Feed aggregator

Myanmar: Myanmar presidential vote to start on March 17 as transition talks drag on

Myanmar - ReliefWeb News - 1 hour 18 min ago
Source: Reuters - AlertNet Country: Myanmar

Source: Reuters - Mon, 8 Feb 2016 07:22 GMT

By Hnin Yadana Zaw and Aung Hla Tun

NAYPYITAW/YANGON, Feb 8 (Reuters) - Myanmar's parliament will begin its election of the new president on March 17, cutting very close to an April 1 deadline, suggesting talks between Aung San Suu Kyi's victorious party and the military are likely to take longer than planned.

Read the full article on Reuters - AlertNet.

Zimbabwe: Surrounded by diamonds, villagers go hungry in drought-hit Zimbabwe

Zimbabwe - ReliefWeb News - 1 hour 24 min ago
Source: AlertNet Country: Zimbabwe

Source: Thomson Reuters Foundation - Mon, 8 Feb 2016 13:40 GMT

Author: Andrew Mambondiyani

MUTARE, Zimbabwe, Feb 8 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Shylet Mutsago, a 63-year-old who lives near the diamond fields of Marange, cannot hide her anger over how mining in this gem-rich part of eastern Zimbabwe has failed to improve the lives of local people.

Read the full article on AlertNet.

occupied Palestinian territory: PRCS’ Operational Update (31\1\2016-6\2\2016) [EN/AR]

oPt - ReliefWeb News - 1 hour 39 min ago
Source: Palestine Red Crescent Society Country: occupied Palestinian territory

Highlights:

  • Since the 3rd of October 2015, Israeli occupation forces have killed 169 Palestinians in the oPt, including 34 children and 8 women according to the Palestinian Ministry of Health.

  • Since the start of 2016, Israeli occupation forces have killed 26 Palestinians in the oPt, including 6 persons under the age of 18 .

  • Israeli occupation authorities still hold the bodies of 10 Palestinians killed since last October and all from Jerusalem.

  • A number of checkpoints and cement blocks were lifted in occupied Jerusalem but still there is one checkpoint in Jabal Al Moukaber, and roadblocks are still in Eisawiah with one checkpoint putting restrictions on the movement of Palestinians in general including PRCS teams and ambulances.

  • Attacks on the PRCS teams and ambulances continue by the Israeli Occupation Forces and Israeli settlers. Since the 3rd of October, (363) attacks were documented against the PRCS in the oPT. (153) EMTs and volunteers were injured, (100) ambulances sustained various damages, and (110) incidents of denying access.

Afghanistan: Afghan Secretary General Visits IRCS

Afghanistan - ReliefWeb News - 1 hour 48 min ago
Source: Indian Red Cross Society Country: Afghanistan

08.02.2016 - New Delhi, India

The Secretary General of the Afghanistan Red Crescent Society, Mr Mohammed Naim DINDAR, visited Indian Red Cross Society on 4th February 2016. He was accompanied by two senior colleagues of the national society on the tour.

Joint Secretary of the Indian Red Cross Society, Dr Veer Bhushan welcomed Mr DINDAR and his team. He recalled the long friendly relations between the two national societies and the previous dialogues with each other in the recent past. A presentation was also made to inform him about the programmes and activities of the IRCS. The two exchanged ideas of mutual interest and the areas of future cooperation. The IRCS offered ARCS the services of the Central Training Institute, Bahadurgarh, Haryana and opportunities to include ARCS staff and volunteers for its training programmes.

Mr Mohammed Naim DINDAR thanked Dr Veer Bhushan for hosting ARCS delegation and offers of partnership. He visited the Disaster Management centre and appreciated the courses being run there. He also conveyed his condolences on the sad demise of the Secretary General, Dr S P Agarwal.

Central African Republic: AUC Chairperson redeploys African Union Short-Term Observers (STOs) for the 2016 Second Round of Presidential Elections and Re- Run of Parliamentary Elections in Central African Republic

CAR - ReliefWeb News - 1 hour 59 min ago
Source: African Union Country: Central African Republic

Addis Ababa, 08 February 2016: The Chairperson of the African Union Commission of the African Union, H.E. Dr. Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma, has approved the re-deployment of the African Union Short-Term Observation (STO) Mission to the second round of the Presidential Elections and re run of the Parliamentary Elections in the Central African Republic (CAR) scheduled for 14 February 2016, following an official invitation of the Government. The STOs arrived in Bangui – CAR on 07 February 2016 and will remain in the country until 17 February 2016.

The African Union Electoral Observation Mission (AUEOM) will be led by H.E. Souleymane Ndene Ndiaye, former Prime Minister of the Republic of Senegal. The mission comprises Forty (40) Short Term Observers (STOs) from the Pan African Parliament, the Permanent Representative Committee (PRC) of the African Union, election management bodies, civil society organizations, think tanks, media and academic institutions. They will be redeployed throughout the electoral constituencies of the country to monitor the electoral process and to consult with key stakeholders involved in the electoral process including government and electoral officials, candidates and political parties, civil society representatives and media to provide a critical assessment of the conduct of election. It could be recalled that the AU had previously deployed the AUEOM in the said country for the first round of elections organized on 30 December 2015.

This redeployment reiterates the African Union’s mandate and commitment to promote democratic values and governance on the continent in line with relevant African Union and international instruments comprising the African Charter on Democracy, Elections and Governance, the OAU/AU Declaration on the Principles Governing Democratic Elections in Africa, the African Union Guidelines for Election Observation and Monitoring Missions, the International Covenant on Civil Political Rights (ICCPR), the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR), the 2005 Declaration of Principles for International Election Observation to which the AU is a signatory. The Mission shall contribute to the reinforcement of the democratization process in Central African Republic by providing an objective, independent and impartial assessment of the conduct of the elections in line with the aforementioned international and regional best practices and standards and the national laws of the Central African Republic.

For more information, please contact:
Karine Kakasi Siaba | Email: Kakasik@africa-union.org | Democracy and Electoral Assistance Unit (DEAU) | DPA - AUC

For further information:
Directorate of Information and Communication | African Union Commission I E-mail: DIC@african-union.org I Website: www.au.int I Addis Ababa | Ethiopia

Cameroon: UNICEF Cameroon Humanitarian Situation Report - December 2015

CAR - ReliefWeb News - 5 hours 20 min ago
Source: UN Children's Fund Country: Cameroon, Central African Republic, Nigeria

Highlights

Humanitarian Context

• Due to the security situation, humanitarian access to people in need remains highly difficult in the Far North Region and in some areas close to the border with Central Africa Republic. This results in difficulties for UNICEF and humanitarians partners to procure assistance to people in need.

• The humanitarian crisis in the Far North region continues to deteriorate; the increasing number of refugees and Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs), on top of the pre-existing nutrition crisis and increasing food insecurity is resulting in a complex humanitarian emergency.

• The humanitarian situation related to refugees coming across the border from the Central African Republic (CAR) does not evolve.

• 123 choleras cases (6 deaths) and 9,874 measles cases (39 deaths) have been reported in 2015.

In figures

• In the context of the deteriorating crisis in the Far North, more than 58,000 children benefited from psychosocial support and 1,261 children under 5 years old with severe acute malnutrition were admitted to nutritional centres, exceeding planned targets for 2015.

• In 2015, more than 16,000 refugee children from CAR in Eastern Cameroon received access to education in temporary learning spaces, and 72,400 children benefited from learning and teaching supplies, reaching respectively 73% and 105% of the planned 2015 targets.

• In response to the nutrition crisis, over 55,000 children under 5 with severe acute malnutrition (95% of the planned target) were admitted for therapeutic care.

• In response to the measles outbreak, UNICEF supported the measles campaign organized by the Ministry of health in 189 health districts; almost 9,230,000 children from 9 months to 14 years (97.8% of the target) were immunized against measles and rubella.

Colombia: Gobierno entregará mil millones de pesos para atender emergencias en Urabá

Colombia - Chad - 5 hours 34 min ago
Source: El Espectador Country: Colombia

El dinero será destinado para el fortalecimiento del Cuerpo de Bomberos de la región, que se ha visto fuertemente afectada por los incendios forestales.

Los estragos causados por el fenómeno de El Niño no paran. Ya son varios los municipios que se encuentran en alerta por los incendios forestales y el Urabá no es ajeno a la situación. Por eso, este fin de semana el ministro de Ambiente, Gabriel Vallejo, anunció recursos por mil millones de pesos para el fortalecimiento del Cuerpo de Bomberos de la región, para que puedan atender con más eficacia las emergencias que allí se presentan.

El dinero, según manifestó Vallejo durante un encuentro con bomberos voluntario de la Brigada número 17 y Corpourabá, se invertirá en la atención de emergencias y en equipos de trabajo, como carrotanques.

"Estamos acompañando y apoyando a los mandatarios y a la población en una de las situaciones climáticas más difíciles que ha enfrentado el país. Esta es la etapa más crítica, vamos a tener un mes de febrero con el fenómeno de El Niño en su máxima expresión y continuaremos así hasta el mes de mayo", dijo el ministro.

Así mismo, Vallejo hizo énfasis en la necesidad que tiene el país para prevenir los incendios forestales, que por la sequía se prolongan y pueden generar daños más daños. De hecho, resaltó que en lo que va corrido de 2016, cerca de 12 mil hectáreas se han visto afectadas por las llamas.

Hasta el momento, los departamentos más afectados son Cundinamarca, Huila, Antioquia y Tolima, y algunas regiones del Valle del Cauca, informó el Ministerio de Ambiente y Desarrollo Sostenible.

Ante este panorama, Vallejo hizo un llamado a la comunidad para que denuncie a los pirómanos y para que ahorren agua y energía.

"Hay unos compromisos del Gobierno Nacional, de los sectores productivos y los empresarios, pero el compromiso más grande es el individual, que cada colombiano asuma un compromiso individual, el agua que ahorramos le va a servir a otra persona, el agua es bendita" señaló.

Colombia: Rebel attack ups tension in Colombia peace drive

Colombia - Chad - 5 hours 54 min ago
Source: Agence France-Presse Country: Colombia

Bogota, Colombia | AFP | Monday 2/8/2016 - 20:58 GMT

Colombia vowed Monday to step up the fight against the country's second-biggest rebel group, despite claims it was ready to join in a peace drive to end decades of conflict.

President Juan Manuel Santos spoke after a meeting of security officials prompted by an attack early Monday on a military brigade, blamed on the leftist ELN, or National Liberation Army.

He said he had ordered the military "to intensify operations against the ELN and all the forms of delinquency that stem from its presence."

The attack raised tension amid efforts to include the ELN in peace efforts alongside the FARC, Colombia's biggest rebel force, aimed at ending half a century of conflict in the South American country.

"The ELN is dead wrong if it thinks that with attacks like this it can smooth the path to peace," Santos said.

"If they think it will strengthen their position at the negotiating table, they are totally mistaken."

The Colombian government has been holding peace talks for the past three years with the leftist FARC.

In 2014, he also launched efforts to convene formal peace talks with the ELN, without calling a ceasefire between the group and government forces.

Santos is demanding the ELN release two captives as a condition for any peace deal.

The FARC and the government have said they aim to sign a peace deal by March 23.

An agreement to start peace talks with the ELN has not yet been reached.

The FARC however said Monday it believed the ELN was ready to start negotiations "as soon as possible."

"The ELN cannot stay outside the peace process," the FARC's chief negotiator Ivan Marquez told reporters in Havana, where the negotiations are ongoing.

"We have grounds to assert that its leaders want to start peace discussions as soon as possible with the Colombian government. A peace without the ELN would be an incomplete peace."

rd/rlp/oh

© 1994-2016 Agence France-Presse

Yemen: Yemen: Organizations 3W Operational Presence (as of 31 January 2016)

Yemen - ReliefWeb News - 6 hours 16 min ago
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Yemen

Syrian Arab Republic: Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator, Stephen O’Brien - Statement on Syria

ReliefWeb - Press Releases - 6 hours 43 min ago
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Syrian Arab Republic

(New York, 8 February 2016) I am gravely concerned by reports that over 30,000 civilians have been displaced from Aleppo city and other areas in northern Syria over the past week, by heavy clashes and aerial bombardment by the Government of Syria, allied forces and armed groups. About 80 per cent of them are estimated to be women and children. We have reports that civilians have been killed and injured, and that civilian infrastructure, including at least two hospitals, has been hit.

I am also extremely concerned by the situation for people in other parts of the country, including in Dar’a governorate in the south, where intensified fighting has led to the displacement of thousands of people as well as civilian deaths and injuries.

While some people are able to stay with host families or relatives, displacement camps in the areas close to the border with Turkey are already full and running above their response capacity. People urgently require shelter, food and basic household items.

I urge the Government and other parties to this conflict to hold to their obligations under international human rights and international humanitarian law to protect all civilians in Syria and allow neutral, impartial humanitarian organizations safe and unconditional access to all people in need, whoever and wherever they are.

I call on the warring parties to immediately halt all actions that might result in civilian loss of life and damage, to permit civilians to move to safer areas and to refrain from targeting medical and other civilian infrastructure.

The United Nations and humanitarian partners are working to quickly scale up response and stocks, providing newly displaced families with food assistance or cash and vouchers where feasible, as well as deploying mobile clinics, supplying health facilities and increasing water and sanitation services for new arrivals at the camps near Bab al Salameh border crossing.

At the same time agencies are working to bring household water treatment and nutrition supplies to Aleppo City as well as school-in-a-box kits for Azaz and other areas of north Aleppo governorate. USD $10.5 million has been allocated through the Humanitarian Pooled Fund to help people affected by the conflict.

occupied Palestinian territory: Israel sprays Gazan farmland close to border fence, destroying crops and causing heavy losses

oPt - ReliefWeb News - 6 hours 52 min ago
Source: Israeli Information Center for Human Rights in the Occupied Territories Country: occupied Palestinian territory

In December 2015, Palestinian farmers in the Gaza Strip reported that Israeli military planes had sprayed their land with herbicides on three days that month: 8, 21 and 23 December. The spraying covered areas up to 200 meters west of the border fence between the Gaza Strip and Israel. The spraying extended from the center of the Gaza Strip to the south, from areas to the east of al-Bureij Refugee Camp to land east of Khuza’ah. This action was undertaken despite the fact that in 2014, the military informed Palestinians that they could farm land up to 100 meters from the fence. Moreover, due to the prevailing winds at the time of the spraying, extensive damage was also caused to farmland further away.

This is not the first time that the military has sprayed crops along the border fence. Over the past two or three years, Israel has undertaken similar spraying operations once or twice a year. In previous years, the military used bulldozers to flatten vegetation and land along the border. Until now, the spraying did not cause serious damage to crops as it was done in areas that were barely farmed. This year, however, extensive areas of farmland were affected, causing serious damage. Testimonies collected by B'Tselem’s field researchers from farmers who work these lands reveal that the damage to crops grew apparent two days after the spraying. Within several days, the leaves of some plants withered completely. Moreover, due to the prevailing winds at the time of the spraying, extensive damage was also caused to farmland as far as 300 meters from the fence.

At the beginning of the second intifada, in September 2000, Israel began to restrict the access of Palestinian farmers in Gaza to their land close to the border fence. Over the years, the military has periodically changed the definition of its no-go area for farmers. However, the precise extent of this area has always remained uncertain, and no official Israeli body has ever provided Gazan residents with the information. In November 2008, for example, following the collapse of the tahdiya (calm) agreement between Israel and Hamas, the military declared a 500-meter buffer zone on the Palestinian side of the fence. In May 2009, the military announced that anyone coming within 300 meters of the fence was endangering their life and would be subject to all possible action, including shooting. The military’s announcement in the same year stated that “the area adjacent to the fence constitutes a combat zone.” At the end of 2012, following the understandings reached between Israel and Hamas after Operation Pillar of Defense, the military announced that Palestinian farmers would be allowed to access land up to 300 meters from the fence. About 18 months later, following Operation Protective Edge, the military informed Israeli human rights organization Gisha that the no-go area for farmers had been reduced and they could now farm up to 100 meters from the fence, though without the use of vehicles. Over the years, the prohibition on the entry of farmers to areas close to the fence has gravely injured the livelihood of the landowners in the area.

In addition, the precise scope of the no-go zone has been unclear over the years. The first reason for this is that the military has not clearly marked the area. The second is ongoing disparity between the military’s official declarations and the actual implementation of policy. For example, the military has shot farmers who were working on their land under the mistaken impression that they were permitted to enter the area. This reality leaves the farmers in a state of constant uncertainty as to where they are permitted to farm and what level of danger they face.

About two days after the spraying, I began to see the damage on the leaves of the plants. Five days later, I could already see the damage to the peas and the fava beans, which dried up. When I saw that, I couldn’t believe it. My plants were burnt, right in front of me, and I realized I’d lost my crop and I wouldn’t see even one shekel from it.

Excerpt from the testimony of H.A., farmer and father of six.

The testimonies collected by B'Tselem’s field researchers in December 2015 reveal that many farmers in the Gaza Strip who own land near the fence have been forced to rent land elsewhere in order to make a living for their families, in the absence of any other source of income. Due to the military’s ambiguity on the matter, even the farming of this land entails mortal danger, particularly during foggy weather or when demonstrations are taking place in the area.

The spraying operations conducted by the military in December form part of Israel’s policy of restricting access to these areas of the Gaza Strip – a policy that the military has implemented for many years, as noted above. Human rights NGO Gisha posted on its website a statement by the IDF Spokesperson in which the military justified these actions, saying: “The aerial spraying of herbicides and germination inhibitors was conducted in the area along the border fence last week in order to enable optimal and continuous security operations.” This statement completely ignores the impact of the spraying on extensive areas due to the prevailing winds at the time of spraying, and the grave injury to the farmers’ livelihood. It also highlights Israel’s utilitarian approach to the Gaza Strip. When Israel so wishes, the area is described as a “hostile state entity” for which – and for whose residents – Israel bears no responsibility. At other times, it is a “zone” in which the military is entitled to undertake “continuous security operations,” as if it were part of Israel’s own territory.

The reality is that, even after the 2005 “disengagement” from Gaza, Israel continues to control many aspects of the lives of Gaza residents. The scope of this control imposes responsibility on Israel for the residents’ wellbeing and welfare. Israel cannot merely regard the territory of the Gaza Strip as part of its own territory, while ignoring the people who live and work in the area. If the security establishment believes that a “security zone” is needed between Israel and the Gaza Strip, it must establish this zone within Israeli territory.

Testimony of Riad Salim Muhammd a-Niser , 54, married father of six, farmer, resident of al-Bureij Refugee Camp, Deir al-Balah District. Testimony given to Khaled al-'Azayzeh on 30 December 2015

Riad Salim Muhammd a-Niser. Photo: Khaled al-'Azayzeh, B'TslemI have been a farmer for 25 years. My five brothers and I have eight dunams of farmland near the border, east of al-Bureij Refugee Camp. Since the land is less than 100 meters away from the fence with Israel, we cannot cultivate it. To make a living, I rent 70 dunams of farmland located 300 meters away from the fence, east of al-Bureij. I pay 4,000 Jordanian dinars a year in rent. It’s a relatively low price, because the land is close to the border and it’s dangerous to work there because of the Israeli army’s fire. I have to rent this land and cultivate it with my children, my brother, and my sister’s children because I have no other work. We provide for our families with the living we make off the land. About 40 people rely on this land for their living. Sometimes I hire extra workers to help us farm the land.

I grow wheat on 48 dunams and parsley on 12. I was planning to plant peppers and watermelons in the rest of the land in February. I sowed the wheat about a month ago and the parsley in April. I harvest the parsley once a month. Each dunam yields 1.5 tons of parsley. The price varies. Sometimes I sell 1.5 tons for 3,000 ILS, sometimes less, sometimes more. I began harvesting the parsley in July and I’ve already harvested it five times.

The seeds for every dunam of parsley cost 1,200 ILS, and each dunam takes a truckload of fertilizer, which costs 1,200 ILS, and all sorts of chemicals, several times a month. One bag of 25 kg costs 125 ILS. I’m left with 1,000 ILS from every 1.5 tons of parsley sold.

One morning around the end of December, I don’t remember when exactly, I saw an Israeli plane spraying a white substance over the border area. It was flying very low, inside the Palestinian area, about 100 meters west of the border fence. Two days later, when I was in the fields I cultivate, I saw that the parsley had gone yellow, and realized it had been destroyed by the spraying. The wind blew the herbicides to our crops. We were supposed to harvest the parsley and sell it, but I had to gather it up and throw it out. Now I’m waiting for the parsley to grow again. Forty dunams of wheat were also destroyed. We have only eight left.

I had made commitments to suppliers. I was supposed to sell them parsley, but because the crop was destroyed and I didn’t deliver the goods, they had to buy parsley from other farmers and I lost their business.

An airplane sprayed the border area in April 2015, too, and we lost crops on eight dunams of parsley, eight dunams of green pepper and eight dunams of watermelon. I plowed the land and sowed again. I lost about 19,000 ILS. At the time, people from the ICRC and the Ministry of Agriculture came by, took photos of the crop and assessed the damages, but I haven’t received financial compensation from anyone.

I buy herbicides, materials for treating the crops and seeds on credit, with the intention of paying back once I sell the crops, but I haven’t had a crop and now I have debts I’ll have to pay back. If the Israeli army goes on spraying around the border, I’ll have to stop farming, and I don’t know how my brothers and I are going to provide for our families. We have no source of income except farming.

We suffer from Israeli military fire around the border area, especially when there are clashes. My children and I take risks and go out to protect our crops from the demonstrators, exposing ourselves to Israeli military fire.

Testimony of H.A., 47, married father of six, farmer and resident of al-Musadar, a village that lies north-east of Deir al-Balah, some 450 meters from the border fence. Testimony given to Khaled al-'Azayzeh on 31 December 2015

I have a 50-dunam plot right next to the western side of the border fence, in the eastern part of the village of al-Musadar. My house is on this plot, but since my land reaches all the way to the border, I can only cultivate 25 dunams of it. The rest of the plot is right in front of me, but I can’t reach it because the Israeli army shoots anyone who comes within 150 meters of the border.

I planted wheat, barley, fava beans and peas in the part of the plot that I can cultivate. The cost of the seeds and the plowing, including renting a tractor, was about 5,000 ILS and I paid another 5,000 ILS for laborers to help me cultivate the land.

On Tuesday, 8 December 2015, at around 7:00 AM, I was on the land near the house when an Israeli plane arrived and started spraying the areas around the border. It went about 200 meters into the Palestinian area. It flew very low, and right then the wind was blowing in the direction of our house. I didn’t think these herbicides would be so devastating. The army sprays that area every year and so far, the damage hasn’t been that bad. Usually, only plants up to 100 meters from the border are harmed. At that distance, people hardly grow anything, so there are no crops that get destroyed from the spraying, just grazing pastures. About two days after the spraying, I began to see the damage on the leaves of the plants. Five days later, I could already see the damage to the peas and the fava beans, which dried up. When I saw that, I couldn’t believe it. My plants were burnt, right in front of me, and I realized I’d lost my crop and I wouldn’t see even one shekel from it.

They destroyed our crop for no reason. Ten days later, I lost any hope of getting anything out of my crop. I brought a tractor in and plowed the wheat and barley fields and replanted them. I left the peas as they were, because it costs a lot of money to plant it again and I won’t make it in time for this season anyway. The wheat and barley I sowed now are also late, but I’m hoping they’ll grow anyway.

I have no source of income other than farming. I was really hoping for a good pea and fava bean crop. One kg of peas sells for 5 ILS now, and a kilo of fava beans is about 16. I put a lot of money into herbicides for this field before it got sprayed. Luckily, I get my fertilizer from my livestock, so I didn’t have to pay for that. I have ten sheep and goats, which I can’t graze near the fence now because the plants there have been poisoned. I’ll have to buy animal feed at the market.

I borrowed about 7,000 ILS for farming expenses, including hiring the tractor, paying laborers and buying materials. Now I can’t pay back the loan because I lost the crop. I was also hoping that the income from the crop would help us build a house, after our house was destroyed in the last war. We live in a makeshift wood and tin structure on the first floor of what was our house. The conditions are very harsh. It’s very hot in the summer, and now, in the winter, it’s cold and the kids are always sick.

I don’t know why the planes sprayed like that for no reason, and why they let us put our heart and soul into working the land and then spray before we manage to harvest the crop.

Testimony of Saeil Mustafa Abu Sa’id, 48, married and father of eight, farmer and resident of al-Bureij Refugee Camp. Testimony given to Khaled al-A’zayzeh on 30 December 2015:

We live about 800 meters from the border fence, to the east of al-Bureij refugee camp. I own about 10 dunams of farmland near my home. My land is also about 800 meters from the fence. There’s an olive grove on part of the land, and on the remainder I grow crops such as wheat, barley, and fava beans. I also rented another seven dunams next to my plot and used to grow vegetables there, but at the moment I’m not growing anything on it. There’s also a well on my land.

Over the years we’ve suffered a lot from shooting from the military watchtowers, particularly early in the morning, because of the fog, and in the evening. So I stopped going to my land at these times because I’m afraid they’ll shoot me.

Apart from the shooting, the Israeli military sprays herbicide all along the border at least once a year. Last year, an airplane sprayed the border area in December or January. At the time I had two dunams of fava beans, three dunams of eggplants, and two dunams of zucchini. On the rest of my land I’d planted wheat and rye. The spraying destroyed 80 percent of my crops. I’d put over two months’ work into those crops – watering them, spraying them, fertilizing the land, and covering the zucchini with plastic sheets at night. Every dunam needed about 800 shekels worth of herbicide.

The same thing happened this year. About two weeks ago, I was on my land one morning tending to my crops – fava beans, wheat, and barley. Suddenly an airplane appeared and sprayed over the border area, about 100 meters to the west of the fence, into the Palestinian side. As the plane turned around, it flew hundreds of meters inside Palestinian territory. It was flying low. At the time I couldn’t tell whether the herbicide had affected my land, but a few days later I saw that my crops had begun to turn yellow. Some of the fava beans I had planted on two dunams of land had gone dry and yellow and were ruined, and four dunams of wheat and three of barley were also totally destroyed. I lost 2,500 ILS because of the spraying.

Now I’m trying to repair the damage. I’m spraying a special substance to try and save what’s left of the fava beans. Every four days I spray at least once, and it costs me 80 ILS every time. I hoped that the treatment would help and I’d be able to sell the crop on the market. Unfortunately it didn’t work and I’ll only be able to sell it as fodder for sheep. Fava beans sell for around 16 shekels a kilo at the moment, and I’d hoped to harvest 50 kilos a day. Now, because of the spraying by the Israeli military, I can’t sell even a single kilo, and instead I’ll have to sell it off as fodder for sheep at one shekel a kilo.

Apart from the spraying, we also suffer from shooting by the military. On Friday, 25 December 2015, I was on my land at about 3:20 P.M. together with my neighbor Yusuf Mubarak Abu Sabika, 48. He was working on land he rented next to my land and he came over to talk to me. At the same time, some young people were holding a demonstration opposite the fence, to the east of al-Bureij. Yusuf and I were standing about 350 meters from the clashes. Someone called Yusuf on the phone and he moved about 50 meters away from me, toward the fence, to take the call. So by then he was 300 meters away from the clashes. The soldiers fired live shots at the demonstrators and two bullets hit Yusuf, one in the thigh and the other in the stomach. He took a few steps, clutching his stomach, and then he fell down. I was shocked when I saw he’d been injured. He’s a farmer and had nothing to do with the demonstration. After a few minutes an ambulance came and took him to hospital. I went home and later learned that Yusuf had died. I lost a fellow farmer and a neighbor who had done nothing more than earn a living for his family.

Testimony of Ghazi Ahmad Ibrahim a-Najar, 48, married and father of five, farmer and resident of the town of Khuza’ah to the east of Khan Yunis. Testimony given to B'Tselem field researcher Muhammad Sa’id on 30 December 2015:

I own four dunams of farmland to the east of Khuza’ah, about 500 meters from the border fence. Apart from my own land, I rent a plot of 18 dunams to increase my income. Eight dunams of that plot are 300 meters from the fence and the rest are 400 to 600 meters from the fence.

On Wednesday, 23 December 2015, at about 8:00 A.M., I was close to my land when I saw two Israeli military vehicles driving near the border and dust kicked up by tanks on the other side of the fence. I picked up my stuff and walked away until reached the home of my sister and brother-in-law, which is nearby and overlooks the border fence.

A few minutes later I heard the military vehicles getting closer to the Palestinian area. I saw four bulldozers and two tanks start to flatten an area that lies about 50 meters from the border, on the Palestinian side.

I stayed there and watched what was happening together with my sister and her husband. After about half an hour I saw two airplanes. One flew about 30-70 meters into the Palestinian side and the other stayed on the Israeli side. The planes and vehicles they went on working until about 9:30 A.M. The planes would disappear from a little while and then come back again. The substance sprayed from the planes scattered across a large area because of the wind and reached a distance of hundreds of meters.

Two days after they sprayed the area, I was working on my land when I noticed white stains on the wheat. The stains spread over the course of the day, and then the leaves turned yellow and wilted completely, particularly in the area closest to the border. Four dunams of wheat were totally ruined, and now I have to plow the whole area and plant again. The rest of my land was also damaged, but only partially.

All the farmers and residents in the Khan Yunis area know about these planes and have seen them several times over the past couple of years. Twice a year, in April and at the end of the year, they spray the weeds close to the border strip, but the spraying also affects our crops. It costs us a lot of money every time, not to mention the time and work we put into the crops.

Testimony of Suliman ‘Abd al-Karim Mahana, 60, married and father of thirteen, farmer and resident of the a-Sreij neighborhood in eastern al-Qararah, Khan Yunis District. Testimony given to Muhammad Sa’id on 29 December 2015:

I have eight sons, all of whom work as farmers. It’s our only source of income. I own 35 dunams of farmland in eastern al-Qararah, about 400 to 800 meters from the border fence.

We sowed winter crops on the land and some of them had already grown and were ready for harvesting. I planted barley on 10 dunams closest to the border area, 400 meters from the fence. On five dunams of land at the same distance from the fence I planted bitter vetch, a legume that’s used as fodder for livestock. Barley and bitter vetch don’t need a lot of care, which is why I plant them on the land closest to the fence. On seven dunams that lie 500 meters from the fence I planted zucchini. On another seven dunams at the same distance from the fence I planted peas, and on six dunams that lie 800 meters from the fence I planted spinach.

On Monday, 21 December 2015, at about 6:00 A.M., I was already awake and about to head out to my land when I heard a plane flying close to our house. I went up to the roof and saw a yellow agricultural airplane flying at a height of about 30 to 60 meters, about 100 meters west of the border on the Palestinian side. The plane was flying from north to the south, spraying a thick substance. The spraying went on for about two hours – every time the plane went away for a while and then reappeared. I don’t know what substance it was spraying, but I could see it spread hundreds of meters from the fence because of the wind.

The morning after they sprayed the area, I noticed new white stains on the leaves and stalks of the plants. I realized that it was because of the spraying the day before and asked my sons to harvest all the crops that were ripe that day, before they got any worse. Sure enough, over the next three days, the damage to the plants got worse and most of them dried up completely.

The plants that suffered the worst damage were the leafy ones like spinach, barley, and bitter vetch. I have to plow and replant that land. The other plants were also damaged, but not as badly. Substances like the one they sprayed affect the plants’ lifespan and the number of times you can harvest them. For example, zucchini usually yields 17 harvests a year, but now that it’s been exposed to this material, I don’t know whether it will flower again.

Over the past couple of years we’ve gotten used to the Israeli military spraying herbicides from airplanes close to the border at this time of year. In 2014, after the last round of fighting, our crops were also very badly damaged after the herbicide reached our land.

I’d estimate that my financial losses are around 5,000 dollars, not including work time. The Israeli occupation authorities persecute us and damage our livelihood all the time. We’ve also suffered many times from shooting and other obstacles that the military puts in the way of our work. They endanger our lives and our children’s lives. Two years ago, one of my sons was injured by a bullet while he was working on our land. The bullet hit him in the spine, paralyzed him, and totally ruined his life.

Testimony of ‘Ali Salameh Abu Sawarin , 29, married and father of four, farmer and resident of the al-Muharabah area in Deir al-Balah. Testimony given to Muhammad Sa’id on 29 December 2015:

I’m a farmer and I have eight dunams of land in the al-Qararah area northeast of Khan Yunis. I also rent a 60-dunam plot in the Wadi a-Salqa area, a little north of my land, to increase my income.

Seven dunams of my land are 200 to 300 meters away from the border. I sowed seeds there about two months ago, in coordination with the ICRC. They sent officials and laborers, and a tractor and plow with ICRC flags on them, so we could plow and sow. We have been banned from farming there since before Operation Protective Edge. The rest of my land is 400 to 600 meters away from the fence. I sowed zucchini on 15 dunams, peas on ten, fava beans on ten, cabbage on six and spinach on eight. I left the rest empty.

On Wednesday, 23 December 2015, around 8:00 AM, I was working the land in the Wadi a-Salqa area. I was watering the plants and treating them when I saw a yellow agricultural airplane flying along the border fence, at about a 100-meter height. While flying, the plane released a thick substance that flew hundreds of meters to the west because of the wind, and reached our land and our plants.

The plane continued flying about a kilometer to the south, and then turned around and flew back. The spraying lasted for about two hours. The next day, white stains appeared on the leaves and stalks of the plants. From that moment, the more sun the plants got, the worse the damage got, until they finally dried up completely. That happened to most of my plants and crops, especially the leafy ones, which I can’t sell anymore.

The area that’s 200 to 400 meters from the fence was the worst hit by the spraying. The rest of my land was also damaged, but less. I put a lot of money, work hours and effort into farming these fields and I lost them. The spraying isn’t new. The Israeli occupation forces harm us, our livelihoods, and our children’s livelihoods every time they do it. We feel that they’re doing it deliberately.

  • 1 dunam = 0.1 hectare

Uganda: Uganda: Water supply and sanitation programme phase II WSSP II - Appraisal Report

Uganda - ReliefWeb News - 7 hours 57 sec ago
Source: African Development Bank Country: Uganda

Project Summary

Programme overview: The Government of Uganda’s second National Development Plan (NDP-II) (2015-2020) identifies the provision of adequate water supply and improved sanitation as one of the key priority areas for promoting sustainable wealth creation and inclusive growth. The objective of the Water Supply and Sanitation Programme II (WSSP II), aligned to the NDP II, is to contribute to improved health and productivity of the population through provision of safe water and sanitation services to a target population of 1.43m people (51.4 % women). The programme to be implemented across the country over four years, will focus on rural gravity flow schemes and solar mini schemes targeting rural beneficiaries in all regions; and will also provide urban water systems in small towns under the WSDF-central region.

Programme Beneficiaries and Impact: The envisaged direct impacts include; reduction in the average walking distance to the nearest water point; and, reduction in time spent fetching water at congested water points. The water infrastructure designed for the identified small towns is a direct response to Uganda’s rate of urbanization currently at 5.74%. Sanitation interventions in schools, institutions and urban setting and the accompanying faecal sludge plants with desludging units will have tremendous impacts on the existing challenge of emptying toilets and septic tanks in schools and informal settlements. The improved access to water and sanitation services will have positive social and gender payoffs and will enable a more conducive business environment in the towns and rural growth centres. The programme will also provide employment opportunities during construction and economically empower women and youths through support groups and skills development. Catchment and river embankment restoration through tree planting will be integral aspects of the intervention.

Programme Rationale: The WSSP II, aligned to the NDP-II, will contribute to Uganda’s 2040 vision of having “a transformed Ugandan society from a peasant to a modern and prosperous country within 30 years.” It addresses the Sector Wide Approach (SWAp) programme of the water sector JWESSP (2013-2018) whose objective is to support the water and environment sector to achieve its targets and improve its efficiency through a consistent, harmonised sector programme that is aligned to government objectives, policies and delivery modalities. The WSSP-II is anchored on the CSP 2011-2016, which focuses on the two main pillars (i)
Infrastructure development and (ii) Human capacity improvement and skills development for poverty reduction. This is in line with the Bank’s TYS (2013-2022), which prioritizes water security as a driver of change in Africa and the need for investments in integrated water development and management as central to sustainable water, food and energy security for green and inclusive growth. The intervention in in line with the Banks high 5s with particular emphasis of improving the quality of life for the African people. It is also consistent with the Bank’s Integrated Water Resources Management Policy (2000) and Gender Strategy (2014–2018).

Programme Need: Access to potable water and improved sanitation is central in Uganda’s development agenda owing to its strong links to all MDGs, the NDP II and the SDGs. The country has made substantial progress in increasing water coverage in 2014 to 64% and sanitation access to 74.6%. The water coverage, however, appears to be stagnating. The WSSP II has been identified as one of the programmes under NDP-II that will contribute to the attainment of Uganda’s national objectives to reach water and sanitation coverage for all, increase access to quality social services to enable a more conducive business environment in the towns and RGC and also make a difference in improved enrolment of the girl child.

Bank Value Addition: The Bank’s experience in Uganda’s water sector dates back to 1968. The Bank is among the largest DPs involved in the sector and the proposed WSSP II is a follow up of the ongoing WSSP I with similar activities, giving the Bank comparative advantage and rationale for continued involvement in the Sector. The new support will further strengthen and consolidate gains achieved from similar previous and on-going support in the sector. The additional investment by the Bank Group comes timely when the country needs to implement the sector strategies agreed upon in the 2014 joint sector review. The Bank is now deemed to be a partner of choice in the water sector in Uganda.

Knowledge Management: Knowledge gathered and generated from implementation of the WSSP-II will be documented for use in improving future interventions financed by the Bank and partners. A comprehensive program monitoring, aligned to the sector M&E framework will be the medium for dissemination and sharing of knowledge generated. The WSDF monitoring will be guided by the Results Based Monitoring Manual with monthly monitoring reports consolidated into JPF quarterly reports and ultimately into the Annual Sector Performance Reports to be discussed at the Joint Sector Reviews (JSR) and disseminated to all stakeholders. The government and development partners will use the generated lessons learnt to update the next Water Atlas and the sector indicators. This will also be captured in the Bank’s bi-annual Implementation Performance Results (IPR) report.

Sudan: Sudan army urges civilians to return to clashes-hit Darfur area

Sudan - ReliefWeb News - 7 hours 6 min ago
Source: Agence France-Presse Country: Sudan

Khartoum, Sudan | AFP | Monday 2/8/2016 - 19:57 GMT

Sudan's military on Monday called on civilians displaced by two weeks of fighting in Darfur's Jebel Marra to return to their homes, claiming to have captured most of the area.

The rebels strongly denied the claim and urged the international community to intervene to protect civilians.

Clashes flared between insurgents and troops in Jebel Marra, a stronghold of the rebel Sudan Liberation Army led by Abdulwahid Nur (SLA-AW), on January 15 and tens of thousands of civilians are thought to have fled the fighting.

"The armed forces, announcing they have extended their control over the Jebel Marra area and have secured all roads and tracks and important sites, invite all citizens in the area to return to their villages," army spokesman Brigadier Ahmed Khalifa al-Shami said in a statement.

"The armed forces are still continuing their efforts in the area to complete the combing of the small remaining pockets" of Jebel Marra, the spokesman said.

But Abdulwahid Nur, head of the SLA-AW, denied his forces had lost control of the area.

"I will say that is not true at all, that is a lie," Nur told AFP by telephone from France. 

"Since January 25, they have been continuously attacking us from eight directions" in Jebel Marra, he said.

He called the fighting "a tragedy, with the silence of the international community". 

Access to Darfur is strictly limited by the government, making it almost impossible to independently verify accounts from both sides.

Tens of thousands of civilians are thought to have fled the latest clashes, which came after a period of relative calm following President Omar al-Bashir's extension of a ceasefire in the area in a New Year's Eve speech.

The military said in their statement they were responding to violations of the ceasefire, but the SLA-AW said troops tried to fight their way into the area.

The army's call for civilians to return came after the United Nations warned that civilians displaced by the fighting were facing dire humanitarian conditions.

"They are basically in need of everything," said the UN Humanitarian Coordinator for Sudan, Marta Ruedas.

'Worst civilian displacement'

The surge in violence "has seen, as a result, the worst civilian displacement that we have seen in the UN in the past decade" in Jebel Marra, she said.

The UN has been unable to gain access to some of the areas worst affected in Jebel Marra, which straddles North, South and Central Darfur states, and has been unable to verify the number of people displaced into the surrounding areas.

Ethnic insurgents in the western Darfur region in 2003 mounted a rebellion against Bashir's Arab-dominated government over claims they were being marginalised.

Bashir unleashed a bloody counter-insurgency using militia, ground troops and jet bombers that saw him indicted by the International Criminal Court on war crimes charges in 2009, which he rejects.

Some 300,000 people have been killed the conflict and there are 2.5 million people in the region who have been displaced, according to the UN.

tl/hc

© 1994-2016 Agence France-Presse

Colombia: Colombia: Emergencia Resguardo de Aponte, Municipio de Tablón de Gómez (Nariño). Flash Update No.1 (08/02/2015)

ReliefWeb - OCHA Situation Reports - 7 hours 35 min ago
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Colombia

Al menos 140 familias, 700 personas se encuentran afectadas por un movimiento en masa – agrietamiento- que se presenta en el Resguardo de Aponte, Municipio de Tablón de Gómez, habitado principalmente por indígenas de la etnia Inga. Producto del movimiento, 130 viviendas han resultado afectadas; 42 familias se encuentran albergadas en casas de vecinos y esperan recibir subsidio de arrendamiento; un número no determinado de familias se ha desplazado hacía otros lugares donde familiares (Pasto, Ipiales, entre otros).

Según información de la comunidad, la afectación se viene presentando desde hace siete meses; pese a haber comunicado los hechos ante las autoridades locales, solo hasta el mes de enero 2016 se ha valorado la situación como emergencia.

Según un informe de la Universidad Politécnica y Tecnológica de Colombia, recibido por el Comité Departamental de Gestión del Riesgo de Desastres - CDGRD el 14 de enero, es prioritario un estudio geológico para determinar la causa de la afectación. Así mismo se recomienda la señalización de las áreas de riesgo, considerar la posible reubicación del resguardo y prestar especial atención a las afectaciones sociales y culturales de las familias en tanto su relación con el territorio.

El 18 de enero, el gobernador y el CDGRD realizaron una visita al Resguardo, solicitando al CMGRD elaborar los censos respectivos y señalizar las zonas de alto riesgo. A la fecha de este flash se cuenta con un censo aproximado de 140 familias afectadas, cifra que, según el Cabildo tiende a aumentar cada día.

Un misión Interagencial llevada a cabo el 28 de enero evidenció necesidades relacionadas con: consolidación de censos; atención psicosocial; afectación a viviendas e infraestructura comunitaria (escuela y puesto de salud); contaminación de fuentes de agua, limitada infraestructura para posible albergue, pérdida de cultivos de azotea ubicados en los patios de las viviendas; acciones de gestión de riesgo comunitaria; limitados recursos financieros para realizar el estudio geológico; conflictos interétnicos;

La Unidad Nacional de Gestión de Riesgo y el CDGRD iniciaron acciones de respuesta, aprobaron subsidios de arriendo para 42 familias por tres meses. Se ha programado una visita, del Servicio Geológico Colombianao, para evaluar el origen del evento de remosión de masa. La secretaria de educación departamental, falcilitará un ejercicio de gestión del riesgo y el ICBF desplegará una unidad móvil de atención psicosocial.

El Equipo Humanitario Local de Nariño, continuará con acciones de coordinación con las autoridades locales y estará atento a las posibles brechas que permanezcan y a la visita del servicio geológico. Priorizará acciones relacionadas con gestión ambiental y atención psicosocial. 

Categories: RSS feeds

Colombia: Colombia: Emergencia Resguardo de Aponte Municipio de Tablón de Gómez (Nariño) Flash Update No.1 (08/02/2015)

ReliefWeb - Press Releases - 7 hours 35 min ago
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Colombia

Al menos 140 familias, 700 personas se encuentran afectadas por un movimiento en masa – agrietamiento- que se presenta en el Resguardo de Aponte, Municipio de Tablón de Gómez, habitado principalmente por indígenas de la etnia Inga. Producto del movimiento, 130 viviendas han resultado afectadas; 42 familias se encuentran albergadas en casas de vecinos y esperan recibir subsidio de arrendamiento; un número no determinado de familias se ha desplazado hacía otros lugares donde familiares (Pasto, Ipiales, entre otros).

Según información de la comunidad, la afectación se viene presentando desde hace siete meses; pese a haber comunicado los hechos ante las autoridades locales, solo hasta el mes de enero 2016 se ha valorado la situación como emergencia.

Según un informe de la Universidad Politécnica y Tecnológica de Colombia, recibido por el Comité Departamental de Gestión del Riesgo de Desastres - CDGRD el 14 de enero, es prioritario un estudio geológico para determinar la causa de la afectación. Así mismo se recomienda la señalización de las áreas de riesgo, considerar la posible reubicación del resguardo y prestar especial atención a las afectaciones sociales y culturales de las familias en tanto su relación con el territorio.

El 18 de enero, el gobernador y el CDGRD realizaron una visita al Resguardo, solicitando al CMGRD elaborar los censos respectivos y señalizar las zonas de alto riesgo. A la fecha de este flash se cuenta con un censo aproximado de 140 familias afectadas, cifra que, según el Cabildo tiende a aumentar cada día.

Un misión Interagencial llevada a cabo el 28 de enero evidenció necesidades relacionadas con: consolidación de censos; atención psicosocial; afectación a viviendas e infraestructura comunitaria (escuela y puesto de salud); contaminación de fuentes de agua, limitada infraestructura para posible albergue, pérdida de cultivos de azotea ubicados en los patios de las viviendas; acciones de gestión de riesgo comunitaria; limitados recursos financieros para realizar el estudio geológico; conflictos interétnicos;

La Unidad Nacional de Gestión de Riesgo y el CDGRD iniciaron acciones de respuesta, aprobaron subsidios de arriendo para 42 familias por tres meses. Se ha programado una visita, del Servicio Geológico Colombianao, para evaluar el origen del evento de remosión de masa. La secretaria de educación departamental, falcilitará un ejercicio de gestión del riesgo y el ICBF desplegará una unidad móvil de atención psicosocial.

El Equipo Humanitario Local de Nariño, continuará con acciones de coordinación con las autoridades locales y estará atento a las posibles brechas que permanezcan y a la visita del servicio geológico. Priorizará acciones relacionadas con gestión ambiental y atención psicosocial. 

Colombia: Colombia: Emergencia Resguardo de Aponte, Municipio de Tablón de Gómez (Nariño). Flash Update No.1 (08/02/2015)

Colombia - Chad - 7 hours 35 min ago
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Colombia

Al menos 140 familias, 700 personas se encuentran afectadas por un movimiento en masa – agrietamiento- que se presenta en el Resguardo de Aponte, Municipio de Tablón de Gómez, habitado principalmente por indígenas de la etnia Inga. Producto del movimiento, 130 viviendas han resultado afectadas; 42 familias se encuentran albergadas en casas de vecinos y esperan recibir subsidio de arrendamiento; un número no determinado de familias se ha desplazado hacía otros lugares donde familiares (Pasto, Ipiales, entre otros).

Según información de la comunidad, la afectación se viene presentando desde hace siete meses; pese a haber comunicado los hechos ante las autoridades locales, solo hasta el mes de enero 2016 se ha valorado la situación como emergencia.

Según un informe de la Universidad Politécnica y Tecnológica de Colombia, recibido por el Comité Departamental de Gestión del Riesgo de Desastres - CDGRD el 14 de enero, es prioritario un estudio geológico para determinar la causa de la afectación. Así mismo se recomienda la señalización de las áreas de riesgo, considerar la posible reubicación del resguardo y prestar especial atención a las afectaciones sociales y culturales de las familias en tanto su relación con el territorio.

El 18 de enero, el gobernador y el CDGRD realizaron una visita al Resguardo, solicitando al CMGRD elaborar los censos respectivos y señalizar las zonas de alto riesgo. A la fecha de este flash se cuenta con un censo aproximado de 140 familias afectadas, cifra que, según el Cabildo tiende a aumentar cada día.

Un misión Interagencial llevada a cabo el 28 de enero evidenció necesidades relacionadas con: consolidación de censos; atención psicosocial; afectación a viviendas e infraestructura comunitaria (escuela y puesto de salud); contaminación de fuentes de agua, limitada infraestructura para posible albergue, pérdida de cultivos de azotea ubicados en los patios de las viviendas; acciones de gestión de riesgo comunitaria; limitados recursos financieros para realizar el estudio geológico; conflictos interétnicos;

La Unidad Nacional de Gestión de Riesgo y el CDGRD iniciaron acciones de respuesta, aprobaron subsidios de arriendo para 42 familias por tres meses. Se ha programado una visita, del Servicio Geológico Colombianao, para evaluar el origen del evento de remosión de masa. La secretaria de educación departamental, falcilitará un ejercicio de gestión del riesgo y el ICBF desplegará una unidad móvil de atención psicosocial.

El Equipo Humanitario Local de Nariño, continuará con acciones de coordinación con las autoridades locales y estará atento a las posibles brechas que permanezcan y a la visita del servicio geológico. Priorizará acciones relacionadas con gestión ambiental y atención psicosocial. 

Lebanon: Liban: faits et chiffres 2015

oPt - ReliefWeb News - 7 hours 54 min ago
Source: International Committee of the Red Cross Country: Lebanon, occupied Palestinian territory, Syrian Arab Republic

Présent au Liban depuis 1967, le CICR a mené à bien son action humanitaire à travers les différents conflits, y compris la guerre civile de 1975 à 1990. Nous nous attachons actuellement à répondre aux besoins croissants de personnes déplacées fuyant la guerre et la violence dans la région ainsi qu'à ceux des communautés qui les accueillent.

En 2015, le CICR a aidé 700 000 personnes au Liban:

Voici un aperçu du travail du CICR au Liban en 2015.

  • 309 000 patients ont été soignés dans des centres de santé soutenus par le CICR.

  • 260 000 personnes ont bénéficié d'un meilleur accès à l'eau et à l'électricité et de meilleures conditions de logement.

  • 7 400 détenus ont reçu des visites dans 31 lieux de détention.

  • 413 chirurgiens ont été formés à la gestion clinique des patients blessés par des armes au Centre de formation en traumatologie balistique du CICR.

  • 53 200 réfugiés syriens et palestiniens, Libanais rentrés chez eux et autres personnes vulnérables ont reçu une aide en espèces, des vivres ou des biens essentiels, tels que couvertures, matelas ou assortiments d'articles d'hygiène.

Pour plus d'informations, consultez les faits et chiffres complets au Liban (en anglais) en 2015

Syndicate content