TyphoonHaiyan - RW Updates

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Philippines: An early warning gave time to prepare for the super typhoon - Case Study

13 hours 56 min ago
Source: Asian Disaster Preparedness Center Country: Philippines preview

February 2014

Iloilo, Philippines – The road to Sara District Hospital in the countryside of the central part of the Philippines is bordered by verdant trees and lively communities.

Children play on school yards and adults go about their daily routines. On the surface, the lives seem to go on normally.

A closer look however reveals the vestiges of the devastation caused by the super typhoon Haiyan that hit the province just three months earlier, in November 2013.

Cut off branches lay scattered on the ground here and there next to uprooted trees. Houses and community buildings lack large pieces of their roofs that were flown away by the strong wind.
In Iloilo, more than two hundered people lost their lives during Typhoon Haiyan. The total number of fatalities in the Philippines exceeded six thousand, and more than 3.9 million people were forced to leave their homes.

The Sara District Hospital, located 95 kilometers north from Iloilo City, was one of the many health facilities severely damaged by the storm. At the mercy of the winds, the building lost a large portion of its roof, while being occupied with a number of patients. Thanks to the experienced staff who had attended ADPC’s Hospital Preparedness for Emergencies (HOPE) training, the hospital was able to mitigate the impacts of the devastating disaster. The facility also benefitted from the early warning about the arriving storm a few days prior to the forecasted landfall of Haiyan. “It took us those two days to get everything ready. One day before the storm we were fully prepared with all supplies and flashlights,” says Ms. Jennifer W. Salcedo, emergency room nurse and graduate from the HOPE training.

Dr. Jeremiah E. Obantana, Chief of the hospital, is proud that the hospital staff managed to keep all patients safe during the storm. “Nobody was hurt in our hospital. We had a total of sixty patients as well as families and staff at the facility. We moved all our patients in the new building prior to the storm to make sure they are safe,” Dr. Obantana states.

Philippines: UNICEF Philippines Humanitarian Situation Report #25, Issued on 12 September 2014

15 September 2014 - 1:08pm
Source: UN Children's Fund Country: Philippines preview

Highlights

  • UNICEF and partners continue to provide life-saving and recovery assistance for children affected by Typhoon Haiyan.

  • UNICEF and the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) launched an extended unconditional cash transfer (UCT) programme targeting 5,801 households in the most affected municipalities in Eastern Samar. Each household will receive around US$ 100 per month on top of the regular cash grants provided by the DSWD to poor households.

Typhoon Haiyan

Situation overview & humanitarian needs
According to OCHA, 14.1 million people have been affected by Typhoon Haiyan. 4.1 million people, including 1.7 million children, were displaced. The devastation occurred in some of the Philippines’ poorest regions and communities where prior to the Typhoon more than 40% of children lived in poverty. On 15 July, category 3 Typhoon Rammasun (Glenda) made landfall in the Philippines. Typhoon Haiyan affected areas were not heavily affected. UNICEF and partners continue to work with the National Government and Local Governments and commun-ities to improve disaster risk

Philippines: Philippines - Typhoon Yolanda Ongoing Recovery: Recovery Framework Case Study August 2014

15 September 2014 - 2:27am
Source: UN Development Programme, GFDRR Country: Philippines preview

Background and Objectives of the Case Study

The World Bank’s Global Facility for Disaster Reduction and Recovery (GFDRR), the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) and the European Union (EU) are working on a guide for developing disaster recovery frameworks (DRF). This guide aims to help governments and partners plan for resilient post disaster recovery while contributing to longer term sustainable development. It is based on practices gleaned from country experiences in disaster recovery around the world. Hence, the development of the DRF Guide entailed the development of country-level case studies as well as thematic case studies on disaster recovery.

These case studies have been designed to collect and analyze information on: i) disaster recovery standards and principles adapted by countries for specific disasters; ii) planning efforts for making such recovery efficient, equitable and resilient; iii) policies, institutions and capacities to implement and monitor disaster recovery; and iv) ways and means for translating the gains of resilient recovery into longer-term risk reduction and resilient development.

Importantly, these case studies aim to learn from, and not evaluate, country reconstruction initiatives. Practices learned from each country’s experience would inform the contents of the guide for developing a DRF. Additionally, the case studies examine the planning processes and not the implementation details of recovery experiences. As such, they do not seek to offer a comprehensive account of the post-disaster recovery program, but instead provide details and insight into the decision-making processes for reconstruction policies and programs.

This case study is unique as it documents ongoing recovery since the occurrence of Typhoon Yolanda, roughly ten months ago. The findings and conclusions should be considered as emerging and evolving as recovery continues to take place in the Philippines.

1. Introduction

1. The Philippines is one of the countries most vulnerable to the impacts of natural disasters. Located within the Pacific Ring of Fire, it is prone to earthquakes and volcanic eruptions. An average of 20 tropical storms or typhoons impact the country each year. Since 2008, typhoons reaching the Philippines have become stronger and more devastating. Two of the most recent ones, Yolanda (Haiyan) and Pablo (Bopha), were considered category 5 storms with winds exceeding 251 km/h, which, according to the Saffir–Simpson hurricane scale, are the most powerful.

2. On November 8, 2013, Super Typhoon Haiyan caused unprecedented damage to nine regions, including 591 municipalities and 56 cities spread across 44 provinces.The sheer strength of the typhoon destroyed 550,928 houses and partially damaged another 589,404.About 16 million persons were affected, many of whom lost their sources of livelihood, while approximately 4.4 million were displaced.There were 6,268 reported casualties, 80% of whom were from Eastern Visayas, the second poorest region in the country. 678 On top of the human toll, damage to infrastructure reached USD 218.18M, with losses totalling USD 59.09M.Initial estimates by the National Economic and Development Authority (NEDA) placed the total damages at around USD 12.9B. 10 Table 1 provides a brief profile the impact of typhoon Yolanda.

Philippines: Yolanda-hit towns in W. Visayas to receive P31.6M for Cash- for-Work

14 September 2014 - 10:33pm
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

Eight towns in Panay Island which were heavily ravaged by Typhoon Yolanda last year will receive a total of P31.6 million for the Cash- for- Work (CFW) program implemented by the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD)-Field Office VI in partnership with local government units (LGUs).

The towns of Anilao, San Rafael, Dao, Bingawan, Banate, and Ajuy in Iloilo, and Sapi-an in Capiz will receive P4.3 million each, while the municipality of New Lucena, Iloilo will receive P1.5 million.

“The amount is intended for those who engaged in CFW for building livelihood assets in their communities. Those who had totally damaged houses were prioritized,” DSWD Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman said.

For this year, DSWD has allotted a total of P384 million for the CFW of 84,000 beneficiaries from 84 municipalities in Western Visayas.

Aside from CFW, the Department is also providing livelihood assistance for various ventures such as oyster culture, purchase of tricycle, loom weaving, setting up of kalamansi plantation and mini-grocery, and vegetable vending amounting to P13.5 million sourced out from donations.

CFW is a developmental strategy of preventing dependency on dole-outs. It is a short-term intervention that will help victims of disasters by engaging them in rehabilitation projects to enable them to have an alternative source of income.

Philippines: Mobile Medical Clinic Ready to Roll in the Philippines

12 September 2014 - 6:14am
Source: Direct Relief Country: Philippines

After Typhoon Haiyan hit the Philippines, Direct Relief partnered with the International Pharmaceuticals, Inc. Foundation (IPI) to increase access to medical care for people living throughout the affected area.

One of the collaborative projects was a mobile medical van focused on providing dental care to underserved communities. We’re happy to announce that as of this week, the van is ready to roll!

With support from a Direct Relief grant, the team at the IPI Foundation – based in Cebu City – worked diligently over the last few months to design, fabricate, and equip the van for medical missions.

The mobile medical van will be staffed by volunteer dentists, hygienists, dental assistants, doctors, nurses, and pharmacists to provide free medical and dental care to typhoon survivors, an estimated 50 percent of whom cannot afford to pay for treatment. IPI estimates that the van will serve 200 people per month.

The project will initially focus on the Eastern, Central, and Western Visayas, but will be open for use throughout the country.

Philippines: Asia-Pacific Humanitarian Bulletin January - June 2014

11 September 2014 - 11:19pm
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Bangladesh, Cambodia, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Indonesia, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Myanmar, Nepal, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Solomon Islands, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Timor-Leste preview

NATURAL DISASTERS AND CONFLICTS IN ASIA-PACIFIC

RISING NUMBER OF STORMS

The first six months of 2014 saw the most intense and highest number of storms in Asia and the Pacific compared to the same period over the last five years. Overall, 58 natural disasters occurred between January and June this year, with over 31 million people affected and 820 people killed. Compared with the same period in 2013, the number of storms increased by 70 per cent, with more than three times the number of people killed and over 13 million affected.

The Philippines and China were the most disaster-affected countries, with the deadliest storms killing 253 people and causing over US$6.1 billion in economic losses in the first half of the year.

Heavy rains and strong winds posed increased difficulties over areas that are still recovering from last year’s devastating Typhoon Haiyan in the central Philippines, as survivors were forced to flee from damaged emergency shelters. With the upcoming storm season, the North-West Pacific might be extensively affected by further storm surges.

CONFLICTS AND DISASTERS ACROSS ASIA-PACIFIC

Humanitarian access continues to pose a challenge in Myanmar, where life-saving services were severely disrupted after attacks against aid agencies in March. Tensions remain high throughout Rakhine and Kachin States following inter-communal violence and fighting between Government forces and troops, with over 236,000 people still displaced. In Thailand, a mass exodus of approximately 120,000 Cambodians returning to Cambodia occurred after an announcement by the Thai Government that they would seek stronger regulation for migrant workers from Cambodia, Lao People’s Democratic Republic and Myanmar.

In the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, nutritional and funding constraints were exacerbated, leaving 2.4 million vulnerable people still in need of regular food assistance and restricting the ability of humanitarian agencies to operate in the country. In southern Philippines, ongoing clashes in the Zamboanga conflict continued to displace over 26,000 people in transitory sites, leaving them with little access to basic services, such as healthcare, employment or education.

Overall, the number of disasters increased from previous years, with most of the events taking place in China (18), Indonesia (9) and the Philippines (5). However, the extent of annual flooding was less severe with fewer losses but greater numbers of people affected.

Similarly, losses from earthquakes dropped significantly over the last four years.

Indonesia experienced two volcanic eruptions in January and February, which led to the displacement of thousands and accounted for 39 deaths. In the Solomon Islands, heavy rain from Tropical Cyclone Ita caused severe flooding at the beginning of April 2014, killing 22 people and affecting over 50,000. The most severely affected area was the capital, Honiara. In Thailand, an unusually long cold spell across the north, north-east and central parts of the country claimed 63 lives in the beginning of the year, with Bangkok experiencing its coldest night in three decades in January

Philippines: Asia-Pacific Humanitarian Bulletin January - June 2014

11 September 2014 - 9:10am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Indonesia, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Myanmar, Nepal, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Solomon Islands, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Timor-Leste preview

Contents

  • Natural Disasters and Conflicts in Asia-Pacific
  • Funding Trends
  • Preparedness Activities in Asia-Pacific
  • WHS Regional Consultation for N&SE Asia
  • Philippines
  • Myanmar
  • El Niño in Asia-Pacific
  • Communications with Communities
  • Humanitarian Civil-Military Coordination

NATURAL DISASTERS AND CONFLICTS IN ASIA-PACIFIC

RISING NUMBER OF STORMS

The first six months of 2014 saw the most intense and highest number of storms in Asia and the Pacific compared to the same period over the last five years. Overall, 58 natural disasters occurred between January and June this year, with over 31 million people affected and 820 people killed. Compared with the same period in 2013, the number of storms increased by 70 per cent, with more than three times the number of people killed and over 13 million affected.

The Philippines and China were the most disaster-affected countries, with the deadliest storms killing 253 people and causing over US$6.1 billion in economic losses in the first half of the year.
Heavy rains and strong winds posed increased difficulties over areas that are still recovering from last year’s devastating Typhoon Haiyan in the central Philippines, as survivors were forced to flee from damaged emergency shelters. With the upcoming storm season, the North-West Pacific might be extensively affected by further storm surges.

CONFLICTS AND DISASTERS ACROSS ASIA-PACIFIC

Humanitarian access continues to pose a challenge in Myanmar, where life-saving services were severely disrupted after attacks against aid agencies in March. Tensions remain high throughout Rakhine and Kachin States following inter-communal violence and fighting between Government forces and troops, with over 236,000 people still displaced. In Thailand, a mass exodus of approximately 120,000 Cambodians returning to Cambodia occurred after an announcement by the Thai Government that they would seek stronger regulation for migrant workers from Cambodia, Lao People’s Democratic Republic and Myanmar.

In the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, nutritional and funding constraints were exacerbated, leaving 2.4 million vulnerable people still in need of regular food assistance and restricting the ability of humanitarian agencies to operate in the country. In southern Philippines, ongoing clashes in the Zamboanga conflict continued to displace over 26,000 people in transitory sites, leaving them with little access to basic services, such as healthcare, employment or education.

Overall, the number of disasters increased from previous years, with most of the events taking place in China (18), Indonesia (9) and the Philippines (5). However, the extent of annual flooding was less severe with fewer losses but greater numbers of people affected.

Similarly, losses from earthquakes dropped significantly over the last four years.

Indonesia experienced two volcanic eruptions in January and February, which led to the displacement of thousands and accounted for 39 deaths. In the Solomon Islands, heavy rain from Tropical Cyclone Ita caused severe flooding at the beginning of April 2014, killing 22 people and affecting over 50,000. The most severely affected area was the capital, Honiara. In Thailand, an unusually long cold spell across the north, north-east and central parts of the country claimed 63 lives in the beginning of the year, with Bangkok experiencing its coldest night in three decades in January.

World: Global emergency overview Snapshot 3–9 September

9 September 2014 - 10:37am
Source: Assessment Capacities Project Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea, Haiti, Honduras, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Namibia, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Paraguay, Philippines, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Uganda, Ukraine, World, Yemen, South Sudan preview

Libya: Concern is growing for the increasing number of people affected by crisis since mid-July, as violence persists, rival governments are failing to assure basic services, and most humanitarian organisations have withdrawn.

Ethiopia and Sudan: Outbreaks of hepatitis E have been reported in IDP camps in South Darfur and among South Sudanese refugees in Ethiopia. At Kalma camp in Sudan, 150 people are thought to have died, and 500 more to have been infected over the past two months. 354 cases of jaundice and hepatitis E have been recorded at Leitchuor camp in Ethiopia since late May.

Iraq: The UN planning figures estimate 1.8 million displaced since January, 850,000 of whom are in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. Shelter is a major challenges and resources are insufficient for adequate construction of the camps that have been planned. Parliament approved a new Government, while Iraqi security forces launched operations around Haditha city, and Peshmerga forces attacked Islamic State positions northeast of Mosul.

Updated: 09/09/2014. Next update: 16/09/2014

Global Emergency Overview Web Interface

Philippines: P700-M ‘Yolanda’ donations disbursed, fully accounted for - DSWD

8 September 2014 - 3:37pm
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

QUEZON CITY, Sept. 9 -- The Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) on Monday clarified that it has already fully disbursed the P779,486,400.15 local and foreign cash donations it has received in December 2013 and that these are fully accounted for.

The clarification came after news reports mentioned that an audit report of Typhoon Yolanda relief operations cited that DSWD has yet to spend the P782 million cash donations it received from local and foreign donors.

“At the time the audit was conducted, we were still doing relief operations and was still using the Department’s existing funds and ready supplies, so much of the cash donations would really not have been really touched yet,” DSWD Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman clarified, adding that the cash donations were really intended for the implementation of rehabilitation efforts based on proposals of affected local government units (LGU).

She also noted, “The audit report only covered until December 2013, just a month after ‘Yolanda’. So understandably, the utilization [of the donations] will still be low.”

The Department explained that the cash donations were used based on approved Work and Financial Plan (WFP).

According to the WFP, the amount was used for the Core Shelter Assistance Program, Emergency Shelter Assistance (ESA) where families with totally damaged houses received P30,000 each and those with partially damaged houses got P10,000, Supplemental Feeding Program, and livelihood assistance.

As of August 28, the DSWD has received a total of P1,121,890,457.41 local and foreign cash donations. Some 90% of this has already been utilized including the more than P700 million received in 2013.

A portion of the balance of P117 million has already been allocated for ESA, cash-for-work in support for ESA, provision of pedicabs, warehouse rentals, and administrative expenses.

The Department is still also waiting for project proposals of typhoon-affected LGUs for part of the remaining balance in the donations.

“We cannot easily transfer funds to LGUs without a clear proposal on how the budget will be used,” Sec. Soliman said.

DSWD likewise reiterated that the spoilage of relief goods from Cebu City and in Isabel, Leyte, also mentioned in the report, was because the goods got wet while in transit at sea.

These were sorted out by the Department, and those found to be unfit for human consumption were reported to COA and were subsequently disposed of.

Sec. Soliman assured that those accountable of the incident will be held liable.

The Secretary also guaranteed all donors that their donations are fully accounted for and will go to the rightful beneficiaries. (DSWD)

Philippines: Typhoon Haiyan: Rebuilding identities in the central Philippines

8 September 2014 - 1:44pm
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Philippines

MAS-IN, the Philippines, September 8 (UNHCR) – Almost a year after Typhoon Haiyan cut a swath of destruction through the central Philippines, rebuilding has turned the region into one big construction site. Major infrastructure, buildings and roads are being rehabilitated. But in the interior village of Mas-in, nestled among sugarcane and pineapple plantations, one woman can only think of building what she has been longing for since birth – her identity.

Marissa Esmiro, 37, along with her husband Marvin, 33, and two daughters, recently acquired their birth certificates at the office of the local civil registrar – formally and legally establishing their identities.

This new lease on life gives the family a chance to improve their situation. "We were considered aliens even before the typhoon came and we owned nothing," said Marissa, who never finished her primary education and gets by with only a US$4 weekly income from clearing farm land.

Starting this April, the UN refugee agency, through its implementing partner IDEALS (Initiatives for Dialogue and Empowerment through Alternative Legal Services), has been implementing a free mobile civil registration project aimed at assisting an estimated 80,000 typhoon survivors in issuing or reconstituting their civil records and other legal documents including birth, marriage and death certificates. As of August, the project has generated more than 120,000 requests, surpassing its initial target.

These vital civil documents, like the birth certificate, open up a range of opportunities to citizens like Marissa to access housing, health care, education, employment, civil protection and confirmation of citizenship.

The Philippines' social services agency recently conducted a household survey for a five-year social protection programme in education and health services in Haiyan-affected areas. The Esmiros were among the lucky ones who have been enrolled in the conditional cash transfer programme of the Department of Social Welfare and Development. Without their documents, this would not have been possible.

"I never really learned to write except for my name. My husband doesn't know how to write at all. We may not have everything in this world, but at least a good education for our children will give them a name they can be proud of some day," said Marissa, hopeful that the government's programme will bring literacy to her children and a way out of the poverty cycle faced by one in four Filipinos.

As she stands in a government office with birth certificates in hand, Marissa cannot believe that her fate is slowly changing. "I can send my children to school every day," she said, reading through the list of services posted on the office wall, "I didn't know we can also avail ourselves of free health services!"

Rebuilding remains a constant activity here in the eastern Visayas region. As some people rebuild their homes and others reconstruct their identities, the once bleak land of death and debris continues to get brighter every day.

Marissa waits for a ride back home, having secured her children's future written on paper. "They say a mother completes a home, so I need to go back to start rebuilding our house."

Meanwhile, as UNHCR prepares to hand over its operation to government structures, its partner relief agency UNICEF plans to pick up UNHCR's civil documentation project and scale up the project coverage until March next year.

By Keneath Bolisay in Mas-in, the Philippines

Philippines: Enduring pain after Muslim rebel attack on Philippine city

8 September 2014 - 1:38am
Source: Agence France-Presse Country: Philippines

09/08/2014 04:47 GMT

by Christian DONIO

ZAMBOANGA, September 8, 2014 (AFP) - Thousands of people displaced by a Muslim rebel assault on a major Philippine city are enduring squalid conditions in an evacuation camp where dozens have died, while the guerilla leader remains free one year on.

The attack by Moro National Liberation Front gunmen triggered three weeks of urban battles with the military in Zamboanga, a southern port city, which left more than 240 people dead.

As Zamboanga this week marks one year since the conflict began, about 11,000 people whose homes were destroyed are still living in the city's sports stadium, where atrocious conditions are regularly claiming lives.

"Life is difficult here. You have to line up to draw water from the faucet," said housewife Vilma Diosma, 43, who shares a tent with her young sons and another family at the sports stadium.

"If you want to use the toilet you have to queue up, and bring your own pail of water to flush. My children are really suffering."

Pneumonia, dysentery and other illnesses generated by the slum-like conditions have claimed 168 lives over the past year, according to Rodelyn Abulos, who is in charge of the city's health services.

He said most of the deaths occurred in the first few months after the conflict when the makeshift evacuation camp was more crowded, but diseases linked to the poor conditions were still killing people.

Portable toilets are so scarce that there is an average of one for every 50 people, according to the city government, while children walk along muddy paths amid flimsy shanty homes on what used to be the grass of the stadium.

  • Overwhelmed -

The cash-strapped Philippine government struggles to provide basic social services even in normal times, with roughly one quarter of its 100 million people living below the poverty line.

However, the Zamboanga conflict occurred at the start of a particularly devastating stretch of disasters that overwhelmed the relief-providing capacities of the government and aid agencies.

A 7.1-magnitude earthquake and Super Typhoon Haiyan, the strongest storm ever recorded on land, claimed more than 7,500 lives late last year across the central Philippines.

Tens of thousands of survivors from Haiyan, as well as deadly storms from previous years, also continue to live in makeshift shelters or evacuation camps.

In Zamboanga, the government has struggled for resources and manpower to rebuild the roughly 10,000 homes, mostly belonging to the city's poorest people, that were destroyed in the conflict.

Most of those homes were set alight by the gunmen, who also took dozens of people hostage, as they sought to deter the surrounding security forces.

At least 116,000 civilians -- about 10 percent of the city's population -- fled their homes when the MNLF gunmen sailed in from neighbouring islands.

MNLF leader Nur Misuari is accused of organising the violence in a failed bid to derail a peace accord between the government and a rival Muslim rebel group, the Moro Islamic Liberation Front.

The MILF is close to finalising a pact that would end a decades-long insurgency that has claimed tens of thousands of lives, and Misuari believes his group has been sidelined in the peace process.

Both groups have been struggling for independence or autonomy for the mainly Catholic Philippines' Muslim minority, and a new self-rule area planned for the southern Philippines is set to be dominated by the MILF.

The military said 208 MNLF gunmen, 25 security forces and 12 civilians died during last year's unrest.

However Misuari did not participate directly in the assault and is believed to be living with sympathetic locals on nearby Muslim-populated islands, avoiding military and police search efforts.

"(Misuari) is in hiding and eventually the law will catch up to him," Philippine military spokesman Lieutenant-Colonel Ramon Zagala said.

The military has also deployed an extra 500 soldiers to Zamboanga in a bid to prevent a repeat attack.

Meanwhile, the national government has said it is aiming to build enough temporary shelters to close the evacuation camp at the sports stadium by Christmas.

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© 1994-2014 Agence France-Presse

Philippines: Philippines: Typhoon Haiyan - Emergency appeal n° MDRPH014, operation update n°8

4 September 2014 - 2:33pm
Source: International Federation of Red Cross And Red Crescent Societies Country: Philippines preview

Appeal history:

  • 30 July 2014: A further revision of the emergency appeal was launched, seeking CHF 99.88 million to support 100,000 households (500,000 people)

  • 16 January 2014: A revision of this emergency appeal was launched for CHF 126.2 million to support 100,000 families (500,000 people) over 24 months.

  • 12 November 2013: An emergency appeal was launched on a preliminary basis for CHF 72.3 million to support 100,000 families (500,000 people) over 18 months.

  • 8 November 2013: CHF 475,495 was allocated from the IFRC’s Disaster Relief Emergency Fund (DREF) to support the Philippine Red Cross in delivering assistance to those affected and undertake initial needs assessments in the affected areas.

Summary:
The establishment of the respective barangay recovery committees together with the Philippine Red Cross (PRC) is now complete with the committees active in certifying beneficiary households through social mapping and community validation together with their respective community members. During this reporting period, over 13,000 households were identified for the first phase of household livelihood assistance (HLA) in Aklan, Antique, Capiz, Cebu and Leyte. These activities were successfully carried out by PRC volunteers and staff, supported by the Haiyan coordination team at the various levels and IFRC. Also, some 4,000 selected beneficiary households have claimed the first instalment of their livelihood grant.

In shelter, this reporting period showed the complete construction of 243 core houses of the current 5,645 beneficiary households already selected for core shelter. About 43 per cent of all validated shelter beneficiary households for shelter repair assistance have received their respective allocations of corrugated galvanized iron (CGI) sheets and almost 5,000 beneficiary households, the full package of CGI sheets and conditional cash grants. Together with the construction of core shelters, 243 household latrines have been built throughout Aklan, Antique, Capiz, Cebu and Leyte.
In support of rehabilitation of school facilities, PRC, with IFRC support, conducted assessments at schools which had been used as evacuation centres in Barugo. Up to 12 schools in Leyte and Cebu have now been identified for rebuilding of communal latrines, hand washing facilities, hand pump repair, water source rehabilitation and tank installation. Health facilities affected by Typhoon Haiyan are also undergoing identification and selection for rehabilitation and re-equipping. Up to 20 facilities have been identified and selected in Aklan, Capiz, Cebu and Leyte. Planning for the handover of medical supplies from PRC to these facilities is currently under discussion among PRC, IFRC and German Red Cross. Up to 19,535 school-going children also participated in PRC-led hygiene promotion activities Training and skill building of PRC staff and volunteers at the chapter level continue through training in warehouse management; livelihood intervention processes, monitoring methods and community engagement; community- based health and first aid (CBHFA), violence prevention and non-communicable diseases; core shelter monitoring, management and technical expertise; and the use of open data kit/smart mobile technology to facilitate clearer and more accurate data collection.
Together with the newly revised emergency appeal launched on 30 July 2014, a comprehensive revised plan of action heralds several alterations to the goals of the overall Haiyan operation. Sectorial targets have been altered to better accommodate available human, material and financial resources.
Contributions to the IFRC Typhoon Haiyan to date have brought coverage of the appeal up to 87 per cent against the revised appeal budget of CHF 99.88 million. Of this, 84 per cent constitutes hard pledges and the remaining 3 per cent, soft. Details of donor contributions can be seen here. For queries, please contact the resource mobilization and relationship management team at the Asia Pacific zone office.

On behalf of Philippine Red Cross, IFRC would like to thank all partners and donors for their invaluable support towards this operation.

Philippines: Philippines: Second phase of construction begins

3 September 2014 - 2:42pm
Source: Medair Country: Philippines

After building 600 houses for vulnerable families in Dulag, Philippines following the destructive typhoon in 2013, Medair has started the second phase of construction. During the second phase, we will build 1,080 more houses, distribute roof kits to 1,200 households to strengthen homes, and provide training to more than 1,800 people on how to lessen risks and be prepared for future typhoons.

Josita and Gregorio, both in their late 70s, are one of the 1,080 families receiving a new house in this next phase. No longer able to formally work because of their age, Josita and Gregorio still grow vegetables in their garden to sell at the local market. While earning them a small profit, it is only enough to get by. So when their home was destroyed by the typhoon, they didn’t have enough money to rebuild properly.

Josita and Gregorio rebuilt what was left of their house by using whatever damaged materials and scraps they could find. “We immediately rebuilt our house because we had nothing,” recalls Josita. “But we have trouble sleeping.” She points to the thin mats on the mud floor where they have been sleeping inside their flimsy structure since the typhoon.

“We’re very happy that you’ve given us this house,” continues Josita. And with construction nearly complete, Josita and Gregorio will move into their new home this week.

Our impact

Since Typhoon Haiyan struck the Philippines in November 2013, we have:

• Helped an estimated 60,000 people rebuild their lives
• Provided new, typhoon-resilient houses for more than 3,000 people
• Distributed nearly 5,000 hygiene kits to prevent the spread of disease
• Supplied more than 800 toolkits to help families rebuild, and
• Given out almost 4,100 tarpaulins to use as emergency roofs and walls

We have also distributed nearly 40 tarpaulins to several schools, which are being used as temporary roofing and walls while they rebuild. Consequently, more children are attending classes now that they have some protection from the weather.

Additionally, our teams have repaired local health centres in the region, supplying them with emergency health kits comprised of basic supplies such as antibiotics and syringes. Each of these kits can support 10,000 people for up to three months.

Hear the stories of those impacted

Philippines: DSWD receives add’l donation for ‘Yolanda’ survivors

3 September 2014 - 1:33am
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman receives the P432, 679. 22 check donation of the Association of Asian Election Authorities from Commission on Elections (COMELEC) Chairman Sixto Brillantes for Typhoon Yolanda survivors.

In accepting the donation, Sec. Soliman expressed her gratitude to the donors and said that this will be used in building additional transitional units for families displaced by ‘Yolanda’.

As of July 2014, a total of 4,393 families from ‘Yolanda’-hit areas are already residing in transitional shelter units.

DSWD has already received a total of US$23,766,111. 40 and P97, 879, 377.44 local donations for ‘Yolanda‘ survivors, as of September 1.

Philippines: Philippines Typhoon Haiyan Response - Appeal PHL131 Revision 2

2 September 2014 - 8:00pm
Source: ACT Alliance Country: Philippines preview

Appeal Target: US$25,114,557

Balance Requested: US$6,805,844

Revision 2 was originally issued on 18 August, 2014. It is corrected and re issued again today, 3rd September, 2014. The only changers made are on page 2, TABLE 3: SUMMARY OF APPEAL REQUIREMENTS. Here, the ICCO cooperation budget has been increased to $7.15 million. As a result, they are seeking a further $2.4 million from the alliance, to fully fund their requirement.

Corrected and reissued on 3rd September, 2014

Dear Colleagues,

In the early morning of 8 November 2013, Typhoon Haiyan (local name: Yolanda), made landfall in the eastern Visayas region of the Philippines. With winds up to 250 kph sweeping through the region, accompanied by a storm surge of up to 5m, the typhoon caused wide spread damage and losses. Its impact was felt from provinces of Batangas and Cavite in the north as far as Surigao del Sur Province,
Mindanao in the south.

Government data as of April 2014 reports estimate that 14.1 million people were affected, including 6,300 casualties and hundreds more missing, 4 million displaced and about 1 million houses destroyed or damaged across 600 municipalities and 44 provinces in 9 regions of the country.

The ACT Alliance members launched their Relief and Rehabilitation response through the ACT Appeal issued in November 2013. The next months’ focus remained on distribution of relief goods while also providing early recovery support through livelihoods restoration, WASH, unconditional cash transfer and provision of semi-permanent shelters alongside providing psychosocial care with optimal integration of quality & accountability measures.

As of April/May the ACT response has transitioned to early recovery and rehabilitation. Several consultation meetings were conducted in the target communities to identify the context and needs as well as possible gaps in the delivery of services of other humanitarian actors present in the area.

Revision 1, issued 28 May 2014, reflected changes based on the community consultation process and after taking stock of realities on the ground. The first revision reflected the amended response of Christian Aid, LWR, NCA and NCCP and focussed on the sectors of permanent shelter, albeit with significant downscaling, shelter repairing, semi-permanent shelter kits, DRR inclusive of capacity building and construction of cyclone shelters, WASH and livelihood restoration with strong mainstreaming of cross-cutting issues including quality & accountability, psychosocial care and LRRD.
Revision 2 reflects the revised ICCO response focussing on food security and nutrition, NFIs, shelter, livelihood, DDR and capacity building.

World: Global Emergency Overview Snapshot 27 August–2 September

2 September 2014 - 9:10am
Source: Assessment Capacities Project Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea, Haiti, Honduras, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Paraguay, Philippines, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Uganda, Ukraine, World, Yemen, South Sudan preview

Syria: Syrian refugee numbers have grown by a million in a year, and now exceed three million, while the journey out of Syria is getting tougher. 42 children were reported killed by government strikes over 29-31 August, while in IS-held areas there are reports of routine executions and amputations.

Sierra Leone: One million people are in need of aid as a consequence of the Ebola outbreak; between 20 and 26 August, 116 new cases and 30 deaths were reported, bringing the total to 1,602 cases, including 422 deaths, since the outbreak began. Staff at a treatment centre have called a strike over pay and conditions, and the Health Minister has been replaced.

Ukraine: IDP figures have grown by more than 80,000 in two weeks, to reach 230,000. 3.9 million people live in areas directly affected by violence, but access to humanitarian aid is near-impossible in conflict areas. Older people are particularly vulnerable.

Updated: 02/09/2014. Next update: 09/09/2014

Global Emergency Overview Web Interface

Philippines: Philippines Humanitarian Bulletin Issue, Issue 27 | 01 – 31 August 2014

1 September 2014 - 7:54am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Philippines preview

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Displaced people in Zamboanga continue to live in difficult conditions in overcrowded evacuation centres.

  • Emergency threshold on health breached six times in Zamboanga over the past 12 months.

  • Pacific Partnership 2014 rebuilding schools and hospital in Tacloban

  • World Humanitarian Day on 19 August.

FUNDING

Typhoon Haiyan
781 million requested (US$)
60% funded

Zamboanga Action Plan (revised)

12.8 million requested (US$)
45% funded
Source: Financial Tracking Service

Philippines: Super Typhoon Haiyan: Gender Snapshot (as of 18 Aug 2014)

1 September 2014 - 5:29am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, Oxfam Country: Philippines preview

Philippines: ICRC President lauds partnership with Philippine Red Cross in Yolanda recovery

29 August 2014 - 2:16am
Source: Philippine National Red Cross Country: Philippines

Basey, Samar -- After viewing the progress of communities in the areas hit by typhoon Yolanda, the President of the International Committee of the Red Cross said that the partnership with the Philippine Red Cross in implementing the recovery efforts can be modeled and used in other places in the world.

ICRC President Peter Maurer told a gathering of volunteers and staff of the Philippine Red Cross during a visit to Samar that “ our partnership is highly inspiring, and for which, I am extremely grateful."

He said that “ I hope that my visit here is also an opportunity [for us to] think together on what we have learned in the past year. And how we can be a model for it in other places."

Maurer added that ‘ The way we work together here ---the ICRC and the [ Philippine Red Cross], the volunteers, and the officials, I think, is exemplary. We can draw lessons from the extraordinary cooperation that we have and see how we can bring this further beyond the Philippines, beyond other continents.“

Among the places where Maurer and PRC officials visited were the Basey District Hospital, which was jointly repaired by the ICRC and the PRC.

So far, the ICRC in partnership with the PRC has built 2,100 shelters in Samar, and aims to finish 4,500 shelters by the end of 2014.

In the immediate aftermath of typhoon Yolanda, the ICRC and PRC prioritized livelihood projects, employing thousands of people by giving them jobs clearing debris on roads, farmlands and backyards, digging trenches, and cutting and producing lumber.

Water network systems benefiting many villages were also implemented , and the Red Cross restored the water supply system in Guiuan. Healthcare facilities across Samar were also constructed to benefit residents in the area.

As for the impact of the recovery efforts to devastated populations in Samar , Maurer said that “ the work of the Philippine Red Cross and ICRC and other support organizations are really appreciated. They are taking initiatives on their own to make the support even bigger. “

Philippine Red Cross Chairman Richard Gordon said that Maurer came all the way over from Geneva and “ What is most important, he found time to come here, especially when the whole world is in turmoil. “

Gordon said that survivors of typhoon Yolanda are now on their way to rebuilding their lives and that ‘’ we’ve made them part of the process of changing their lives for the better. “

Philippine Red Cross Secretary General Gwendolyn Pang said that the Red Cross movement is ‘ focused on providing shelter and livelihood to the survivors of typhoon Yolanda. We were here when it hit, and we will be here until every community has completely recovered. “

Pang added that the PRC is on track to constructing about 90,000 shelter units for the families devastated by typhoon Yolanda and that ‘’ we are also providing families with livelihood opportunities so that they can rebound and become self-reliant as soon as possible. “

For his part, Maurer said that ‘ There is one single thing that struck me –everybody who I met, for whom you have worked, and we have all worked together, was extremely happy and grateful. And I think there is nothing better than that. "

Before he left the country, Maurer also paid a visit to the Philippine Red Cross National Headquarters in Manila, where he was warmly received.

Philippines: ADRA in the Philippines sustains humanitarian efforts in typhoon-hit areas

27 August 2014 - 11:46pm
Source: Adventist Development and Relief Agency International Country: Philippines preview

The Adventist Development and Relief Agency (ADRA) in the Philippines has spent almost 8 million USD in combined emergency response and recovery efforts since Typhoon Haiyan struck the country in November last year, addressing the basic but crucial post-disaster needs of more than 160,000 individuals or 32,000 households in the Visayas region.

Eight emergency response projects amounting to 1.9 million USD in total were already completed as of July this year. These included food relief distribution, provision of potable water and sanitation and hygiene (WASH), Disaster Risk Reduction trainings, self-recovery shelter projects and Cash-For-Work programs. These efforts were directed at severely affected communities in Leyte, Aklan, Iloilo, and Capiz provinces, although food relief aid also covered some areas of Northern Cebu just days after the typhoon.

ADRA International, ADRA Network, ADRA Regional Office, ADRA Japan, Swiss Solidarity, Hong Kong Disaster Relief, Aktion Deutschland Hilft (ADH) Germany, and the Southern Asia-Pacific Division of the Seventh-day Adventist church have made these initial efforts possible.

Meanwhile, eight recovery projects are ongoing in the aforementioned provinces, with a projected total spending of 5.9 million USD. These projects primarily focus on rebuilding shelters, reviving sources of livelihood, food security and further DRR education.

ADRA Network, ADRA Australia, Canada, Czech Republic, New Zealand, Norway, United Kingdom, GEZA Austria, the Canadian Foodgrains Bank, and the Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada are supporting the said recovery projects.

Through the Support to Self-Recovery for Shelter (SSRS) program, ADRA is helping 5,950 households rebuild decent shelters. The organization has provided these families shelter kits composed of construction materials such as corrugated galvanized iron (CGI) sheets, GI sheets and coco lumber, and tool kits composed of tarpaulin, rope, nails, saw, hammer, shovel, machete and bucket, among others.

The SSRS project had been completed in Kalibo, Aklan last July and had reconstructed houses for 550 families. This was part of the eight initial emergency response projects.

Meanwhile, 4,000 shelters are still being constructed in Roxas (Capiz), 1,000 in the towns of Carigara and Dagami (Leyte), 500 in Ajuy (Iloilo) and 170 in Makato (Aklan).

Livelihood is another crucial aspect in the recovery process of the typhoon survivors. ADRA has assisted fisher folks and their families in terms of reviving their fishing livelihood, which had been severely affected by the devastation of the super typhoon. Through the Boat Repair Assistance Grant (BRAG) program, the organization has helped a total of 1,716 households in Ajuy (Iloilo) and 500 in Roxas (Capiz) repair or construct their boats.

In Bato, Leyte, ADRA is helping 300 families in the fishing community of Dawahon Island in terms of having better access to local food source. The residents on this island primarily rely on seaweed farming and fishing. ADRA is providing these families fishing tools such as fish traps and seaweed kits for seaweed production, and cash-for-work incentives for the locals.