TyphoonHaiyan - RW Updates

Syndicate content
ReliefWeb - Updates
Updated: 1 hour 13 min ago

Philippines: ACT Alliance Appeal: Philippines - Typhoon Haiyan – Rehabilitation - PHL151

21 May 2015 - 5:36am
Source: ACT Alliance Country: Philippines

Appeal Target: US$ 10,320,781 Balance Requested: US$ 10,320,781

Dear Colleagues,

Typhoon Haiyan, (locally known as Yolanda), slammed into eastern Philippines on 8 November 2013.
Haiyan, the strongest typhoon in recorded history ever to make landfall, created winds and storm surges that killed more than 6,300 people and caused catastrophic damage to the affected areas. 44 provinces, 57 cities, 591 municipalities and 12,129 barangays were impacted, affecting more than 16 million people. Over 1 million homes were destroyed. The provinces of Leyte and Samar, where Haiyan initially made landfall, were among the most affected. The super typhoon created an estimated $2.04B in damage, including major damage to the agricultural sector. Fisher folk and small-scale coconut farmers, already among the poorest in the agricultural sector, suffered tremendous losses.

With the immediate relief effort now transitioning into recovery, four members of the ACT Alliance:
Christian Aid, ICCO, Lutheran World Relief (LWR) and the National Council of Churches in the Philippines (NCCP) are requesting a follow-on appeal to build on their critical work in the most affected provinces of Cebu, Samar, Leyte and Panay and Palawan. These four organizations are members of the ACT Philippines Forum.

The follow-on appeal will build on ACT Philippines’ strong local partnerships to effectively implement these critical programs to help build healthier, more economically sustainable disaster resilient communities. Continued progress has been made on land use issues in many areas. While land tenure has not been granted in most cases, many tenants have been given written permission to build homes, small-scale livelihood enterprises and/or WASH facilities in barangays. This is a key factor that will help to accelerate project implementation in the coming months.

ACT Philippines Forum members plan to continue the following projects amongst others: shelter (more resilient homes), community based psychosocial support (CBPS); WASH; disaster risk reduction (DRR); livelihood restoration and training including diversification of agricultural and non-agricultural income; protection; natural resource management, emergency preparedness along with quality and accountability.

Philippines: DSWD releases more shelter aid for ‘Yolanda’ survivors in W. Visayas

18 May 2015 - 3:09pm
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

QUEZON CITY, May 19 -- The Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) has recently released an additional P391 million in Emergency Shelter Assistance (ESA) for families whose houses were damaged by Typhoon Yolanda in four municipalities in Aklan, one in Iloilo, and another in Negros Occidental.

Of the amount, P15.1 million was released for 505 families in Lezo, P10.7 million for 358 families in Tangalan, P5.5 million for 184 families in Nabas, and P16.9 million for 566 families in Ibajay all in Aklan.

Meanwhile, P242.3 million was transferred to the local government unit (LGU) of Carles, Iloilo for 8,079 families while P100.2 million was released to the LGU of Sagay City, Negros Occidental for 3,342 families.

The LGUs will schedule and conduct the distribution of the cash assistance to their constituents while the DSWD will be monitoring the release of the funds to the beneficiaries.

DSWD will give priority to families with totally damaged houses whose incomes are below P15,000 and those who have not received shelter assistance from local or international organizations. They will receive P30,000 each.

ESA provides cash assistance of P30,000 and P10,000 to families whose houses were partially or totally damaged, respectively.

To date, the Department has already released a total of P2.5 billion ESA funds in Western Visayas region covering the following LGUs:

Aklan Libacao, Lezo, Tangalan, Nabas, Kalibo, and Ibajay

Antique Culasi, Pandan, and Tibiao

Capiz Pontevedra, Roxas City, Panay, Tapaz, and Pilar

Iloilo Ajuy, Concepcion, Lambunao, Sara, Alimodian, Cabatuan, San Rafael, Estancia, and Carles

Negros Occidental Manapla, EB Magalona,and Sagay City

ESA provides cash assistance to families whose houses were partially or totally damaged by ‘Yolanda’ for the purchase of construction materials to repair or reconstruct their homes. It is intended for families who have not received any shelter assistance from the government or private sector. (DSWD)

Philippines: Typhoon Haiyan: Community research into the relocation of internally displaced people in the Philippines

16 May 2015 - 8:10am
Source: Oxfam Country: Philippines

In February and March 2014, Oxfam carried out field research in the Philippines with people displaced by typhoon Haiyan in order to inform and influence the government-led process for their relocation. The project tested a cyclical research process – including an innovative digital survey – in order to make timely use of the findings in programming and advocacy; to ensure better sharing with other actors and the authorities; and to feedback to affected communities. This paper reviews the methodology used and presents key learnings and conclusions that can be used to strengthen future studies.

The original briefing paper which documents the survey results and provides recommendations for the Philippines government, the international community and civil society is ‘The Right Move? Ensuring durable relocation after typhoon Haiyan’

Philippines: Philippines: Resilience amidst natural and man-made disasters

15 May 2015 - 8:30am
Source: International Committee of the Red Cross Country: Philippines

"During Typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan), we were told to evacuate, so we moved to my in-law's house up the hill. When it was over, we came back and our house was gone, completely washed away. The same thing with the crops – the bananas, cassava and sweet potatoes – we rely on these for food and they were all gone," narrated Leonila Garen, 30, a resident of Mabini village in Basey, Samar province.

A mother of five, Leonila recalls how difficult it was during the first few days when they had nothing to eat and relied entirely on relief goods. Her family spent a few more weeks at a relative's house until her husband was able to gather enough scrap material for a makeshift shelter, using a tarpaulin as a roof.

With the crops gone, her husband – who used to earn a living delivering a truckload of copra to Tacloban (in Leyte province, neighbouring Samar) once a week, with the rest of the week spent farming – found himself without a job for a while.

Village councilor Efren Pacanas echoed the same story: "The people in our village have very limited sources of income, with the majority relying on upland farming for their livelihood. When Typhoon Yolanda came, all the crops were destroyed. The people had nothing."

He added that even before the typhoon, the remote village of Mabini had been facing other problems. "Upland farming is only done on a seasonal basis; it's purely rain-fed, which is one of the reasons why it is taking longer for our community to recover completely. Also, transporting crops downtown has always been a challenge for us owing to the poor road network. This is further complicated by the armed clashes that erupt occasionally in some districts." The most recent incident, he said, was in February this year.

Growing up in Northern Samar province, Leonila is no stranger to armed conflict. "Others, especially the children, still get scared when they hear gun shots, but I'm already used to it."

In 2011, as part of ICRC's work to support communities affected by armed conflict, a water network was constructed to supply clean water to more than 1,200 people in Mabini. Before this, villagers had to spend over two hours each day on paddle boats to collect drinking water from the Sohoton river.

Today, the same network is helping them recover from the effects of Typhoon Haiyan. "With water readily accessible, we have more time to spend cultivating the land," said Rogelio Asis, a farmer.

A year and a half after Typhoon Haiyan, Leonila and her family are living in their new home – this time, sturdier than the temporary structure her husband had built. "It would have taken us at least five years to build a house like this because our income is just enough to cover our most basic needs. With four of the children in school, we could only dream of having a house," she said, adding that having been chosen as a beneficiary of the Philippine Red Cross-ICRC shelter programme is an answered prayer. She is also very happy with the latrine that was built this year, noting that in the past, they didn't have their own toilet and would need to go to a relative's house nearby.

Leonila's family is among the 4,461 households who received storm-resilient shelters from the Philippine Red Cross and the ICRC in 2014. The ICRC, together with the National Society, focused its response on Samar island, where it has been working for years to address the needs of communities affected by armed conflict.

To complete the houses, individual latrines are being added this year with help from partners in the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement.

As the people of Mabini strive to overcome the difficulties left behind by one of the world's most powerful typhoons and continue to deal with cycles of conflict, they remain resilient, facing challenges that come their way one day at a time.

World: Global Emergency Overview Snapshot 6–12 May 2015

12 May 2015 - 11:02am
Source: Assessment Capacities Project Country: Afghanistan, Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guatemala, Guinea, Haiti, Honduras, India, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Kiribati, Lebanon, Liberia, Libya, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Uganda, Ukraine, Vanuatu, World, Yemen

Snapshot 6–12 May 2015

Iraq: Conflict has escalated in a number of locations. In Anbar, fighting has displaced more than 47,000 in Karmah district, and more than 133,000 around Ramadi. Clashes between Islamic State and government forces have intensified around Baiji oil refinery, in Salah al Din.

Nepal: A second earthquake of magnitude 7.3 struck on 12 May. As of 1800 local time, 37 people have been reported killed and 1,129 injured. The earthquake was followed by aftershocks with magnitudes up to 6.3. Major landslides have been reported, further hampering relief efforts.

Niger: 3,300 suspected cases of meningitis recorded as an epidemic is declared in eight districts. Vaccines are reported to be out of stock. 39,700 people have reportedly been displaced from islands on Lake Chad, due to planned military operations against Boko Haram.

South Sudan: Since the beginning of May, up to 100,000 people have been displaced by fighting south of Bentiu, Unity state. Bentiu’s Protection of Civilians (PoC) site, housing 52,900 IDPs, is so close to the fighting that the displaced are seeking safety elsewhere. Fighting in Upper Nile saw 1,500 IDPs arrive at the Malakal PoC site over 22–23 April.

Updated: 12/05/2015. Next update: 19/05/2015

Global Emergency Overview Web Interface

World: Disaster and Crisis Management – Annual report 2014 MAA00040

12 May 2015 - 6:46am
Source: International Federation of Red Cross And Red Crescent Societies Country: Guinea, Iraq, Liberia, Niger, Philippines, Sierra Leone, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, World

Period covered: January-December 2014

Overview -- DCM mission and core functions

The Disaster and Crisis Management (DCM) department’s mission is to ensure that a well functioning, relevant global disaster management system is in place to address the needs of communities who are vulnerable to or affected by disasters and crises. DCM is part of a global disaster management team guided by the following key strategic priorities:

  • Providing leadership for the development of global disaster and crises management policies, strategies and programming approaches to reflect the changing humanitarian environment and the growing capacities of National Societies to coordinate and deliver humanitarian assistance.

  • Developing and disseminating global disaster response guidance and procedures that clarify roles and responsibilities, set standards and help the IFRC to measure efficiency, effectiveness and the impact of operations.

  • Strengthening IFRC-wide response tools and capacities for disaster and crises including in the areas of response preparedness and contingency planning, disaster needs assessment, relief to recovery planning, the scaled-up use of cash in emergencies; global surge capacity systems and tools development and improving the timeliness and quality of Emergency Appeal and Disaster Relief Emergency Fund (DREF)-supported1 operations.

Within these key priorities, DCM delivers the following core functions:
- Conceptual leadership and remote and field-based technical support for response preparedness, relief and recovery programming globally.
- Quality assurance and approval of all DREF proposals and Emergency Appeals.
- Real time evaluations (RTE’s) of all major operations.
- Immediate mobilization of global surge capacity / disaster response tool upon request.
- Reliable disaster management information systems and maps.
- Facilitating global coordination and representation on disaster and crises management with Movement and non-Movement partners.

As part of an effective global disaster management team, DCM strives to continuously improve communications and collaboration between the department and DM colleagues at Zone, regional and country levels; regularly deploys to operations to provide surge capacity where needed, to ensure that disaster and crises operations are appropriately led and strategized and that humanitarian standards are adhered to.

Syrian Arab Republic: Disaster and Crisis Management – Annual report 2014 MAA00040

12 May 2015 - 6:46am
Source: International Federation of Red Cross And Red Crescent Societies Country: Guinea, Iraq, Liberia, Niger, Philippines, Sierra Leone, Syrian Arab Republic

Period covered: January-December 2014

Overview -- DCM mission and core functions

The Disaster and Crisis Management (DCM) department’s mission is to ensure that a well functioning, relevant global disaster management system is in place to address the needs of communities who are vulnerable to or affected by disasters and crises. DCM is part of a global disaster management team guided by the following key strategic priorities:

  • Providing leadership for the development of global disaster and crises management policies, strategies and programming approaches to reflect the changing humanitarian environment and the growing capacities of National Societies to coordinate and deliver humanitarian assistance.

  • Developing and disseminating global disaster response guidance and procedures that clarify roles and responsibilities, set standards and help the IFRC to measure efficiency, effectiveness and the impact of operations.

  • Strengthening IFRC-wide response tools and capacities for disaster and crises including in the areas of response preparedness and contingency planning, disaster needs assessment, relief to recovery planning, the scaled-up use of cash in emergencies; global surge capacity systems and tools development and improving the timeliness and quality of Emergency Appeal and Disaster Relief Emergency Fund (DREF)-supported1 operations.

Within these key priorities, DCM delivers the following core functions:
- Conceptual leadership and remote and field-based technical support for response preparedness, relief and recovery programming globally.
- Quality assurance and approval of all DREF proposals and Emergency Appeals.
- Real time evaluations (RTE’s) of all major operations.
- Immediate mobilization of global surge capacity / disaster response tool upon request.
- Reliable disaster management information systems and maps.
- Facilitating global coordination and representation on disaster and crises management with Movement and non-Movement partners.

As part of an effective global disaster management team, DCM strives to continuously improve communications and collaboration between the department and DM colleagues at Zone, regional and country levels; regularly deploys to operations to provide surge capacity where needed, to ensure that disaster and crises operations are appropriately led and strategized and that humanitarian standards are adhered to.

World: Bringing drones down to earth

12 May 2015 - 5:38am
Source: IRIN Country: Nepal, Philippines, Vanuatu, World

By Caterina Pino and Obinna Anyadike

KATHMANDU, 12 May 2015 (IRIN) - Disaster coverage now seems incomplete without amazing drone footage of the damage, accompanied by effusive media reports on the technological wizardry of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and their humanitarian application. But is that really the story? Here’s a look at how far their use has evolved and what is still needed for them to fulfill their potential.

Right tool for the job?

The advantage of UAVs is that they are a fraction of the cost of manned aircraft and the smallest can fit into the hand luggage of a humanitarian response team. They provide very high resolution imagery and can carry an array of sensors. “They provide extra information in the phase where you need a quick overview,” explained Arjan Stam, overall leader of international Urban Search-and-Rescue units in Nepal.

But misconceptions remain, including within the humanitarian community, over what UAVs can achieve. “People who have not seen UAVs often think of the military versions that can fly a long way and carry heavy payloads,” said Andrej Verity of the UN’s Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA).

Commonly used micro-UAVs, like the quadcopter DJI Phantom, has a flight time of under 25 minutes and doesn’t fly in high winds and bad weather. There are larger, more capable UAVs, but drones are far from always the answer. In many circumstances old-fashioned helicopters, manned aircraft and people doing assessments on foot are better options.

“If we prioritise using the cool new toys instead of choosing the collection platform that meets needs and constraints, we risk being less useful than we could be and probably slower,” said John Crowley of UN Global Pulse. “[UAVs] can be amazing assets when they fit into a larger system that makes it safe, secure and legal to use them – [that requires] trained people, clear policies, and established protocols.”

UAVs in disaster response are largely privately operated. There are currently 10 UAV teams in Nepal, from Canada’s Global Medic to California-based Team Rubicon, whose philanthropic partner is US intelligence-linked data mining firm Palantir. Encouraging adherence to standard operating procedures and maximising the humanitarian value of these diverse teams has historically proven a challenge.

Coordination conundrum

“Disaster responders in an emergency are generally too overwhelmed to lead on innovative methods,” Crowley told IRIN. “A disaster is rarely the time to introduce unfamiliar tools with lots of elements that require coordinated action between several organisations.”

Keeping on the right side of the law can be the first challenge. While some countries have UAV legislation in place to cover safety, privacy, national security and insurance liability, many do not. Where no regulations exists, UAV flights are either cleared with national authorities on an ad-hoc emergency basis, or are flown without permission – a reality that has a host of implications.

Then there is the glaring gap in the humanitarian response structure to facilitate UAV use. OCHA serves as the secretariat for critical coordination mechanisms like the Inter-Agency Standing Committee and the UN’s rapid-response Disaster Assessment and Coordination system and International Search and Rescue Advisory Group. But it has no formal oversight role as far as UAV operations are concerned, and has been cautious in claiming a mandate.

Who can we talk to?

In the Philippines, during Cyclone Haiyan in 2013, there was little coordination or clarity over how UAVs were to be used. OCHA then worked with the authorities on recognizing the value of UAVs and including them in national disaster response plans. But in 2014, when Cyclone Hagupit arrived, there was only an ad-hoc link between UAV operators, the humanitarian community and the government.

In the wake of Cyclone Pam that tore through the Pacific islands of Vanuatu earlier this year, a World Bank project used the volunteer Humanitarian UAV Network (UAViators) to provide damage assessment imagery. There was better engagement with the government and military on basics like flight path clearance and notification to local communities, but the arrangement was still informal.

In Nepal, UAViators has taken the lead in engaging with the civil aviation authorities and the police, but it lacks institutional clout. For drones to be better established, the founder of UAViators, Patrick Meier, argues what is required is “strong backing or leadership from an established humanitarian organisation that is able and willing to mediate with appropriate ministries.”

In a Skype conversation with IRIN, he added: “The UN has not designated a formal focal point for UAV flights who can serve as liaison with [government]…. This is a big problem, as UAV teams need formal letters confirming that they are part of the humanitarian response. Also, we need this focal point to serve as initial liaison with ATC [air traffic control] and the military. In sum: [it is a] major institutional gap here.”

But in a disaster, where aid agencies and government officials are scrambling to respond and capacity is stretched so thin, should the appointment of a focal person to work with UAV operators always be a priority?

Sharing is caring

The purpose of UAV imagery is to help better shape the humanitarian response.

To get proper value out of UAVs “we need to make sure that we’re as clear as possible on where imagery needs are greatest, where the gaps in coverage may be, and how those imagery needs are going to be connected directly with practical relief efforts,” Andrew Schroeder, director of research and analysis at Direct Relief, a medical aid charity, told IRIN.

“We need an easy way for people and organisations to express where and why they need imagery so that priorities can be established quickly and those with skills and access to the technology can be appropriately tasked. We need to make sure that we’re sharing data effectively and adhering to open standards,” said Schroeder, also chair of the UAV working group at Nethope, an NGO consortium. But the reality is that people can be averse to sharing. This can be due to legal and political considerations, with some humanitarian organisations leery of associating too closely with private UAV teams, or data hoarding by the drone operators.

Data is power

“Some UAV teams have not (yet) expressed an interest in sharing their imagery. Some have not provided information about where they’re flying,” Skyped Meier. “Of course, they are incredibly busy. And besides, they are not required to share.… [W]ithout strong public backing from established humanitarian groups, there is little the network can do.”

“Data is power, and people perceive it that way,” said Nama Budhathoki, the head of Kathmandu Living Labs. His team of volunteers is working with OpenStreetMap, a crowd-sourced geographic information system (GIS), to map the impact of the Nepal quake.

A significant impediment to working with UAV imagery is the size of the data files, which in the case of a country like Nepal, with low internet bandwidth, impacts on the speed with which data can be analysed.

“Aerial imagery typically constitute large files, which means they take longer to upload, and with unreliable or low bandwidth it can take multiple repeat attempts to upload just one mosaic [GIS maps are composed of a multitude of data mosaics],” said Meier.

“Figuring out file transfers from the field… this is a huge problem… and getting it out of disaster zones is really not easy. We need to treat the logistics for this as seriously as the damage assessment,” Robert Banick, a GIS expert at the Assessment Capacities Project, told IRIN.

Build local capacity

“I think we’re so excited about the possibilities of UAVs and so challenged by making it work that we’re not giving full attention to the data analysis,” he added.

Kathmandu Living Labs is trying to reduce the dependence on external analysis by using local mappers, who have the additional advantage of a “better sense of location and geography,” said Budhathoki.

His goal is not only to build sustainability in GIS, but also to develop a local “UAV capacity with Nepal.” It’s a project that Meier and UAViators are collaborating on.

Reducing the need for external assistance by assisting national authorities and local NGOs build their capacity in high disaster risk countries like Nepal would be a step forward.

cp-oa/bp/ag

Philippines: Noul hits, but Philippines learns the lessons of Haiyan

11 May 2015 - 5:27am
Source: IRIN Country: Philippines

MANILA , 11 May 2015 (IRIN) - Powerful Typhoon Noul swept through the far northern Philippines on Monday, killing two people, but officials and aid agencies said a greater impact had been averted because people had learnt to heed warnings in the wake of the Haiyan disaster.

Bringing sustained winds of up to 160 kilometers per hour and gusts up to 195 kph, there had been fears that Noul would cause a greater loss of life, as well as do widespread damage to property and agricultural land.

The Category 5 storm blew the roofs off some home and felled trees and power lines, but officials say the impact of the Category 5 storm was mitigated by timely warnings and preventative action.

Emergency crews had been put on standby and thousands of food packs, tents and portable toilets placed at the ready.

Some 3,000 people were moved out of harm's way before the typhoon made landfall in the province of Cagayan, including some forced evacuations in vulnerable coastal areas.

According to the Red Cross and the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC), more than half the 27 camps set up to accommodate those displaced by the storm had already been closed by Monday morning. Roads were being cleared of debris as Noul moved away in the direction of Japan, and people began heading home.

“Hopefully, the timely preparations and warnings by the state forecasters contributed to the fact that minimal damage was sustained,” presidential spokeswoman Abigail Valte told IRIN.

“The government’s performance in past typhoons shows that we have the capability to keep doing better in terms of disaster risk management and reduction.”

Early warnings prove effective

Valte said lessons from Haiyan “continue to guide officials and citizens in ensuring that communities are better prepared every time.”

Secretary General of the Philippine Red Cross, Gwendolyn Pang, agreed that the response to Typhoon Noul had broadly worked.

“Although there are still some areas that we are having difficulties reaching, from our reports we can say that most people are aware now and know what to do.”

Improvements are still needed to avoid any possible repeat of the tragedy inflicted by Typhoon Haiyan (known locally as Yolanda), which left more than 7,000 people dead and around one million homeless in 2013, Pang cautioned.

“When we started post-Haiyan (recovery efforts), there was total destruction,” said Pang. “We didn’t even know where to start or how to help. Logistically it was very difficult to bring people on the ground and help.”

Build back better?

A year and a half on, the focus is on working towards long-term resilience or, in the oft-quoted parlance of post-disaster recovery, to “build back better”.

“That is why you can see there are still some people living in “no build zones” (areas the government has declared too dangerous for communities to continue to live in). We have to make preparedness a way of life, and not just when there is disaster,” said Pang.

While rebuilding has proved difficult post-Haiyan, livelihoods are slowly getting back to normal.

Liberty and Eduardo Gonzaga, who live with their son and grandson in central Iloilo province, used a conditional cash grant of 10,000 pesos (about 200 dollars) from the Red Cross, and seeds provided by other donors, to replant their land.

Gonzaga now sells the produce each week at the local market.

“I can now support our needs, including my son’s education,” she said. “ I no longer need to apply for loans to survive.”

jg/rh/ag

Philippines: Foreign Medical Teams in the Philippines after Typhoon Haiyan 2013 – Who Were They, When Did They Arrive and What Did They Do?

6 May 2015 - 4:14pm
Source: Public Library of Science Country: Philippines

AUTHORS

Kim Brolin
Omar Hawajri
Johan von Schreeb

ABSTRACT

Background: Foreign medical teams (FMT) are international medical teams sent to provide assistance in the aftermath of a disaster. In the last decade, there has been an increase in FMTs deployed following disasters. Despite the potential benefit FMTs might have in substituting the collapsed health care and caring for excess morbidity after large-scale disasters, several studies have demonstrated the difficulties in determining the quality of the response, mainly due to lack of reliable data. In order to bridge the knowledge gap on functioning of FMTs, the aim of this study is to assess the timing, capacities and activities of FMTs deployed to the Philippines after typhoon Haiyan.

Methods: This is a retrospective, descriptive study. Data on characteristics of FMTs present in the Philippines after typhoon Haiyan was provided by the World Health Organization (WHO) and compiled into a single database. Additional data was collected through a web survey, email correspondence and internet searches.

Results: A total of 108 FMTs were identified as arriving to the Philippines within the first month following typhoon Haiyan. None of these were operational in the affected areas within the first 72 h and the average time between arriving and being on-site operational was three days. Of the 108 FMTs, 70% were FMT type 1, 11% were FMT type 2 and 3% were FMT type 3. 16% of FMTs had unknown status. The total number of staff within all these FMTs were 2121, of which 210 were medical doctors, 250 nurses and 6 midwifes. Compared to previous sudden onset disasters, this study found no improvement in data sharing.

Philippines: ACT Alliance Alert/Update: Typhoon Haiyan, Philippines

6 May 2015 - 7:00am
Source: ACT Alliance Country: Philippines

Geneva, May 6, 2015

1. Brief description of the emergency and impact

Typhoon Haiyan (locally known as Yolanda) slammed into the eastern Philippines on November 8, 2013.
The strongest typhoon recorded in history killed more than 6,300 people and caused catastrophic damages to 44 provinces, 57 cities, 591 municipalities, affecting more than 16 million people. Total damages were estimated to have reached $2.04 B, including major damages to the agricultural sector.
Fisher folk and small coconut farmers, already among the poorest sectors suffered tremendous losses.

Philippines: Cash coordination in the Philippines: A review of lessons learned during the response to super Typhoon Haiyan

5 May 2015 - 4:01pm
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees, Cash Learning Partnership Country: Philippines, World

In the last five years there has been a growing trend towards the use of cash transfer programming (CTP) as a response modality in emergencies across the humanitarian sector. The fungibility of cash, when provided without restrictions, offers increased choice for affected populations to meet cross-sectoral needs according to their priorities. There is consequently a growing interest in the mainstreaming of cash transfers in response, recovery and rehabilitation and in the potential of so called multi-purpose cash grants within some international non-governmental organisations and donors. The effective and appropriate use of CTP requires strong intra and inter-agency coordination and communication between various actors across sectoral divisions, which poses particular challenges as well as opportunities for aid coordination efforts.

CaLP and UNHCR commissioned this review in order to document lessons learnt on the effectiveness of cash coordination during the initial three to four months of the response to Typhoon Haiyan, and to provide recommendations on inter-agency and cross-sectoral coordination.

Philippines: Life Goes on After Yolanda

5 May 2015 - 11:49am
Source: Action Contre la Faim Country: Philippines

PALO, Leyte--"If it was not for the small fish selling business, we could not have started to rebuild our lives back after the typhoon," says Ebeth Mendaza.

Ebeth is a fish vendor in Barangay Cogon in Palo, Leyte. Her husband is a coconut wine gatherer. Even with their measly income, they were able to raise 15 children.

But Typhoon Yolanda (international name Haiyan) changed it all. “I was worried that time. How will we survive? How will we feed our children? We got nothing. All my livelihood assets for fish vending were washed out. There were no coconut trees. There was no more livelihood for me and my husband," Mendaza said.

Worse, Mendaza and her family stayed in an evacuation area in Palo.

“It was a room occupied by more than 50 people. My family stayed there for one month with no decent clothes, not having anything at all. I thought we would not survive,” she said.

What pained her more was seeing her children eat in one plate. “I saw them eat in one plate, sharing rice and dried fish or noodles. That time there was no relief goods. You can even see people washing their clothes and wearing it back notwithstanding that it is still wet,” she added.

In March 2014, with funding support from the United States Aid for International Development – Office of the Foreign Disaster Assistance (USAID-OFDA), ACF International, implemented a livelihood project aimed at ensuring sustainable recovery of the fisheries sector affected by the typhoon.

“Even if it was uncertain that I would be chosen as a beneficiary, I had hope. I really prayed that I will be chosen. I am a fish vendor with 15 kids, I know God will not forsake me.” Mendaza recalled the time when ACF staff conducted house-to-house validation for those who are listed under the fisheries sector.

And the good news came.

“The day I saw my name as one of the beneficiaries of ACF and USAID project, I cried. I was thanking God for bringing hope to our devastated lives,” she said.

Mendaza has returned to fish vending. Her son, Rodulfo Jr., also received P10,000 worth of fishing materials. The Mendazas were also supported by other organizations to rebuild their house. “There is always a light at the end of the tunnel,” she said. For the Mendazas, ACF and USAID helped her find the light

About ACF

ACF international | Action Against Hunger is a global humanitarian organization committed to ending world hunger and malnutrition. ACF responds to help vulnerable populations around the world through programs that empower communities to overcome the barriers standing in their way.

In the Philippines, ACF tackles the root causes of hunger, prevents outbreaks of life-threatening acute malnutrition, and helps the most vulnerable communities regain self- sufficiency through integrated programs in health and nutrition, care practices and psychosocial and care practices, food security and livelihoods; water, sanitation and hygiene; disaster risk management; good governance and advocacy while incorporating crosscutting issues such as gender, care for the environment, climate change adaptation and cultural sensitivity.

Our programs save lives and provide communities with long-term solutions to hunger and its underlying causes. We work in more than 45 countries and reach approximately eight million people annually.

For more information, please contact:

Rosa May de Guzman Maitem
Communications Manager

ACF International - Philippine Mission
Email: rmaitem@ph.acfspain.org
Tel/Fax: +63-(02) 840-1808; +63-(02) 659-3598
Cellular: + + 63-998-560-5447

Philippines: Farmers Rise from Yolanda

5 May 2015 - 11:47am
Source: Action Contre la Faim Country: Philippines

GENERAL MacARTHUR, Eastern Samar—Erlinda Dael, the 48-year old mother of three and barangay (village) chairman of Pinggan in General MacArthur town in Eastern Samar, lost most of her belongings to Typhoon Yolanda (international name Haiyan).

Immediately after the typhoon struck, she received help from various government and non-government organizations. She cherished the livelihood assistance she received to begin a new life after the storm. Dael said the farm implements and seeds gave her a chance to plant in more areas and, literarily, begin a new life after the storm.

What she earns from her farm produce augments her salary as a village chair. “It helps in the day-to-day expenses. I even have some savings for the education of the children,” she said.

Dael said she was thankful for the help she and her village received. Despite the devastation, Dael still thinks Typhoon Yolanda also brought something positive— making residents realize the importance of living life with a purpose. Thus, as the village leader, Dael is looking at working for the construction of a flood control system and the strengthening of their evacuation center. With these two projects, Dael hopes that the damage to life and property will be mitigated when typhoons hit their village.

In the same village, Oscar Belicario’s life as a farmer had less problems. His two-hectare farm provided for his family of six. But Typhoon Yolanda came and wrought havoc in its path, including Balicario’s coconut and banana farm. Rising from the devastation, Belicario started to replant on his farm. But it would take a year before he could harvest his bananas.

Thanks to ACF International and its shelter and livelihoods assistance funded by the European Commission’s Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection department (ECHO), Belicario and Dael received seeds and farming tools. Aside from the livelihood assistance, they also received help for them to rebuild their homes.

The 61-year old farmer planted root crops and vegetables such as taro, sweet potatoes, squash, eggplant, bitter gourd, string beans and lady fingers. While waiting for harvest time, Belicario also worked as a carpenter, building houses in nearby towns.

Even food on the table has changed. Before typhoon, Belicario said, they could afford anything they wanted— like pork and chicken. This time, however, the family’s regular diet would be rice and fish. But the assistance made life more bearable for Belicario and his family.

“As a beneficiary of conditional cash transfer, I was able to buy medicines for myself and my children. I would not have the means to start life anew, recover from the devastation without the help extended to my family,” he said.

ACF and ECHO, responded quickly after Typhoon Yolanda struck Central Visayas, providing humanitarian assistance and early recovery interventions. Priority was given to the most severely affected people providing them with life-saving shelter, food, water, sanitation and healthcare, as well as livelihoods and reconstruction support.

ACF implemented the ECHO-funded project as part of a consortium with Save the Children and Care International. ACF covered Eastern Samar, CARE in Leyte and SCI in Panay. All three partners implemented shelter, food security and livelihoods projects, education and health infrastructure repairs; water, sanitation and hygiene; and child protection programs in their respective areas.

The organizations paired cash and in-kind assistance with training. Households were trained in applying Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) methods to their daily lives; community carpenters and families who received cash and shelter repair kits were trained how to Build Back Safer homes; households who received livelihood grants were given management skills and sector-specific DRR training; staff of rehabilitated barangay health stations, day care centers and schools, and parents were trained on psychological first aid and child protection.

Overall, the grant reached €4.9 million in 2014. Through the project, more than 7,300 houses have been built back safer, more than 7,300 households have recovered their livelihoods, and 65 health and education facilities have been rehabilitated increasing access to basic social services to more than 71,700 Filipinos. #

About ACF

ACF international | Action Against Hunger is a global humanitarian organization committed to ending world hunger and malnutrition. ACF responds to help vulnerable populations around the world through programs that empower communities to overcome the barriers standing in their way.

In the Philippines, ACF tackles the root causes of hunger, prevents outbreaks of life-threatening acute malnutrition, and helps the most vulnerable communities regain self- sufficiency through integrated programs in health and nutrition, care practices and psychosocial and care practices, food security and livelihoods; water, sanitation and hygiene; disaster risk management; good governance and advocacy while incorporating crosscutting issues such as gender, care for the environment, climate change adaptation and cultural sensitivity.

Our programs save lives and provide communities with long-term solutions to hunger and its underlying causes. We work in more than 45 countries and reach approximately eight million people annually.

For more information, please contact:

Rosa May de Guzman Maitem
Communications Manager

ACF International - Philippine Mission
Email: rmaitem@ph.acfspain.org
Tel/Fax: +63-(02) 840-1808; +63-(02) 659-3598
Cellular: + + 63-998-560-5447

Philippines: Engaging women in improving village sanitation

5 May 2015 - 11:03am
Source: Action Contre la Faim Country: Philippines

GEN. MaCARTHUR, Eastern Samar-- Without help from her husband, who has a daytime job, Gregoria Canatoy dug a six-foot hole that would serve as a septic tank. Then, the 39-year old mother of three, did some carpentry--installing lumber, concrete flooring and, finally, the ceramic toilet bowl.

“After four days of labor, I managed to build the latrine,” a satisfied Gregoria said.

“It’s quite difficult but I’ve tried hard to get it done. My husband and children are happy. Thanks to the clean latrine, our dignity has been restored through this sanitation project," Gregoria added.

Gregoria is just one of the women in the remote villages of Gen. MacArthur in Eastern Samar who did not have access to clean toilets.

One of ACF’s goals is to end open defecation through implementing innovative solutions to the challenges of water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) in the communities. ACF, in collaboration with UNICEF, works hard in its campaign to end child and maternal undernutrition and mortality.

In 2013, Typhoon Yolanda, considered the strongest typhoon ever to hit the Philippines, devastated Gen. MacArthur town, destroying homes and livelihoods, including water systems and toilets.

The town's remote and almost-inaccessible communities made it difficult for the families to have access to basic social and healthcare services. In Gen. Mac Arthur, 18 communities are considered geographically isolated.

“Sanitation has always been a problem in the municipality. Every time we have year-end evaluation in the province, Gen. Macarthur gets a red mark because of poor access to sanitation facilities. The advocacy to promote proper use of latrines and support the Department of Health’s Zero Open Defecation campaign is a big help to us,” said Dr. Corazon Miflores, the municipal health officer.

Esther Magdayo, head of WASH project in Eastern Samar, said women played a big role in improving hygiene and sanitation issues in the said town. “Women have been actively engaged in our implementation.”

“They bear the impact of dirty and inadequate water and hygiene and sanitation practices. But they rose up from these challenges. They were the first ones to understand the devastating effects of unhygienic practices, and the benefits of Open Defecation Free (ODF) status,” she added.

ACF, in coordination with Municipal Health Office and the Department of Social Welfare and Development, was in the forefront in promoting the significance of having toilets in far-flung communities.

“The CLTS (community-led total sanitation) behavioral changes process encourages community self-analysis of existing defecation patterns and threats, and promotes local solutions to reduce and ultimately eliminate the practice of open defecation," Magdayo said.

“Typhoon Yolanda has taught women that they can step up and do more beyond their traditional roles of tending the households and caring for their children. They, too, can rebuild their homes,” shares Magdayo.

In March 2014, a consultative workshop was held in Borongan City. It was attended by municipal sanitation inspectors and non-government organization partners. There, 129 barangays from the 11 Yolanda-affected towns in Eastern Samar were identified as target for the Zero Open Defecation (ZOD) project.

“It has been my long-time dream that Gen. Macarthur become a clean community not only in front of our houses but the whole community as well,” Mayor Jaime Ty then said.

“I am grateful that the eight barangays heeded the call stopping open defecation. I would also like to encourage the residents to build their latrines and practice proper hygiene,” the mayor added.

A year after Typhoon Yolanda, ACF, through the generous support from its donors and with its WASH services, has reached over 400,000 people in the three worst affected areas: Leyte, Samar and Panay. #

About ACF

ACF international | Action Against Hunger is a global humanitarian organization committed to ending world hunger and malnutrition. ACF responds to help vulnerable populations around the world through programs that empower communities to overcome the barriers standing in their way.

In the Philippines, ACF tackles the root causes of hunger, prevents outbreaks of life-threatening acute malnutrition, and helps the most vulnerable communities regain self- sufficiency through integrated programs in health and nutrition, care practices and psychosocial and care practices, food security and livelihoods; water, sanitation and hygiene; disaster risk management; good governance and advocacy while incorporating crosscutting issues such as gender, care for the environment, climate change adaptation and cultural sensitivity.

Our programs save lives and provide communities with long-term solutions to hunger and its underlying causes. We work in more than 45 countries and reach approximately eight million people annually.

To arrange for interview, please contact:

Rosa May de Guzman Maitem
Communications Manager

ACF International - Philippine Mission
Email: rmaitem@ph.acfspain.org
Cellular: + 63-999-673-9099

World: Global Emergency Overview Snapshot 29 April–5 May 2015

5 May 2015 - 10:35am
Source: Assessment Capacities Project Country: Afghanistan, Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guatemala, Guinea, Haiti, Honduras, India, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Kiribati, Lebanon, Liberia, Libya, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Uganda, Ukraine, Vanuatu, World, Yemen

Snapshot 29 April–5 May 2015

Nepal: The death toll from the earthquake has reached 7,250, with more than 14,000 injured. Aftershocks are still occurring, and some villages have still not been reached. 300,000 homes are estimated to need rebuilding or repair.

Yemen: The estimated number of IDPs has doubled since 17 April to reach 300,000, as conflict continues. Food distribution, health, and WASH systems are on the verge of collapse, due in large part to severe fuel shortages.

Nigeria: 9.7 million people are living in the areas worst affected by the Boko Haram insurgency, and 300,000 new IDPs have been recorded since February. In Damasak, Borno state, hundreds of people have been found dead following Boko Haram attacks.

Updated: 05/05/2015. Next update: 12/05/2015

Global Emergency Overview Web Interface

Philippines: Philippines: Cash Transfer Programming (4 May 2015)

4 May 2015 - 2:36am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Philippines

World: Southeast Asia: Annual Report 2014 (MAA51001)

29 April 2015 - 8:20am
Source: International Federation of Red Cross And Red Crescent Societies Country: Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, Indonesia, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Viet Nam, World

Overview

ASEAN region is undoubtedly a very dynamic region in Asia and the Pacific. With Indonesia accounting for two-fifth of regional output, value added in South-East Asia (SEA) continues to grow by 5 percent in 2014. According to the World Bank, Singapore and Brunei are the only ASEAN countries that are considered high income. Malaysia and Thailand are categorized as upper-middle income economies, while Indonesia, Philippines and Vietnam are lowerincome economies. Cambodia, Lao PDR and Myanmar, on the other hand are categorized as low income. In spite of progress in reducing poverty, the region still faces development challenges and gaps closely associated with social inequities. Irregular migration and human trafficking remain significant challenges that will continue to increase in the coming years. Migration public health, concerns the governments, particularly the re-emerging infectious disease such as tuberculosis, HIV/AIDS and malaria. Natural disasters and conflict in certain areas also pose on-going threats to population and have resulted in the displacement of significant numbers of people.

However, growing levels of wealth and the resultant penetration of new technologies, means that innovation is necessary if the Red Cross Red Crescent National Societies are to maintain our privileged position within the humanitarian community. Shifting disaster and developmental trends, driven by factors such as climate change, rapid urbanization and weakening social structures, demands more strategic, evidence-based approach to communications and advocacy. This growing focus on the development agenda (Community Safety and Resilience-CSR, National Society Development-NSD, Communication and Advocacy/Humanitarian Diplomacy-HD) in SEA is part of a broader effort in 2014 to re-imagine and reposition the regional delegation in a rapidly changing Red Cross and Red Crescent context. There is a clear need to innovate; adapting our ways of working and communication and understanding better our operating context. Focus has been placed on working on profiling the needs of vulnerable communities, using Bangkok as the third largest humanitarian hub in the world to position the Red Cross Red Crescent National Societies in the region.

In 2014, the SEA region has witnessed widespread natural calamities (Indonesia, Lao and Philippines) and political instability (Cambodia, Myanmar and Thailand), which had impacted some of the planned activities towards the end of the year.

The resilience agenda has been structured maximizing health, disaster risk reduction (DRR), NSD, climate risk reduction and public health in emergencies as well as other cross-cutting components as defined in the “Resilience House Model” and “Regional Road Map” of Red Cross Red Crescent National Societies of the region. The project on building regional capacity and collaboration for community resilience in SEA (Regional Resilience Initiative – RRI, previously named C3R) commenced as a regional project to provide platform for National Societies to explore opportunities in order to build their capacity towards strengthening advocacy/ HD, disaster law and gender and diversity components in National Societies programming, along with technical competencies on DRR, climate change, pandemic preparedness and response preparedness. The project also facilitated to strengthen the links between the National Disaster Management Authority of the specific country along with other stakeholders including ASEAN Secretariat, Red Cross Red Crescent National Societies, which ultimately has added value in forging strong partnership and provided an opportunity to be better placed within a specific country.

The key highlights of the Regional Community Safety and Resilience Forum (RCSRF) in September were the agreement of participated National Societies to reactivate the Regional Disaster Response Teams (RDRT) mechanism in the region and to accelerate the technical cooperation with ASEAN Coordinating Centre for Humanitarian Assistance on disaster management (AHA Centre) to support peer-to-peer training and capacitybuilding among National Societies of the region. A joint plan of action between AHA Centre and Red Cross Red Crescent was agreed at a meeting in Jakarta in October 2014. Climate Change Master Training-of-Trainers was organized to develop a core group of climate change experts amongst SEA National Societies who can provide technical support to plan and implement climate smart project activities at national, sub national and community levels.

Many National Societies in SEA have taken great strides in working with their governments and other key partners to influence the development of laws, rules and regulations for disaster management (DM), risk reduction and response. Given the ongoing activities and momentum with regards to disaster law among National Societies and governments in the region, a dedicated regional disaster law delegate joined the team in the South-East Asia regional delegation (SEARD) in August 2014 to support SEA National Societies to build their knowledge and capacity in disaster law and legislative advocacy; to participate in the development or review of DM and related laws (and the associated regulations and guidelines); and in the undertaking of technical assistance projects. Disaster law is one of the key components in the RRI project. The project will continue building on the trusted, pre-established relationships with National Societies, governments and humanitarian partners (e.g. the UN), capitalizing on the auxiliary status of the National Societies as well as their participation in national-level processes relating to DM and response, in order to positively influence legislative work in SEA.

A number of actions were carried out to promote youth engagement and strengthen the youth network in SEA. Youth empowerment initiatives were carried out and youth trained on Youth as Agents of Behavioural Change (YABC) were linked with different programmes such as health, DM and so on. Initiatives were taken to mainstream/integrate youth into CSR actions with their improved positioning and increased representation. The second Asia Pacific Youth Summit in Beijing in October has also re-affirmed the importance of regional Red Cross Red Crescent Youth Network (SEAYN), where SEAYN commitment in the final Beijing Youth Summit Commitment has been included and endorsed.

The increase of interest on gender and diversity was seen and support is being provided from SEARD based on the needs and demands of the National Societies. The First Regional Red Cross Red Crescent Workshop on Gender and Diversity was organized for National Societies to gain a shared understanding about gender and diversity as well as their inclusion within programming. A regional Red Cross and Red Crescent network on gender and diversity was also launched during the event. The organization of this network is being promoted and possibilities have been explored for peer learning and sharing. The participants also reviewed the terms of reference (ToR) of the network, provided inputs and suggested for its endorsement at the SEA Leadership meeting in February 2015.

The organizational capacity assessment and certification (**OCAC**) process has been progressing well with increased interests from Myanmar Red Cross Society (Myanmar RC), Timor-Leste Red Cross Society (CVTL) and Viet Nam Red Cross Society (Viet Nam RC) to carry out OCAC self-assessment in 2014. Myanmar RC reviewed its OCAC findings and developed a plan together with the partners for harmonized support on organizational development (OD) and capacity building. Cambodian Red Cross Society (Cambodian RC) is undertaking branch organizational capacity assessment (BOCA) exercises in its branches. Significant progress has been made in finance development in Myanmar, Timor-Leste and Viet Nam. SEARD also supported the Brunei Darussalam Red Crescent Society (Brunei Darussalam RC) to prepare financial statement and submit to the Finance Commission.

A range of communication materials were developed and several other activities took place to voice the needs of vulnerable communities and support National Societies to build their capacity to function effectively in both emergencies and non emergencies. Some of the resources that were developed including World Disaster Report 2014, numerous publications to support global and regional events such as one-year anniversary of Typhoon Haiyan, Ten Years on: Remembering the Indian Ocean Tsunami, Global Volunteering Forum and so on.

Philippines: Voc-Tech trainings benefit 6,683 Yolanda survivors

29 April 2015 - 12:02am
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

ILOILO CITY, April 29 (PIA) --- A total of 6,683 typhoon Yolanda-affected individuals from Western Visayas benefitted from the Technical Education and Skills Development Authority (TESDA)-6 Emergency Response Rehabilitation and Recovery (TERRR) program.

TESDA-6 public information officer Bernadette Puertas said that TERRR was implemented to help Yolanda-affected residents in the region undergo technical vocational training so that they could find employment opportunities.

“Of the 6,683 who were enrolled in the program, a total of 5,014 already graduated from the various accredited training centers in the region, as of March 31, 2015,” she said.

She said that 2,702 of these scholars are already employed; 2,503 have been assessed, while 2,142 have been certified.

The scholars were trained from the array of tech-voc trainings like carpentry, computer hardware servicing, and information technology and on tourism sector.

The TERRR program covered 2,606 beneficiaries from Iloilo province, 1,717 from Capiz, 1,123 from Aklan, 697 from Negros Occidental, and 540 from Antique.

TESDA allocated P81.21-million for the community-based specialty training program that addressed the specific skills needed in Western Visayas and promote employment. (JCM/LTP/PIA-Iloilo)

World: Global Emergency Overview Snapshot 22–28 April 2015

28 April 2015 - 10:35am
Source: Assessment Capacities Project Country: Afghanistan, Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guatemala, Guinea, Haiti, Honduras, India, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Kiribati, Lebanon, Liberia, Libya, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Uganda, Ukraine, Vanuatu, World, Yemen

Snapshot 22–28 April 2015

Nepal: The 7.8 magnitude earthquake that hit the country on 25 April has affected 8 million people. As of 28 April, 5,057 people have been reported dead, and more than 8,500 injured. Hundreds of thousands of people are living in tents, while the villages closest to the quake’s epicentre remain inaccessible.

Burundi: President Nkurunziza has confirmed he is seeking a third term in power, and insecurity in the country is growing, with two killed during protests in the capital. 800 people are crossing into Rwanda every day. 20,400 are now in Rwanda, and 5,000 in DRC, as tensions relating to elections continue to increase.

Niger: 3,080 cases of measles were recorded across the country from 1 January to 23 April, with 77% in Zinder region. WHO reported another 1,150 suspected cases of meningitis, including 129 deaths, have been recorded for all regions except Diffa 1 January–27 April.

Updated: 28/04/2015. Next update: 05/05/2015

Global Emergency Overview Web Interface