haïti a également travaillé pendant cinq ans à une approche globale du développement, en particulier à Fort National.

Dans un premier temps, le Programme de gestion des débris a permis d’enlever, recycler et réutiliser les débris du tremblement de terre. Plus tard, le projet 16/6 a encouragé le retour des personnes déplacées dans leurs quartiers et a contribué à créer des emplois.

PARI SUR FORT NATIONAL

Fort National est un quartier particulièrement pauvre de Port au Prince, généralement associé à un fort taux de délinquance, de violence et d’armes. Le simple fait de prononcer le nom déclenche un signal d’alarme dans l’esprit des habitants de la capitale.

Le chômage des jeunes est l‘un des principaux problèmes de Port-au-Prince et en particulier de Fort National. Alors que plus de 90% des petites entreprises sont informelles, le taux de chômage des jeunes dans les zones urbaines atteint près de 60%.

C’est pourquoi, quand nous avons eu la chance de donner aux jeunes la possibilité de démarrer leur propre entreprise, nous avons décidé de commencer par Fort National et avons introduit l’autobus LIDÉ …

IDÉES POUR DEMAIN ...

LIDÉ, traduction créole de « L’idée », est un projet de 12 mois financé dans sa phase pilote par l’« Innovation Facility » du PNUD. Le projet a transformé un autobus en espace pour l’innovation dans le but de traduire les idées des jeunes au chômage de Fort National en microentreprises et ainsi renforcer la cohésion sociale par l’inclusion économique.

Le projet offre aux jeunes l’accès aux technologies et l’encadrement nécessaire au développement de leurs idées et initiatives directement dans leur quartier.

Durant les six premiers mois, nous avons commencé par former 300 jeunes en entreprenariat. Ensuite, nous avons donné une formation supplémentaire à 80 jeunes qui montraient le plus d‘intérêt dans le marketing, la création de plan d‘affaires et la comptabilité financière.

Sur la base des connaissances acquises, ces 80 jeunes participants ont présenté leur plan d’affaires devant un panel constitué de partenaires du Projet LIDÉ (KOTELAM et Fondation Etre Ayisyen) et des membres du PNUD.

40 gagnants ont été sélectionnés, et avec un capital initial de 500 à 1500 dollars américains, ils ont pu démarrer leur entreprise et bénéficier d‘un soutien technique pour minimiser les risques. Des initiatives telles que des entreprises de chocolats organiques, des services d’électronique et d’informatique, une bibliothèque, un restaurant offrant la cuisine créole, et la production de parfums à base de plantes indigènes haïtiennes ont été sélectionnées.

NOS PARTENAIRES...

L’institution de Microfinance Haïtienne Kotelam offre des comptes bancaires et la gestion au quotidien des micro subventions pour les jeunes entrepreneurs; l’Institution Haïtienne de Formation Fondation Etre Aysyien donne des cours d‘inspiration et de techniques aux entrepreneurs inscrits au programme; Le Ministère du Commerce et de l‘Industrie est notre homologue gouvernemental pour la promotion de l‘emploi et de l‘entrepreneuriat en Haïti; l’entreprise de télécommunications haïtienne SURTAB fournit aux jeunes des outils technologiques; l’ Université Haïtienne de l‘Informatique développe une application pour start-ups qui permettront aux jeunes entrepreneurs de rester en contact avec leurs formateurs tout en poursuivant leurs activités économiques.

Central African Republic: Centrafrique : Le Gouvernement, les Nations Unies et la société civile s’engagent pour les ODD

CAR - ReliefWeb News - 27 August 2016 - 2:35pm
Source: UN Development Programme Country: Central African Republic

Des membres du Gouvernement, les Agences du Système des Nations Unies, les membres du corps diplomatique, les partenaires au développement, des représentants d’organisations de jeunesse, du secteur privé et de la société civile ont pris part à cette cérémonie présidée par le Ministre de l’Economie, du Plan et de la Coopération, M. Félix Moloua et le Représentant Spécial Adjoint, Coordonnateur Résident du Système des Nations Unies, Coordonnateur Humanitaire et Représentant Résident du PNUD, M. Fabrizio Hoschchild.

Les Objectifs de Développement Durable font partie du nouveau Programme de développement durable, adopté par les 193 Etats de l’Organisation des Nations Unies en septembre 2015. Les ODD comprennent 17 Objectifs de développement et 169 cibles ambitieux et intégrés, visant notamment l’éradication de la pauvreté et de la faim dans le monde à l’horizon 2030. Entrée en vigueur depuis le 1er Janvier 2016, les ODD ont pris le relais des anciens Objectifs du Millénaire pour le développement qui ont prévalu jusqu’au 31 décembre 2015. Les ODD ont un caractère universel, donc acceptés par tous et applicables à tous les pays, aussi bien développés que les pays en développement. En outre, les ODD traduisent une vision transformative de l’économie pour des modes de production et de consommation durables. Les ODD intègrent également la problématique de la durabilité environnementale et l’instauration des sociétés inclusives et de paix pour le développement durable.

Dans son allocution, M. Fabrizio Hoschchild a fait remarquer que malgré les progrès réalisés ces quinze dernières années en matière de réduction de la pauvreté, grâce à la mise en œuvre des Objectifs du Millénaire pour le développement, des inégalités persistent encore au sein des pays, et entre pays riches et pays pauvres. La persistance de ces inégalités est source d’instabilité et de conflits. Dès lors, les ODD ont été adoptés pour permettre de créer les opportunités d’une solidarité mondiale afin de corriger ces inégalités. « Pour un pays à faible développement humain comme la RCA, avec un niveau d’inégalités très élevé, les ODD sont une opportunité pour opérer des réformes structurelles et renforcer les politiques publiques afin de bénéficier davantage du soutien de la communauté internationale », a dit le Représentant Spécial Adjoint du Secrétaire Général des Nations Unies en RCA.

L’impératif de gouvernance, de justice et de paix porté par l’ODD 16 constitue l’une des innovations des ODD. Cette innovation établit une interdépendance entre gouvernance, justice et paix comme la condition de base pour rendre possible la réalisation des 16 autres objectifs. « Cette focalisation sur la bonne gouvernance, la paix et les droits humains constitue un grand progrès apporté par les ODD pour une vision beaucoup plus intégrée du développement » a conclu M. Fabrizio Hoschchild.

Dans son discours de lancement officiel, M. Félix Moloua fera remarquer que, pour poser les bonnes bases de la réalisation des ODD et pour une bonne appropriation nationale dans un contexte aussi difficile que celui dans lequel se trouve la RCA, le Gouvernement s’est engagé dans une politique de planification qui met l’accent sur les priorités de relèvement économique, la stabilisation, la consolidation de la paix et de l’Etat de droit dans le cadre de la Stratégie de relèvement et de consolidation de la paix (RCPCA) en cours de finalisation. Les domaines prioritaires du RCPA comprennent également la fourniture des services sociaux de base par la restauration de l’Etat et le redéploiement de ses services déconcentrés et locaux, l’emploi des jeunes et des femmes, la cohésion sociale, le retour des déplacés internes et des réfugiés, la modernisation de l’agriculture et la promotion du secteur privé. « Le retour à la croissance et à l’investissement passe nécessairement par le retour à la paix » a indiqué le Ministre de l’Economie, du Plan et de la Coopération.

Dans le contexte Centrafricain marqué par la dégradation des indicateurs de développement humain du fait des conflits armés, la mise en œuvre des ODD présente des enjeux et défis majeurs en termes de priorisation des objectifs pour accélérer le relèvement, restaurer la paix et la cohésion sociale. Les défis se posent aussi en termes d’intégration des ODD dans les politiques publiques de développement, de budgétisation et de renforcement des capacités nationales.

Pour les étapes prochaines, le Gouvernement envisage de mettre en œuvre un programme d’appropriation des ODD à travers une campagne d’information, de sensibilisation et de plaidoyer ciblant les structures de l’Etat, le Parlement et les autres institutions publiques, les autorités locales et les communautés décentralisées, les médias, les organisations de jeunes et de femmes,. L’objectif est d’assurer une participation inclusive dans le choix des ODD prioritaires pour une meilleure planification du développement en RCA au cours des années à venir.

Central African Republic: Signature d’un accord relatif à l'opérationnalisation de la Cour pénale spéciale de la RCA

CAR - ReliefWeb News - 27 August 2016 - 2:33pm
Source: UN Development Programme, UN Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in the Central African Republic Country: Central African Republic

Le Gouvernement de la République centrafricaine et les Nations Unies ont signé ce vendredi 26 août 2016, en présence des Ambassadeurs de France et des Etats-Unis d’Amérique, le document du projet conjoint d'appui à l'opérationnalisation de la Cour pénale spéciale de la Centrafrique.

D’un coût global d’environ 7 millions de dollars américains pour les 14 premiers mois, le projet constitue une réponse de la communauté internationale à la décision prise par les autorités nationales en 2015 de créer une Cour pénale spéciale visant à enquêter, poursuivre et juger les violations graves des droits humains, y compris des crimes contre l’humanité et des crimes de guerre en République centrafricaine. Le financement initial est assuré par la MINUSCA, le PNUD, la France, les Etats-Unis d’Amérique et la Hollande.

Évoquant la création de cette Cour, le Représentant spécial adjoint du Secrétaire général des Nations Unies, Coordonnateur humanitaire et Représentant résident du PNUD, Fabrizio Hochschild, a insisté sur l’utilité de ce nouveau mécanisme judiciaire pour lutter contre l’impunité, « un grand cadeau fait au monde ». Il a salué l’engagement financier de la France, des Etats-Unis et des Pays-Bas. La signature de ce document de projet est un premier pas sur la voie difficile de la mise en place effective de la Cour pénale spéciale, mais elle révèle en même temps « un grand exemple de coopération internationale en terme de soutien au gouvernement de la Centrafrique », a-t-il ajouté.

Le ministre de la Justice, des Droits de l’homme, Garde des Sceaux, Flavien Mbata, a, quant à lui, fait valoir qu’« en proposant la création de la Cour pénale spéciale, le Gouvernement innove tout en s’inscrivant dans un mouvement plus large en matière de lutte contre l’impunité». Il a par ailleurs dit sa « fierté » et son « bonheur de voir se concrétiser un projet qui sera, sans aucun doute, la pierre angulaire de la paix et de la réconciliation en Centrafrique ». Le ministre de la Justice a, en outre, encouragé le PNUD à commencer les travaux de réhabilitation du bâtiment du Tribunal de Grande Instance de Bangui qui a été affecté comme siège de la future juridiction spéciale.

Conformément à la loi no. 15-003 du 3 juin 2015, la Cour pénale spéciale sera composée de magistrats et de personnel nationaux et internationaux et est compétente pour enquêter, poursuivre et juger les auteurs des graves violations des droits humains perpétrées depuis 2003.

Rappelons que depuis 2014, les Nations Unies, à travers la MINUSCA et le PNUD, soutiennent activement le processus de création et d’opérationnalisation de la Cour pénale spéciale, notamment en ce qui concerne l’élaboration de l’avant-projet de loi, le plaidoyer pour son adoption et sa promulgation, la rédaction des termes de référence et autres documents techniques nécessaires au recrutement du personnel, les études initiales relatives à l’évaluation des risques et au cadre juridique de protection des victimes et témoins.

World: Pas de paix sans libération de la misère

DRC - ReliefWeb News - 27 August 2016 - 2:30pm
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Country: Angola, Democratic Republic of the Congo, World

Lors d’une conférence au Kenya, le chef de la FAO souligne le rôle de l’agriculture dans la prévention des conflits et le relèvement

27 août 2016, Rome/Nairobi – La sécurité alimentaire et l’agriculture jouent un rôle primordial dans la prévention des conflits et des crises sur le continent africain. Elles en atténuent les effets et sont les moteurs du relèvement après un conflit.

Tel est le message principal délivré aujourd’hui par M. José Graziano da Silva, Directeur général de la FAO, devant les leaders africains et les décideurs internationaux réunis à Nairobi (Kenya) dans le cadre d’un important sommet sur le développement en Afrique.

“Eliminer la faim et la malnutrition, affronter les crises humanitaires et prolongées, prévenir et résoudre les conflits, consolider la paix ne sont pas des tâches distinctes, mais les différentes faces d’un même défi”, a souligné M. Graziano da Silva lors d’un événement parallèle Paix et Sécurité Alimentaire organisé par la FAO et qui se déroule dans le cadre de la sixième conférence du TICAD (26-28 août 2016).

Le Directeur général de la FAO a participé ce matin à la cérémonie d’ouverture de la sixième édition du TICAD, en présence du Président de la République du Kenya et du Premier ministre du Japon. La conférence, qui rassemble notamment des leaders influents, des décideurs et des représentants d’organismes des Nations Unies et d’institutions financières, vise à promouvoir le dialogue politique de haut niveau entre les dirigeants africains et leurs partenaires tout en mobilisant le soutien aux initiatives de développement africaines.

Le lien entre la prévention des conflits et le développement revêt une importance particulière dans une région du monde qui abrite près de 60 pour cent des missions actives de maintien de la paix des Nations Unies. Et bien que les conflits armés à travers l'Afrique dans son ensemble aient régressé au cours des dernières années, la tendance a été inégale.

«Une grande partie du travail de la FAO vise à promouvoir le développement durable et à renforcer la résilience des populations rurales», a rappelé M. Graziano da Silva, en citant des exemples concrets de pays où le soutien agricole a contribué à assurer la transition de la guerre à la paix durable, notamment en Angola et en République démocratique du Congo.

«En soutenant l'agriculture et le développement rural, nous contribuons à la création d’emplois et de revenus et stimulons le recrutement des jeunes. Cela contribue aussi à prévenir la migration motivée par la misère et la radicalisation tout en atténuant les conflits sur les ressources qui se raréfient», a dit le Chef de la FAO.

S’affranchir du besoin

En République démocratique du Congo, la FAO a œuvré avec ses partenaires en matière de désarmement, démobilisation et réintégration des anciens combattants en fournissant à ces derniers les compétences agricoles, les connaissances et les outils, une approche qui a fait ses preuves tout en réduisant le risque de voir d’anciens combattants rejoindre les rangs des milices une fois acquise la possibilité de se procurer de la nourriture et des revenus.

M. Graziano da Silva a indiqué qu’il était possible de transposer cette stratégie à de nombreuses autres situations post-conflit et indiqué que ses récentes conversations avec les dirigeants de la République centrafricaine visaient à mettre l'agriculture au centre du relèvement du pays en assurant sécurité alimentaire et emplois aux jeunes ruraux.

«La prévention et la résolution des conflits nécessitent des conditions sûres et résilientes qui répondent aux besoins des populations rurales, tant en termes de nutrition que de moyens d’existence», a-t-il dit.

Autres exemples: la FAO est à pied d’œuvre avec ses partenaires en Ethiopie, au Kenya et en Somalie pour promouvoir l'utilisation pacifique des ressources naturelles et prévenir la propagation des maladies animales transfrontières, tandis qu’au Sahel, le pastoralisme et l'autonomisation économique des femmes rurales sont au cœur de la feuille de route de l'Organisation en vue de renforcer la résilience de la région.

La sécurité alimentaire, les moyens d’existence et la paix durables sont interdépendants, a fait valoir M. Graziano da Silva en citant les pères fondateurs de la FAO pour lesquels il ne peut y avoir de paix durable sans l’affranchissement de l’état de besoin.

Lancement d’une nouvelle initiative sur la nutrition

Dans ce contexte, la FAO a applaudi au lancement aujourd'hui, à la TICAD, de l'Initiative pour la sécurité alimentaire et nutritionnelle en Afrique (IFNA) qui vise à accélérer les efforts internationaux en faveur de la réduction de la faim et de la malnutrition sur le continent africain.

Au cours des 25 dernières années, la proportion d’Africains souffrant de la faim est passée de 28 à 20 pour cent et ce, en dépit d'une population croissante – un succès que l’on pourrait attribuer en grande partie au haut niveau d'engagement des dirigeants du continent à l’égard de cette question.

La nouvelle initiative sur la sécurité alimentaire et la nutrition, lancée officiellement par le Vice-Président du Kenya, M. William Ruto, et élaborée par l'Agence de coopération internationale japonaise, doit tirer parti des réalisations et progrès déjà accomplis pour mettre en œuvre des projets inclusifs centrés à la fois sur la personne, sur l’autonomisation des femmes et sur la collaboration entre les secteurs de l'agriculture, de la santé, de l'éducation et le secteur privé en vue de bâtir des communautés plus résilientes à travers l'Afrique. Cela se fera en collaboration avec les organisations régionales, notamment le Nouveau partenariat pour le développement de l'Afrique (NEPAD).

Cette initiative s’inscrit dans le cadre des efforts continus visant à mettre en œuvre les recommandations de la Deuxième Conférence internationale sur la nutrition (CIN2) en Afrique (la Déclaration de Rome sur la nutrition et le Cadre d’action), qui seront facilités par l’IFNA. A cet égard, la FAO travaille en étroite collaboration avec l’Organisation mondiale de la santé (OMS), le Fonds des Nations Unies pour l'enfance (UNICEF), le Fonds international de développement agricole (FIDA) et d’autres partenaires dans le cadre du Comité directeur sur la nutrition de la CIN2 en vue d’une action future.

La TICAD – qui a lieu tous les cinq ans – est co-organisée par le Gouvernement du Japon, l'Office des Nations Unies du Conseiller spécial pour l'Afrique (UN-OSAA), le Programme des Nations Unies pour le développement (PNUD), la Commission de l'Union africaine (AUC) et la Banque mondiale.

Pour la première fois, la réunion de la TICAD s’est tenue cette année sur le sol africain, les organisateurs ayant confié à la FAO le rôle de chef de file pour organiser le troisième thème principal de la conférence: «Promouvoir la stabilité sociale pour une prospérité partagée».

World Hum Day 2016

Smugmug Photo Gallery - 27 August 2016 - 1:36pm

OCHA updated gallery 'World Hum Day 2016'

World Hum Day 2016

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