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Democratic Republic of the Congo: WFP Democratic Republic of Congo Country Brief, August 2016

DRC - ReliefWeb News - 5 hours 16 min ago
Source: World Food Programme Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo

Highlights

  • The School Feeding Programme is facing critical funding gaps. The Country Office urgently requires contributions in order to begin preparations for the next school term, which begins in October 2016.

Operational Updates

  • Through the school feeding programme, WFP provides 95,000 children with hot meal and plans to reach 132,000 children through 2018. The school feeding programme has been suspended from July to September due to the school holiday. The new school year will start in October and WFP is facing a serious funding shortfalls.

  • In November 2015, under the safety net component, WFP started electronic food transfers to vulnerable groups in the newly-selected areas of Sibiti and Owando using a small contribution from the Government. The programme, however, is still suspended in Brazzaville and Pointe Noire due to insufficient resources.

Democratic Republic of the Congo: In the Democratic Republic of Congo, protecting and empowering albino children in schools

DRC - ReliefWeb News - 5 hours 28 min ago
Source: UN Children's Fund Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo

By Mehdi Meddeb

Children living with albinism in the Democratic Republic of Congo often face discrimination and exclusion from their peers, causing some of them to skip school or drop out altogether. Learn how UNICEF is working with the Ministry of Education to make sure that albino children and other vulnerable students get the support they need to stay in school.

KINSHASA, Democratic Republic of Congo, 26 September 2016 – "I had to fight to get here, but mostly against myself," says Michel Mualaba as he overlooks the city of Brazzaville from the terrace of his brand new offices. Michel, a 35-year-old lawyer and financial affairs expert, was raised in a supportive, middle-class family. But he has faced discrimination his entire life because he is albino.

Albinism is a condition that deprives the hair, eyes, and skin from melanin, our body's natural pigment. In the Democratic Republic of Congo, as in other African countries, albino populations still endure fear and rejection. Schools are no exception.

“Socially, I did have friends, although many other children were afraid of me,” Michel says. To protect himself, he had to learn to build a virtual wall around him to withstand the mockery.

"It wasn't always easy, I had to hang on,” he admits.

On top of these issues with his peers, Michel also had to cope with impaired vision caused by his albinism. “I always needed to sit at the front of the classroom, and sometimes, had to be literally inches away from the blackboard because of my sight problems," he says.

Luckily, Michel did not have to overcome the prejudices alone. “In my family, we all had to go through this: my albino brother is now a doctor, my sister, also albino is an interior designer, and my other sister, also albino, is completing her university degree in communication," he says.

Today, Michel continues to work hard to be a role model to younger albino victims of prejudice and discrimination.

Inclusive education

In an effort to support the most vulnerable, including albino children, UNICEF is working with the Democratic Republic of Congo’s Ministry of Education to implement social protection measures in approximately 5,000 schools across the country. This programme provides grants to schools to cover fees for students from lower-income households, as well as school supplies and extracurricular activities.

The social protection programme will also take steps to reduce absenteeism and exclusion of vulnerable children in classrooms. An early warning system for absenteeism will be implemented, and tutoring sessions will be organized for children with learning difficulties.

Although there is no statistical survey data on absenteeism among albino children in the Democratic Republic of Congo, anecdotal evidence suggests that these children have a higher rate of attrition in schools.

“What is certain is that there is a tendency: these kids do suffer from discrimination, mockery, and so some end up dropping out,” says Aimé Dunia, Education Programme Officer for UNICEF. “That is why we are launching a social protection programme to support the most vulnerable children. We will subsidize these schools so that they do not drive away these children.”

A model student

Around 1,000 kilometres away from Kinshasa, near the city of Kisangani, Trésor, 10, is facing the same difficulties that Michel experienced twenty years earlier. While taking notes, his face is just inches from the paper of his notebook. He doesn’t have glasses because his family cannot afford them.

In his primary school in the Tshopo district, there have been some improvements to how albino children are taught. School supervision is more careful, including his teacher, Mr. Jean Bonnard Yeye, 65.

Mr. Yeye recognizes that Trésor has to take extra steps to participate because of his sight problems. “You can tell he's making significant efforts as he's forced to stand up to get as close as possible to the blackboard,” he says.

Despite these challenges, Trésor is one of the best students in his class, and a genuine source of pride for his teacher. "Trésor is an attentive, focused student,” says Mr. Yeye. “He writes well and works very hard."

"It's very important to provide schooling to albino children,” he adds. “They are just kids, like any other."

Kenya: Meru County: Drought Early Warning Bulletin for August 2016

Kenya - ReliefWeb News - 5 hours 50 min ago
Source: Government of Kenya Country: Kenya

Drought Situation & EW Phase Classification

Biophysical Indicators

  • The month remained dry across all livelihood zones.
  • Vegetation conditions however remained above normal with an average vegetation condition index of 54.66. Conditions however portrayed notable declines in Tigania East and Tigania West Sub - Counties.
  • Pastures and browse were mainly fair to poor across all li vel ihood zones Socio Economic Indicators (Impact Indicators)

-**Production indicators**

  • Livestock body conditions were largely fair to poor in the Agro - pastoral livelihood zone and fair in all other livelihood zones.

  • Milk production declined to 22 litres from 26 last month.

  • 30 -percent of LTA harvests of beans was realized this season and less than 20 percent of LTA for maize.
    Pigeon peas and dolichos are at grain filling and maturing stages. Approximately 80 percent of LTA harvests are expected.

Access indicators

  • Milk quantity consumed increased to 19 litres from 17 litres last month.
    Return watering distances for households increased to km this month from km last month.

Utilization Indicators

  • 11 percent of sampled children were at risk of malnutrit ion similar to the previous month

Central African Republic: Displaced women in Bangui create a safe haven amidst horror and violence

CAR - ReliefWeb News - 5 hours 57 min ago
Source: Guardian Country: Central African Republic
In the face of conflict and sexual abuse, women in a camp in Central African Republic’s capital are working together to rebuild their lives

Metres away from passengers awaiting their flights in the departure lounge of M’Poko airport in Bangui, tens of thousands of people shelter inside old jumbo-jets, under hangars or in ramshackle tents.

Marie Valentine, 66, is one of them. She remembers vividly the bullets flying in all directions as she fled her house in the capital of Central African Republic, in December 2013.

Read the full article on the Guardian.

Kenya: Mbeere County: Drought Early Warning Bulletin for August 2016

Kenya - ReliefWeb News - 6 hours 1 min ago
Source: Government of Kenya Country: Kenya

Drought Situation & EW Phase Classification

Biophysical Indicators

  • Rainfall: Minimal precipitation was experienced in the county in the month. Sunny weather was experienced most of the days in the larger Mbeere sub - counties .
  • Vegetation condition: Forage condition is generally fair across the county. Browse is adequate and in good condition though on decline in the marginal mixed farming zone. Pasture is poor in the marginal mixed zone, and on fast decline in both MF and MMF zones.

Socio Economic Indicators (Impact Indicators)

  • Production indicators: Harvesting of maize mainly in the mixed farming zone and land preparation for short rains. Livestock body condition is fair but on downward trend (cattle) particularly in MMF where pasture is on the decline. Milk production is normal.

  • Access indicators: Distances to grazing areas and water sources are within normal range, terms of trade are normal through out the month.

  • Utilization Indicators: There was a notable decline in milk consumption at household level. The rate children at risk of malnutrition decreased from 5.6% to 4.5 %.

  • Coping strategy index in the month was 0.55

Ethiopia: Volunteer refugee teacher steps up to fill gaps in camp schooling

Sudan - ReliefWeb News - 6 hours 5 min ago
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Ethiopia, Sudan

Veteran Sudanese educator launches his own learning centre to give young refugees lessons in English – and peace – at Ethiopian camp.

By: Diana Diaz in Sherkole Camp, Ethiopia

Alnur Burtel may be an old man now, but he still remembers how his university teachers at home in Sudan inspired him to live a good life and study hard for a better future.

Now, in the Ethiopian refugee camp where he has lived since 2011, the 71-year-old seeks to be a similar guide to young Sudanese who have also ended up here. It is a place where inspiration and motivation can be in short supply.

“Education is instrumental for life and development,” says Burtel, from his Light Language Centre at Sherkole camp in western Ethiopia. He built the small one-room education centre himself, and teaches English and civics to teenage and young adult refugees who lack proper schooling or vocational training.

“Young refugees are wasting their lives, doing nothing,” he adds. “It’s time to end these problems. These young people are the future of our countries.”

Back home in Sudan, Burtel taught English at local high schools and at Omdurman University. “I thought, let us feed their minds. If I succeed at changing the life of just one, that will make a difference.”

UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency, which helps manage Sherkole camp, where Burtel lives alongside more than 11,200 mostly Sudanese refugees, does its best to provide as much schooling as it can, but resources are stretched. UNHCR’s appeal for Ethiopia is only 35 per cent funded, with a US$181 million shortfall, meaning that education loses out to providing refugees with the basics like shelter, food, and health care.

That is where committed volunteers like Burtel are crucial to fill in the gaps. He and two fellow refugee volunteers teach 130 students English and civics, transparency, rule of law and what Burtel describes as “peaceful coexistence.” UNHCR and the Ethiopian government refugee agency, ARRA, have provided two blackboards and chalk.

Burtel is from Kauda, a town in the Nuba Mountains in Sudan’s South Kordofan region, where conflict broke out again between rebels and government forces in 2011. The day he and his wife fled, in June that year, was “a day when Nuban people were massively killed,” he remembers, with tears in his eyes. His two uncles were killed and his home was destroyed.

“I left everything behind except my knowledge,” Burtel says. “I have the dream of developing education services for the youth. I encourage them to learn from each other. It helps them uplift their self-confidence. I have many brilliant students who just need a bit of confidence.”

The Light Learning Centre has only been open since January 2016, but Burtel’s students already recognize the impact of his lessons and feel committed to further learning.

“I didn’t fully understand the importance of learning before,” says Sudanese refugee Emoel Yakub, 27. “With Alnur I am not only learning how to speak English, I understand why we must respect each other. We are becoming better and more responsible people so we can have chances of a better future.”

Yakub and several other graduates of the Light Learning Centre are now using what Burtel taught them, and teaching English themselves to refugee children in the camp.

Sirak Sileshi, a UNHCR protection associate at Sherkole, commends Burtel for adding these valuable lessons to his basic language curriculum.

“Alnur inspires refugees to pursue their dreams through education, whilst returning a sense of normalcy to their lives,” says Sileshi. “Given funding constraints, UNHCR and our partners are not always able to provide secondary or language education to refugees. We rely on volunteer work like Alnur’s for young refugees to fulfil their full potential, to recover their hope in life and to prepare for durable solutions in pursuit of productive lives.”

Burtel’s five adult children, aged from 21 to 35, all studied in Kenya thanks to scholarship programmes. They are poised to launch professional careers as teachers, nurses, and development workers.

The refugee youth at Sherkole constitute some 15 per cent of the population and are often at risk of violence and engaging in harmful coping mechanisms. Alnur hopes that he might also encourage a whole generation of young refugees at the camp to pick up the skills needed to find jobs when they can go home.

“I wish that the youth could convey messages of tolerance so that peace overwhelms our turbulent countries,” he says. “Education is not the only solution, but it is a start for our youth to contribute to their communities.”

Ethiopia: Volunteer refugee teacher steps up to fill gaps in camp schooling

Ethiopia - ReliefWeb News - 6 hours 5 min ago
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Ethiopia, Sudan

Veteran Sudanese educator launches his own learning centre to give young refugees lessons in English – and peace – at Ethiopian camp.

By: Diana Diaz in Sherkole Camp, Ethiopia

Alnur Burtel may be an old man now, but he still remembers how his university teachers at home in Sudan inspired him to live a good life and study hard for a better future.

Now, in the Ethiopian refugee camp where he has lived since 2011, the 71-year-old seeks to be a similar guide to young Sudanese who have also ended up here. It is a place where inspiration and motivation can be in short supply.

“Education is instrumental for life and development,” says Burtel, from his Light Language Centre at Sherkole camp in western Ethiopia. He built the small one-room education centre himself, and teaches English and civics to teenage and young adult refugees who lack proper schooling or vocational training.

“Young refugees are wasting their lives, doing nothing,” he adds. “It’s time to end these problems. These young people are the future of our countries.”

Back home in Sudan, Burtel taught English at local high schools and at Omdurman University. “I thought, let us feed their minds. If I succeed at changing the life of just one, that will make a difference.”

UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency, which helps manage Sherkole camp, where Burtel lives alongside more than 11,200 mostly Sudanese refugees, does its best to provide as much schooling as it can, but resources are stretched. UNHCR’s appeal for Ethiopia is only 35 per cent funded, with a US$181 million shortfall, meaning that education loses out to providing refugees with the basics like shelter, food, and health care.

That is where committed volunteers like Burtel are crucial to fill in the gaps. He and two fellow refugee volunteers teach 130 students English and civics, transparency, rule of law and what Burtel describes as “peaceful coexistence.” UNHCR and the Ethiopian government refugee agency, ARRA, have provided two blackboards and chalk.

Burtel is from Kauda, a town in the Nuba Mountains in Sudan’s South Kordofan region, where conflict broke out again between rebels and government forces in 2011. The day he and his wife fled, in June that year, was “a day when Nuban people were massively killed,” he remembers, with tears in his eyes. His two uncles were killed and his home was destroyed.

“I left everything behind except my knowledge,” Burtel says. “I have the dream of developing education services for the youth. I encourage them to learn from each other. It helps them uplift their self-confidence. I have many brilliant students who just need a bit of confidence.”

The Light Learning Centre has only been open since January 2016, but Burtel’s students already recognize the impact of his lessons and feel committed to further learning.

“I didn’t fully understand the importance of learning before,” says Sudanese refugee Emoel Yakub, 27. “With Alnur I am not only learning how to speak English, I understand why we must respect each other. We are becoming better and more responsible people so we can have chances of a better future.”

Yakub and several other graduates of the Light Learning Centre are now using what Burtel taught them, and teaching English themselves to refugee children in the camp.

Sirak Sileshi, a UNHCR protection associate at Sherkole, commends Burtel for adding these valuable lessons to his basic language curriculum.

“Alnur inspires refugees to pursue their dreams through education, whilst returning a sense of normalcy to their lives,” says Sileshi. “Given funding constraints, UNHCR and our partners are not always able to provide secondary or language education to refugees. We rely on volunteer work like Alnur’s for young refugees to fulfil their full potential, to recover their hope in life and to prepare for durable solutions in pursuit of productive lives.”

Burtel’s five adult children, aged from 21 to 35, all studied in Kenya thanks to scholarship programmes. They are poised to launch professional careers as teachers, nurses, and development workers.

The refugee youth at Sherkole constitute some 15 per cent of the population and are often at risk of violence and engaging in harmful coping mechanisms. Alnur hopes that he might also encourage a whole generation of young refugees at the camp to pick up the skills needed to find jobs when they can go home.

“I wish that the youth could convey messages of tolerance so that peace overwhelms our turbulent countries,” he says. “Education is not the only solution, but it is a start for our youth to contribute to their communities.”

Pakistan: Crisis Response Bulletin, September 26, 2016 - Volume: 2, Issue: 39

Pakistan - ReliefWeb News - 6 hours 9 min ago
Source: Alhasan Systems Country: Afghanistan, Pakistan

HIGHLIGHTS

Lahore: Congo virus claims another life

Criticality of climate change explained

Comprehensive arrangements for treatment of dengue patients

4.9 magnitude earthquake jolts Nawabshah

Accounts of over 8,400 terror financing suspects being frozen

State sponsor of terrorism: US bill unlikely to gain Congressional support

Safe travel: Plea moved for effective measures against accidents

TDPs return, rehab continue at full pace

Armed forces could defend each and every inch of our beloved country: COAS

Russian troops arrive for first-ever military exercises

Anti-polio drive begins in tribal areas today

International partners laud Pakistan’s vaccination successes

Increase in life saving drugs prices effects cardiac patients

18 food outlets sealed in Islamabad

Pakistan: Crisis Response Bulletin, September 26, 2016 - Volume: 2, Issue: 39

Afghanistan - ReliefWeb News - 6 hours 9 min ago
Source: Alhasan Systems Country: Afghanistan, Pakistan

HIGHLIGHTS

Lahore: Congo virus claims another life

Criticality of climate change explained

Comprehensive arrangements for treatment of dengue patients

4.9 magnitude earthquake jolts Nawabshah

Accounts of over 8,400 terror financing suspects being frozen

State sponsor of terrorism: US bill unlikely to gain Congressional support

Safe travel: Plea moved for effective measures against accidents

TDPs return, rehab continue at full pace

Armed forces could defend each and every inch of our beloved country: COAS

Russian troops arrive for first-ever military exercises

Anti-polio drive begins in tribal areas today

International partners laud Pakistan’s vaccination successes

Increase in life saving drugs prices effects cardiac patients

18 food outlets sealed in Islamabad

South Sudan: Gbudue state citizens in need of humanitarian aid: official

DRC - ReliefWeb News - 6 hours 18 min ago
Source: Sudan Tribune Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo, South Sudan

September 26, 2016 (YAMBIO) – Thousand of people in Ezo county of South Sudan’s newly created Gbudue are in dire need of humanitarian assistance after returning home from the bush, an official said.

Most of them fled to neighbouring Congo after the fighting between armed youth and government forces intensified.

The commissioner of Ezo county, Arkangelo Bakinde said thousands of citizens have returned and resumed their normal life, but still live in dire situation conditions without food, non-food items and medicines.

The local markets, according to Bakinde, are operating on a daily basis, but that only few traders have commodities in their shops, yet they sell them very expensively to locals who cannot even afford.

“A bar of soap is being sold at 130 SSP and packet of a salt is being sold at 90 SSP while prices of agricultural produce have also gone higher as local people cannot meet the demand to buy salt for the family,” he told Sudan Tribune in a phone interview.

Bakinde further disclosed that the hundreds of Congolese who fled the conflict in Ezo also have returned to the county together with Ezo residents with whom they share common values and ways of life.

“Most of the Congolese residing along the border with South Sudan were getting support from South Sudan as living conditions were not good for them along the border,” said the Ezo county commissioner.

“All shops and lodges in Ezo town were looted during the conflict between the SPLA and the armed youth which claimed over 10 lives in and displaced thousands to the bush and neighbouring Democratic Republic of Congo for safety,” he added.

(ST)

Uganda: Uganda Monthly Market Monitor, August 2016: Issue 29

Uganda - ReliefWeb News - 6 hours 33 min ago
Source: World Food Programme Country: Uganda

HIGHLIGHTS

KARAMOJA

  • Average prices for maize grain reduced across Karamoja in August compared to July by 10% due to increased supply from farmers.
    However, prices for both maize and sorghum were higher this year compared to August 2015 and the long-term average 2013-2015 signifying increasing costs of living.

  • Pastoralists benefited from the high goat prices during the month as Muslims prepared for Eid Al-Adha.

  • There was an improvement in the terms of trade for goats and casual labor wage due to reduced maize grain price in August compared to July 2016. However, compared to August 2015, the terms of trade for both goats and casual labour wage against maize grain deteriorated.

REST OF THE COUNTRY

  • Average retail price for maize grain reduced in most parts of the country by 5% during the month of August compared to July except in Gulu where price increased by 13%.
    Prices for maize grain/flour, sorghum and beans remained higher compared to August 2015.

  • Price for maize grain is expected to go down in September while for beans will go up due to reduced stocks

Yemen: Member states must advance concrete measures to protect access to medical care in conflict zones

Yemen - ReliefWeb News - 6 hours 43 min ago
Source: Médecins Sans Frontières Country: Yemen

After conducting internal investigations, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) is releasing two reports describing attacks on medical facilities it runs or supports in Yemen. The two attacks combined resulted in the death of 20 people, most of them patients, and wounded 32 others. Both attacks were acknowledged by the Saudi-led coalition (SLC). The attacks were on a hospital in Abs, Hajjah governorate on 15 August 2016, and on the MSF clinic in Taiz city on 2 December 2015. The reports detail the actions taken before, during and immediately after the airstrikes. MSF is engaged with the military leadership of the SLC and have raised our serious concerns about the attacks.

Beyond the immediate loss of life and destruction caused by the bombings, the attacks led to a suspension of activities that left an already very vulnerable population without access to healthcare. As a consequence of the bombing of Abs hospital, MSF withdrew from six hospitals in northern Yemen.

While there are significant differences in the circumstances surrounding each incident, in both cases, the bombings hit fully functioning health facilities and the protected nature of the medical mission was not respected. The internal investigations of the Abs and Taiz incidents also conclude that the neutrality and impartiality of the facilities had not been compromised before the attacks and therefore there was no legitimate reason to attack them. The details of the incidents documented in these two reports are unambiguous indicators of how war is being waged in Yemen, where there is an utter disregard for civilian life by all warring parties.

UN Security Council (UNSC) resolution 2286, passed last May, condemned attacks on medical facilities in conflict situations and demanded that all parties to armed conflict comply fully with their obligations under international law. However, there have been no concrete and visible steps to materialise the resolution’s underlying intention. MSF urges UNSC members to take bold and practical steps in tomorrow’s meeting to ensure that 2016 is the last year that hospitals are massively bombed while the world watches in silence. MSF reiterates its call for all warring parties to uphold the principles of humanitarian law, which protect civilians as well as medical facilities, patients and staff, and thus reduce the massive human cost that has characterised this conflict.

Iraq: QRCS, IOM Work Together to Secure Medical Care in Iraq

Iraq - ReliefWeb News - 7 hours 1 min ago
Source: Qatar Red Crescent Society Country: Iraq

September 27th, 2016 ― Doha: Qatar Red Crescent Society (QRCS) has signed a framework agreement with the International Organization for Migration (IOM) to consolidate their partnership and strengthen cooperation for securing emergency health assistance for the crisis-affected populations in Iraq.

It was signed by QRCS Executive Director, Fahad Mohamed Al-Naimi, represented by Ahmed Al-Qahtani, Head of QRCS's delegation, and IOM Iraq Chief of Mission, Thomas Lothar Weiss.

The two-year MoU involves support of the Ministries of Health of the Government of Iraq and the Kurdistan Regional Government, enhancement of the operational and technical capacities of local health services, and provision of comprehensive health care for most vulnerable groups, whether the internally displaced people (IDPs) or host communities.

Mr. Al-Qahtani said, "We consider this partnership to be among the most important strategies in our work. Emergency response operations in Mosul will require concerted humanitarian efforts. We look forward to further collaboration with IOM Iraq in heath, shelter, and WASH to provide assistance for displaced Iraqis".

Mr. Weiss said, "We are pleased to provide life-saving health services in cooperation with QRCS, to help the displaced Iraqis during this time of crisis. Responding to massive health and emergency needs requires cooperation from all humanitarian partners, and even greater commitments as displacement continues."

Currently, joint projects are in the process of consideration to launch a response to the imminent displacement of hundreds of thousands from Mosul. These efforts are funded by IOM and Qatar Development Fund, which is already funding several relief and humanitarian endeavors conducted by QRCS across Iraq.

The representatives of QRCS and IOM visited the Debaga IDP Camp, where the two organizations jointly operate a primary health care clinic, in coordination with the Erbil and Nineveh Directorates of Health, as well as the Health Cluster in Iraq.

Working 24/7, the health facility provides nearly 2,500 consultations every week for the most vulnerable IDPs.

Since its inception early in June, the clinic has served more than 35,000 cases (300-350 cases per day), mostly upper respiratory infections, urinary tract infections (UTIs), diarrhea, skin diseases, hypertension, and diabetes. More than 500 patients needing specialized care have been referred to hospitals in Kirkuk and Erbil, many by ambulances.

The Debaga clinic offers comprehensive primary health care, including pediatrics, obstetrics and gynecology, dentistry, and X-ray, ultrasound, laboratory tests, and minor surgery. It is run and managed by 39 male and female health staff. QRCS pays the staff incentives, while IOM covers the clinic's operating costs.

The clinic's manager represents the Erbil Directorate of Health, which cooperates with the Nineveh Directorate of Health in jointly managing and supervising health services in Debaga.

Other active health partners in Debaga include United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF), Malteser International, Women and Health Alliance International (WAHA), and the Emirates Red Crescent (which established the Debaga clinic).

Since mid-June, more than 100,000 Iraqis fled the military operations in the Mosul corridor, to be added to the 3.3 million Iraqis already displaced nationwide since January 2014. As a result, the health needs of both IDPs and host communities were severely augmented.

Since June 2016, more than 18,000 Iraqis have arrived to camps in Makhmour district, southern Erbil, where the Debaga IDP Camp's population has rapidly increased in recent months to exceed 37,000.

End

Pakistan: Pakistan: FATA Return Weekly Snapshot (from 16 to 22 September 2016)

Pakistan - ReliefWeb News - 7 hours 11 min ago
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Pakistan

In the period from 16 to 22 September, 2,294 families have returned to South Waziristan, Khyber and North Waziristan Agencies.

According to FDMA, the final phase of South Waziristan Agency returns will begin shortly, with the denotification of 110 villages, followed by the return of approximately 40,000 families.

Kenya: Marsabit County: Drought Early Warning Bulletin for August 2016

Kenya - ReliefWeb News - 7 hours 21 min ago
Source: Government of Kenya Country: Kenya

Drought Situation & EW Phase Classification

Biophysical Indicators

  • Rainfall report: No rainfall was received in the county which is normal for the month.
  • Vegetation condition; Pasture and browse condition is fair in agro pastoral livelihood and fair to poor in pastoral livelihood .

Socio Economic Indicators (Impact Indicators)

  • Production indicators; no crops is in the farms, farmers are ploughing their farms in readiness for next season. Livestock body condition is good in all the species for agro pastoral . In pastoral areas, livestock body condition is good to fair except for cattle which is poor in Balesa. 

  • Milk production has significantly reduced in both Pastoral and Agro Pastoral Livelihood.
    Livestock Migration is on the rise with both in and out migration reported in the County. Most livestock have shifted to dry grazing areas. No livestock deaths as a result of drought.

  • Access indicators ; Terms of trade has slightly decreased due to decrease in goat prices.
    Return distance to water sources has incre ased when compared to last month.
    Milk consumption has significantly declined due to decreased production compared to last month. 

  • Utilization Indicators; nutritional status has slightly deteriorated with 19.1 % of children less than 5 years at risk of maln utritio n. Coping strategies index has increased compared to last month

France: Unaccompanied minors in Calais cultivate a world away from home

Sudan - ReliefWeb News - 7 hours 25 min ago
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Afghanistan, France, Sudan, World

A centre for young refugees in Saint-Omer offers shelter and protection, as well as the chance to enjoy being children again.

By: Céline Schmitt in Saint-Omer, France

On a cloudy day in the northern French town of Saint-Omer, Ibrahim, from Darfur in Sudan, is tending to a crop of vegetables with eight other young teenagers.

Ranging from 14 to 17 years in age, they are among the lucky few who have been given a place at Saint-Omer’s Maison du Jeune Réfugié (‘house for young refugees’), run by the NGO France Terre d’Asile.

Forty-five children live at the centre, one of the few places that provide accommodation and protection for unaccompanied children who had been living in the makeshift camp known as ‘the jungle’ near Calais, 45 kilometres away. Here, they find shelter and protection, and can enjoy being children again – unlike in the jungle, where children sleep outside in makeshift shelters and are at risk of violence and abuse. Many have already faced danger while transiting along insecure routes through several countries in Europe.

Gardening is one of the leisure activities organized by the centre and is popular with residents. The children plant, tend and harvest lettuces, courgettes, thyme, tomatoes, basil and rhubarb.

Germaine Tetou, a social worker in Saint-Omer, is teaching them the French names for the vegetables and gardening tools. They repeat them, joking and laughing at one another’s pronunciation.

Tetou, who herself came to France as a refugee from Benin, says the children learned quickly. “Every day I am grateful to have this job,” she says. “I understand what they have to go through.” Gardening reminds Ibrahim*, who is 14, of his grandmother’s farm in Darfur. “I like everything here in Saint-Omer, but especially gardening,” he says.

He has been in France for 42 days, including the 15 he spent in ‘the jungle’, where he slept in a makeshift shelter with other teenagers who had fled Darfur, like him, without their parents.

“France has an obligation to protect unaccompanied minors living in the so-called jungle in Calais,” says Ralf Gruenert, the representative in France for UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency.

“And that means first and foremost to find appropriate housing solutions and provide them with legal, social and health care, but also to establish a workable and speedy system for family reunification for unaccompanied minors who have families in other European countries, including the United Kingdom, where such a move is in their best interests.”

Activities at the centre include French classes, maths, music, arts, sports, cinema and gardening. There is also a library.

Manal*, 16, from Sudan, looks at photos of castles in the south of France after lunch. “It’s beautiful, where is it?” he asks. He wants to find the location on a map to see if it is possible to visit them.

In the afternoon, some of the residents will head to the cinema, where ‘Ghostbusters’ and ‘Star Trek Beyond’ are their top choices. Afterwards they plan to play football in the park.

They feel safe at the centre, where they are able to dream as children do once more.

Jamal*, 17, from Ghazni in Afghanistan, also lives at the Saint-Omer centre. He arrived in Calais alone after he fled home.

He says he feels comfortable in Saint-Omer and dreams of becoming an electronic engineer. “There is no fighting here like in the jungle. I like everything here but my favourite activity is learning French.”

Accommodation centres and places for children are limited. Most of the unaccompanied children living in Calais do not have the same opportunities as Jamal and Ibrahim.

“Every day we receive requests to receive more children, but we are obliged to refuse as the centre is permanently full,” says the director, Jean-Francois Roger. “More places have to be created. Minors need to be in a safe environment.”

According to NGOs, about 850 unaccompanied children live in the Calais ‘jungle.’

As an emergency measure, 215 minors are accommodated in a temporary reception camp (Le Centre d’Accueil Provisoire, known by the French acronym CAP) and the Jules Ferry centre for women and children, which are run by the organization La Vie Active. Both are full and cannot accommodate more. The other children live in tents and makeshift shelters in the ‘jungle.’

So far this year, of the 300,000 refugees and migrants who have reached Europe, 28 per cent are children and many are travelling alone. In Italy, 15 per cent of the arrivals since the beginning of the year are unaccompanied children.

In 2015, children comprised more than half the global refugee population of 21.3 million, with the number of unaccompanied and separated children on the move also growing dramatically.

Nearly 100,000 asylum applications were made by unaccompanied and separated children in 78 countries in 2015 alone. This was the highest number on record since UNHCR started collecting such data in 2006.

Tensions in Calais have risen over the past few weeks, with French demonstrators blocking access to the Channel Tunnel and the Calais ferry to support calls for the closure of the ‘jungle.’

No matter what, as winter approaches, suitable accommodation for unaccompanied children like Jamal, Ibrahim and Manal is urgently needed.

*Names have been changed for protection

France: Unaccompanied minors in Calais cultivate a world away from home

Afghanistan - ReliefWeb News - 7 hours 25 min ago
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Afghanistan, France, Sudan, World

A centre for young refugees in Saint-Omer offers shelter and protection, as well as the chance to enjoy being children again.

By: Céline Schmitt in Saint-Omer, France

On a cloudy day in the northern French town of Saint-Omer, Ibrahim, from Darfur in Sudan, is tending to a crop of vegetables with eight other young teenagers.

Ranging from 14 to 17 years in age, they are among the lucky few who have been given a place at Saint-Omer’s Maison du Jeune Réfugié (‘house for young refugees’), run by the NGO France Terre d’Asile.

Forty-five children live at the centre, one of the few places that provide accommodation and protection for unaccompanied children who had been living in the makeshift camp known as ‘the jungle’ near Calais, 45 kilometres away. Here, they find shelter and protection, and can enjoy being children again – unlike in the jungle, where children sleep outside in makeshift shelters and are at risk of violence and abuse. Many have already faced danger while transiting along insecure routes through several countries in Europe.

Gardening is one of the leisure activities organized by the centre and is popular with residents. The children plant, tend and harvest lettuces, courgettes, thyme, tomatoes, basil and rhubarb.

Germaine Tetou, a social worker in Saint-Omer, is teaching them the French names for the vegetables and gardening tools. They repeat them, joking and laughing at one another’s pronunciation.

Tetou, who herself came to France as a refugee from Benin, says the children learned quickly. “Every day I am grateful to have this job,” she says. “I understand what they have to go through.” Gardening reminds Ibrahim*, who is 14, of his grandmother’s farm in Darfur. “I like everything here in Saint-Omer, but especially gardening,” he says.

He has been in France for 42 days, including the 15 he spent in ‘the jungle’, where he slept in a makeshift shelter with other teenagers who had fled Darfur, like him, without their parents.

“France has an obligation to protect unaccompanied minors living in the so-called jungle in Calais,” says Ralf Gruenert, the representative in France for UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency.

“And that means first and foremost to find appropriate housing solutions and provide them with legal, social and health care, but also to establish a workable and speedy system for family reunification for unaccompanied minors who have families in other European countries, including the United Kingdom, where such a move is in their best interests.”

Activities at the centre include French classes, maths, music, arts, sports, cinema and gardening. There is also a library.

Manal*, 16, from Sudan, looks at photos of castles in the south of France after lunch. “It’s beautiful, where is it?” he asks. He wants to find the location on a map to see if it is possible to visit them.

In the afternoon, some of the residents will head to the cinema, where ‘Ghostbusters’ and ‘Star Trek Beyond’ are their top choices. Afterwards they plan to play football in the park.

They feel safe at the centre, where they are able to dream as children do once more.

Jamal*, 17, from Ghazni in Afghanistan, also lives at the Saint-Omer centre. He arrived in Calais alone after he fled home.

He says he feels comfortable in Saint-Omer and dreams of becoming an electronic engineer. “There is no fighting here like in the jungle. I like everything here but my favourite activity is learning French.”

Accommodation centres and places for children are limited. Most of the unaccompanied children living in Calais do not have the same opportunities as Jamal and Ibrahim.

“Every day we receive requests to receive more children, but we are obliged to refuse as the centre is permanently full,” says the director, Jean-Francois Roger. “More places have to be created. Minors need to be in a safe environment.”

According to NGOs, about 850 unaccompanied children live in the Calais ‘jungle.’

As an emergency measure, 215 minors are accommodated in a temporary reception camp (Le Centre d’Accueil Provisoire, known by the French acronym CAP) and the Jules Ferry centre for women and children, which are run by the organization La Vie Active. Both are full and cannot accommodate more. The other children live in tents and makeshift shelters in the ‘jungle.’

So far this year, of the 300,000 refugees and migrants who have reached Europe, 28 per cent are children and many are travelling alone. In Italy, 15 per cent of the arrivals since the beginning of the year are unaccompanied children.

In 2015, children comprised more than half the global refugee population of 21.3 million, with the number of unaccompanied and separated children on the move also growing dramatically.

Nearly 100,000 asylum applications were made by unaccompanied and separated children in 78 countries in 2015 alone. This was the highest number on record since UNHCR started collecting such data in 2006.

Tensions in Calais have risen over the past few weeks, with French demonstrators blocking access to the Channel Tunnel and the Calais ferry to support calls for the closure of the ‘jungle.’

No matter what, as winter approaches, suitable accommodation for unaccompanied children like Jamal, Ibrahim and Manal is urgently needed.

*Names have been changed for protection

Kenya: Mandera County: Drought Early Warning Bulletin for August 2016

Kenya - ReliefWeb News - 7 hours 29 min ago
Source: Government of Kenya Country: Kenya

Drought Situation & EW Phase Classification

Biophysical Indicators

  • No rains were received in the entire County during the month. This is normal during this time of year.
  • Vegetation condition ; the-month Vegetation Condition index for the County was 61.16 classifying it as Normal vegetation greenness
  • The Monthly VCI for Lafey, Mandera East , south , west and North sub counties are showing Normal Vegetation Greeness
  • Pasture and browse situation is fair to poor in all sub counties.

Socio Economic Indicators (Impact Indicators)

  • Production indicators; Milk production and consumption ha ve declined as compared to last month but above LTA .
  • Water situation is normal in all sub counties .
  • Terms of trade are favourable to pastoral communities.
  • The body conditions for all livestock species are fair but on worsening trend .
  • The ut ilization indicator is within the normal range .
  • Joint nutritional Survey indicates GAM of 2.% and SAM of 4.3% in August 2016.

Guinea: Guinea: 7 Years On, Justice for Massacre Needed

Guinea - ReliefWeb News - 7 hours 38 min ago
Source: Human Rights Watch Country: Guinea

Victims Anxious for Long-Awaited Trial to Begin

(Conakry) – Guinea has yet to deliver justice for the grave crimes committed on September 28, 2009, at a Conakry stadium, six international and national human rights groups said today, in advance of the massacre’s seventh anniversary. That day, more than 150 peaceful protesters were massacred by security forces and more than 100 women were raped. Hundreds of injuries and widespread looting were also documented.

“How much longer will we have to wait for justice to be done?” said Asmaou Diallo, president of the Association of Victims, Parents, and Friends of September 28. “We recognize the progress made, but we anxiously await the day those responsible for the murder and rape of our loved ones will have their day in court.”

The six organizations are the International Federation on Human Rights (FIDH), Human Rights Watch, the Guinean Organization for the Defense of Human and Citizens’ Rights (OGDH), the Association of Victims, Parents and Friends of September 28 (AVIPA), Equal Rights for All (MDT), and the Coalition of Human Rights Defense Organizations (CODDH).

The investigation, which is being conducted by a pool of Guinean investigating judges, was opened in February 2010 but has not yet been completed. Nevertheless, the investigation has made major progress despite political, financial, and logistical obstacles.

Current and former high-level officials have been charged, including Moussa Dadis Camara, the former leader of the National Council of Democracy and Development junta, which ruled Guinea at the time, and his vice president, Mamadouba Toto Camara. Judges have heard the testimony of more than 400 victims and their family members, and they have also questioned witnesses, including members of the security services.

Some investigative aspects remain outstanding, including the questioning of at least one key witness, locating at least one suspect, and locating mass graves believed to contain the bodies of about 100 victims who remain unaccounted for. Witnesses allege that the security forces engaged tried to hide the evidence of their crimes and misrepresented the number of people killed. But these outstanding elements should not cause Guinean judicial authorities to delay the completion of the investigation, the groups said.

“The victims, their lawyers from the FIDH and the OGDH, and our organizations now want to see the conclusion of the investigation and a trial that will finally enable truth, justice, and reparations for the victims,” said Dimitris Christopoulos, president of FIDH.

The beginning of a major reorganization of the justice system in 2014 has led to significant progress in the case and laid the foundations for an awaited modernization of the system, the organizations said. These changes are essential to overcome striking gaps in the Guinean judicial system and strengthen its independence, impartiality, and efficiency.

The International Criminal Court (ICC), which opened a preliminary examination into the situation in Guinea in October 2009, has regularly reminded the Guinean government of its obligation to deliver justice for the 2009 crimes. The Guinean government should ensure that the investigations phase of the case moves ahead with no further delay to organize the trial, the organizations said.

The ICC is designed as a court of last resort. Under the principle of complementarity, the ICC only steps in when national courts are unable or unwilling to investigate and prosecute cases under its authority.

“Guinea could become, with this long-awaited trial, a real leader on justice for grave crimes in Africa,” said Corinne Dufka, associate Africa director at Human Rights Watch. “The government of Guinea should give its strongest support to the investigative panel to complete its work so that those responsible for the stadium massacre can be tried without delay.”

Kenya: Makueni County: Drought Early Warning Bulletin for August 2016

Kenya - ReliefWeb News - 7 hours 41 min ago
Source: Government of Kenya Country: Kenya

Drought Situation & EW Phase Classification

Biophysical Indicators

  • Generally the mon th was char acterized by hot sunny days .
    No rai nfall was received and this is n ormal at this time of the year .

  • Quantity and quality of Pasture and browse was fair in Mixed Farming zones and poor in Marginal mixed farming livelihood zones .

  • The average 3 month VCI index for the county was 39.73

  • Most surface water sources such as pans and earth dams had started to dry up hence reduction in v olume of water thus households had to look for alternative sources of water .

Socio Economic Indicators (Impact Indicators)

  • Body condition for s hoats remained good and fair for cattle across all the livelihood zones and this is norm al at this period .

  • Terms of trade remained favorable .

  • The percentage of child ren at risk of malnutrition decreased to 6.4 % from 7.1 % which is within the normal range .

  • Coping strategy index (CSI) was within the normal ranges at 0.72, households employed fo od based coping strategies mostly .

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