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Niger: Niger Bulletin des Prix - Août 2015

Niger - ReliefWeb News - 31 August 2015 - 10:28pm
Source: Famine Early Warning System Network Country: Niger

Le mil, le maïs, le niébé et le riz importé sont les produits alimentaires les plus importants consommés au Niger. Le mil est consommé aussi bien par les ménages ruraux que les ménages pauvres urbains dans l’ensemble du pays. Le maïs et le riz importé sont plus importants pour les ménages urbains, tandis que le niébé est principalement consommé par les ménages pauvres des régions rurales et urbaines en tant que source de protéine. Niamey est le marché national le plus important et un centre du commerce international ; elle approvisionne en outre les ménages urbains.
Tillaberi est aussi un centre urbain approvisionnant les localités environnantes. Le marché de Gaya est le principal marché urbain pour le maïs avec des liens transfrontaliers. Maradi, Tounfafi et Diffa sont des marchés de regroupement régionaux et des marchés transfrontaliers pour le Niger et d’autres pays de la région.
C'est dans ces marchés que vont régulièrement acheter leur nourriture les ménages et les éleveurs des régions déficitaires en céréales du nord. Agadez et Zinder sont également d’importants marchés nationaux et régionaux. Nguigmi et Abalak se trouvent dans des zones pastorales, où la population dépend largement des marchés céréaliers pour leur approvisionnement alimentaire. Ces deux marchés sont particulièrement importants pendant la saison des pluies, lorsque les éleveurs sont confinés dans la zone pastorale.

South Sudan: South Sudan: Cholera cases decline as aid agencies join forces to contain the outbreak

ReliefWeb - Press Releases - 31 August 2015 - 10:22pm
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: South Sudan

When 32-year-old Rosa Lino arrived at the cholera treatment unit in Gumbo, a neighbourhood in the capital, Juba, with her 22-month-old son Angelo, he had all the signs of severe dehydration and she feared that he might not survive

Read the full story

Chad: Chad Price Bulletin, August 2015

Chad - ReliefWeb News - 31 August 2015 - 10:19pm
Source: Famine Early Warning System Network Country: Chad

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) monitors trends in staple food prices in countries vulnerable to food insecurity. For each FEWS NET country and region, the Price Bulletin provides a set of charts showing monthly prices in the current marketing year in selected urban centers and allowing users to compare current trends with both five-year average prices, indicative of seasonal trends, and prices in the previous year

Sorghum, millet, white maize, and local and imported rice are the most important food commodities. Millet is most heavily consumed in the eastern and northern regions of the country. Local rice is another basic food commodity, especially for poorer households. Imported rice and white maize are most commonly consumed in and around the capital. The Marché d'Atrone in N’Djamena, the capital city, is the largest market for cereals. Moundou is an important consumer center for sorghum and the second largest market after the capital. The Abéché market is located in a northern production area. The Sarh market is both a local retail market and a cross-border market.

Kenya: East Africa Price Bulletin August 2015

Uganda - ReliefWeb News - 31 August 2015 - 10:17pm
Source: Famine Early Warning System Network Country: Burundi, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Yemen

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) monitors trends in staple food prices in countries vulnerable to food insecurity. For each FEWS NET country and region, the Price Bulletin provides a set of charts showing monthly prices in the current marketing year in selected urban centers and allowing users to compare current trends with both five-year average prices, indicative of seasonal trends, and prices in the previous year.

Staple Food Markets in East Africa: White maize is the main staple grain consumed in Tanzania, Kenya, and Ethiopia. In Uganda, white maize is grown mainly as a commercial crop for export in the region. Imported rice is a major staple for Djibouti and Somalia, which mainly consume belem—the imported red rice. Tanzania is also a major producer and source of rice in the region while Kenya and Uganda are minor producers. Both red and white sorghum are produced and consumed in the region. This is an important staple in Sudan, Djibouti and Somalia as well as in other marginal agricultural areas of the region. It is also a substitute cereal among the rural poor. Red sorghum is mainly grown in Ethiopia, Sudan, and Somalia, and is the preferred type for households in Djibouti. Beans are an important source of protein and a complementary food crop grown in the high potential agricultural areas of Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Rwanda, Burundi and Ethiopia. It is consumed across household types. Maize and beans are the most heavily traded commodities in the region. The cooking banana–matoke is the primary staple in Uganda. Uganda is also a main source of cooking and other types of bananas traded in the region especially in Southern Sudan. However, bananas are not traded nearly as heavily as maize or beans.

Kenya: East Africa Price Bulletin August 2015

Sudan - ReliefWeb News - 31 August 2015 - 10:17pm
Source: Famine Early Warning System Network Country: Burundi, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Yemen

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) monitors trends in staple food prices in countries vulnerable to food insecurity. For each FEWS NET country and region, the Price Bulletin provides a set of charts showing monthly prices in the current marketing year in selected urban centers and allowing users to compare current trends with both five-year average prices, indicative of seasonal trends, and prices in the previous year.

Staple Food Markets in East Africa: White maize is the main staple grain consumed in Tanzania, Kenya, and Ethiopia. In Uganda, white maize is grown mainly as a commercial crop for export in the region. Imported rice is a major staple for Djibouti and Somalia, which mainly consume belem—the imported red rice. Tanzania is also a major producer and source of rice in the region while Kenya and Uganda are minor producers. Both red and white sorghum are produced and consumed in the region. This is an important staple in Sudan, Djibouti and Somalia as well as in other marginal agricultural areas of the region. It is also a substitute cereal among the rural poor. Red sorghum is mainly grown in Ethiopia, Sudan, and Somalia, and is the preferred type for households in Djibouti. Beans are an important source of protein and a complementary food crop grown in the high potential agricultural areas of Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Rwanda, Burundi and Ethiopia. It is consumed across household types. Maize and beans are the most heavily traded commodities in the region. The cooking banana–matoke is the primary staple in Uganda. Uganda is also a main source of cooking and other types of bananas traded in the region especially in Southern Sudan. However, bananas are not traded nearly as heavily as maize or beans.

Kenya: East Africa Price Bulletin August 2015

Somalia - ReliefWeb News - 31 August 2015 - 10:17pm
Source: Famine Early Warning System Network Country: Burundi, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Yemen

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) monitors trends in staple food prices in countries vulnerable to food insecurity. For each FEWS NET country and region, the Price Bulletin provides a set of charts showing monthly prices in the current marketing year in selected urban centers and allowing users to compare current trends with both five-year average prices, indicative of seasonal trends, and prices in the previous year.

Staple Food Markets in East Africa: White maize is the main staple grain consumed in Tanzania, Kenya, and Ethiopia. In Uganda, white maize is grown mainly as a commercial crop for export in the region. Imported rice is a major staple for Djibouti and Somalia, which mainly consume belem—the imported red rice. Tanzania is also a major producer and source of rice in the region while Kenya and Uganda are minor producers. Both red and white sorghum are produced and consumed in the region. This is an important staple in Sudan, Djibouti and Somalia as well as in other marginal agricultural areas of the region. It is also a substitute cereal among the rural poor. Red sorghum is mainly grown in Ethiopia, Sudan, and Somalia, and is the preferred type for households in Djibouti. Beans are an important source of protein and a complementary food crop grown in the high potential agricultural areas of Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Rwanda, Burundi and Ethiopia. It is consumed across household types. Maize and beans are the most heavily traded commodities in the region. The cooking banana–matoke is the primary staple in Uganda. Uganda is also a main source of cooking and other types of bananas traded in the region especially in Southern Sudan. However, bananas are not traded nearly as heavily as maize or beans.

Kenya: East Africa Price Bulletin August 2015

Kenya - ReliefWeb News - 31 August 2015 - 10:17pm
Source: Famine Early Warning System Network Country: Burundi, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Yemen

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) monitors trends in staple food prices in countries vulnerable to food insecurity. For each FEWS NET country and region, the Price Bulletin provides a set of charts showing monthly prices in the current marketing year in selected urban centers and allowing users to compare current trends with both five-year average prices, indicative of seasonal trends, and prices in the previous year.

Staple Food Markets in East Africa: White maize is the main staple grain consumed in Tanzania, Kenya, and Ethiopia. In Uganda, white maize is grown mainly as a commercial crop for export in the region. Imported rice is a major staple for Djibouti and Somalia, which mainly consume belem—the imported red rice. Tanzania is also a major producer and source of rice in the region while Kenya and Uganda are minor producers. Both red and white sorghum are produced and consumed in the region. This is an important staple in Sudan, Djibouti and Somalia as well as in other marginal agricultural areas of the region. It is also a substitute cereal among the rural poor. Red sorghum is mainly grown in Ethiopia, Sudan, and Somalia, and is the preferred type for households in Djibouti. Beans are an important source of protein and a complementary food crop grown in the high potential agricultural areas of Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Rwanda, Burundi and Ethiopia. It is consumed across household types. Maize and beans are the most heavily traded commodities in the region. The cooking banana–matoke is the primary staple in Uganda. Uganda is also a main source of cooking and other types of bananas traded in the region especially in Southern Sudan. However, bananas are not traded nearly as heavily as maize or beans.

Kenya: East Africa Price Bulletin August 2015

Ethiopia - ReliefWeb News - 31 August 2015 - 10:17pm
Source: Famine Early Warning System Network Country: Burundi, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Yemen

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) monitors trends in staple food prices in countries vulnerable to food insecurity. For each FEWS NET country and region, the Price Bulletin provides a set of charts showing monthly prices in the current marketing year in selected urban centers and allowing users to compare current trends with both five-year average prices, indicative of seasonal trends, and prices in the previous year.

Staple Food Markets in East Africa: White maize is the main staple grain consumed in Tanzania, Kenya, and Ethiopia. In Uganda, white maize is grown mainly as a commercial crop for export in the region. Imported rice is a major staple for Djibouti and Somalia, which mainly consume belem—the imported red rice. Tanzania is also a major producer and source of rice in the region while Kenya and Uganda are minor producers. Both red and white sorghum are produced and consumed in the region. This is an important staple in Sudan, Djibouti and Somalia as well as in other marginal agricultural areas of the region. It is also a substitute cereal among the rural poor. Red sorghum is mainly grown in Ethiopia, Sudan, and Somalia, and is the preferred type for households in Djibouti. Beans are an important source of protein and a complementary food crop grown in the high potential agricultural areas of Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania, Rwanda, Burundi and Ethiopia. It is consumed across household types. Maize and beans are the most heavily traded commodities in the region. The cooking banana–matoke is the primary staple in Uganda. Uganda is also a main source of cooking and other types of bananas traded in the region especially in Southern Sudan. However, bananas are not traded nearly as heavily as maize or beans.

Niger: Niger Price Bulletin, August 2015

Niger - ReliefWeb News - 31 August 2015 - 10:14pm
Source: Famine Early Warning System Network Country: Niger

The Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) monitors trends in staple food prices in countries vulnerable to food insecurity. For each FEWS NET country and region, the Price Bulletin provides a set of charts showing monthly prices in the current marketing year in selected urban centers and allowing users to compare current trends with both five-year average prices, indicative of seasonal trends, and prices in the previous year

Millet, maize, cowpea, and imported rice are the most important food commodities. Millet is consumed by both rural and poor urban households throughout the country. Maize and imported rice are most important for urban households, while cowpea is mainly consumed by poor households in rural and urban areas as a protein source. Niamey is the most important national market and an international trade center, and also supplies urban households. Tillaberi is also an urban center that supplies the surrounding area. Gaya market represents a main urban market for maize with cross-border connections. Maradi, Tounfafi, and Diffa are regional assembly and cross-border markets for Niger and other countries in the region. These are markets where households and herders coming from the northern cereal deficit areas regularly buy their food. Agadez and Zinder are also important national and regional markets. Nguigmi and Abalak are located in pastoral areas, where people are heavily dependent on cereal markets for their food supply. They are particularly important during the rainy season, when herders are confined to the pastoral zone.

Somalia: Somalia - Estimated Nutrition Situation (GAM) - Projection: September - October 2015

Somalia - ReliefWeb News - 31 August 2015 - 9:54pm
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization, Food Security and Nutrition Analysis Unit Country: Somalia

Somalia: Somalia - Estimated Nutrition Situation (GAM) - Projection: September - October 2015

Somalia - Maps - 31 August 2015 - 9:54pm
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization, Food Security and Nutrition Analysis Unit Country: Somalia

Somalia: Somalia - Estimated Nutrition Situation (GAM) - August, 2015 (Based on May - July, 2015 surveys)

Somalia - ReliefWeb News - 31 August 2015 - 9:49pm
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization, Food Security and Nutrition Analysis Unit Country: Somalia

Somalia: Somalia - Estimated Nutrition Situation (GAM) - August, 2015 (Based on May - July, 2015 surveys)

Somalia - Maps - 31 August 2015 - 9:49pm
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization, Food Security and Nutrition Analysis Unit Country: Somalia

Somalia: Somalia Acute Food Security Situation Overview - Rural, Urban and IDP Populations: August - December 2015, Most likely Scenario

Somalia - ReliefWeb News - 31 August 2015 - 9:46pm
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization, Integrated Food Security Phase Classification, Food Security and Nutrition Analysis Unit Country: Somalia

Somalia: Somalia Acute Food Security Situation Overview - Rural, Urban and IDP Populations: August - December 2015, Most likely Scenario

Somalia - Maps - 31 August 2015 - 9:46pm
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization, Integrated Food Security Phase Classification, Food Security and Nutrition Analysis Unit Country: Somalia

Somalia: Somalia Acute Food Security Situation Overview - Rural, Urban and IDP Populations: July 2015

Somalia - ReliefWeb News - 31 August 2015 - 9:42pm
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization, Integrated Food Security Phase Classification, Food Security and Nutrition Analysis Unit Country: Somalia

Somalia: Somalia Acute Food Security Situation Overview - Rural, Urban and IDP Populations: July 2015

Somalia - Maps - 31 August 2015 - 9:42pm
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization, Integrated Food Security Phase Classification, Food Security and Nutrition Analysis Unit Country: Somalia

World: The South Asia Right to Food Conference ends with the elaboration of Dhaka Declaration

Pakistan - ReliefWeb News - 31 August 2015 - 9:18pm
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization Country: Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, World

More than 2000 participants (from the governments, civil society, NGOs and International organizations) of six countries from South Asia (Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Myanmar and Bhutan) were gathered from May 30th till June 1st 2015 for the first South Asia Right to Food Conference, held in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

One of the event’s main output was the Dhaka Declaration, in which the conference delegates declared their position and vision for a future South Asia free of poverty and hunger, ensuring the right to adequate food, nutritional security and food sovereignty.

The inaugural ceremony was chaired by Dr. Qazi Kholiquzzaman Ahmad, from the organizing committee, and had the presence of Sheikh Hasina MP, the Prime Minister of the People’s Republic of Bangladesh, Kailash Satyarthi, a nobel laureate and the chairperson-global of March Against Child Labour in India, and of Advocate Md. Qamrul Islam MP, Minister of Food of the People’s Republic of Bangladesh.

One of the objectives of the conference was to debate some main challenges of the region. According to the Conference’s concept note: “The challenge of hunger and malnutrition in South Asia is complex and multi-faceted. It will require a multi-pronged approach, including interventions for greater availability of food through improved agricultural production; enhanced livelihoods for secure access; education for improved food utilization; clean water for improving health and nutrient uptake; women’s empowerment and social protection for an equitable distribution of food and a focus on resources amongst other relevant interventions. These would also provide the basis of communities’ resilience to climate change.”

In order for these vast challenges to be addressed, the conference participants shared experiences of civil societies and relevant entities on Right to Food and nutritional security movements, policies and legislation across South Asia. The conference was also aiming on strengthen networking among civil society organizations, farmers’ organizations, CBOs, academia and researchers, and policy makers for effective campaign and to promote legal framework on Right to Food issue and relevant policy reforms at national and regional level engaging policy makers, political societies and relevant stakeholders.

World: The South Asia Right to Food Conference ends with the elaboration of Dhaka Declaration

Nepal - ReliefWeb News - 31 August 2015 - 9:18pm
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization Country: Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, World

More than 2000 participants (from the governments, civil society, NGOs and International organizations) of six countries from South Asia (Bangladesh, India, Nepal, Pakistan, Myanmar and Bhutan) were gathered from May 30th till June 1st 2015 for the first South Asia Right to Food Conference, held in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

One of the event’s main output was the Dhaka Declaration, in which the conference delegates declared their position and vision for a future South Asia free of poverty and hunger, ensuring the right to adequate food, nutritional security and food sovereignty.

The inaugural ceremony was chaired by Dr. Qazi Kholiquzzaman Ahmad, from the organizing committee, and had the presence of Sheikh Hasina MP, the Prime Minister of the People’s Republic of Bangladesh, Kailash Satyarthi, a nobel laureate and the chairperson-global of March Against Child Labour in India, and of Advocate Md. Qamrul Islam MP, Minister of Food of the People’s Republic of Bangladesh.

One of the objectives of the conference was to debate some main challenges of the region. According to the Conference’s concept note: “The challenge of hunger and malnutrition in South Asia is complex and multi-faceted. It will require a multi-pronged approach, including interventions for greater availability of food through improved agricultural production; enhanced livelihoods for secure access; education for improved food utilization; clean water for improving health and nutrient uptake; women’s empowerment and social protection for an equitable distribution of food and a focus on resources amongst other relevant interventions. These would also provide the basis of communities’ resilience to climate change.”

In order for these vast challenges to be addressed, the conference participants shared experiences of civil societies and relevant entities on Right to Food and nutritional security movements, policies and legislation across South Asia. The conference was also aiming on strengthen networking among civil society organizations, farmers’ organizations, CBOs, academia and researchers, and policy makers for effective campaign and to promote legal framework on Right to Food issue and relevant policy reforms at national and regional level engaging policy makers, political societies and relevant stakeholders.

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