ReliefWeb Latest Reports for Country Office

Djibouti: Djibouti: Inter-agency update for the response to the Yemeni situation #46 (1 – 15 August 2016)

Yemen - ReliefWeb News - 25 August 2016 - 11:28pm
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Iraq, Somalia, Syrian Arab Republic, Yemen
KEY FIGURES

3,618 Refugees currently hosted in Djibouti pending further physical verification exercises

1,636 Registered females.

1,299 Registered children and adolescents

HIGHLIGHTS
  • According to the latest available statistics from IOM and the Government of Djibouti, a total of 36,162 persons of mixed nationalities have arrived in Djibouti as of end of July 2016 (since 26 March 2015). Of those, 19,636 persons (54 per cent) are Yemeni nationals, 14,562 (40 per cent) are transiting migrants and 1,964 persons (6 per cent) are Djiboutian returnees.

  • As at 15 August 2016, there are 3,618 refugees currently in Djibouti (pending forthcoming verification exercises in Obock town and Djibouti city). Markazi camp hosts over 1,400 refugees.

PRIORITIES
  • Ensure protection of refugees and asylum seekers and provide assistance.

  • Provide documents to refugees.

  • Work with the government to ensure access to territory and freedom of movement.

  • Continue to develop the infrastructure at Markazi camp.

  • Continue border monitoring activities.

Operational Context and Migration

UNHCR carries out regular border monitoring in Djibouti by observing activities at Obock port as well as entry points along the villages north of Obock. UNHCR has observed a decrease in new arrivals compared to previous months; this may be due to the harsh weather conditions in Obock. Meanwhile, UNHCR continues to advise refugees in Markazi camp on the dangers of return to Yemen.

Djibouti: Djibouti: Inter-agency update for the response to the Yemeni situation #46 (1 – 15 August 2016)

Somalia - ReliefWeb News - 25 August 2016 - 11:28pm
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Iraq, Somalia, Syrian Arab Republic, Yemen
KEY FIGURES

3,618 Refugees currently hosted in Djibouti pending further physical verification exercises

1,636 Registered females.

1,299 Registered children and adolescents

HIGHLIGHTS
  • According to the latest available statistics from IOM and the Government of Djibouti, a total of 36,162 persons of mixed nationalities have arrived in Djibouti as of end of July 2016 (since 26 March 2015). Of those, 19,636 persons (54 per cent) are Yemeni nationals, 14,562 (40 per cent) are transiting migrants and 1,964 persons (6 per cent) are Djiboutian returnees.

  • As at 15 August 2016, there are 3,618 refugees currently in Djibouti (pending forthcoming verification exercises in Obock town and Djibouti city). Markazi camp hosts over 1,400 refugees.

PRIORITIES
  • Ensure protection of refugees and asylum seekers and provide assistance.

  • Provide documents to refugees.

  • Work with the government to ensure access to territory and freedom of movement.

  • Continue to develop the infrastructure at Markazi camp.

  • Continue border monitoring activities.

Operational Context and Migration

UNHCR carries out regular border monitoring in Djibouti by observing activities at Obock port as well as entry points along the villages north of Obock. UNHCR has observed a decrease in new arrivals compared to previous months; this may be due to the harsh weather conditions in Obock. Meanwhile, UNHCR continues to advise refugees in Markazi camp on the dangers of return to Yemen.

Djibouti: Djibouti: Inter-agency update for the response to the Yemeni situation #46 (1 – 15 August 2016)

Iraq - ReliefWeb News - 25 August 2016 - 11:28pm
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Iraq, Somalia, Syrian Arab Republic, Yemen
KEY FIGURES

3,618 Refugees currently hosted in Djibouti pending further physical verification exercises

1,636 Registered females.

1,299 Registered children and adolescents

HIGHLIGHTS
  • According to the latest available statistics from IOM and the Government of Djibouti, a total of 36,162 persons of mixed nationalities have arrived in Djibouti as of end of July 2016 (since 26 March 2015). Of those, 19,636 persons (54 per cent) are Yemeni nationals, 14,562 (40 per cent) are transiting migrants and 1,964 persons (6 per cent) are Djiboutian returnees.

  • As at 15 August 2016, there are 3,618 refugees currently in Djibouti (pending forthcoming verification exercises in Obock town and Djibouti city). Markazi camp hosts over 1,400 refugees.

PRIORITIES
  • Ensure protection of refugees and asylum seekers and provide assistance.

  • Provide documents to refugees.

  • Work with the government to ensure access to territory and freedom of movement.

  • Continue to develop the infrastructure at Markazi camp.

  • Continue border monitoring activities.

Operational Context and Migration

UNHCR carries out regular border monitoring in Djibouti by observing activities at Obock port as well as entry points along the villages north of Obock. UNHCR has observed a decrease in new arrivals compared to previous months; this may be due to the harsh weather conditions in Obock. Meanwhile, UNHCR continues to advise refugees in Markazi camp on the dangers of return to Yemen.

Djibouti: Djibouti: Inter-agency update for the response to the Yemeni situation #46 (1 – 15 August 2016)

Ethiopia - ReliefWeb News - 25 August 2016 - 11:28pm
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Iraq, Somalia, Syrian Arab Republic, Yemen
KEY FIGURES

3,618 Refugees currently hosted in Djibouti pending further physical verification exercises

1,636 Registered females.

1,299 Registered children and adolescents

HIGHLIGHTS
  • According to the latest available statistics from IOM and the Government of Djibouti, a total of 36,162 persons of mixed nationalities have arrived in Djibouti as of end of July 2016 (since 26 March 2015). Of those, 19,636 persons (54 per cent) are Yemeni nationals, 14,562 (40 per cent) are transiting migrants and 1,964 persons (6 per cent) are Djiboutian returnees.

  • As at 15 August 2016, there are 3,618 refugees currently in Djibouti (pending forthcoming verification exercises in Obock town and Djibouti city). Markazi camp hosts over 1,400 refugees.

PRIORITIES
  • Ensure protection of refugees and asylum seekers and provide assistance.

  • Provide documents to refugees.

  • Work with the government to ensure access to territory and freedom of movement.

  • Continue to develop the infrastructure at Markazi camp.

  • Continue border monitoring activities.

Operational Context and Migration

UNHCR carries out regular border monitoring in Djibouti by observing activities at Obock port as well as entry points along the villages north of Obock. UNHCR has observed a decrease in new arrivals compared to previous months; this may be due to the harsh weather conditions in Obock. Meanwhile, UNHCR continues to advise refugees in Markazi camp on the dangers of return to Yemen.

Afghanistan: Afghanistan: Patients Struggle to Reach Hospitals in Helmand

Afghanistan - ReliefWeb News - 25 August 2016 - 11:23pm
Source: Médecins Sans Frontières Country: Afghanistan

The intensity of fighting has decreased in recent days in districts surrounding Lashkar Gah, the capital of Afghanistan’s Helmand Province, after heavy clashes between Afghan government forces and armed opposition groups at the beginning of August. Despite the relative calm, sick and wounded people are still struggling to reach the emergency room (ER) in Boost Hospital, a 300-bed facility run by Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in partnership with the Afghan Ministry of Health.

“Our patients have reported that roads are blocked and checkpoints are delaying them reaching the hospital,” said Guilhem Molinie, MSF’s country representative in Afghanistan. “As a result, we’ve seen a trend of quieter mornings in the ER, which is usually the busiest time, and more people arriving in the evening after facing delays getting here.”

Overall, the number of patients arriving at the ER has decreased since fighting escalated at the beginning of August.

“The Emergency Room is the main entry point for patients coming to the hospital so the fluctuating admissions are a direct reflection of the ebb and flow of the conflict and people’s ability to reach the hospital,” said Molinie. “As the only hospital able to provide secondary healthcare free of charge in the area, many patients have to travel from far away to get treatment for a range of lifesaving care, such as surgical interventions, and emergency obstetric and neonatal care.”

In other wards of the hospital—such as the intensive therapeutic feeding center (ITFC) and pediatric departments—doctors are starting to see the number of patients slowly return to normal.

Read: "Empty Beds are the Face of War"

Fighting is ongoing in the districts of Nad Ali, Marja, Geremshir and Nawa, surrounding Lahkar Gah, but the intensity has decreased. MSF has prepared a mass causality plan in case of a sudden influx of wounded due to the fighting, with materials stockpiled and triage protocols in place. MSF will continue treating people regardless of their political, ethnic, religious or any other affiliations.

“Our ability to continue providing medical care in Lashkar Gah depends on all warring parties respecting medical staff, facilities and patients,” said Molinie. “We are in contact with all parties to the conflict, including Afghan government forces, international forces, and the armed opposition, to obtain these assurances”.

MSF has shared the coordinates to the hospital and the information related to its facilities in Lashkar Gah with all parties to the conflict. MSF has a strict no weapons policy and all people entering its hospitals need to place their weapons in a safety locker.

“In order to protect our staff and patients we not only need people to know where we are located, but we also need their firm commitment to respect the fact that we work in a neutral and impartial way,” said Molinie. “We have to constantly reassess whether all parties fully accept us providing medical care to anyone who needs it, whether the fighting remains in the neighboring districts or reaches Lashkar Gah itself.”

MSF started working in Afghanistan in 1980. In Helmand, just as in the rest of Afghanistan, both national and international staff work together to ensure the best quality of treatment. MSF supports the Ministry of Public Health in Ahmad Shah Baba hospital in eastern Kabul, Dasht-e-Barchi maternity in western Kabul and Boost hospital in Lashkar Gah, Helmand province. In Khost, in the east of the country, MSF operates a maternity hospital. MSF plans to open a multi-drug resistant tuberculosis diagnosis and treatment facility in Kandahar later this year. MSF relies only on private funding for its work in Afghanistan and does not accept money from any government.

Zimbabwe: Poverty, hardship emboldens protesting Zimbabweans

Zimbabwe - ReliefWeb News - 25 August 2016 - 11:16pm
Source: Agence France-Presse Country: Zimbabwe

Harare, Zimbabwe | AFP | Friday 8/25/2016 - 23:05 GMT-4

by Reagan MASHAVAVE

A failing economy and deepening poverty have spawned a wave of sporadic anti-government protests in Zimbabwe, the likes of which have not been seen in years.

Street vendors, bus drivers, grandmothers, university graduates and even civil servants have joined protests that have become an almost daily occurrence in recent weeks.

The protests rocking the southern African country since June indicate that Zimbabweans are no longer afraid of the repressive government of President Robert Mugabe and are refusing to be silenced.

The "outburst of public anger" has come about as a response to various factors including economic hardships that have condemned millions to poverty, bad governance, and infighting within the ruling ZANU-PF party over Mugabe's succession, according to political scientist Eldred Masunungure.

"The state of the economy and big levels of abject poverty are forcing people to go on to the streets," said independent analyst Dumisani Nkomo.

"People don't have (an) option, they have nothing to lose because they know if they don't protest they will die, with their children, of hunger," said Nkomo.

The state has reacted violently to the protests, unleashing police to brutally quell demonstrations with tear gas, water cannon and by physical assaults.

But the police violence has only hardened the protesters' resolve.

'Makes me stronger'

"Each time they torture me, punish me and do all sorts of bad things, I get stronger and more inspired," said veteran protester and outspoken Mugabe critic Stendrick Zvorwadza.

Zvorwadza, who bears the scars of a recent beating when he tried to hand police flowers as a gesture of peace, warned that the current protests were only a warm-up ahead of "bigger demonstrations that will see this government running away or coming to the table to say they are ready to listen".

Zvorwadza heads the National Vendors Union, an association which groups tens of thousands of Zimbabweans who have been forced to become street hawkers to eke out a living.

Rallying under various banners, Zimbabweans are demonstrating against the state's failure to halt the worsening economic troubles which have seen banks running short of cash and the government failing to pay civil workers.

'Push Mugabe out'

Analysts and activists have warned of a total breakdown within society unless Mugabe heeds demands for key political and economic reforms, or steps down.

On Friday, the main opposition parties will stage a march to push for electoral reforms ahead of the 2018 vote in which the 92-year-old leader will seek re-election.

Another activist, Promise Mkwananzi, said nothing short of Mugabe's resignation will end the protests.

"We aim for the exit of Mugabe from the political scene," said Mkwananzi who leads the #Tajamuka (We are Agitated) protest movement which has called for a nationwide strike on August 31.

"The precursor for resolving the problems in this country is the exit of Mugabe from power," said Mkwananzi.

"The time is now for political parties and citizens to come together to push Mugabe out."

Citizen activism re-emerges

Mugabe has been in power since independence from British colonial rule in 1980. He has avoided naming a successor despite his advanced age and concerns over his fitness to rule.

Despite putting a brave face and deploying heavy-handed approach to the protests, "panic is everywhere" in the administration, said Masunungure.

The last time Zimbabwe saw a wave of similar protests was in the late 1990s.

Led by civil society groups and trade unions, those demonstrations spawned the emergence of the Movement for Democratic Change -- the only party that has posed a serious challenge to Mugabe's iron grip on the country.

"It is a repeat of what happened before. What is distinctly different is the medium of communication and mobilisation where social media is the new development," said Masunungure a political scientist at the University of Zimbabwe.

Zimbabweans have taken to Facebook, Twitter and WhatsApp using the hashtag "ThisFlag" to share the hardships of living under Mugabe's rule and to organise protests.

"There is... a re-emergence of an active citizenry where Zimbabweans are refusing to turn the other cheek, saying 'I need to express my views to the government'," he said.

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© 1994-2016 Agence France-Presse

Iraq: ISHM: August 19 – 25, 2016

Iraq - ReliefWeb News - 25 August 2016 - 10:50pm
Source: Education for Peace in Iraq Center Country: Iraq

Key Takeaways:

  • On August 25, following an investigation into allegations of corruption, the Iraqi Parliament passed a vote of no confidence and ousted Minister of Defense Khaled al-Obeidi, 142 to 105 with 16 abstentions. Al-Obeidi has served in the role since October 2014. The vote follows several weeks of delayed votes and a secondary investigation into Speaker of Parliament Salim al-Jabouri, who was oddly accused of corruption by the ousted Defense Minister during questioning. Al-Jabouri was cleared of any wrongdoing. Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi has previously said that he will assume the Defense Minister’s duties until a replacement can be confirmed. The Defense Minister’s ouster comes at an especially inconvenient time as Iraqi Security Forces and their allies prepare operations to clear Mosul of ISIS militants.

  • The UNHCR and humanitarian agencies are pressing ahead with preparations for a massive wave of displaced persons during and after military operations to clear Mosul of ISIS militants. Preparations for the estimated 1.3 million IDPs include camp enlargement and construction, negotiations for land allocation to build new camps, and the strategic placement of emergency relief supplies and shelter kits around Mosul proper. According to UNHCR Representative in Iraq, Bruno Geddo, despite “the best-laid plans, there will be insufficient camps for all families needing shelter.” As previously reported in ISHM, military advancements south of Mosul, particularly in Qayyarah and Sharqat, continue to outpace relief efforts to those displaced.

  • Iraqi Security Forces assisted by the U.S.-led international coalition successfully cleared ISIS militants from the strategically important city of Qayyarah, 60 kilometers south of Mosul in Ninewa Province. Qayyarah and its nearby air base are critical staging areas for the impending progression of forces toward Mosul itself. Meanwhile, in Anbar Province, Popular Mobilization Units (PMUs) were assigned to control and secure Khalidiyah, between Fallujah and Ramadi, after forces encountered pockets of ISIS militants. Commander of Anbar Operations Major General Ismail al-Mahlawi said that after clearing Khalidiya, forces will return to Ramadi to secure that city which has seen the return of 70% of its citizens. U.S. Ambassador to Iraq Stuart Jones said on August 22 that the U.S. will continue to support PMUs only if they coordinate with the ISF.

  • On August 23, Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi confirmed that President of the Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG) Mahmoud Barzani said that Iraqi Peshmerga Forces have “no ambitions” of holding territory in Ninewa Province after it is cleared of ISIS militants. The confirmation came the day after U.S. Ambassador to Iraq Stuart Jones announced the allocation of US$ 415 million in aid to the Peshmerga to pay salaries, buy supplies, and continue their joint military operations against ISIS near Mosul.

  • 36 individuals convicted for their involvement in the Speicher Massacre of June 2014 were hanged at the Nasriyah Prison in Dhi Qar Province as hundreds of family members of victims watched and rejoiced on August 21. Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch, and the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights have called on Iraqi authorities to halt executions and reinforce rights to due process and fair trials. Based on credible accounts of the mass trials which lasted no longer than a day, those rights were denied to those executed this week.

  • A final draft of the Government of Iraq’s 2017 fiscal year budget includes few changes from 2016, according to Mohammad Saleh, financial advisor to Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi. Despite continuing outsized security and humanitarian needs, the budget represents, in Saleh’s words, a transition from a “war economy to a peace economy.” The budget draft will be introduced to Parliament in mid-September.

Parliament Declares ‘No Confidence’ in Defense Minister

On August 19, Head of Parliament’s Committee on Security and Defense and Member of Parliament, Saghloon Abdallah, spoke of the need to come up with replacements in the event that Minister of Defense Khaled al-Obeidi is voted out of office. The Iraqi Parliament is planned to vote on the minister’s ouster and Abdallah hopes they can resolve the leadership issue before efforts to clear Mosul of ISIS militants advances. Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi said he would take over the responsibilities of the minister temporarily if al-Obeidi is removed from the office he has held since October 2014.

On August 19, representative of the Alliance of Iraqi Forces, Member of Parliament Ahmed al-Jabra, speculated that most Members of Parliament will likely vote to keep the Minister of Defense Khaled al-Obeidi because of the impending Mosul Operation and the ongoing operation to clear the Ninewa Province. Another reason al-Jabra mentioned for voting to keep the minister is due to the lack of consensus on an alternative candidate which will force Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi to run the ministry for the foreseeable future.

On August 19, hundreds of protesters congregated in Horreya Square in the city of Hila to demand continued political reform. Civil rights activist Kazem Mohammad explained that the new technocratic ministerial appointments are a step in the right direction, but that the entire cabinet must be replaced with the same effective professionals. Protesters in the Babil Province also called for a reform of the judiciary, investigations into financial corruption, reduction of parliamentary representatives, the resignation of the Babel governor, an end to the quota system, and increased job opportunities for young people.

On August 19, dozens of people protested in Haboubi Square in the city of Nasriya to demand continued political reform. Civil rights activists Sahran Masir explained that people in the Dhi Qar Province are seeking to reform the three branches of government and that the recent ministerial appointments signal a comprehensive change in the legislative branch.

On August 21, Prime Minister, Haider al-Abadi, stated that the approval of the five technocrat ministerial candidates by Parliament was a major step in the right direction for political reform. The candidates were experts and specialists in their fields, rather than politicians, and that this technocratic approach to politics has proven to be successful.

On August 21, Chairman of the Integrity Commission, Hassan al-Yasri, appealed to Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi to accept the resignation request he submitted in early July. The Office of the Integrity Commission explained that al-Abadi’s choice not to accept the chairman’s resignation was due to the timing of the corruption investigation of Minister of Defense Khaled al-Obeidi and the release of the National Anti-Corruption Strategic Plan put forth by the commission.

On August 21, representative for the National Alliance, Member of Parliament Nayef al-Shamari, confirmed that the coalition has not put forward candidates to fill the Minister of Commerce or Minister of Trade positions to the Prime Minister. Al-Shamari did say that his coalition is ready to discuss filling this post and have numerous candidates in mind.

On August 22, an anonymous senior source in government revealed that the National Alliance bloc will meet today to discuss the vacant ministerial seats. The source confirmed that Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi will nominate Hussein Tahan to be the Minister of Interior. Previous candidates either rejected their nominations or were ruled out due to their political allegiances. According to the same source, in return for consensus from the Turkmen political group for this position, Prime Minister al-Abadi is prepared to nominate Turkmen official Torhan Mufti, to be Minister of Commerce. Mufti was formerly a Member of the Kirkuk Provincial Council, acting Minister of Communication, and Minister of State for Provincial Affairs.

On August 23, the Parliament convened their 13th session under the leadership of Speaker of Parliament, Salim al-Jabouri, with 256 members in attendance. The session lasted only 30 minutes after Members of Parliament walked out of the session in protest of a no confidence vote on Minister of Defense Khaled al-Obeidi.

On August 23, Speaker of Parliament Salim al-Jabouri was forced to postpone a no confidence vote on Minister of Defense Khaled al-Obeidi after representatives walked out of the session and the Parliament failed to reach a quorum. 57 representatives voted to postpone the vote to withdraw confidence from al-Obeidi and eventually walked out of the session when the postponement was not agreed upon.

On August 24, Minister of Finance Hoshair Zeibari expressed his willingness to be questioned in Parliament over corruption allegations made by Member of Parliament Haitham al-Jabouri. Zeibari warned that during his session he will reveal documents proving his innocence and al-Jabouri’s own involvement in corrupt dealings with other Gulf states. Zeibari said earlier that the investigation into his actions does not serve the public interest and only seeks to damage his reputation.

On August 24, Deputy for the Kurdish Alliance Ahmed al-Badri and Member of the Kurdish Alliance Majid al-Shenkali expressed their support for the process of parliamentary interrogations of state officials and institutions. Both believe that public questioning is not only the right of the Parliament but integral to keeping individuals and institutions accountable to the public and the political apparatus. Al-Badri added that the process allows for transparent proceedings and limits the ability of politicians to make back door agreements.

On August 25, during the 14th session of parliament, Minister of Finance Hoshair Zeibari, was questioned over corruption allegations made by Member of Parliament Haitham al-Jabouri.

On August 25, the vote to withdraw confidence from the Minister of Defense was chaired by Deputy Speaker of Parliament Aram Sheikh Mohammed after Speaker of Parliament Salim al-Jabouri recused himself.

On August 25, the Iraqi Parliament voted to withdraw confidence from the Minister of Defense Khaled al-Obeidi with 142 representatives voting, ‘yes,’ and 105 voting, ‘no,’ and 16 abstentions.

On August 25, Minister of Defense Khaled al-Obeidi apologized to the Iraqi people and thanked those who stood behind him during investigations into allegations of corruption. Al-Obeidi maintained that he has diligently fought corruption, nepotism, and favoritism and will continue to be a “soldier in the fight against corruption.”

IDP Returns Hastened Amid More Displacements

On August 19, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) announced that it is planning to build a camp in Daquq in the Kirkuk Province in hopes of accommodating 1,000 families displaced from areas south of Mosul. The biggest formal camp in Kirkuk, the Nazrawah Displacement Camp, will also receive an additional 100 tents.

On August 19, the UNHCR reported that there are still people stranded in Sharqat City, unable to leave amid fighting between Iraqi Security Forces (ISF) and Islamic State of Iraq and al-Sham (ISIS) militants. Those left are elderly or people with physical needs that make them unable to walk the four hours needed to reach safety.

On August 19, the UNHCR began construction on the new al-Allam camp across from the al-Hajaj Reception Center in the Tikrit District of the Salah ad-Din Province. Al-Hajaj Reception Center was built to conduct security screenings but now houses 24,000 people – five times its capacity.

On August 19, the Ministry of Migration and Displacement announced that 314,000 people have returned to Ramadi since August 1. Ramadi was cleared of ISIS militants in December, 2015.

On August 20-22, 8,000 internally displaced persons (IDPs) participated in security screenings at the al-Hajaj Reception Center in the Salah ad-Din Province. The Ministry of Migration and Displacement reported that 83,000 people have passed through the transit security center since July, with most people moving on to Tikrit.

On August 21, Iraqi Kurdish Peshmerga evacuated 645 people from Hawija and Riyadh, 45 kilometers west of Kirkuk City. Director of Displacement and Migration, Ammar al-Sabah, reported that the IDPs were taken to the Nazrawah Camp, 15 kilometers east of Kirkuk, adding to the camp’s overcrowding.

On August 21, sources from the Iraqi Joint Special Operations Center reported that Iraqi planes dropped millions of leaflets and Iraqi flags in cities west of Mosul such as Tal Afar, Baiji, and Hawija. The leaflets provided residents with exit instructions and asked residents to distance themselves from known ISIS strongholds.

On August 21, Governor of Salah ad-Din, Ahmed Abdullah al-Jabouri, met with Ninewa Operation commanders to discuss the state of displaced people in the overcrowded Debaga camps in the Erbil Province. Al-Jabouri hopes to evacuate some IDPs from the camp and host them in the Salah ad-Din Province after security forces fortify the area over the next two weeks. He also spoke with military leaders about providing safe corridors for civilians to exit areas undergoing military operations.

On August 21, ISF Commander in Fallujah, Juma al-Jumaili, identified a single point of entry for displaced people returning to Garma City, 27 kilometers northeast of Fallujah. The entry point will be patrolled by joint forces consisting of ISF, Popular Mobilization Units (PMUs), and local police officers who will also be screening young men to determine whether they could be ISIS sympathizers. Al-Jumaili explained that security forces will also be monitoring movement in the city and setting up checkpoints at main roads to prevent the reemergence of militants. 1,000 displaced families have already been approved to return back to Garma and the UNHCR expects continued returns.

On August 22, Member of the Anbar Provincial Council, Mohammad Yassin, informed the public that people displaced from Fallujah will be able to return in early October once services are restored. Yassin also spoke of the continued efforts of local departments and volunteers to restore services, rehabilitate the city infrastructure, and dismantle improvised explosive devices left by ISIS militants.

On August 22, Governor of Salah ad-Din, Ahmed Abdullah al-Jabouri, announced that public offices and services in the small town of Seena will reopen August 23, and that displaced residents will be returning next week. This comes after al-Jabouri launched the plan to rehabilitate the town last week.

On August 22, an anonymous security source reported that six IDPs were killed, and five others injured by an improvised explosive device (IED) while trying to flee Hawija, 65 kilometers west of Kirkuk City. Agence France Press claimed that cities south of Mosul are filled with IEDs planted by ISIS in order to prevent ISF military movements or a civilian exodus from their control.

On August 22, tribal leader in Hawija, Shiekh Mahmoud al-Asafi, called on Kurdish President Mahmoud Barzani to admit over 500 people, mainly women and children, who are stranded in the Dabs District, 40 kilometers northeast of Kirkuk city. Al-Asafi hopes that the IDPs who fled Hawija, 65 kilometers west of Kirkuk City, will be received by Peshmerga forces in Kirkuk and provided with relief. Earlier this week, Member of Parliament for Kirkuk, Mohammad Tamimi, condemned the silence of the local and international community over the humanitarian suffering witnessed by people in Hawija. Tamimi explained that despite readiness from the security forces to intervene, authorities refuse to lift a finger to help the people of Hawija.

On August 22, Diyala police spokesperson, Ghalib al-Attiyah, reported that a local police officer in Azeem City organized an initiative to restore electricity services to individual homes in preparation for IDP returns. Al-Attiyah said that the Diyala Police will form a volunteer team to design initiatives to support reconstruction for returnees.

On August 23, the European Commission Humanitarian Aid Office (ECHO) revealed that many IDPs trying to flee Hawija are stranded around active military lines and unable to reach security checkpoints due to the lack of transportation and evacuation support. ECHO highlighted the importance of building the 1,000 tent camp in Daquq and adding 100 tents to the Nazrawah Camp, both in the Kirkuk Province.

On August 23, ECHO reported that 77,000 people have fled from Sharqat and Qayyarah, both south of Mosul, since June 2016. IDPs are traveling long distances, sometimes as much as 200 kilometers to Kirkuk City without water and food. UNHCR confirmed that many people are left stranded for days waiting to cross security checkpoints, reception centers, and military frontlines. The suspension of the scholarship process, which allows IDPs to relocate to other provinces, has also hampered the ability of IDPs to move freely to safety.

On August 23, the UNHCR outlined their ongoing preparation efforts for the high number of displacements expected during and after efforts to clear Mosul of ISIS militants. The UNHCR’s Representative in Iraq, Bruno Geddo, explained that “even with the best-laid plans, there will be insufficient camps for all families needing shelter.”

  • Completed two new camps in Debaga in the Erbil Province
  • Negotiating land allocation to build another camp in Debaga
  • Constructing two new camps north of Mosul (Zelekan in Sheikhan District, and Amalla, in Tel Afar District) to house 4,000 families
  • Constructing a camp in Tal al-Seebat in the Salah ad-Din Province to include 1,000 tents Constructing a camp in Daquq and adding to Nasarawa and Laylan Camps in the Kirkuk Province to include 1,000 tents
  • Strategically placing 100,000 emergency relief and shelter kits around Mosul proper
  • Creating a contingency plan to provide shelter for 120,000, if needed

On August 23, the UNHCR explained that land procurement to build new camps has proven difficult for a variety of reasons. Many times landowners refuse to lease their land to the organization, and also because the UNHCR is taking serious geographical considerations into account like the proximity to military operations, landmines, topography problems, and social and demographic tensions in various regions.

On August 23, UNHCR spokesperson, Adrian Edwards, confirmed that 1.3 million people could be displaced from Mosul, the second largest city in Iraq. This came during a news briefing in Geneva were Edwards reported the displacement of 48,000 people from Mosul, 87,000 from Fallujah, and 78,000 from Sharqat and Qayyarah in recent months.

On August 24, Member of the Anbar Provincial Council, Barakat al-Ifan, said that Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi approved the council’s request to return displaced people to Garma, Saqlawiyah, Nisaf, al-Bawifan, Fallujah, and al-Hisa beginning in mid-September. Al-Ifan said that the Minister of Planning, Governor of Anbar, and top security leaders also agreed to the request.

On August 24, an aide for the Jihadi Brigades of Imam Abukarrar al-Saadi confirmed the reception of 300 families from Sharqat in the village of Awja, 140 kilometers south of the city. Al-Saadi expressed the intention of the brigades to house the IDPs and provide them with relief and protection until they are able to go back to Sharqat.

On August 25, 20 civilians were killed and 45 others were kidnapped by ISIS militants while trying to flee Hawija, 65 kilometers west of Kirkuk City. An anonymous security source explained that militants began shooting civilians indiscriminately while they attempted to reach Peshmerga forces in the Dabs District, 71 kilometers northwest of Hawija.

On August 25, spokesperson for the Popular Mobilization Units (PMUs), Ali al-Husseini, confirmed the reception of 30 civilians fleeing from Hawija, 65 kilometers west of Kirkuk City. Al-Husseini continued that the IDPs were taken to the al-Bashir District in the Taza Khurmatu area, 25 kilometers south of Kirkuk, where they will later be relocated to a displacement camp.

Philippines: NDRRMC Update: Severe Weather Advisory No. 03 re Typhoon "DINDO" (I.N. LIONROCK)

Philippines - ReliefWeb News - 25 August 2016 - 10:35pm
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

I. SITUATION OVERVIEW:

Typhoon "DINDO" has maintained its strength and moves slowly in a southwest direction

Philippines: NDRRMC Update: Severe Weather Advisory No. 02 re Typhoon "DINDO" (I.N. LIONROCK)

Philippines - ReliefWeb News - 25 August 2016 - 10:31pm
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

I. SITUATION OVERVIEW:

Typhoon "DINDO" has maintained its strength as it continues to move south southwest slowly.

Philippines: NDRRMC Update: Severe Weather Advisory No. 01 re Typhoon "DINDO" (I.N. LIONROCK)

Philippines - ReliefWeb News - 25 August 2016 - 10:30pm
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

I. SITUATION OVERVIEW:

Typhoon with International Name "LIONRICOK" has entered the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR) and was named "DINDO"

Philippines: Philippine Government’s ‘War on Drugs’ Claims Child Victim

Philippines - ReliefWeb News - 25 August 2016 - 7:47pm
Source: Human Rights Watch Country: Philippines

Justice Secretary Defends Killing Suspected Drug Dealers, Users

By Phelim Kine

Five-year-old Danica May became the youngest reported victim of the Philippine government’s abusive “war on drugs” on Tuesday.

The kindergarten student died from a gunshot wound to the head after an unidentified gunman opened fire on her grandfather, Maximo Garcia, as the family sat down to lunch. The attack came just three days after Garcia had registered with local police, who suspected his involvement in the drug trade. Garcia had said he wasn’t. He survived being shot in the abdomen in the attack, which police have attributed to unnamed “drug dealers.”

Danica May is just one of more than a thousand Filipinos killed by unidentified gunmen between July 1, when President Roderigo Duterte took office, and August 19. Official statistics show that, in addition, police have killed 712 suspected “drug pushers and users” in the same time period. These killings suggest Duterte’s aggressive rhetoric advocating violent, extrajudicial solutions to crime in the Philippines has found willing takers. Last month, he exhorted Filipinos who knew of any drug addicts to “go ahead and kill them yourself as getting their parents to do it would be too painful.” This prompted the United Nations special rapporteur on summary executions, Agnes Callamard, to accuse Duterte of effectively granting the police and others “a license to kill.”

The same day Danica May bled to death in her family’s kitchen, Philippine Department of Justice Secretary Vitaliano Aguirre defended the killings linked to Duterte’s “war on drugs.” Aguirre refused to respond to repeated calls for the Justice Department to launch an urgent and impartial investigation of those killings, and he expressed firm support for Duterte’s promise “to do everything to stop drugs, crime and corruption.” He dismissed criticism and insisted that, “If you’re in the Philippines, you will choose to kill these drug lords.” Aguirre justified killings of alleged criminal suspects on the basis that, “Desperate times call for desperate measures. So this is what the president is doing and we support it.”

Aguirre’s perverse endorsement of extrajudicial violence as crime control suggests that Danica May is unlikely to be the last child victim. Each day, the death toll from the government’s “war on drugs” climbs higher and higher.

Côte d'Ivoire: Côte d'Ivoire: retour d'une trentaine de réfugiés du Ghana

Guinea - ReliefWeb News - 25 August 2016 - 7:00pm
Source: Agence France-Presse Country: Côte d'Ivoire, Ghana, Guinea, Liberia, Togo

Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire | AFP | jeudi 25/08/2016 - 22:34 GMT

Une trentaine de réfugiés ivoiriens sont arrivés jeudi soir à Abidjan, en provenance du Ghana qui accueille près de 11.000 Ivoiriens ayant fui le pays après la grave crise postélectorale 2010-2011.

"Un convoi de trente-deux réfugiés ivoiriens en provenance du Ghana est arrivé en Côte d’Ivoire (...), ce jeudi 25 août 2016", selon un communiqué du Service d'Aide et d'Assistance aux Réfugiés et Apatrides (SAARA) du ministère des Affaires étrangères, transmis à l'AFP.

Il s'agit du plus gros contingent en provenance de ce pays "depuis le début du processus de rapatriement volontaire des réfugiés ivoiriens en 2011", a précisé le SAARA.

Fin juin, quatre réfugiés pro-Gbagbo, dont l'ex-ministre de la Défense Kadet Bertin, étaient rentrés à Abidjan.

Le Haut commissariat aux réfugiés (HCR) et le gouvernement ivoirien s'étaient réunis mi-juillet afin d'accélérer le retour des quelque 50.000 réfugiés de la crise postélectorale de 2010-11 qui ne sont pas encore rentrés au pays et lutter contre la "manipulation" politique dont certains feraient l'objet.

D'après le HCR, plus des deux tiers des 300.000 Ivoiriens ayant fui leur pays pendant ou après le conflit sont déjà rentrés chez eux. Il resterait 20.000 réfugiés au Liberia, 7.000 en Guinée ainsi que 11.000 exilés pro-Gbagbo au Ghana et environ 2.000 au Togo. Ces derniers avaient majoritairement fui après la crise postélectorale de 2010-2011 qui a fait plus de 3.000 morts en cinq mois.

Le retour des réfugiés est un enjeu majeur pour la réconciliation nationale, et l'une des priorités du président Alassane Ouattara, plus de cinq ans après la fin de la crise provoquée par le refus de l'ex-président Laurent Gbagbo de reconnaître la victoire de son rival.

"Pour le Liberia, il y a plus d'engouement avec plus de 16.000 retours. Alors que pour le Ghana, en dehors des ministres (un ancien ministre et trois personnalités sont rentrés le 30 juin, ndlr), il n'y a que deux personnes qui s'étaient portées volontaires pour rentrer sur les 11.000. Sur le Togo, c'est 9 personnes sur 2.000... On sent la réticence de réfugiés du Ghana et du Togo", avait souligné Liz Kapam Ahua, la représentante régionale du HCR.

La ministre de la Cohésion sociale Mariatou Koné a assuré qu'il "n'y a pas de raison que ces frères et soeurs restent. (...)Aujourd'hui l'heure est à la paix, à la sécurité et au pardon".

eak/mf

© 1994-2016 Agence France-Presse

Côte d'Ivoire: Côte d'Ivoire: retour d'une trentaine de réfugiés du Ghana

Côte d’Ivoire - ReliefWeb News - 25 August 2016 - 7:00pm
Source: Agence France-Presse Country: Côte d'Ivoire, Ghana, Guinea, Liberia, Togo

Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire | AFP | jeudi 25/08/2016 - 22:34 GMT

Une trentaine de réfugiés ivoiriens sont arrivés jeudi soir à Abidjan, en provenance du Ghana qui accueille près de 11.000 Ivoiriens ayant fui le pays après la grave crise postélectorale 2010-2011.

"Un convoi de trente-deux réfugiés ivoiriens en provenance du Ghana est arrivé en Côte d’Ivoire (...), ce jeudi 25 août 2016", selon un communiqué du Service d'Aide et d'Assistance aux Réfugiés et Apatrides (SAARA) du ministère des Affaires étrangères, transmis à l'AFP.

Il s'agit du plus gros contingent en provenance de ce pays "depuis le début du processus de rapatriement volontaire des réfugiés ivoiriens en 2011", a précisé le SAARA.

Fin juin, quatre réfugiés pro-Gbagbo, dont l'ex-ministre de la Défense Kadet Bertin, étaient rentrés à Abidjan.

Le Haut commissariat aux réfugiés (HCR) et le gouvernement ivoirien s'étaient réunis mi-juillet afin d'accélérer le retour des quelque 50.000 réfugiés de la crise postélectorale de 2010-11 qui ne sont pas encore rentrés au pays et lutter contre la "manipulation" politique dont certains feraient l'objet.

D'après le HCR, plus des deux tiers des 300.000 Ivoiriens ayant fui leur pays pendant ou après le conflit sont déjà rentrés chez eux. Il resterait 20.000 réfugiés au Liberia, 7.000 en Guinée ainsi que 11.000 exilés pro-Gbagbo au Ghana et environ 2.000 au Togo. Ces derniers avaient majoritairement fui après la crise postélectorale de 2010-2011 qui a fait plus de 3.000 morts en cinq mois.

Le retour des réfugiés est un enjeu majeur pour la réconciliation nationale, et l'une des priorités du président Alassane Ouattara, plus de cinq ans après la fin de la crise provoquée par le refus de l'ex-président Laurent Gbagbo de reconnaître la victoire de son rival.

"Pour le Liberia, il y a plus d'engouement avec plus de 16.000 retours. Alors que pour le Ghana, en dehors des ministres (un ancien ministre et trois personnalités sont rentrés le 30 juin, ndlr), il n'y a que deux personnes qui s'étaient portées volontaires pour rentrer sur les 11.000. Sur le Togo, c'est 9 personnes sur 2.000... On sent la réticence de réfugiés du Ghana et du Togo", avait souligné Liz Kapam Ahua, la représentante régionale du HCR.

La ministre de la Cohésion sociale Mariatou Koné a assuré qu'il "n'y a pas de raison que ces frères et soeurs restent. (...)Aujourd'hui l'heure est à la paix, à la sécurité et au pardon".

eak/mf

© 1994-2016 Agence France-Presse

Iraq: SRSG Kubiš Welcomes Progress in Parliament’s Legislative Agenda, with Adoption of Amnesty Law in Line with National Political Agreement and Government Program

Iraq - ReliefWeb News - 25 August 2016 - 6:36pm
Source: UN Assistance Mission for Iraq Country: Iraq

Baghdad, 25 August 2016 - The Special Representative of the United Nations Secretary-General, Mr. Jan Kubiš, welcomes the progress made in implementing the legislative agenda of the Council of Representatives, the last of which was the parliament’s adoption of the Amnesty Law.

“This is one more step towards consolidating state building,” the SRSG said. “This legislation adopted today is key for promoting national reconciliation efforts.”

Mr. Kubiš said the Amnesty Law was preceded by the Banning of the Ba’ath Party Law, another important legislation, and expressed hope that more steps will be taken to strengthen the rule of law in Iraq.

“These laws are explicitly stated in the National Political Accord of 2014 and the Government of Iraq program,” he said. “We expect that other legislation will follow, notably the Justice and Accountability law as proclaimed in the agreement and the Government’s program,” Mr. Kubiš said.

For more information, please contact: Mr. Samir Ghattas, Director of Public Information/Spokesperson
United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq, Phone: +964 790 193 1281, Email: ghattass@un.org
or the UNAMI Public Information Office: unami-information@un.org

Iraq: The Iraqi Red Crescent organizes psychosocial support programs for displaced families at Erbil camps

Iraq - ReliefWeb News - 25 August 2016 - 4:05pm
Source: Iraqi Red Crescent Society Country: Iraq

Iraqi Red Crescent Society (IRCS) has announced that the it organized first aid courses and of psychosocial support programs for displaced families (IDPs) at Hursham, Kourkosk and Dar Shokran camps, which is home to more than 3,000 displaced families in Erbil governorate.

Hawrey Ehsan, the head of Erbil branch/IRCS said that the IRCSs’ teams have visited the three above mentioned camps, so that to see for their living, physical and health conditions, adding that the teams have organized several courses of first aid on who to aid the patients, and how to deal with emergency cases like suffocation, burns, fractures and other cases that might the displaced had. He has also noted that the number of beneficiaries from that courses were more than 1,800 beneficiaries.

In the same context, the IRCSs’ teams have organized a psychosocial support for the displaced families’ children where more than 800 children have been targeted in this program. The Society has also implement a variety of activities such as drawing and entertainment games that all can be considered like psychosocial support program (Open Day for Child) so that to alleviate the suffering of displaced children in order to enable them living normally and to forget the effects of forced displacement.

In the end, the Red Crescents’ teams has distributed more than 800 children’s gift.

Zimbabwe: Parched Zimbabwe faces dire water shortages as new dry season nears

Zimbabwe - ReliefWeb News - 25 August 2016 - 4:03pm
Source: AlertNet Country: Zimbabwe

by Andrew Mambondiyani | Thomson Reuters Foundation

Thursday, 25 August 2016 07:04 GMT

By Andrew Mambondiyani

GUTAURARE, Zimbabwe, Aug 25 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - The only dam in this small-scale farming community in eastern Zimbabwe used to provide water for both people and cattle. Now, dried to a dirty puddle, it is a source of competition rather than refreshment.

Read the story on the Thompson Reuters Foundation

Greece: Frontex: FRAN Quarterly - Quarter 1 (January–March 2016)

Pakistan - ReliefWeb News - 25 August 2016 - 4:00pm
Source: European Union Country: Afghanistan, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Côte d'Ivoire, Gambia, Greece, Guinea, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Nigeria, Pakistan, Senegal, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, World

2016-08-25

FRAN QUARTELRY: ILLEGAL CROSSINGS DOWN IN THE FIRST QUARTER OF 2016

In the first quarter of this year, FRAN indicators on illegal border-crossing between border crossing points (BCPs), illegal stay and asylum eased after reaching record levels in the fourth quarter of 2015. Irregular migration pressure steadily decreased between January and March 2016, although it was still higher than in any previous first quarter since the FRAN data collection began in 2007.

In total, there were 284 525 detections of illegal border-crossing in the first quarter. With more than 150 000 crossings reported, the Eastern Mediterranean experienced the largest migration pressure, although the number of detections has been falling steadily after peaking in October 2015. After the EU-Turkey statement came into effect and the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia applied stricter border policies at its border with Greece in March, some 8 800 migrants were detected on the Eastern Mediterranean in the period between April and June.

FRAN Quarterly reports are prepared by the Frontex Risk Analysis Unit to provide a regular overview of irregular migration at the EU’s external borders, based on the irregular migration data exchanged among Member State border-control authorities.

Greece: Frontex: FRAN Quarterly - Quarter 1 (January–March 2016)

Iraq - ReliefWeb News - 25 August 2016 - 4:00pm
Source: European Union Country: Afghanistan, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Côte d'Ivoire, Gambia, Greece, Guinea, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Nigeria, Pakistan, Senegal, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, World

2016-08-25

FRAN QUARTELRY: ILLEGAL CROSSINGS DOWN IN THE FIRST QUARTER OF 2016

In the first quarter of this year, FRAN indicators on illegal border-crossing between border crossing points (BCPs), illegal stay and asylum eased after reaching record levels in the fourth quarter of 2015. Irregular migration pressure steadily decreased between January and March 2016, although it was still higher than in any previous first quarter since the FRAN data collection began in 2007.

In total, there were 284 525 detections of illegal border-crossing in the first quarter. With more than 150 000 crossings reported, the Eastern Mediterranean experienced the largest migration pressure, although the number of detections has been falling steadily after peaking in October 2015. After the EU-Turkey statement came into effect and the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia applied stricter border policies at its border with Greece in March, some 8 800 migrants were detected on the Eastern Mediterranean in the period between April and June.

FRAN Quarterly reports are prepared by the Frontex Risk Analysis Unit to provide a regular overview of irregular migration at the EU’s external borders, based on the irregular migration data exchanged among Member State border-control authorities.

Greece: Frontex: FRAN Quarterly - Quarter 1 (January–March 2016)

Guinea - ReliefWeb News - 25 August 2016 - 4:00pm
Source: European Union Country: Afghanistan, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Côte d'Ivoire, Gambia, Greece, Guinea, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Nigeria, Pakistan, Senegal, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, World

2016-08-25

FRAN QUARTELRY: ILLEGAL CROSSINGS DOWN IN THE FIRST QUARTER OF 2016

In the first quarter of this year, FRAN indicators on illegal border-crossing between border crossing points (BCPs), illegal stay and asylum eased after reaching record levels in the fourth quarter of 2015. Irregular migration pressure steadily decreased between January and March 2016, although it was still higher than in any previous first quarter since the FRAN data collection began in 2007.

In total, there were 284 525 detections of illegal border-crossing in the first quarter. With more than 150 000 crossings reported, the Eastern Mediterranean experienced the largest migration pressure, although the number of detections has been falling steadily after peaking in October 2015. After the EU-Turkey statement came into effect and the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia applied stricter border policies at its border with Greece in March, some 8 800 migrants were detected on the Eastern Mediterranean in the period between April and June.

FRAN Quarterly reports are prepared by the Frontex Risk Analysis Unit to provide a regular overview of irregular migration at the EU’s external borders, based on the irregular migration data exchanged among Member State border-control authorities.

Greece: Frontex: FRAN Quarterly - Quarter 1 (January–March 2016)

Côte d’Ivoire - ReliefWeb News - 25 August 2016 - 4:00pm
Source: European Union Country: Afghanistan, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Côte d'Ivoire, Gambia, Greece, Guinea, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Nigeria, Pakistan, Senegal, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, World

2016-08-25

FRAN QUARTELRY: ILLEGAL CROSSINGS DOWN IN THE FIRST QUARTER OF 2016

In the first quarter of this year, FRAN indicators on illegal border-crossing between border crossing points (BCPs), illegal stay and asylum eased after reaching record levels in the fourth quarter of 2015. Irregular migration pressure steadily decreased between January and March 2016, although it was still higher than in any previous first quarter since the FRAN data collection began in 2007.

In total, there were 284 525 detections of illegal border-crossing in the first quarter. With more than 150 000 crossings reported, the Eastern Mediterranean experienced the largest migration pressure, although the number of detections has been falling steadily after peaking in October 2015. After the EU-Turkey statement came into effect and the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia applied stricter border policies at its border with Greece in March, some 8 800 migrants were detected on the Eastern Mediterranean in the period between April and June.

FRAN Quarterly reports are prepared by the Frontex Risk Analysis Unit to provide a regular overview of irregular migration at the EU’s external borders, based on the irregular migration data exchanged among Member State border-control authorities.

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