TyphoonHaiyan - RW Updates

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Updated: 16 min 58 sec ago

Philippines: REACH supports efforts to improve sanitation in the Philippines

2 hours 45 min ago
Source: REACH Initiative Country: Philippines

In the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan, REACH assessments of damage to water and sanitation infrastructure informed emergency response and early recovery planning, including the rehabilitation of water systems and latrines in the most affected areas. More than one year on, the focus has shifted from emergency interventions to sustainable development, and there is a critical opportunity to address long-term sanitation challenges such as open defecation, which remains a major problem in the Philippines. Open defecation contributes to the almost 10, 000 deaths caused by diarrhoea every year in the country, and constrains economic and social development.

Planning and implementing sustainable solutions to this long-term challenge requires in-depth data which goes beyond infrastructure to encompass social norms. REACH worked to fill this information gap through a large scale assessment conducted in September-November 2014, comprising of (in each of six provinces) a large-scale household survey, community focus group discussions, a school survey, student focus group discussions and key informant interviews with representatives from the Department of Health, Department of Education and Department of Interior and Local Government. The qualitative and quantitative components of this assessment provided detailed baseline data on sanitation knowledge, attitudes and practices at household and school level across six provinces of the Philippines.

This baseline data will be used by UNICEF and partners to inform planning and implementation of the Philippines Approach to Total Sanitation (PhaTS) program, as well as to measure its progress. The program is expected to reach over 900, 000 beneficiaries, and aims to end the practice of open defecation through facilitating changes in social norms and fuelling demand for sanitation and hygiene; sustaining demand through supply side interventions; and promoting good governance, resilience and disaster risk reduction.

Philippines: Water supply technology shared with Southeast Asia

23 January 2015 - 1:55am
Source: Korean Information Service Country: Cambodia, Indonesia, Philippines, Republic of Korea, Viet Nam

Many more people around the world now have access to safe drinking water as Korea's technology to supply clean water has been shared with other nations.

Three hundred home-use water purifiers that can eliminate arsenic and provide clean drinking water were delivered to the village of Binh Chau in Vung Tau Province in southern Vietnam on January 17. The supply of water purifiers is part of ongoing efforts to improve environmental conditions and to fine-tune the Korean technology to make it suitable to the situation in targeted countries, finally providing, "environmentally appropriate technology."

Subterranean water in the province is contaminated with arsenic, one of the most dangerous carcinogens, due to geological reasons in the province. However, many residents in the province have been using underground water as drinking water and it has become a threat to their health.

The water purifiers can sanitize water without using electricity, as they are equipped with filters that have arsenic absorbers. This feature was added in consideration of the instable electricity supply in some rural areas. In addition to arsenic, the filters can also process other harmful materials, including microorganisms in the water. They are designed so that they can be maintained just by changing the filter.

The Korea Environmental Industry Technology Institute (KEITI) has been providing environmentally appropriate technology to Vietnam, the Philippines, Cambodia and Indonesia since May 2014. This supply of water purifiers to Vietnam is its first project to bear fruit.

The KEITI has also undertaken the construction of a water purification facility in the state of Iloilo in the Philippines. It will be completed in February and will help the victims of the typhoon Haiyan that hit the province in 2013. The facility is designed to store rain water and to provide drinking water.

The KEITI is also working on a simplified network of waterworks in Cambodia and a waste water processing facility in an industrial complex in and excrement disposal facilities in Indonesia will be completed in late March.

"We intend to establish a system to properly and continuously maintain the water purifiers and other facilities so that the sharing of environmentally appropriate technology does not end up as a one-time solution," said Kim Yong-joo, president of the KEITI.

By Limb Jae-un
Korea.net Staff Writer
Photos courtesy of the KEITI
jun2@korea.kr

Philippines: The Typhoon Haiyan response - Humanitarian Exchange Magazine Issue 63

21 January 2015 - 10:53am
Source: ODI - Humanitarian Practice Network Country: Philippines

This edition of Humanitarian Exchange focuses on lessons from the humanitarian response to Typhoon Haiyan, the worst disaster ever to hit the Philippines. Making landfall on 8 November 2013, the typhoon killed more than 6,000 people and affected more than 14 million. It also triggered a swift, large-scale national and international (Level 3) response.

In the lead article, David Carden and Ashley Jonathan Clements highlight the important coordination role of the Philippines government in the response.

Katie Peters and Mirianna Budimir analyse why such heavy losses were sustained despite significant government investment in Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR).

Julie Hall analyses the World Health Organisation (WHO)’s long experience of responding to disasters in the Philippines, emphasising that government structures need to be able to handle multiple waves of health needs for months or even years after an event.

Articles by Barb Wigley and Alex Jacobs reflect on the attitudes and tools needed to build a culture of accountability to affected populations

Caroline Austin and Nicki Bailey discuss lessons learned from a review of support to enhance two-way communications with communities.

Articles by John Tipper, Anne Street and Michiel Hofman and Sandrine Tiller focus on the need to improve the quality of partnerships and engagement with local actors by clusters and individual agencies.

Alesh Brown reflects on the collective cash response in the Philippines, one of the largest humanitarian cash-based interventions ever mounted

Serena Brown points out the extensive and growing role of the private sector in the Haiyan response.
The issue ends with articles by Catholic Relief Services (CRS) Philippines and Victoria Maynard and Phil Barritt discussing key aspects of the shelter response.

As always, we welcome any comments or feedback, which can be sent to hpn@odi.org or to The Coordinator, 203 Blackfriars Road, London SE1 8NJ.

Read the full issue

Featured in this issue

  • The Typhoon Haiyan response

  • Coordinating the response to Typhoon Haiyan

  • Typhoon Haiyan: pushing the limits of DRR?

  • Assessing early warning efforts for Typhoon Haiyan in Leyte

  • Typhoon Haiyan: lessons from the response and how to prepare for the future

  • Constructing a culture of accountability: lessons from the Philippines

  • Pamati Kita: ‘Let’s Listen Together’

  • Coordination around communicating with disaster-affected communities: insights from Typhoon Haiyan

  • Engaging with clusters: empowering and learning from local organisations

  • Humanitarian partnerships: reality lags behind the rhetoric

  • ‘Recently noticed’ aid actors: MSF’s interaction with a changing humanitarian landscape

  • Philippines Are cash transfers the ‘new normal’ in the Philippines? Challenges and opportunities from Typhoon Haiyan

  • The private sector: stepping up

  • Urban shelter and settlement recovery: a ‘menu of options’ for households

  • Supporting shelter self-recovery: field experience following Typhoon Haiyan

Philippines: The Typhoon Haiyan response - Humanitarian Exchange Magazine Issue 61

21 January 2015 - 10:53am
Source: ODI - Humanitarian Practice Network Country: Philippines

This edition of Humanitarian Exchange focuses on lessons from the humanitarian response to Typhoon Haiyan, the worst disaster ever to hit the Philippines. Making landfall on 8 November 2013, the typhoon killed more than 6,000 people and affected more than 14 million. It also triggered a swift, large-scale national and international (Level 3) response.

In the lead article, David Carden and Ashley Jonathan Clements highlight the important coordination role of the Philippines government in the response.

Katie Peters and Mirianna Budimir analyse why such heavy losses were sustained despite significant government investment in Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR).

Julie Hall analyses the World Health Organisation (WHO)’s long experience of responding to disasters in the Philippines, emphasising that government structures need to be able to handle multiple waves of health needs for months or even years after an event.

Articles by Barb Wigley and Alex Jacobs reflect on the attitudes and tools needed to build a culture of accountability to affected populations

Caroline Austin and Nicki Bailey discuss lessons learned from a review of support to enhance two-way communications with communities.

Articles by John Tipper, Anne Street and Michiel Hofman and Sandrine Tiller focus on the need to improve the quality of partnerships and engagement with local actors by clusters and individual agencies.

Alesh Brown reflects on the collective cash response in the Philippines, one of the largest humanitarian cash-based interventions ever mounted

Serena Brown points out the extensive and growing role of the private sector in the Haiyan response.
The issue ends with articles by Catholic Relief Services (CRS) Philippines and Victoria Maynard and Phil Barritt discussing key aspects of the shelter response.

As always, we welcome any comments or feedback, which can be sent to hpn@odi.org or to The Coordinator, 203 Blackfriars Road, London SE1 8NJ.

Read the full issue

Featured in this issue

  • The Typhoon Haiyan response

  • Coordinating the response to Typhoon Haiyan

  • Typhoon Haiyan: pushing the limits of DRR?

  • Assessing early warning efforts for Typhoon Haiyan in Leyte

  • Typhoon Haiyan: lessons from the response and how to prepare for the future

  • Constructing a culture of accountability: lessons from the Philippines

  • Pamati Kita: ‘Let’s Listen Together’

  • Coordination around communicating with disaster-affected communities: insights from Typhoon Haiyan

  • Engaging with clusters: empowering and learning from local organisations

  • Humanitarian partnerships: reality lags behind the rhetoric

  • ‘Recently noticed’ aid actors: MSF’s interaction with a changing humanitarian landscape

  • Philippines Are cash transfers the ‘new normal’ in the Philippines? Challenges and opportunities from Typhoon Haiyan

  • The private sector: stepping up

  • Urban shelter and settlement recovery: a ‘menu of options’ for households

  • Supporting shelter self-recovery: field experience following Typhoon Haiyan

Philippines: Accountability after Haiyan

21 January 2015 - 9:28am
Source: IRIN Country: Philippines

LONDON, 21 January 2015 (IRIN) - When Typhoon Haiyan swept across the central Philippines in November 2013, the subsequent emergency response was a test case for the aid industry's aspiration to be accountable to affected populations.

The phrase became a term of art, with its own initials, AAP, and in the early days of the response the UN appointed its first ever AAP Coordinator.

In normal times at least the Philippines, as a middle-income country, has considerable human and infrastructural resources for informing people, consulting them and soliciting their views. Even if radio transmitters and phone masts were destroyed (and it was mostly only the teenagers who managed to hold onto their mobile phones in the scramble to survive the typhoon) the Philippines still had a lot going for it.

So how well did agencies do? The London-based Humanitarian Practice Network attempts an assessment in a special Typhoon Haiyan edition of its publication, Humanitarian Exchange, which includes an article by that very first AAP coordinator, Barb Wigley.

The trouble with tools

Wigley warns against too great a preoccupation with tools and systems, leading to what she calls a drift away from the primary purpose of a culture of accountability.

"The tools and mechanisms," she says, "have increasingly become an end in themselves."

One of the most useful things she describes doing was done very simply, without text messaging or smartphones or social media. Small teams went into evacuation centres and just talked to people, all sorts of people, including young boys and girls and elderly people, to see what they had to say about the response.

They found adults distressed by the lack of information, and wanting to know far more than the simple messages which, she says, the humanitarian community was inclined to transmit to them. They found young people upset by any unfairness and disturbed by seeing so many dead bodies around, and elderly people embarrassed by the lack of appropriate underwear.

Agencies were able to respond. HelpAge International tackled the underwear problem; UNFPA started including radios in the kits of non-food items it was distributing. And by quickly writing up and distributing their findings as widely as possible, Wigley says they were able to reinforce the point "that the voices and opinions of ordinary people...were as important and as instructive as input from what are usually more privileged, better educated and more powerful 'Key Informants.'"

Systems and culture

So some things did work, but participants at a meeting in London to launch the publication - many of whom had worked on the response to Haiyan - were more inclined to a verdict of 'could do better.'

Mike Noyes of Action Aid, who helped compile a report, 'Missed Again', on the shortcomings of partnerships with local NGOs during the Haiyan operation said this couldn't be blamed on the local situation.

"In Haiti it was because the system works in English and everyone spoke French; in the Philippines the lingua franca for most educated people was English anyway," he said.

Noyes went on to dismiss other oft-voiced excuses, such as "security issues."

"No, that wasn't the case there. 'Mistrust of the outsider'.... all those easy, practical reasons why it might not be happening just weren't big factors in the Philippines. So it does come back much more to a system and to a culture."

Noyes blames a culture where the international UN and NGO staff all know each other and local organizations don't understand the system, especially the UN cluster system, and feel excluded.

Yet local NGOs are inherently accessible and accountable, rooted in their communities, and they can also be of great help to the internationals - if they are allowed.

"There is an assumption," said Noyes, "that local NGOs don't have resources, so our natural thing is not to look round and say, 'Now which is the organization which might help us with warehousing?' We just assume they don't exist because that's the way it's always been, and we are not catching up with those developments and those changes."

Alex Jacobs, from Plan International, worked on a project in the Philippines called Pamati Kita, or 'Let's Listen Together'. He stressed the need to cut through alphabet soup of acronyms and the proliferation of agencies, and make things much simpler for people to deal with.

"At its most simple, we were saying, 'Well, how about a common hotline, rather than twenty different numbers which people have to call or text? Wouldn't it make sense from the community's point of view if there was just one number?' Which is a very appealing idea, but - as ever - turned out to be a little bit harder than we had hoped."

But it's still a good idea, and is now being tried in Iraq, a much more difficult environment. The plan is for a call centre for all UN organizations and clusters, with between four and six staff, and a coordinator who can direct comments and questions to the relevant agencies.

UN OCHA's Sarah Mace described it as a mandated, response-wide accountability tool. But she conceded that local groups would not be directly involved, at least not in the initial phase.

Mace told IRIN, "Iraq is more complicated because there is a combination of Kurdish and different dialects of Kurdish, Arabic and different dialects of Arabic.....but the people we are recruiting to work in the call centre have to have all these languages and will be using them to reach out to local NGOs. The engagement of local NGOs and local partners is one of our key indicators for achievement."

The value of radio

Radio was hugely important in the Haiyan emergency. The CDAC (Communicating with Disaster Affected Communities) Network's own learning review of the response notes a dramatic shift in people's main source of information from television before the typhoon, to radio afterwards. But several participants in the London meeting stressed the need for humanitarian actors to change their mindset and accept radio as a two-way medium, not just for delivering information, but also for discussion and dialogue.

Internews, a US-based non-profit which works with local media across the world, got a radio station and information centre up and running just three weeks after the storm.

Radio Bakdaw, set up by Internews, put officials live on air, and at its peak was receiving a thousand text messages from listeners a day. Its project director, Stijn Aelbers, worries about what happens when organizations want to be better at communication.

"It must be acknowledged that if people have questions, they are allowed to ask them," he told IRIN. "I am worried that humanitarians are very wary of false information; as a result there will be communications staff appointed that are allowed to talk, but they talk about their organization. It's inevitable. They will have a hard time translating it into very practical, very simple information for the affected people. And the result is a very, very controlled communication. If people come to you, then have your programme staff available, because they know the practical stuff. This is not about crafting a message."

What it is about, finally, is fundamental attitudes to the people affected by disasters like Haiyan. In the words of that first AAP coordinator, Barb Wigley, it's "about seeing the people we seek to assist as our equals."

Eb/am

[END]

Philippines: Philippines: Typhoon Haiyan - Executive Brief, 8 January 2015

19 January 2015 - 10:17pm
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization Country: Philippines

HIGHLIGHTS

  • FAO is providing assistance in four critical areas of intervention, in support of over 154 000 families:
  1. Rice and corn farming – FAO has supported more than 100 000 rice and corn farmers since December 2013. Livelihoods were restored rapidly, with big returns. This included the distribution of certified rice seeds by FAO to more than 44 500 farming households, in time for the December 2013/January 2014 planting season, which resulted in an improved rice yield to: ensure food security; generate vital income; and save seed for the next planting season.

  2. Fisheries and coastal communities – FAO is providing some 19 000 small-scale fishers with livelihood inputs, technical guidance and trainings on aquaculture, post-harvest processing, marine protected areas management and hybrid boats.

  3. Coconut-based farming systems – FAO is assisting 32 500 small-scale coconut farmers build alternative livelihoods and is providing 3 000 upland farmers with seedlings and training to rehabilitate agroforestry systems.

  4. Coastal/mangrove forest rehabilitation – FAO is promoting the natural regeneration of coastal ecosystems and the recovery and protection of related livelihoods by distributing seeds and planting materials.

  • Resilience building is a key part of FAO’s ongoing interventions, complementing efforts to meet the urgent needs of farmers whose seed stocks were lost or damaged by the typhoon, while enhancing farmers and government capacities and apply approaches to avoid or limit the adverse effects of future hazards.

  • FAO has mobilized over USD 39.7 million – more than 100 percent of the funds appealed for under the Typhoon Haiyan Strategic Response Plan. Contributors include: Central Emergency Response Fund, European Commission Directorate General for Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection, FAO and the Governments of Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Finland, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Japan, New Zealand, Norway, Switzerland and the United Kingdom.

Philippines: Pope euphoria quickly fades in Philippines typhoon zone

19 January 2015 - 1:44am
Source: Agence France-Presse Country: Philippines

Tacloban, Philippines | AFP | Monday 1/19/2015 - 05:15 GMT | 609 words

Vincent Basiano sang and cheered along with a sea of other joyous typhoon survivors as Pope Francis celebrated mass on a rainy Philippine day, but all too quickly the euphoria passed.

Basiano lost his shanty home when Super Typhoon Haiyan, the most powerful storm recorded on land, claimed thousands of lives in poor fishing and farming communities 14 months ago.

As soon as the pope heard about the disaster, he vowed to travel to the mainly Catholic Philippines and visit the millions of survivors.

On the weekend he fulfilled that commitment, celebrating a deeply emotional mass with Basiano and about 200,000 other people in Tacloban, one of the worst-hit cities.

"While I was there in the presence of the pope, the joy was overflowing," Basiano, 32, told AFP a few hours later as heavy rain fell on his new shanty made of scrap wood and tin.

"But when I got home, it was back to reality. Here comes another typhoon. We try to take this reality in stride, being vulnerable to the dangers of typhoons, but we also need to prepare."

The pope had to cut short Saturday's trip to Tacloban and other areas devastated by Haiyan because of another storm, and he flew back to Manila leaving millions like Basiano to continue with their struggle.

In Basiano's Anibong village in Tacloban, 500 families are crammed into shanties and they were all preparing for another brutal night as Tropical Storm Mekkhala passed.

Haiyan killed or left missing more than 7,350 people, in the deadliest natural disaster of 2013, and it will take many years if not lifetimes for the region to recover.

Scars from Haiyan are still visible across Tacloban, with many still living in temporary shelters, while ruins of homes, buildings and decapitated coconut trees line the roads.

  • 'We are holding on to hope' -

In Anibong, the bow of a ship lies beached dozens of metres (yards) from the shore, almost touching the highway, a reminder of Haiyan's monster winds and tsunami-like waves that wiped out entire villages.

"If the pope had visited here, he would have been shocked with what he saw," Ofelia Villarmenta, a 37-year-old mother of eight, told AFP.

Villarmenta said she would have loved to have gone to the mass and been blessed by the pope, but she stayed home to pack her family's clothes before they moved out of their tiny home to a storm shelter.

"We have not rebuilt our homes here because we have no money," said Villarmenta, whose fish vendor-husband was out of work for almost a year after Haiyan struck.

Basiano said he was out of work for more than a year after Haiyan as the huge waves demolished the computer school where he taught, forcing him to rely on his meat vendor father, who supports a household of 14.

"We didn't buy clothes and other material things for a year, just rice," said Basiano, who only found work, as a community worker with an aid group, this month.

Villarmenta said she and her husband relocated to Manila after Haiyan but returned to Tacloban several months later.

"We ended up selling fish in Manila like we do here, so we just went home so we can be with family," she said.

Still, Basiano said the pope's visit had given renewed hope to storm survivors, and he said he expected it jolt the government to quicken the painfully slow pace of rebuilding the region.

"Because of the sympathy showed by the pope. We Yolanda (Haiyan) survivors are holding on to hope," he said.

"He gave us a voice and strengthened our faith," he said.

jfg/kma/mtp

© 1994-2015 Agence France-Presse

Philippines: IFAD grants P84M for the Yolanda Rehabilitation Program in WV

18 January 2015 - 11:10pm
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

QUEZON CITY, Jan. 13 -- The International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) through the Department of Agriculture VI has given a total of Php84M for rehabilitation of the agriculture sector affected by typhoon Yolanda last November 8, 2013 in Western Visayas.

Rene B. Famoso, regional rice program action officer in a statement said that a total of P44,858,240.00 were used to purchase 32,984 bags of certified seeds distributed to the affected farmers last year.

Famoso stressed that the province of Iloilo received a total 14,768 bags of rice certified seeds, Capiz – 13,033 bags, Negros Occidental – 2,900 bags, Antique – 1,616 bags, Aklan – 549 bags and Guimaras – 135 bags.

He added that the certified seeds were released to the provinces of Aklan, Guimaras and Negros Occidental last May and June in time for the first cropping season and to the provinces of Antique, Capiz and Iloilo last October and December which greatly help in sustaining rice sufficiency in the region.

Famoso also said that the remaining P39,141,760.00 was intended to buy 32,984 bags of urea fertilizer due for delivery this January and February 2015.

“We will follow the same scheme of one bag of fertilizer per hectare which will be given to the affected farmers base also on the allocation per province.” Famoso said.

The P84M-IFAD funds augmented the DA reconstruction and recovery initiatives which include cash for work program, fuel subsidy, provision of Pakbet vegetable seeds, white corn seeds, steel layer cages and provision of vitamins, antibiotics and de-wormer for poultry and livestock. (RAFID 6)

Philippines: DSWD, partners extend free civil registration project for ‘Yolanda’ survivors

18 January 2015 - 8:35pm
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

Typhoon Yolanda survivors whose civil documents were damaged or lost during the disaster will still have the chance to reconstruct these vital papers as the multi-agency Free Mobile Civil Registration Project is extended for another six months starting this month.

The project is funded by the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) in the amount of P5 million in partnership with the Philippine Statistics Authority-National Statistics Office (PSA-NSO), local government units, and their local civil registrars.

The P5 million check was turned over on Wednesday to PSA-NSO at the DSWD-Central Office in Batasan Quezon City with DSWD Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman witnessing the turnover.

Also present during the turnover were Interim Deputy National Statistician Paula Monina Collado, United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) Country Representative Bernard Kerblat, Initiatives for Dialogue and Empowerment through Alternative Legal Services (IDEALS) Board of Director President Joey Faustino, UNCHR staff Rico Salcedo, IDEALS Executive Director Edgardo Ligon, Interim Assistant National Statistician Lourdes Hufana, and DSWD Assistant Secretary Vilma B. Cabrera.

Sec. Soliman underscored the importance of continuing this project, which provides the opportunity to recover and reconstitute birth, death, and marriage certificates, among others.

“These documents are required in accessing basic services and transactions with government agencies, non-government organizations, and private institutions,” Sec. Soliman said.

According to Collado, the project was implemented in June 2014 and has already benefited almost 100,000 ‘Yolanda’ survivors from 18 towns and two cities of Leyte and Samar.

She said that an additional 37,500 ‘Yolanda’ survivors in Eastern Samar will benefit from the project extension.

Sec. Soliman acknowledged the strong support of DSWD partners on this project saying that it is very encouraging to note that this is part of the early recovery efforts that we have done in helping thousands of families affected by ‘Yolanda.’

UNHCR and IDEALS embarked on a civil registration project for ‘Yolanda’ survivors early in 2014 and initiated the partnership with DSWD and PSA-NSO to extend the project coverage to close to 40,000 beneficiaries age 18 and below. IDEALS will continue to provide technical services for the project, including the assistance of its 200-strong staff based in Leyte and Samar.

Philippines: Typhoon-damaged health facilities get a makeover

17 January 2015 - 4:20pm
Source: International Federation of Red Cross And Red Crescent Societies Country: Philippines

By Kate Marshall, IFRC

The Philippine Red Cross, with the support of the Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement, is targeting 35 health facilities for rehabilitation as part of the overall Typhoon Haiyan recovery plan.

The society, in collaboration with the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC), has started work on 20 of these facilities in Cebu, Leyte and Panay. The health clinic in Abaca, Leyte, is the first to be restored and was inspected by health officials and representatives from Philippine Red Cross and IFRC last week.

“The process starts with a very detailed assessment by our health teams to ensure that all stakeholders are informed and give their consent,” said Dr Bhanu Pratap, the IFRC’s Health Coordinator for the Haiyan operation.

Before work can begin, each project goes through a thorough assessment process to ensure every detail is covered and to allow proper consultation with communities, legal and building representatives and municipal officials.

The assessment takes into account several factors such as proximity to other services, existing equipment, income level, location and community requests.

Meanwhile in Tacloban, the Red Cross is undertaking a full reconstruction of the Barangay Suhi district health centre. Flood-prone Suhi is one of the coastal city’s poorest communities. It is also geographically challenging, stretching all the way from the banks of the San Juanico Strait to an inaccessible, hilly inland area.

For some months following Typhoon Haiyan, a site in Suhi next to the health centre was used as a mass grave for up to 2,000 bodies and residents were forced to go to another centre for medical check-ups. Once the facility is repaired residents will find it much easier to access medical help, Dr Pratap said.

The Philippine Red Cross assessment report on Suhi assembled evidence of several factors affecting the health and safety of residents by referring to secondary data, community mapping and the seasonal health calendar, recording direct observations and consulting the community through meetings and focus groups.

A community health volunteer team then surveyed dozens of households using mobile phone data entry to collect and record information.

“It’s very important to ensure community participation and decision-making so that local issues are well identified,” Dr Pratap said. “In some places residents will wait for our staff and volunteers to arrive because they are so eager to present their ideas. They realise what we’re doing will serve to strengthen their community.”

Health complaints in Suhi include a high incidence of respiratory tract infections, blamed on the nearby rubbish dump. Diarrhoea is also an issue, as many families lack proper toilets and clean drinking water.

Malnutrition is also compounded by schistosomiasis, a common waterborne disease. Medical missions to treat residents in the mountainous upland area are few and far between, despite the need for more first aid, especially in light of the area’s numerous traffic accidents.

As part of the Haiyan operation, the health facilities rehabilitation programme is an ideal entry point for a comprehensive community-based health and first aid programme covering nearly 100,000 people. It is also the first time that mobile phone technology based on Open Data Kits is being used to record baseline information for health in the Philippines.

“We’ve selected 68 communities and recruited more than 450 health volunteers ranging from 18 to 68 years of age. The health workers, through a community health committee, act as a bridge between the communities and the municipal health authorities,” Dr Pratap said.

Philippines: Haiyan: Helping vulnerable communities in Coron with Decent Work

14 January 2015 - 10:27pm
Source: International Labour Organization Country: Philippines

Typhoon Haiyan killed 8,000 and affected nearly 16 million people across the Philippines. And while Tacloban City sustained the most destruction, other more remote places also suffered heavy damage. Lives and livelihoods, infrastructure and services were all lost on the vacation island of Coron. A year after Haiyan, the island's people are gradually restoring some of what was lost, and at the same time, learning new skills and ways to support their families.

Philippines: Typhoon Haiyan: Cash-for-Shelter Pilot Findings

14 January 2015 - 2:46pm
Source: Catholic Relief Services Country: Philippines

This handout summarizes the findings from a cash-for-shelter pilot study in the Philippines.

The study found that cash grants can be effective and flexible in meeting the needs of families. Cash grants can also provide a positive incentive to use "build back safer" techniques.

Philippines: Cash-for-shelter pilot findings in CRS's Typhoon Haiyan Response

14 January 2015 - 2:46pm
Source: Cash Learning Partnership Country: Philippines

In order to explore possible strategies for shelter assistance that would also benefit local markets, a cash transfer pilot study was conducted in which beneficiaries received cash to purchase shelter materials and to hire labourers. CRS promoted disaster-resilient construction techniques and employed a phased approach in which beneficiaries were required to demonstrate completion of each phase according to these construction techniques before the subsequent phase of cash would be disbursed. In Leyte province, 49 households participated in a 3-phase pilot beginning in January 2014, and in Eastern Samar province, 18 households participated in a 2-phase pilot beginning in May 2014.

This document presents a summary of the findings from the pilot.

Philippines: Turnover of Japan-funded reconstructed daycare center and national agricultural school for Typhoon Yolanda affected areas - first turn over ceremony in Typhoon Yolanda devastated area

14 January 2015 - 12:59am
Source: Government of Japan Country: Japan, Philippines

The government of Japan turned over the reconstructed daycare center and national agricultural school to the Government of the Philippines in a ceremony held on January 13, 2015 in Municipalities of Guian and Balangiga, Eastern Samar for the Japan-funded Quick Impact Projects under Urgent Development Study on the Project on Rehabilitation and Recovery from Typhoon Yolanda. The ceremony was attended by second secretary of the Embassy of Japan Koji Otani and the chief representative of JICA Philippine office Noriaki Niwa. The daycare center turn over ceremony was also attended by the vice-mayor of the municipality of Guiuan Rogelio Cablao. The national agricultural school turn over ceremony was also attended by the mayor of the municipality of Balangiga Viscuso de Lira, the deputy director general of TESDA Teodoro C. Pascua and the regional director of TESDA region 8 Cleta M. Omega. In each ceremony, the representatives of recipients expressed their deepest appreciation.

The Quick Impact Projects is composed of projects which targets restarting of economic activities, reconstruction of daily lives, and strengthening of capacities in implementing supportive measures of government organizations. This turnover is the first one among 15 such projects. Besides daycare centers and national agricultural schools, regenerating livelihood through the introduction of disaster-resilient submersible fish cages, promotion of local products to improve livelihoods, improvement of municipal capacity for disaster-resilient construction management through reconstruction of public markets and some other projects are going to be implemented. In addition to these Quick Impact Projects, hazard maps, resulting from field surveys and scientific analyses based on storm surge, wind strength and flood data, which were turned over to 18 LGUs affected by Yolanda last month, will be used in reviewing the comprehensive land use plans of LGUs with technical support from the study team.

Japan, as the top ODA donor to the Philippines as well as a disaster-prone country itself, has supported the Philippines' disaster mitigation efforts by sharing its experiences and lessons learned from past natural disasters. This project, with its policy of "Build Back Better", is expected to further foster the strategic partnership between the two countries and serve as a model for other disaster-prone areas of the Philippines.

[Related Link]

Ministry of Foreign Affairs Typhoon Damage in the Central Philippines
http://www.mofa.go.jp/region/page24e_000012.html

World: Global Emergency Overview Snapshot 7-13 Jan 2015

13 January 2015 - 12:26pm
Source: Assessment Capacities Project Country: Afghanistan, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guatemala, Guinea, Haiti, Honduras, India, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Liberia, Libya, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Uganda, Ukraine, World, Yemen

Nigeria: Violence has escalated significantly in the northeast. Boko Haram killed more than 2,100 people in the first 11 days of the year. Most were killed in an attack on the town of Baga and surrounding settlements in Borno state, on Lake Chad. Up to 20,000 people were displaced. Other attacks took place in Maiduguri, Damaturu, and Potiskum.

Sudan: Government and opposition forces fought in Tawila locality, North Darfur and in Northern Jebel Marra, Central Darfur. 15 villages were burned and another 30 abandoned in Tawila, with up to 37,000 estimated displaced. In Fanga, northern Jebel Marra, 21 villages were burned and some 50,000 estimated displaced.

Ukraine: Savings are dwindling and winter needs remain unmet, as the latest figures indicate more that than half of the 633,000 registered IDPs were displaced in the past four months. More than 4,800 people have been killed in the conflict, and it is reported that hostilities are intensifying.

Updated: 13/01/2015 Next Update: 20/01/2015

Global Emergency Overview Web Interface

Philippines: ACF Philippines Bulletin Volume 4 Issue 1, 3rd Quarter 2014

12 January 2015 - 1:18am
Source: Action Contre la Faim Country: Philippines

Rebuilding Lives after Yolanda

By HENRY JAMES ROCA, EVA CHRISTINE PICA
ACF community development officers and Maria Lia Olino, ACF Enumerato

LEYTE – More than eight months after Yolanda unleashed her wrath and brought unprecedented damage to lives and property, survivors have yet to recover the quality of life they had before the calamity. But survivors have a lot to hope for as many humanitarian organizations are helping them get back on track.

ACF International, with funding from United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), has been providing emergency assistance to 10,000 affected households under the Unconditional Cash Transfer (UCT) project in Tacloban City, and the towns of Dagami, Julita, Pastrana, Burauen and La Paz in Leyte. Among the project beneficiaries are pregnant and lactating mothers, single parents, households with malnourished children and persons with disability whose livelihoods depend on farming devastated by Typhoon Yolanda. The amount, Php 4,370 provided for six months until August 2014, is estimated to cover the food needs of a family of five for a month. Widely-used in emergency response, the UCT was launched in the Philippines following its success in emergency situations in Africa.

Abandoned by her husband, Karen Germanes, 23, from Brgy. Rizal, Dagami town had been suffering from epileptic seizures. Without a job to support her children and continue her medication, her problem worsened after Typhoon Yolanda destroyed the family-owned coconut farm and sari-sari (variety) store. Assessments were made by ACF team and Germanes was among the thousands who qualified for the UCT project.

According to Germanes the monthly cash assistance hasgiven her family a new lease on life, as it is momentarily providing them subsistence now that their livelihood sources are gone.

World: Shelter Projects 2013 - 2014

5 January 2015 - 5:16pm
Source: International Federation of Red Cross And Red Crescent Societies, UN Human Settlements Program, UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Central African Republic, Colombia, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Fiji, Haiti, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Myanmar, Nigeria, Pakistan, Philippines, Portugal, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, World

FOREWORD

Shelter Projects 2013-2014 is the fifth edition in the series which began in 2008. This book adds 27 new shelter case studies and overviews, bringing the total number of project articles to over 150. This valuable repository of project examples and response overviews represents a significant body of experience offering unique reference material for shelter and settlement practitioners worldwide.
To quote Albert Einstein, “anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new”, and the objective of this publication has always been to encourage the sharing of lessons learned, both good and bad, and to advocate the following of best practices. Such knowledge sharing helps practitioners to be more accountable to crisis affected communities by implementing effective shelter responses and to show impact to donors by ensuring adequacy in our settlement and shelter interventions.

Shelter programming should operate in accordance with recognized shelter best practice while enabling those displaced to return to their homes or equivalent living space in a timely manner encouraging community recovery and building resilience to possible future shocks. Participation and promoting a sense of ownership is the key to achieving successful projects.

The introduction section of this publication provides and overview of the emergencies which have continued to require large-scale settlement and shelter responses since the last edition. The on-going and widening conflict in Syria, vast destruction left in the wake of tropical storms Sandy in the Americas and Haiyan (Yolanda) in the Philippines and recurring flooding in Pakistan prompted this edition to include four overview pieces to complement the geographic spread of the selected case studies.

The international humanitarian community is dealing with unprecedented levels of displacement and scale of natural disaster. This implies a requirement for increased shelter needs, larger mobilization of resources and projects requiring improved models of delivery as well as innovative, cost-effective solutions which incorporate best practice as well as positioning the persons of concern at the forefront of response interventions.

The topics of the opinion pieces in Section B were decided on through discussion with a technical advisory group. The pieces are written by experts with specific interests and experiences and we are extremely grateful for their invaluable contribution. The topics include the importance of assessment in shelter, evaluating cash-for-rent subsidies, security of tenure and humanitarian shelter, supporting host families as shelter options and urban settings, all of significant current relevance and interest in the settlement and shelter domain.

These new case studies remind us of the similarities yet uniqueness every crisis presents. It is important not to ‘re-invent the wheel’ with every emergency and this publication acts as a tool for building on and improving on the successes of completed shelter projects. The case studies address common issues emerging in shelter response, outline different approaches to addressing shelter needs and assist in evaluating the impact on affected communities. They provide an excellent resource against which to gauge proposed shelter interventions and possible outcomes.

The Shelter Projects website - www.sheltercasestudies.org - has been updated with the latest edition and provides an easy way to search the repository of case studies, overviews and project updates.
We are once again indebted to everyone who contributed case studies and to the technical advisory group for their valuable time and expert input.

We trust that the reader will find this edition of ‘Shelter projects’ relevant and thought-provoking, leading to improved settlement and shelter solutions for affected communities.

Philippines: DSWD clarifies report on expired relief noodles in Negros Occidental

4 January 2015 - 11:01pm
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

From the Department of Social Welfare and Development

The Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) clarified the issue that there were relief food packs containing expired noodles distributed to Typhoon Seniang survivors in Silay City, Negros Occidental. With instructions from Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman, DSWD-Field Office VI immediately validated this report.

Upon coordinating with Silay City Social Welfare and Development Officer (CSWDO), the Field Office found out that only two food packs contained expired noodles.

The said food packs were part of the last tranche of relief goods for Typhoon Yolanda survivors, which were released to the CSWDO by DSWD last September 2014 with the specific instruction that those have to be distributed immediately to the intended beneficiaries.

The CSWDO explained that she had two extra packs from the last tranche of goods for the Yolanda survivors and, admittedly, without checking the condition of their contents, she just gave those out.

The Field Office has been checking the other local government units (LGU) and so far, it has not yet monitored any similar incident.

Sec. Soliman instructed all DSWD Field Offices to constantly remind LGUs on the immediate distribution of relief goods given to them to ensure that these will not expire and that survivors can immediately use them.

World: GFDRR on Resilient Recovery

4 January 2015 - 1:52pm
Source: GFDRR Country: India, occupied Palestinian territory, Philippines, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, World

GFDRR supports resilient reconstruction planning and post-disaster assessments, helping more than 50 disaster-affected countries with these approaches since its launch in 2007.

Why Resilience Matters for Recovery

With growing urbanization and settlement near coasts and rivers, the amount of people and economic infrastructure exposed to natural hazards—including earthquakes, landslides, and cyclones—is rising. With the risk awareness of governments and people at its highest in the aftermath of disaster, recovery and reconstruction planning presents an important opportunity to change practices that have led to underlying vulnerabilities.

What We Do

GFDRR helps developing countries implement postdisaster recovery and reconstruction programs that are efficient, transparent, and financially predictable, while reducing the risk of future hazards. GFDRR supports resilient recovery by:

  • Implementing the Recovery Framework methodology, an emerging international approach to postdisaster recovery and reconstruction that focuses on longer-term resilience to future disasters through prioritizing recovery activities sequentially, improving financial management, and ensuring monitoring and evaluation;

  • Promoting reliable and internationally-accepted damage, loss, and needs assessments after major disaster events;

  • Providing technical assistance for post-disaster recovery and reconstruction planning; and

  • Helping countries improve their disaster recovery strategies and governmental institutions in order to manage recovery before a disaster strikes.

Post-disaster needs assessments allow countries to accurately assess the economic impacts of a disaster, and mobilize the technical and financial resources necessary for recovery. In partnership with the European Union (EU), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), and the World Bank Group, GFDRR is working to ensure that the methodology behind these assessments leads to more resilient and inclusive recovery and reconstruction processes.

World: Aide alimentaire: 2014 en 10 visages

30 December 2014 - 1:43pm
Source: World Food Programme Country: Central African Republic, Guatemala, Iraq, Lebanon, occupied Palestinian territory, Philippines, Sierra Leone, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Syrian Arab Republic, World

De l’Afrique de l’Ouest touchée par Ebola, à la Syrie et à l’Irak, l’assistance alimentaire a joué un rôle important pour aider les familles affectées par les crises. Voici 10 personnes, venant de 10 pays, qui ont reçu une assistance grâce à toutes les personnes qui nous soutiennent : les gouvernements, les entreprises, et tous ceux qui ont fait un don en 2014.

Philippines

Trois mois après que le typhon Haiyan ait détruit sa maison, ce grand-père a remercié le PAM d’avoir continué à apporter une assistance alimentaire le temps que sa famille puisse se reconstruire.

République Centrafricaine

Alors que les violences ont continué à frapper le pays en 2014, le PAM a distribué des rations alimentaires à des centaines de milliers de personnes qui ont été obligé de quitter leurs maisons. Parmi elles, Ashta, qui est en train de cuisiner un repas pour sa famille.

Liban

Ali a 14 ans et vient de Syrie. Il est maintenant réfugié au Liban avec ses parents. Sa famille reçoit des coupons alimentaires distribués par le PAM. Avec ces coupons, il peut acheter la nourriture de son choix dans le supermarché local. « Je ne sais pas ce que nous deviendrons si nous n’avons plus ces coupons ».

Sud Soudan

Un rapport réalisé en juin a montré que les personnes âgées font face à davantage de risque du fait de leur mobilité réduite. Jal Bitien explique qu'elle a dû manger des herbes sauvages pour survivre.

Guatemala

Hugo Jolon est originaire du Guatemala. Comme 2,5 millions d'agriculteurs, ses cultures ont été décimées par la sécheresse cette année. Jolon a perdu toute sa récolte de maïs et il a eu besoin d’assistance alimentaire pour traverser cette crise.

Gaza

Voici Eman, et ses enfants : Rima et Jiwad. Leur maison a été détruite pour les conflits en juillet 2014. Sa famille s’est réfugiée dans une école à Al Maghazi à Gaza et ils ont reçu des rations alimentaires prêtes à être consommées. Ils ne savent pas encore quand ils pourront retourner chez eux.

Sri Lanka

Aujourd’hui Kaanchanan est en bonne santé, il est fier de montrer qu’il peut aider sa famille dans les champs. Pour en arriver là, il a reçu des aliments nutritifs conçus pour lutter contre la malnutrition. Il vit dans une région où la pauvreté est telle que la malnutrition menace beaucoup d’enfants.

Syrie

La famille de Um Zuhour avait avant un magasin de tissu à Alep. Aujourd’hui, elle a perdu son mari et son pays est en guerre. Elle et ses 4 filles ont dû fuir leur maison comme des millions de Syriens. Elle travaille parfois pour ramasser des pommes et des olives. Et elle reçoit de l’huile, de la farine et des lentilles du PAM.

Sierra Leone

La Sierra Leone a été l'un des trois pays les plus durement touchés par l'épidémie d'Ebola en Afrique de l’Ouest. Kadiatou a survécu au virus. Sur cette photo, elle est en train de cuisiner un repas avec les aliments distribués par le PAM, dans le quartier de Ferry Junction à Freetown.

Irak

Hajji Maratalu travaillait auparavant dans le bâtiment. Il a fui son domicile dans le nord de l'Irak après l’arrivée de l’Etat islamique. Alors que l'hiver commence, il vit avec sa femme et son fils dans un immeuble en construction dans le gouvernorat de Duhok. Il fait partie des 1.000.000 Irakiens déplacés qui ont reçu aide alimentaire du PAM depuis le début de la crise.