ReliefWeb Latest Reports for Country Office

occupied Palestinian territory: UNFPA Alarmed Over Devastating Impact of Gaza Violence on Women, Girls

oPt - ReliefWeb News - 5 min 7 sec ago
Source: UN Population Fund Country: occupied Palestinian territory

UNITED NATIONS, New York—UNFPA, the United Nations Population Fund, is deeply concerned about the impact of the ongoing Gaza conflict on women’s health and their access to safe births.

Reports of the destruction of hospitals and health facilities are particularly disturbing as some 45,000 pregnant women in Gaza are currently in need of maternity care. About 5,000 of those are among the 140,000 internally displaced people in temporary shelters throughout Gaza. Due to mounting stress and anxiety, many of these women are likely to face obstetric complications, while access to maternal health services is increasingly limited by the conflict.

“It is critical that humanitarian assistance, including medical supplies and equipment, be given safe passage into Gaza to enable us to provide the much-needed assistance to pregnant women,” said UNFPA Executive Director Dr. Babatunde Osotimehin.”Pregnant women in particular must be allowed unhindered access to maternal health services to ensure their safety throughout their pregnancy and childbirth.”

Several emergency maternity centres, established with UNFPA support in previous years, have been affected and are no longer operational, leaving many women without access to safe delivery services.

Working with other United Nations agencies and other partners, UNFPA is supporting lifesaving reproductive and maternal health services by delivering medicine and surgical instruments to Gaza’s hospitals, as well as hygiene products and first aid supplies to families in Gaza. UNFPA is also supporting the provision of psychosocial support, through its youth network in Gaza, to internally displaced women, girls and families in evacuation shelters.

With the possibility of a further escalation in violence, UNFPA joins the Security Council in calling on all sides to urgently exercise maximum restraint and ensure the protection of civilians. UNFPA also reiterates the call of Ban Ki-moon, the United Nations Secretary-General, for an immediate ceasefire and for the protection of the vulnerable population, particularly women and children.

For more information, please contact:
In New York: Mandy Kibel; Tel: +1 212 297 5293; kibel@unfpa.org
In Jerusalem: Ziad Yaish; Tel: + 972 54 817 4018; yaish@unfpa.org

occupied Palestinian territory: On the 18th Day of the Israeli Offensive on Gaza: Israeli Warplane Attack Shelter of Displaced Civilians Killing 11 and Wounding Dozens

oPt - ReliefWeb News - 17 min 46 sec ago
Source: Palestinian Centre for Human Rights Country: occupied Palestinian territory preview

Israeli occupation forces have continued their brutal and immoral offensive on the Gaza Strip for the 18th consecutive day, and have continued the policy of collective punishment in disregard for the international law and humanitarian law, which ensure protection for civilians in times of war, and in violation of the principles of necessity, proportionality and distinction. Israeli forces have continued their aerial, ground and sea attacks throughout the Gaza Strip, causing more civilian casualties and damaging civilian facilities. Israeli forces escalated their attacks throughout the Gaza Strip. They attacked civilians, houses and other civilian facilities. In a new serious crime, Israeli forces attacked a shelter for displaced civilians at an UNRWA school in the northern Gaza Strip, killing 11 civilians, including 7 children and 2 women, and wounding dozens of others. Israeli forces also attacked hospitals, medical crews and houses. Israeli warplanes bombarded a number of houses without prior warnings. Israeli forces continued their incursions in several areas in the Gaza Strip, and more Palestinian civilians were forced to leave their homes in border areas. The ICRC and medical crews have not been allowed in some areas that were subject to Israeli attacks in order to recover dead and wounded Palestinian civilians. These areas, especially al-Shuja’iya neighborhood in the east of Gaza City, and Khuza’a village east of Khan Yunis, have been subjected to continuous Israeli attacks.

PCHR field worker have been unable to collect information from border areas in the Gaza Strip, because the situation is extremely dangerous in these areas. The following details are based on the information which the field workers have been able to collect.

From 10:00 on Thursday, 24 July 2014 to 10:00 on Friday, 25 July 2014, according to the information PCHR has been able to obtain, 65 Palestinians, 61 of whom are civilians, including 18 children and 11 women, were killed. Additionally, 471 Palestinians, mostly civilians, were wounded – this number includes 150 children and 88 women. Israeli warplanes also targeted and destroyed 28 houses.

The latest developments since the press release issued by PCHR yesterday noon have been as follows:

The Northern Gaza Strip:

Israeli warplanes launched 13 airstrikes and Israeli tanks and gunboats fired dozens of shells targeting houses, an UNRWA shelter, agricultural plots and open areas. As a result of these attacks, 18 Palestinian civilians, including 10 children and 3 women, were killed, and 170 others, including 77 children and 43 women, were wounded. Israeli warplanes bombarded 8 houses and destroyed one of them.

Iraq: Iraq - Humanitarian Access at 23 July 2014

Iraq - ReliefWeb News - 27 min 26 sec ago
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, MapAction Country: Iraq preview

South Sudan: South Sudan Crisis Situation Report No. 46 (as of 24 July 2014)

Uganda - ReliefWeb News - 40 min 58 sec ago
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Kenya, Sudan, Uganda, South Sudan preview

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Some 1.1 million people are facing emergency levels of food insecurity.

  • Water, sanitation and hygiene partners reported reaching some 400,000 more people in crisis-affected areas in June compared to May, raising the overall number of people reached with some humanitarian assistance to 2.4 million.

  • An additional aircraft, able to carry 10 metric tonnes per day, was contracted and dedicated specifically to operations in Bentiu. This frees up other air assets for rapid response operations.

3.8 million People to be assisted by the end of the year

2.4 million People reached with humanitarian assistance*

1.1 million People internally displaced by violence

425,000 People who have fled to neighboring countries

Situation overview

There was notable insecurity in some areas of the country, with fighting in Nassir, Upper Nile State, and in Ayod, Jonglei State. In Mingkaman, Lakes State, a wrestling match on 20 July led to fighting among spectators, and nearby homes of displaced people and host community members were looted.
Calm returned in the following days. Elsewhere in Lakes there were reports of tension related to continued fear of cattle raids.

Of some 1.1 million people displaced internally by the crisis, an estimated 95,470 were seeking safety across ten Protection of Civilian (PoC) sites within UNMISS bases, as of 21 July. Some 425,000 people have fled to neighbouring countries.

Health partners were closely monitoring the cholera situation, as well as tracking other disease risks. Partners noted that malaria, acute respiratory infection, and acute watery diarrhea were the highest disease risks in displacement sites, especially during the rainy season.

South Sudan: South Sudan Crisis Situation Report No. 46 (as of 24 July 2014)

Sudan - ReliefWeb News - 40 min 58 sec ago
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Kenya, Sudan, Uganda, South Sudan preview

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Some 1.1 million people are facing emergency levels of food insecurity.

  • Water, sanitation and hygiene partners reported reaching some 400,000 more people in crisis-affected areas in June compared to May, raising the overall number of people reached with some humanitarian assistance to 2.4 million.

  • An additional aircraft, able to carry 10 metric tonnes per day, was contracted and dedicated specifically to operations in Bentiu. This frees up other air assets for rapid response operations.

3.8 million People to be assisted by the end of the year

2.4 million People reached with humanitarian assistance*

1.1 million People internally displaced by violence

425,000 People who have fled to neighboring countries

Situation overview

There was notable insecurity in some areas of the country, with fighting in Nassir, Upper Nile State, and in Ayod, Jonglei State. In Mingkaman, Lakes State, a wrestling match on 20 July led to fighting among spectators, and nearby homes of displaced people and host community members were looted.
Calm returned in the following days. Elsewhere in Lakes there were reports of tension related to continued fear of cattle raids.

Of some 1.1 million people displaced internally by the crisis, an estimated 95,470 were seeking safety across ten Protection of Civilian (PoC) sites within UNMISS bases, as of 21 July. Some 425,000 people have fled to neighbouring countries.

Health partners were closely monitoring the cholera situation, as well as tracking other disease risks. Partners noted that malaria, acute respiratory infection, and acute watery diarrhea were the highest disease risks in displacement sites, especially during the rainy season.

South Sudan: South Sudan Crisis Situation Report No. 46 (as of 24 July 2014)

Kenya - ReliefWeb News - 40 min 58 sec ago
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Kenya, Sudan, Uganda, South Sudan preview

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Some 1.1 million people are facing emergency levels of food insecurity.

  • Water, sanitation and hygiene partners reported reaching some 400,000 more people in crisis-affected areas in June compared to May, raising the overall number of people reached with some humanitarian assistance to 2.4 million.

  • An additional aircraft, able to carry 10 metric tonnes per day, was contracted and dedicated specifically to operations in Bentiu. This frees up other air assets for rapid response operations.

3.8 million People to be assisted by the end of the year

2.4 million People reached with humanitarian assistance*

1.1 million People internally displaced by violence

425,000 People who have fled to neighboring countries

Situation overview

There was notable insecurity in some areas of the country, with fighting in Nassir, Upper Nile State, and in Ayod, Jonglei State. In Mingkaman, Lakes State, a wrestling match on 20 July led to fighting among spectators, and nearby homes of displaced people and host community members were looted.
Calm returned in the following days. Elsewhere in Lakes there were reports of tension related to continued fear of cattle raids.

Of some 1.1 million people displaced internally by the crisis, an estimated 95,470 were seeking safety across ten Protection of Civilian (PoC) sites within UNMISS bases, as of 21 July. Some 425,000 people have fled to neighbouring countries.

Health partners were closely monitoring the cholera situation, as well as tracking other disease risks. Partners noted that malaria, acute respiratory infection, and acute watery diarrhea were the highest disease risks in displacement sites, especially during the rainy season.

South Sudan: South Sudan Crisis Situation Report No. 46 (as of 24 July 2014)

Ethiopia - ReliefWeb News - 40 min 58 sec ago
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Kenya, Sudan, Uganda, South Sudan preview

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Some 1.1 million people are facing emergency levels of food insecurity.

  • Water, sanitation and hygiene partners reported reaching some 400,000 more people in crisis-affected areas in June compared to May, raising the overall number of people reached with some humanitarian assistance to 2.4 million.

  • An additional aircraft, able to carry 10 metric tonnes per day, was contracted and dedicated specifically to operations in Bentiu. This frees up other air assets for rapid response operations.

3.8 million People to be assisted by the end of the year

2.4 million People reached with humanitarian assistance*

1.1 million People internally displaced by violence

425,000 People who have fled to neighboring countries

Situation overview

There was notable insecurity in some areas of the country, with fighting in Nassir, Upper Nile State, and in Ayod, Jonglei State. In Mingkaman, Lakes State, a wrestling match on 20 July led to fighting among spectators, and nearby homes of displaced people and host community members were looted.
Calm returned in the following days. Elsewhere in Lakes there were reports of tension related to continued fear of cattle raids.

Of some 1.1 million people displaced internally by the crisis, an estimated 95,470 were seeking safety across ten Protection of Civilian (PoC) sites within UNMISS bases, as of 21 July. Some 425,000 people have fled to neighbouring countries.

Health partners were closely monitoring the cholera situation, as well as tracking other disease risks. Partners noted that malaria, acute respiratory infection, and acute watery diarrhea were the highest disease risks in displacement sites, especially during the rainy season.

South Sudan: South Sudan Crisis Situation Report No. 46 (as of 24 July 2014)

DRC - ReliefWeb News - 40 min 58 sec ago
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Kenya, Sudan, Uganda, South Sudan preview

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Some 1.1 million people are facing emergency levels of food insecurity.

  • Water, sanitation and hygiene partners reported reaching some 400,000 more people in crisis-affected areas in June compared to May, raising the overall number of people reached with some humanitarian assistance to 2.4 million.

  • An additional aircraft, able to carry 10 metric tonnes per day, was contracted and dedicated specifically to operations in Bentiu. This frees up other air assets for rapid response operations.

3.8 million People to be assisted by the end of the year

2.4 million People reached with humanitarian assistance*

1.1 million People internally displaced by violence

425,000 People who have fled to neighboring countries

Situation overview

There was notable insecurity in some areas of the country, with fighting in Nassir, Upper Nile State, and in Ayod, Jonglei State. In Mingkaman, Lakes State, a wrestling match on 20 July led to fighting among spectators, and nearby homes of displaced people and host community members were looted.
Calm returned in the following days. Elsewhere in Lakes there were reports of tension related to continued fear of cattle raids.

Of some 1.1 million people displaced internally by the crisis, an estimated 95,470 were seeking safety across ten Protection of Civilian (PoC) sites within UNMISS bases, as of 21 July. Some 425,000 people have fled to neighbouring countries.

Health partners were closely monitoring the cholera situation, as well as tracking other disease risks. Partners noted that malaria, acute respiratory infection, and acute watery diarrhea were the highest disease risks in displacement sites, especially during the rainy season.

Sierra Leone: CAFOD responds to ebola outbreak in west Africa

Guinea - ReliefWeb News - 54 min 46 sec ago
Source: Catholic Agency for Overseas Development Country: Guinea, Sierra Leone

Hundreds of people have died from the deadly Ebola virus in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia. CAFOD’s partners are on the ground, helping communities to protect themselves.

An outbreak of Ebola Virus Disease has hit communities in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia. To date, the World Health Organisation estimates that 786 people have been infected, and 442 people have died, making it the largest outbreak ever known.

Ebola is a severe acute viral illness often characterized by the sudden onset of fever, intense weakness, muscle pain, headache and sore throat. This is followed by vomiting, diarrhoea, rash, impaired kidney and liver function, and in some cases, both internal and external bleeding.

People who are infected with Ebola have a 40% chance of survival - in many cases less, given the low levels of health services available in the rural areas which have been most heavily affected.

There is no vaccine and no known cure, but by following a few key practises, the spread of Ebola can be relatively easily stopped.

CAFOD’s Catherine Mahony says: “One reason that the virus has spread so extensively is a widespread fear and lack of trust in the advice given on Ebola prevention. Many people don’t have access to reliable information, and high death rates and stigmatisation make people afraid to take their loved ones to hospitals, if medical facilities are even available.

“While rumours abound, the disease rages on. Cases are now being reported in towns and cities in all three countries.”

CAFOD is working with its partners to ensure that the right messages get to the most vulnerable people through community leaders they trust. In Sierra Leone the agency is launching a programme of training and sensitisation for religious leaders, which will empower them with information that they can share widely in remote rural areas. A similar programme is already underway in Guinea, where the outbreak is now stabilising.

Catherine Mahony says: “The network of churches and mosques are able to reach deep into communities, providing reassurance and guidance. Religious leaders are in a unique position to bust myths and ensure that communities take the right action to stop the spread of this appalling disease.”

CAFOD is taking careful measures to ensure that its staff and partners are protected as they undertake their lifesaving work.

CAFOD is the official aid agency of the Catholic Church in England and Wales. Across the world we bring hope and compassion to poor communities, standing side by side with them to end poverty and injustice.

Iraq: Blasts targeting Shiites in Iraq's Kirkuk kill four

Iraq - ReliefWeb News - 1 hour 15 min ago
Source: Agence France-Presse Country: Iraq

07/25/2014 14:00 GMT

KIRKUK, July 25, 2014 (AFP) - A series of blasts outside Shiite prayer halls killed four people and wounded 19 others on Friday in the northern Iraqi city of Kirkuk, police and medical sources said.

The deadliest blast took place in a car park outside the Mustafa prayer hall, or husseiniya, in the city's southwest, where a car bomb killed four worshippers and wounded 15 others after they had finished prayers.

Three roadside bombs near the Zahraa husseiniya in west Kirkuk wounded four people, while a roadside bomb near the Jaafar al-Sadeq husseiniya in the city's south caused no casualties.

Islamic State jihadists who overran swathes of northern and western Iraq last month have not taken Kirkuk.

Kurdish peshmerga forces moved in during the chaos but bombings and shootings are still common.

The Islamic State considers Shiite muslims heretics.

str-ma/jmm/tl

occupied Palestinian territory: No wonder Gazans are angry. The Red Cross can’t protect them

oPt - ReliefWeb News - 1 hour 27 min ago
Source: International Federation of Red Cross And Red Crescent Societies Country: occupied Palestinian territory

25-07-2014 Article

Article by Jacques de Maio, head of the ICRC's delegation in Israel and the occupied territories, published in the Guardian

Three ICRC vehicles are leaving Shujaia. They have rescued 11 people from the rubble but the intense combat has forced them back. As they depart an angry crowd of Palestinians attacks the vehicles with stones and sticks. “You are useless,” the crowd shouts. “You must protect us.”

But we cannot. The anger is unpleasant and misplaced, but understandable. We do our utmost, risking the lives of our staff to rescue who we can, but we cannot end the conflict. As ever, humanitarian organisations are a sticking plaster, not the solution.

If your home in Gaza was being shelled, who would you call in desperation? On the night Israel’s ground offensive began intense fire struck north-east Gaza. The emergency services, including our partners at the Palestinian Red Crescent (PRCS), were overloaded. Many Gazans tried to telephone us. Our office switchboard couldn’t cope. In the dark violent hours of the night we could not send ambulances or restore the water supply or treat the injured dying of their wounds. Isolated and terrified, with nowhere to flee and no help in sight, the anger of Palestinian families grew.

Two nights later in Shujaia hundreds more families went through the same ordeal. Again ICRC staff and PRCS volunteers could do little. With no guarantees of safety it would have been folly to attempt a rescue. In the daylight a temporary ceasefire was agreed, at our request. It was quickly broken, but nevertheless several dozen injured were brought from their ruined homes to hospitals and hundreds took advantage of our presence on the spot to flee. It was little and late. No wonder the helpless families have accused us of callous disregard. When your one faint hope of help is snuffed out the intensity of disappointment is all the deeper.

Other accusations have been levelled.

We were charged with collaborating with the Israeli Defence Forces in the destruction of Wafa hospital. In truth, we sought to protect the hospital through our dialogue with both sides. When combat came perilously close we intervened to win time for a possible last-resort evacuation of gravely ill patients, many on life support.

We are upbraided for not taking sides and refusing to apportion blame. Given our strict political neutrality it is usual that we get criticised by all sides at different times. But the ICRC is not silent in the face of clear breaches of international law. We explicitly and loudly condemned the direct shelling of the Al Aqsa hospital on July 21st that killed at least four people. We clearly denounce the indiscriminate rocketing of Israel. We stated categorically that even in the midst of warfare, people must be able to receive medical care in safety.

We are horrified at the death toll. We have repeatedly called for both sides to protect and spare civilians. We have warned of the need to protect Gaza’s perilously fragile water supply – many residents of the densely populated area are now without water, at the height of the scorching hot Mediterranean summer. Today our priority is the civilians, in Beit Hanoun and many other places all over Gaza. We are calling on all sides, based on the humanitarian imperatives of the situation, to ensure that their combat operations be conducted in accordance with the fundamental principles of international laws protecting civilians. But will our pleas for restraint, and the constant efforts of nearly 140 staff and more than 400 PRCS teams to rescue civilians and restock hospitals, be enough to quell the anger of grieving families? We hope so but we understand that it might not.

We do ask one thing: understand the limits of our role and look to the politicians to end this deadly, miserable conflict.

Jacques de Maio

Head of Delegation ICRC Israel and Occupied Territories

Sudan: Abducted IOM staff released in South Darfur

Sudan - ReliefWeb News - 1 hour 28 min ago
Source: Agence France-Presse Country: Sudan

07/25/2014 15:08 GMT

KHARTOUM, July 25, 2014 (AFP) - A Zambian aid worker was released in Sudan's troubled Darfur region on Friday after 19 days in captivity, peacekeepers said.

Felix Ngoma, who is on the staff of the International Organisation for Migration, was the latest kidnap victim in a region where crime and violence have risen dramatically.

He appeared to be unharmed, in good health and will soon fly home to Zambia, the African Union-UN Mission in Darfur (UNAMID) said in a statement.

He was abducted in the early evening of July 6 as he drove between UNAMID's South Darfur regional base and the state capital Nyala, UNAMID said.

"The abductors forced him out of his vehicle at gunpoint", it said.

Nyala, Sudan's second-largest city, has been under a state of emergency this month because of insecurity.

UNAMID did not identify Ngoma's kidnappers but said Sudanese authorities and the Zambian government gave "valuable assistance" in his release.

Three Sudanese employees of the Irish aid group GOAL and the UN children's agency UNICEF were released last weekend after about a month in captivity following their abduction in North Darfur.

They were among 25 aid workers taken in Sudan this year, up from 10 last year and two in 2012, according to data quoted by the UN's Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs on Thursday.

Employees of UNAMID have also been captured and released this year.

Insurgents from non-Arab ethnic minority groups in Darfur rose up 11 years ago against what they said was the domination of Sudan's power and wealth by Arab elites.

In response, the government turned to "Janjaweed" militia recruited from Arab tribes, who have since been incorporated into official paramilitary units.

Officials acknowledge "they are increasingly losing control over paramilitaries, who have been the main source of insecurity in Darfur for two years", the International Crisis Group of analysts said in a January report.

Militias in search of resources have turned on each other, and sometimes against the government, while violent crime has increased.

it/ps

Madagascar: Southern Africa: Malnutrition Snapshot (as of July 2014)

Zimbabwe - ReliefWeb News - 2 hours 57 sec ago
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Angola, Botswana, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, United Republic of Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe preview

SITUATION OVERVIEW: MALNUTRITION

Malnutrition levels, particularly stunting levels, in the southern Africa region are very high, as is reflected in child nutritional status. All the countries in the region have stunting levels that are of concern, above the 20% World Health Organization (WHO) threshold for stunting.

Stunting (low height for age), is an irreversible outcome of chronic nutritional deficiency during the first 1,000 days of a child’s life. When a child is stunted, essential physical and mental growth processes are compromised. If the root causes of stunting are not addressed during the first two years of life, the impacts of the growth restriction prevail through adulthood, resulting in a higher risk of non-communicable diseases. The effects of stunting impact an entire nation. It is estimated that investing in child nutrition can increase a country’s gross domestic product by 2 to 3 percent

Madagascar: Southern Africa: Malnutrition Snapshot (as of July 2014)

DRC - ReliefWeb News - 2 hours 57 sec ago
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Angola, Botswana, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, Swaziland, United Republic of Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe preview

SITUATION OVERVIEW: MALNUTRITION

Malnutrition levels, particularly stunting levels, in the southern Africa region are very high, as is reflected in child nutritional status. All the countries in the region have stunting levels that are of concern, above the 20% World Health Organization (WHO) threshold for stunting.

Stunting (low height for age), is an irreversible outcome of chronic nutritional deficiency during the first 1,000 days of a child’s life. When a child is stunted, essential physical and mental growth processes are compromised. If the root causes of stunting are not addressed during the first two years of life, the impacts of the growth restriction prevail through adulthood, resulting in a higher risk of non-communicable diseases. The effects of stunting impact an entire nation. It is estimated that investing in child nutrition can increase a country’s gross domestic product by 2 to 3 percent

Democratic Republic of the Congo: Note d’information sur les récentes violences entre les communautés Luba et Pygmées

DRC - ReliefWeb News - 2 hours 6 min ago
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo preview

Le District du Tanganyika, vaste de près de 500 000 km2, frontalier à la province du Sud-Kivu, risque d’être embrasé par un conflit communautaire entre les pygmées et Lubas dont son origine récente remonte à mai 2013 où les Mayi Mayi « Bakata Katanga », avaient incendié les localités voisines de Lwela et Nsange, localités situées sur l’axe Kiambi – Nyunzu, à près de 100 km de Manono Centre, dans le Territoire de Manono. A Lwela, selon certains sources, des femmes et enfants auraient été brulés vifs et environ 200 maisons incendiées.

Cette attaque avait ciblé particulièrement les Pygmées pour les « punir » de leur appartenance à des groupes d’autodéfense et leur collaboration supposée avec les Forces armées congolaises (FARDC). D’autres habitants de l’ethnie Luba ont été également blessés par balles et flèches.

Depuis lors, ce conflit s’est étendu dans les autres territoires notamment à Kalemie, Moba et Nyunzu. Depuis avril 2014, une recrudescence de violence s’observe entre ces deux peuples. En juin dernier, cet antagonisme s’est amplifié et a touché Kabalo, territoire situé à 300 km à l’ouest de Kalemie, qui était jadis stable, en dépit des efforts de réconciliation consentis par les autorités.

Entre le 25 juin et le 15 juillet, une dizaine des villages appartenant aux pygmées ont été incendiés par la milice Luba, causant d’importants mouvements de populations. Une douzaine de personnes a été assassinée dont la majorité constituée des pygmées et plus de 30 autres prises en otage. De nombreuses femmes ont été également violées.

Democratic Republic of the Congo: RDC - Province du Katanga : Personnes déplacées internes (Juin 2014)

DRC - ReliefWeb News - 2 hours 13 min ago
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo preview

Democratic Republic of the Congo: Bulletin d'Information Humanitaire - Province du Sud-Kivu N°26/14, 23 juillet 2014

DRC - ReliefWeb News - 2 hours 20 min ago
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo preview

Faits saillants

  • Plus de 14 000 personnes déplacées entre Hombo Nord et Sud suite aux affrontements entre Raïya Mutomboki

  • Kabare : 750 ménages vulnérables bénéficient d’outils aratoires et semences pour restaurer leurs moyens de subsistance

Besoins et réponses humanitaires Multisectoriel

  • Suite aux affrontements entre des éléments Raïya Mutomboki du 6 au 19 juin à Otobora, Karete et Musenge au Nord-Kivu, zone couverte par les acteurs du Sud-Kivu à cause de l’inaccessibilité depuis le Nord-Kivu, 14 160 personnes se sont déplacées vers Hombo Nord (7 100) et Hombo Sud (7 060). Selon la Fondation AVSI qui y a effectué une mission d’évaluation multisectorielle du 8 au 16 juillet. Il n’y a pas pour l’instant de perspective de retour pour ces déplacés, étant donné que la situation sécuritaire demeure précaire dans leurs zones de provenance. Les déplacés hébergés à Hombo Nord bénéficient d’un accès aux soins gratuits de l’ONG International Medical Corps (IMC) au centre de santé de Hombo Nord. Ceux de Hombo Sud n’ont pas accès aux soins gratuitement car la structure sanitaire de l’aire de santé n’est pas appuyée par un partenaire humanitaire. Déplacés pendant les examens de fin d’année scolaire, les élèves n’ont pas pu intégrer l’école dans les zones de déplacement et ont ainsi raté l’année scolaire. Cependant, des pourparlers seraient en cours entre les autorités locales et la Division provinciale de l’Enseignement primaire, secondaire et professionnel (EPSP) pour permettre à ces élèves de passer ces examens. Cette mission d’évaluation a également relevé des besoins en vivres pour les déplacés.

  • L’ONG Tearfund a organisé du 17 au 19 juillet un transfert monétaire pour plus de 482 familles déplacées à Kazimia au sud de Fizi, qui se sont ainsi procuré une ration alimentaire pour une semaine et des articles ménagers essentiels. Ces familles s’étaient déplacées des localités du sud de Kazimia dont Talama et Yungu durant la période du 9 au 17 juin fuyant les affrontements entre les Forces Armées de la RDC (FARDC) et les Mayi-Mayi Yakutumba.

Niger: Niger SRP 2014: Funding Status as of 25 July 2014

Niger - ReliefWeb News - 2 hours 22 min ago
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Niger preview

REQUIREMENT 391 millions FUNDING 164 millions UNMET REQUIREMENT 227 millions

Pakistan: Pakistan: Hyderabad Education Summary (as of June 2014)

Pakistan - ReliefWeb News - 2 hours 25 min ago
Source: US Agency for International Development, Information Management and Mine Action Programs Country: Pakistan preview

occupied Palestinian territory: Israel/Gaza conflict, July 2014

oPt - ReliefWeb News - 2 hours 27 min ago
Source: Amnesty Country: occupied Palestinian territory

AMNESTY INTERNATIONAL
QUESTIONS & ANSWERS

What does Amnesty International think of the resolution passed by the UN Human Rights Council on 23 July? What should happen next?

Amnesty International welcomes resolution S-21/1 to establish a commission of inquiry and notes that the wording allows the commission to investigate violations of international law by all parties to the current conflict. The commission of inquiry represents an important opportunity to break the cycle of persistent impunity for crimes under international law in Israel and the Occupied Palestinian Territories (OPT). In order to be effective the commission of inquiry must be thorough, independent and impartial, and look into violations by any party to the conflict. It must be adequately resourced and have unrestricted access to all relevant areas. Amnesty International urges all states – including all EU member states, who abstained on the resolution – to co-operate with the commission as required.

What are the key obligations of the parties to the conflict during the hostilities under international humanitarian law?

During an armed conflict, all parties – whether state or non-state armed forces – must respect international humanitarian law, which aims to protect civilians by regulating the conduct of all sides in hostilities. States also continue to have an obligation to respect international human rights law during a conflict.

Under international humanitarian law, all sides in an armed conflict must distinguish between military targets and civilians and civilian structures, and direct attacks only at the former. Deliberate attacks on civilians or civilian objects – such as homes, medical facilities, schools, governmental buildings – that are not being used for military purposes are prohibited and are war crimes. Indiscriminate and disproportionate attacks (where the likely number of civilian casualties or damage to civilian property outweighs the anticipated military advantage to be gained) are also prohibited.

All sides must take necessary precautions in attack to minimize harm to civilians and civilian objects. This includes giving civilians effective warnings ahead of attacks, and cancelling or suspending an attack if it becomes apparent that the target is civilian or that the attack would be disproportionate. They also must take all feasible precautions to protect civilians under their control from the effects of attacks. For example, warring parties should avoid endangering civilians by storing ammunition in, and launching attacks from, populated civilian areas.

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