TyphoonHaiyan - RW Updates

Syndicate content
ReliefWeb - Updates
Updated: 18 min 42 sec ago

World: Global emergency overview snapshot 22 - 29 july

3 hours 44 min ago
Source: Assessment Capacities Project Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominican Republic, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guatemala, Guinea, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Paraguay, Philippines, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Uganda, World, Yemen, South Sudan preview

Snapshot 22-29 July 2014

oPt: 1,067 are reported killed in Gaza since the beginning of Operation Protective Edge. 215,000 people have been displaced, and shelter conditions are a major concern. Damage to critical infrastructure, including the only power station in Gaza and health facilities, is heavily restricting access to basic services. Insecurity is also impeding humanitarian access.

Syria: Islamic State launched multiple attacks on government positions across northern and northeastern Syria in its first large-scale coordinated assault. An increasing number of injuries – averaging 25,000 injuries each month - combined with the severe shortages in surgical supplies are rendering functioning hospitals unable to cope with the demand for surgical treatment.

Nigeria: The frequency and fatality of attacks are currently at their highest levels since the state of emergency (SoE) was imposed. Four attacks took place in Kano city, and two in Kaduna. Ebola was confirmed as the cause of death of a Liberian man in Lagos, the largest city in sub-Saharan Africa.

More on www.geo.acaps.org

Updated: 29/07/2014 Next Update: 05/08/2014

Global Emergency Overview Web Interface

Philippines: Rebuilding storm-resilient shelters in Haiyan-stricken areas

25 July 2014 - 6:32am
Source: International Committee of the Red Cross Country: Philippines

Haiyan, the world’s most powerful typhoon to make landfall, not only destroyed lives and livelihoods but left millions of houses in central Philippines in ruins. More than eight months after the typhoon battered the country, rebuilding efforts are well underway. Helene Plennevaux heads the ICRC's sub-delegation in Guiuan. In this audio slide show she tells us how the ICRC and the Philippine Red Cross are building storm-resilient shelters for thousands of families along the southern coast of Samar Island.

Philippines: Doctors send aid to Yolanda victims

25 July 2014 - 12:40am
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

By: Danilo E. Doguiles

GENERAL SANTOS CITY, July 25 (PIA) -- Members of the Philippine Society of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery (PSOHNS) here recently handed to the Socksargen Federation of Fishing and Allied Industries, Inc (SFFAII) some P269,000 as financial aid to victims of typhoon Yolanda.

The Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR) 12 on Saturday hosted a ceremony at the East Asia Royale Hotel to acknowledge the contributions of the donor organization and facilitate the hand-over of checks from the PSOHNS to SFFAII.

SFFAII, the umbrella organization of fisheries associations in Region 12, has been tasked to handle funds for the rehabilitation of the Yolanda-devastated communities under the AHON (Tagalog for “rise”) Program.

Dr. Howard Enriquez, president of PSOHNS, said, “As an organization, we have a social responsibility, thus through our collective efforts we were able to raise substantial amount of money from our fellows, hospitals, specialty group chapters, and pharmaceutical partners.…a portion of this will be given to your good program AHON.”

“We hope that even in small ways we can help improve the lives of the fisherfolk affected by the typhoon.”

Enriquez also mentioned that they agree with the proposal that a portion of their donation will be used to purchase chest freezers to support livelihood of affected families.

Meanwhile, Mr. Joaquin Lu, president of SFFAII, thanked all the professionals who contributed for the AHON Program.

He suggested that with the coming of more funds it would be better to build new fiberglass boats considering that these last longer and these do not require outrigger that needs more space. He also said that fiberglass boats can be safely kept in their homes.

Lu also commended the fact that AHON now considers distribution of chest freezers. This, for him, is one opportunity to add value to their produce and eventually these could command better price in the market.

AHON program is BFAR’s version of public-private-people participation since it involves various sectors, including the beneficiaries, in implementing initiatives intended to help Yolanda survivors recover and re-establish their livelihood.

BFAR Office for Special Concerns acting chief Melanie Guerra, who represented BFAR director Atty. Asis Perez, expressed the bureau’s gratitude for all the efforts exerted by PSOHNS.

“Be assured that your financial assistance will reach the persons this is intended for,” said Guerra as she cited BFAR’s ground operations mechanics in identifying beneficiaries and their needs to rebuild life and livelihood of the fisherfolk after having being hit by the ruthless disaster.

She also informed the group that BFAR has already surpassed its targeted number of boats to be distributed and it is just right to support livelihood of the affected families, thus, AHON project now also focuses on procuring chest freezers and post-harvest interventions.

Another highlight of the ceremony was the signing of the memorandum of agreement (MOA) which specifies commitments of involved parties, namely: BFAR, PSOHNS, and SFFAII who pledged to effectively deliver all forms of assistance to the target beneficiaries.

Doctors Howard Enriquez, Raymond Belmonte, and Melfred Hernandez signed for PSOHNS while Mr. Joaquin Lu signed in behalf of the private sector through SFFAII. Atty. Asis Perez was expected to sign document for BFAR.

BFAR 12 OIC Regional Director Ambutong Pautong and Rosanna Bernadette Contreras, the Executive Director of SFFAII officially witnessed the MOA signing.

The participants were given a chance to experience a glimpse of the impacts of AHON initiatives and its message of “bayanihan” and hope as they viewed the music video “Ahon”.

Said video can now be downloaded at www.facebook.com/Ahon.BFAR. (DEDoguiles-PIA 12 with report from OSabal-BFAR 12)

World: Pacific Islands Humanitarian Bulletin, July 2014

24 July 2014 - 12:08am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Cook Islands, Fiji, French Polynesia (France), Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Niue (New Zealand), Palau, Solomon Islands, Tokelau, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, World preview

HIGHLIGHTS

• El Niño alert issued, with meteorologists estimating a 70 per cent chance of event developing by late 2014.

• OCHA and the Pacific Humanitarian Team responded to five emergencies between November 2013 and May 2014.

• Recovery efforts in cyclone-affected Tonga include a cash-for-work programme focusing on food security and debris management.

• A study of the Pacific Humanitarian Team response in the Solomon Islands finds coordination support appreciated, but improved communication and assessments needed.

El Niño alert issued

The Australian Bureau of Meteorology has issued an El Niño alert and is estimating a 70 per cent chance of an El Niño event by late 2014. Northeast trade winds and sea surface temperature anomalies have been evident since February. A large expanse of warm water is currently located along the equator and moving eastwards, with temperatures one to two degrees Celsius higher than average. Some forecasters were initially expecting the El Niño event to be similar in impact to record temperatures experienced in 1997 and 1998, but is now not expected to be as strong as first predicted.

What does this mean for the Pacific Islands?

Drought conditions may be experienced in some Pacific Island countries. In addition to rainfall distribution changes, there could be increased air temperatures due to warm ocean temperatures rising to the surface and making contact with the atmosphere.

In the period from November 2014 to April / May 2015, below average rainfall and drought conditions may be experienced in the Solomon Islands, Vanuatu, Fiji, Tonga, Niue and even Tuvalu. These conditions could threaten food security and livelihoods as many island communities depend on the agricultural sector. It is also important to note that the El Niño event is expected to end just as the dry season commences, further exacerbating impacts for communities already dealing with crop and livestock losses.

During El Niño events, Pacific cyclone seasons generally commence earlier than expected, in September / October rather than November / December. Wetter than normal conditions may be experienced in the eastern Pacific area, including Kiribati, Tokelau, French Polynesia and the northern Cook Islands.

Philippines: Red Cross volunteers reach out to Palawan tribal communities

23 July 2014 - 9:04am
Source: International Federation of Red Cross And Red Crescent Societies Country: Philippines

By Kate Marshall, IFRC

The Tagbanwa villagers on the island of Banuang Daan gather excitedly as Philippine Red Cross staff and volunteers arrive by traditional bangka outrigger from the main island of Coron, Palawan, two hours away by boat.

They greet the visitors with “Mupia ong-koi, ong-koi, [welcome friend],” as they disembark and make their way to the outdoor meeting hall where Philippine Red Cross is scheduled to conduct a recruitment drive for 30 community volunteers and the barangay (village) recovery committee.

Later in the day, a staff member will present a session on building back safer illustrated with eight simple shelter messages.

Ancestors of Palawan’s various tribal nations, including the Tagbanwa and Palawano, date back at least 24,000 years. Exact numbers are hard to come by but their descendants make up about 30 per cent of the 800,000 residents of Palawan, the westernmost island of the Philippines prized by tourists for its pristine waters and spectacular natural attractions.

For many years, Philippine Red Cross has been conducting regular outreach programs to remote communities in the Calamian Islands, which can only be reached by boat or by foot. Just days after Typhoon Haiyan struck the Visayas and northern Palawan last November, Philippine Red Cross was the first aid organisation to deliver food and relief supplies to three island municipalities: Coron, Cullion and Busuanga. With the support of the Swiss Red Cross and the IFRC, this was followed by cash, non food items, shelter repair kits, tools and CGI distributions to 2000 of the neediest households.

The Swiss Red Cross has committed a minimum 2 million Swiss Francs (USD2.2 million) for recovery, which will be boosted by the Irish Red Cross. This will be used for shelter assistance, water and sanitation projects and improvements to schools and health facilities. A separate livelihoods assessment is underway, including training for carpenters.

Barangay official Jaime Aguilar says: “Philippine Red Cross has established a good relationship with us and has been visible in the community. They were the only ones who delivered food to us after Yolanda [Haiyan].”

Banuang Daan might look idyllic, with its turquoise waters, coconut trees and thatched homes, but life is far from easy for the few hundred scattered inhabitants. Nearly all are fishermen or seaweed farmers. A handful of the younger ones find work in Coron town as waiters and cleaners. Some of the men supplement their meagre income in the dry season by making a treacherous climb up the limestone cliffs to collect swiftlets’ nests from cracks in the rock. These are destined for Chinese wedding banquets, for which buyers will pay up to $10,000 US dollars a kilo to make the highly prized delicacy bird’s nest soup.

Longstanding Philippine Red Cross volunteers Isabelita ‘Belet’ and Felix Pamor, who regularly visit the islands and speak the tribal language, explain that the inhabitants face a constant struggle to survive and that their way of life is under threat by dynamiting of fishing grounds. Unscrupulous collectors use cyanide to stun sea creatures and make them easier to trap. They can fetch a lot of money on the black market.

“Here in Palawan the only source of income for the Tagbanwa is fish, tambalang and hagar hagar [the tasty local seaweeds],” Belet explains. “Before Yolanda [Typhoon Haiyan] they were suffering, and when the storm came they experienced trauma and their suffering worsened because they lost seaweed, clothes, blankets, everything.”

The local seaweeds are susceptible to wind damage, and much of the crop was wiped out by Haiyan. “When the wind is blowing the children and the elderly will start wailing ‘’Oh no! Not Yolanda again!’’,” Belet says.

Water, or lack of it, is also a problem, especially in the dry season. In order to have enough for their needs and to water crops, the islanders will resort to deliveries from the mainland. Although there are springs further inland, the two wells in the village usually dry up before the rainy season starts. Past attempts by Spanish Red Cross to fix the problem with a series of pipes have failed through lack of maintenance and replacement parts. Although some homes harvest rainwater, the practice is not widespread because of the cost of installing drums and downpipes.

“There’s not enough water in the dry season,” says Aguilar. “We need help to install pipes from the source to the community.”

But what Banuang Daan needs most of all, says Aguilar, is alternative livelihoods, so that Tagbanwa people can learn new ways of making a living while they wait for the seaweed to grow back.

World: Tirer les leçons de l'expérience asiatique en matière d'intervention humanitaire

23 July 2014 - 7:09am
Source: IRIN Country: Indonesia, Philippines, World

BANGKOK, 23 juillet 2014 (IRIN) - En préparation du Sommet mondial sur l'aide humanitaire, des gouvernements, universitaires, acteurs humanitaires, responsables militaires et activistes de toute la région Asie-Pacifique se réunissent à Tokyo aujourd'hui, le 23 juillet, pour tirer des enseignements de l'expertise de la région en matière de réponse aux crises humanitaires.

« Ce que j'attends de ce sommet, ce sont des conseils capables de changer la donne - pas les conseils habituels », a dit Oliver Lacey-Hall, le responsable de l'antenne régionale du Bureau de la coordination des affaires humanitaires des Nations Unies (OCHA) pour l'Asie et le Pacifique, à IRIN. « Je souhaite que les acteurs humanitaires écoutent réellement les personnes qui n'ont pas l'habitude d'exprimer leurs besoins - les personnes affectées, les universitaires, le secteur privé, les gouvernements locaux - ces personnes qui n'ont habituellement pas voix au chapitre. »

L'Asie est la région du monde la plus exposée aux catastrophes. De 1975 à 2011, l'Asie a enregistré le plus grand nombre de décès en lien avec une catastrophe naturelle au monde, soit 1,5 million. Des études ont également révélé que plus de 130 millions d'habitants de la région étaient affectés par des conflits sous-nationaux. À l'échelle de la planète, 89 pour cent de l'ensemble des personnes affectées par une situation d'urgence se trouvent en Asie.

Le Sommet mondial sur l'aide humanitaire organisé par les Nations Unies, qui se tiendra à Istanbul en 2016, est précédé de 8 sessions consultatives visant à recueillir des informations et des points de vue sur l'action humanitaire à travers le monde. Il intervient dans un contexte marqué par une hausse des dépenses et une multiplication des besoins en assistance humanitaire travers le monde.

« Nous peinons à trouver la définition exacte de ce qu'est une action humanitaire efficace », a dit M. Lacey-Hall. « Les gouvernements ont des conceptions très différentes de ce que représente une intervention humanitaire efficace. Les anciens mécanismes et l'époque où l'aide humanitaire n'était qu'une affaire de logistique - l'affrètement d'avions pour distribuer de la nourriture et des fournitures, par exemple - seront bientôt révolus. »

Les participants à la session consultative de Tokyo sont très enthousiastes à l'idée d'inspirer les pratiques humanitaires mondiales avec leurs expériences locales.

Victoria Lanting est membre du conseil d'administration de la Croix-Rouge philippine qui participe à l'intervention mise en place à la suite du typhon Haiyan en novembre 2013. « Les Philippines sont souvent citées comme le pays du monde le plus exposé aux catastrophes. Cela signifie, entre autres choses, que les Philippins connaissent l'aide humanitaire sous toutes ses formes. »

Mais « les catastrophes de la magnitude du typhon Haiyan ne devraient pas devenir quelque chose d'habituel, contrairement aux interventions humanitaires rapides, efficaces et transparentes. Doter la population de certaines compétences apparaît aujourd'hui plus pertinent que jamais », a ajouté Mme Lanting.

Le sommet se concentre sur quatre domaines thématiques : « L'efficacité humanitaire », « Réduction de la vulnérabilité et gestion des risques », « La transformation par l'innovation » et « Assister les personnes affectées par les conflits ».

L'expérience d'Aceh

Rina Meutia, qui coordonnera une session sur les besoins en situation de conflit, a dit à IRIN qu'elle était très impatiente de partager les leçons tirées de l'expérience d'Aceh et ainsi d'apporter son concours au système humanitaire mondial.

« Aceh fut l'une des plus vastes opérations humanitaires à l'époque, lorsque tout le monde commença à affluer après le tsunami », a dit Mme Meutia en faisant référence au séisme et au tsunami de 2004 qui balayèrent maisons, immeubles et routes sur leur passage et firent plus de 167 000 victimes dans la province d'Aceh, au nord de l'Indonésie. Plus de 7 milliards de dollars US de dons et de fonds publics furent destinés à Aceh, une région déjà éprouvée par trois décennies de guerre civile.

« Lorsque les acteurs humanitaires sont arrivés pour prodiguer des secours, nombre d'entre eux n'avaient pas la moindre idée du conflit en cours. Lorsqu'ils ont appris par la suite à quel point la situation était complexe, ils ont été surpris de réaliser que les populations qu'ils aidaient à se relever d'une catastrophe naturelle étaient affectées de si longue date par un conflit et que le monde humanitaire les avait délaissés durant tout ce temps. »

« Parfois, les intervenants humanitaires qui débarquent avec un mandat précis pour prodiguer de prétendus secours peuvent ne faire qu'embrouiller les idées des populations, et même faire plus de tort que de bien », a-t-elle indiqué. « Il est controversé et très complexe ne serait-ce que de suggérer que les interventions humanitaires devraient se mêler des réalités politiques sur le terrain, mais c'est une question qui mérite d'être débattue à l'occasion de cet échange international si nous souhaitons améliorer l'efficacité des futures interventions. »

Les spécialistes s'accordent à dire que les débats portant sur l'engagement en situation de conflit seront un facteur clé d'amélioration du système mondial - y compris les considérations sur la manière dont sont financées les activités dans les zones de conflit.

« La question de l'action humanitaire en situation de conflit me préoccupe. Nous devons prendre le temps de débattre ouvertement de la question de savoir si une organisation dont l'essentiel des financements provient d'une même source peut toujours être considérée comme étant neutre », a dit M. Lacey-Hall.

Selon le Centre de surveillance des déplacements internes (IDMC), basé à Genève, 33,3 millions de personnes à travers le monde étaient déplacées par des conflits à la date de janvier 2014 - « le plus grand nombre jamais recensé de personnes déplacées en raison des conflits et de la violence ».

« Nous devons nous pencher sur nos principes fondamentaux - humanité, impartialité, neutralité et indépendance - pour voir si nous réussissons à nous y tenir à la lumière des appels de fonds », a dit M. Lacey-Hall.

Travailler en situation de conflit requiert de faire des compromis, a-t-il dit, en évoquant les complexités du travail humanitaire là où « les civils ont désespérément besoin d'aide [mais] où nous devons être vigilants au message que nous véhiculons - les sensibilités contextuelles - et trouver l'équilibre vis-à-vis de notre engagement envers les principes humanitaires »

kk/cb-xq/amz

World: Capturing Asia’s aid response lessons

22 July 2014 - 2:58am
Source: IRIN Country: Indonesia, Philippines, World

BANGKOK, 22 July 2014 (IRIN) - Governments, academics, humanitarians, military leaders, and activists from across the Asia-Pacific region will gather in Tokyo tomorrow to glean expertise on responses to humanitarian crises across the region in the lead-up to the 2016 World Humanitarian Summit.

“What I am expecting of this summit are game-changing recommendations - not the usual ones,” Oliver Lacey-Hall, head of the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific, told IRIN. “I want the humanitarian actors to really listen to those who are not used to articulating their needs - affected people, academics, the private sector, local governments - people who don’t usually have a voice.”

Asia is the most disaster-prone region in the world. From 1975 to 2011, Asia had the world’s highest number of fatalities from natural disasters - 1.5 million. Research has also shown that more than 130 million people in the region are affected by sub-national conflicts. In global terms, 89 percent of all people affected by emergencies live in Asia.

The World Humanitarian Summit, which will be hosted by the UN in Istanbul in 2016, is preceded by eight regional consultations to gather information and perspectives on humanitarian responses around the world. It is taking place amid both increasing spending and increasing need for humanitarian responses around the world.

“We are struggling to find an answer to what exactly constitutes effective humanitarian action,” said Lacey-Hall. “Governments have very different views of an effective humanitarian response. Old mechanisms and the days when humanitarian assistance was simply logistical - such as planes being flown to deliver food and supplies - are close to being over.”

Participants in the Tokyo session are eager to share local experiences to inform global response practices.

Victoria Lanting, a board member of the Philippines Red Cross who is working in the ongoing response to the devastation wrought by Typhoon Haiyan in November 2013, explained: “The Philippines is routinely called the most disaster-risky country in the world. Among many other things, this means, Filipinos have experience of response in all forms.”

But, Lanting argued, “disasters of Haiyan magnitude should not be a way of life - fast, effective and transparent humanitarian response should be. Equipping the citizenry with skills… is more relevant now than ever.”

The Summit focuses on four thematic areas: humanitarian effectiveness, reducing vulnerability and managing risk, “transformation through innovation”, and serving the needs of people in conflict.

The Aceh experience

Rina Meutia, who will coordinate a session on conflict needs, told IRIN she was eager to bring her experiences from the response in Aceh to bear on the global humanitarian system.

“Aceh was one of the largest humanitarian operations at the time when everyone started arriving after the tsunami, Meutia said, referring to the 2004 earthquake and tsunami that wiped out homes, buildings and roads, and claimed over 167,000 lives in the northern Indonesian province of Aceh. More than US$7 billion in donations and government funds poured into the province, which had experienced three decades of civil war.

“When humanitarians arrived to provide relief, many of them had no idea about the ongoing conflict, and when they learned later how complicated it was, they were surprised to know that the people they were helping recover from a natural disaster had been affected by conflict for so long, and neglected by humanitarians during that time.”

“Sometimes internationals arriving with a particular mandate to give so-called help can actually just confuse people, and even do more harm than good,” she argued. “It’s controversial and messy to even suggest that humanitarian responses should engage with political realities on the ground, but it needs to be part of this global discussion if we want future responses to be more effective.”

Experts agree that the discussions around conflict-time engagement will be a crucial component of improving the global system - including considerations about how operations in conflict areas are funded.

“I am concerned about the question of humanitarian action in conflict settings. We need to sit down and have an honest conversation whether an organization getting the majority of its funds from one single source can still be neutral,” said Lacey-Hall.

According to the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre in Geneva, there were 33.3 million people displaced by conflicts around the world as of January 2014 - “the highest ever number of people displaced as a consequence of conflict and violence.”

“We need to look at our core principles - humanity, impartiality, neutrality and operational independence - to see if we manage to uphold them in light of fundraising demands,” said Lacey-Hall.

Working in conflicts involves trade-offs, he said, pointing to the complexities of humanitarian work where “civilians are in desperate need of assistance… [but] we have to be careful about the message we give - the contextual sensibilities - and balance our commitment to humanitarian principles.”

kk/cb

Philippines: ACF Interventions in Zamboanga, Leyte and Tacloban

21 July 2014 - 2:03pm
Source: Action Contre la Faim Country: Canada, Philippines

ZAMBOANGA CITY—Nine months into recovery and reconstruction efforts after armed faction of the Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF) engaged the Philippines security forces in Zamboanga on 9 September 2014, ACF International, the world’s leading organization in the fight against hunger and malnutrition, is continuing providing a range of essential support to complement government efforts for the 25,670 displaced people, among them 13,000 in Joaquin F. Enriquez Memorial Stadium and thousands more in other evacuation centers.

The conflict destroyed homes, infrastructures, water systems, the facilities needed for safe drinking and sanitation, and thousands lost their livelihoods.

From beginning of conflict to April 2014, in the overcrowded evacuation centers, city health authorities identified over 1,000 children under five suffering from acute malnutrition, and a total of 114 deaths, 47 % of them were children under five, diarrhea as the leading cause of death. Other causes of deaths are neonatal and pneumonia. Pregnant and lactating women needing nutrition interventions account to 2,427, according to health authorities.

"We remain extremely concerned over the fate of the displaced people as many of their needs are still unaddressed. These conditions pose dangers to the most vulnerable sectors. This can involve many deaths among them especially children under five from acute malnutrition, and poses risks to pregnant and lactating women. We are collaborating with stakeholders in supporting these vulnerable groups cope with their suffering,” says Javad Amoozegar, country director of ACF International.

Noting the distressing conditions of the displaced in the evacuation centers, Amoozegar emphasizes the need to focus on the wellbeing of the most vulnerable populations. "The international community must protect children and their families, the pregnant and lactating women, and speed up assistance to those who need it. The number of deaths are unacceptable to the humanitarian community. Access to clean water, sanitation and hygiene services is insufficient, threatening the lives of majority of the population," stresses Amoozegar.

The Zamboanga Action Plan 2014, which outlines the needs of the people affected by the crisis, highlights the very little help extended to save lives and alleviate their suffering.

The plan presents that of the $12.7 million funding requirements, only $5.2 million have been met to address the most urgently needed assistance for 120,000 people in the first three months of the crisis. It calls for additional $7.4 million in funding to cover the needs of the families that lost their homes and livelihoods.

"Children under five, persons with disability, pregnant and lactating women in evacuation centers, and those without permanent source of food and income especially those from poorer layers of the population are the most vulnerable in this situation, and their specific needs can be overlooked,” says Amoozegar.

Since the crisis begun, ACF, through the generous support of the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), Spanish Agency for International Development Cooperation (AECID), and European Union's Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection department (ECHO), has been providing latrines and potties, tanks and pipes, bathing facilities, faucets, and looks at proper methods of waste disposal, holds awareness sessions on disaster risk management, hygiene promotion and positioned nutrition intervention needed in addressing the growing cases of diarrhea and malnutrition rates among children under five.

"Despite the uncertainties in the evacuation centers, the heads of families are determined to make a better future for their children. Their smiles and courage are inspiring. I hope we can find solutions for the remaining thousands internally displaced people. By ensuring quality of life, we can help build a better and stable Zamboanga City, with close coordination with the local government,” says Amoozegar.

=======

TACLOBAN CITY—Over 100,000 Filipino people whose lives were blighted by Typhoon Yolanda will benefit from a CAD$ 3, 733,065.87 million (P146 million) livelihood and water, sanitation and hygiene project in Leyte and Iloilo, two of the worst hit provinces by the storm.

ACF International (known internationally as Action against Hunger, Acción contra el Hambre, Action Contre la Faim), the world’s leading organization in the fight against hunger and malnutrition, increased its provision of need essentials to typhoon survivors, more than eight months after the fiercest storm ever recorded lashed central Visayas region.

The organization received funding support from the Government of Canada through the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development to help restore livelihoods and improve health of 115,000 people belonging to the highly vulnerable sectors, such as children under five, pregnant and lactating women, persons with disability, elders, especially those from poorer layers of the populations.

"The typhoon survivors not only lost their homes, but their livelihoods too. Restoring livelihoods and critical life-saving services such as safe water, health promotion and sanitation services are essential to prevent public health risk and malnutrition from taking root. We are thankful to the commitment of Canadian government by helping the affected families recover what they lost, their welfare and self-sufficiency. We cannot reduce malnutrition without clean water and livelihood to meet the needs of the affected families,” says Javad Amoozegar, country director of ACF International in the Philippines.

In Iloilo province, ACF will conduct a cash-based intervention to reach vulnerable individuals in the town of Sara, Batad and Conception who lost their livelihoods while ensuring access to safe water, sanitation and hygiene in Tacloban City, Tanauan, Sta. Fe, Jaro, Alang-alang, Ormoc City and Albuera in Leyte province.

The existing acute malnutrition rates among children under five have reached 11, 643 while 399, 313 children are at risk in the typhoon-stricken areas in regions 6, 7 and 8, and over 30,000 pregnant and lactating women are nutritionally at risk, according to the Nutrition Database All Regions and the ACF-led Standardized Monitoring and Assessments of Relief and Transitions (SMART) nutritional survey, a methodology that provides up-to-date and reliable information on hunger.

“This is a big concern for ACF. We are on the recovery phase and ACF will focus on rehabilitating water networks, protecting livelihoods such as rice farming, and recovering productive resources—actions which further reduces vulnerability to malnutrition and health risks,” says Amoozegar.

In the first phase of the emergency, ACF delivered clean water, food, sanitation equipment, shelter and other survival essentials to approximately 650,000 people in Leyte, Samar and Panay islands.

“Behind these services and statistics are thousands of our supporters working hard to improve their conditions, such as the Canadian government,” says Amoozegar.

During the third phase, ACF will enable vulnerable populations to build resilience against future disasters.

ACF International, mobilized 23 international staff and over 300 Filipino nationals, delivering critical life-saving support to the affected populations in disaster zones in the Philippines, such as the conflict in Zamboanga, earthquake in Bohol and typhoon in central Visayas, and contributing to poverty reduction in Central Mindanao through its integrated development projects.#

About ACF

ACF International (known internationally as Action Contre la Faim, Action Against Hunger, Accion Contra el Hambre) is a global humanitarian organization committed to ending world hunger. ACF responds to help vulnerable populations around the world through programs that empower communities to overcome the barriers standing their way.

In the Philippines, ACF tackles the root causes of hunger, prevents outbreaks of life-threatening acute malnutrition, and helps the most vulnerable communities regain self-sufficiency through integrated programs in Nutrition, Food Security & Livelihood; Water, Sanitation & Hygiene; Disaster Risk Management, Good Governance & Advocacy incorporating crosscutting issues such as gender, environment and cultural sensitivity.

ACF likewise aims to decrease the vulnerability of communities and schools to disaster through increasing awareness to disaster risk reduction, and strengthening of institutional capacities within the government and education sectors.

ACF works in more than 45 countries and reach approximately seven million people annually.

For more information, please contact:

Rosa May de Guzman Maitem
Communication Manager

ACF International Philippine Mission

Action Against Hunger | ACF-Spain
www.accioncontraelhambre.org / www.actionagainsthunger.org
2nd Floor, Eurovilla 4 Building,
853 A. Arnaiz Avenue,Legaspi Village,
Makati City. Metro Manila, Philippines 1229
Tel/Fax: +63-(02) 840-1808; +63-(02) 659-3598
Mobile: + 63-998-988-5461
Skype: mimiksi1

Philippines: “No-build zones” confusion delays resettlement of Haiyan survivors

18 July 2014 - 11:06am
Source: IRIN Country: Philippines

MANILA, 18 July 2014 (IRIN) - Mixed messages related to “No-Build Zones” in coastal areas of the Philippines, including those devastated by Typhoon Haiyan in November 2014 can create a false sense of security, and prevent the rehabilitation of storm-displaced people, officials and experts warn.

In the weeks after super typhoon Haiyan (local name Yolanda) decimated the central Philippines, the Department of Environment and Natural Resources (DENR) declared a “40-metre no-build zone” along the coastlines of Eastern Samar and Leyte, two of the worst-hit areas.

The declaration was based on protocols outlined in Article 51 of the Philippine Water Code, a presidential decree. However, officials say, the move could undermine safety and recovery efforts.

“There is a misinterpretation of the Water Code. It gives the wrong message that when you are beyond 40 metres of the coastline, you are already safe,” Alfred Romualdez, the mayor of Tacloban, told IRIN.

“Elevation is a better measure of protection. You cannot build a structure that will withstand a storm surge or tsunami - the only way is up,” he said.

Tacloban, a coastal city in the central Philippines, was swallowed up by storm surges reported to be as high as six metres. Most of the over 6,000 deaths caused by Haiyan occurred in Tacloban.

A May 2014 inter-agency report shows that around 26,000 people remain in tents and evacuation centres, or with host families; and 200,000 people face prolonged displacement, the report said, if the areas where they lived previously are declared by the government as being in “no dwelling zones”. The designation means structures can be built but not inhabited, which is often in practice interpreted to mean “no-build zone”.

Government officials and humanitarian workers are concerned that compliance with the 40-metre no-build zone can have the dual effect of convincing people at lower elevations that they are safe when they are not, and limiting relocation options by designating some safe areas as off-limits.

“Non-strict” application

“We recommend that we do not strictly apply the no-build zone [guideline]. It is impractical to implement,” said Karen Jimeno, director of communications for the Office of the Presidential Advisor for Rehabilitation and Recovery (OPARR).

OPARR was a committee created by President Benigno Simeon Aquino III to oversee all rehabilitation efforts after Haiyan.

Instead of the blanket 40-metre no-build zone, OPARR is recommending that areas be classified as “safe zones,” “unsafe zones,” or “controlled zones”.

Building in “controlled zones,” for example, will be permitted as long as there are mitigating measures in that area such as mangroves, catch basins, or sea walls to protect against disasters.

OPARR is currently surveying affected areas using “multi-hazard maps” - which scope out the topography of an area and determine its degree of vulnerability to certain disasters. Then the committee will classify areas as safe, unsafe or controlled zones.

Previously the DENR-Mines and Geosciences Bureau produced geo-hazard maps that classified areas according to their degree of vulnerability to floods and landslides.

According to Jimeno, the multi-hazard maps will complement the geo-hazard maps to include an area’s vulnerability to storm surge and earthquake, in addition to floods and landslides.

“We hope that the LGUs [Local Government Units, which bear principal responsibility for disaster response] can use the maps as an evaluation tool to plan their resettlement and rebuilding efforts,” explained Sarah Jane Samalburo, chief science research specialist at the Department of Science and Technology (DOST), which is developing the maps in cooperation with the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA).

Taking too long

While many welcome the development of multi-hazard maps as part of “build back better” efforts, some are concerned that they are taking too long to complete, leaving the displaced in limbo.

According to Samalburo, of the 171 municipalities affected by Yolanda, 114 have been mapped out for landslide, 60 for flood and 20 for storm surge. A multi-hazard map to determine earthquake vulnerability will be developed at a later date.

“Our shelter interventions depend on these multi-hazards maps and the decision of the local government on where to build. If you look at their situation now, it is as if [the displaced] have not yet received humanitarian aid,” said Conrad Navidad, emergency preparedness and response coordinator for the International Organization for Migration (IOM), in the Philippines.

The May inter-agency report acknowledged that the government had adjusted its blanket policy on no-build zones, but pointed out that only limited options for resettlement remained.

Typhoon Ramussan (local name Glenda) made landfall in the Philippines this week, killing at least 38 people. According to IOM, several hundred Haiyan-displaced families were evacuated temporarily from tents to other structures when flooding began.

as/kk/cb

China: China braces for Super Typhoon Rammasun

18 July 2014 - 4:44am
Source: Agence France-Presse Country: China, Philippines

07/18/2014 07:03 GMT

BEIJING, July 18, 2014 (AFP) - China on Friday braced for a powerful super typhoon heading for its southern coast after the storm left a trail of destruction and at least 54 dead in the neighbouring Philippines.

China's National Meteorological Center (NMC) said an intensifying Super Typhoon Rammasun was on course to hit Hainan island and Guangdong province late in the afternoon.

The outer bands of the storm lashed Hong Kong overnight with heavy rain and strong winds, but the city was spared a direct hit as the typhoon tracked west towards Hainan.

Packing winds Friday afternoon of up to 216 kilometres (134 miles) an hour, the super typhoon was expected to bring torrential rains, the NMC said.

China's official news agency Xinhua said Rammasun was expected to be the strongest typhoon to hit Hainan in 40 years.

Late on Thursday, the NMC issued its highest "red alert" for the storm, the first such declaration this year, according to Xinhua.

State-run China Central Television showed images of wind-whipped trees in Hainan and high waves churned up by the typhoon.

More than 26,000 residents in the areas close to where the typhoon is expected to land were evacuated, Xinhua said, citing Hainan disaster authorities.

Meanwhile, Hainan provincial tourism authorities ordered all resorts to shut down and tour bus operators to cease operations from early Friday afternoon until about midafternoon on Saturday, Xinhua said.

Earlier, Rammasun -- a Thai word for "Thunder God" -- hit the Philippines, slamming the capital Manila and killing at least 54 people, with 100 others injured and three still missing, according to the country's National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council.

The typhoon made landfall on the main island of Luzon on Tuesday, where it destroyed or damaged more than 26,000 homes while cutting electricity supplies to nearly all of Manila and surrounding urban areas.

The regional utility, Manila Electric Co., said about 11.5 percent of the capital, a megacity of more than 12 million people, remained without power Friday but it promised to restore supplies to the entire city later in the day.

The Philippines is often the first major landmass to be struck after storms build above the warm waters of the Pacific Ocean.

Rammasun was the first typhoon to make landfall in the Philippines since this year's rainy season began in June, and the first major storm since Super Typhoon Haiyan devastated the eastern islands of Samar and Leyte last November.

Haiyan killed up to 7,300 people in one of the Philippines' worst natural disasters.

In China, the typhoon comes after dozens of people died in the past week when heavy rain battered swathes of the country, with at least six killed by lightning, thousands of homes destroyed and more than 300,000 evacuated, state media have reported.

The rains have killed 10 people and left another 10 missing in the southwestern province of Guizhou, where 122,400 people were evacuated, Xinhua said citing local authorities.

kgo/slb/st

© 1994-2014 Agence France-Presse

Philippines: Australia responds to Typhoon Rammasun

17 July 2014 - 1:44am
Source: Government of Australia Country: Australia, Philippines

The Australian Government is providing urgent humanitarian assistance to the people of the Philippines following Typhoon Rammasun, known locally as ‘Glenda’.

Australia again stands with the Philippines, our close friend and partner, at this difficult time and extend our sympathy to those affected by this natural disaster.

Typhoon Rammasun struck the Philippines on 15 July, just eight months after Super Typhoon Haiyan devastated parts of the country in November 2013.

While the full scale of the disaster is still being assessed, reports suggest that more than 450,000 people have been affected by Typhoon Rammasun.

To help meet the urgent humanitarian needs of thousands of families, Australia has released emergency relief supplies. These include family survival kits containing sleeping mats, blankets, mosquito nets and emergency shelters delivered to over 1400 families through the Philippines Red Cross, as well as health and dignity kits for 2000 women through the United Nations Population Fund.

Through our aid program, Australia continues to support communities in the Philippines to better prepare for, cope with, and respond to natural disasters. Support includes multi-hazard and risk mapping, updates to land use planning and building codes, and the establishment of early warning systems and emergency management teams in high-risk areas, and providing six Australian Civilian Corps experts to support recovery following Typhoon Haiyan.

Australia provided over $41 million in immediate humanitarian assistance following Typhoon Haiyan, and is spending a further $36 million on longer term recovery efforts.

Media enquiries

Minister's office: (02) 6277 7500
DFAT Media Liaison: (02) 6261 1555

Philippines: Pacific Partnership delivers on promises

17 July 2014 - 1:38am
Source: Government of Australia Country: Australia, Cambodia, Philippines, Timor-Leste, Viet Nam

Australian Defence Force (ADF) personnel have improved the lives of thousands of people in Timor-Leste, Cambodia, Vietnam and the Philippines as part of the largest annual multilateral humanitarian and civic assistance mission conducted in the Asia-Pacific region.

Exercise Pacific Partnership 14 has delivered medical, dental, veterinary and engineering aid while strengthening international relationships with partner and host nations.

Over 50 ADF personnel participated in this year’s Pacific Partnership from 24 May to 15 July working alongside colleagues from the armed forces of the United States (US), Japan, Singapore, Republic of Korea, Malaysia and Chile.

Chief of Joint Operations Vice Admiral (VADM) David Johnston said Exercise Pacific Partnership was highly successful in delivering assistance to local communities and building trust and relationships between the international partners and hosts.

“There have been many success stories for the ADF,” VADM Johnston said.

“In Dili the ADF-led construction projects delivered desperately needed school and health facilities to the community.

“In the Philippines, a US doctor and an Australian nursing officer saved a young boy’s life, which is an excellent example of international teamwork achieving a truly amazing result.

“There was also the excellent integration of the ADF medical and command team onboard the Japan Maritime Self Defense Force amphibious support ship JS Kunisaki, a significant event for our forces.”

The Kunisaki-embarked team treated almost 3,000 people in the Cambodian city of Sihanoukville and the surrounding region and provided valuable training for more than 300 medical practitioners at the Da Nang General Hospital, Da Nang Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation Hospital and Military Hospital 17 in Vietnam.

Furthermore, 100 orphans in Da Nang city have a better quality of life and education thanks to a refurbishment of the Tram Y Te Phuong Hoa Quy orphanage and clinic by US Army and ADF personnel.

In the Philippines the Mayor of Tacloban, Alfred Romualdez, praised the medical team for their assistance in training more than 200 hospital staff and treating 2,600 people at two free medical clinics in the southern province of Leyte.

“We are very grateful to our Pacific Partnership friends, particularly the Australians and the Americans, who came back to help us, because it will take a very long time to recover from Typhoon Haiyan,” Mayor Romualdez said.

Another team of ADF medical specialists deployed directly to Timor‑Leste with a group of 6th Engineer Support Regiment personnel to spend an intensive five weeks improving schools and hospitals and providing valuable medical training.

Working alongside Timor-Leste Defence Force (F-FDTL) and US military personnel, the ADF medical team provided training for Timorese military paramedics and other health specialists while a dental team provided services to local schools and communities.

The Army engineers worked with the US Navy’s Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 1 (the ‘Seabees’) and F-FDTL engineers to construct a new emergency room at the Comoro Medical Health Centre, an outdoor kitchen at Comoro Intermediate School and an ablutions facility at Farol Primary School.

A key feature of this year’s exercise was the emphasis placed on the transfer of specialist skills.

Every medical, dental, veterinary, and engineering project was conducted side-by-side with the host nation’s specialists, ensuring that the mission’s impact will continue long after its conclusion.

The annual US-sponsored Pacific Partnership series of exercises arose from the military-led humanitarian response to the devastation wrought by the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami that swept through littoral Southeast Asia.

The primary objective of Pacific Partnership is to improve cooperation and understanding between the partner and host nations ahead of major natural disasters that require a multinational response.

Media note:
Imagery from Exercise Pacific Partnership 14 is available at: http://images.defence.gov.au/S20141536

Further information about Pacific Partnership is available at: https://www.facebook.com/pacificpartnership http://www.cpf.navy.mil/pacific-partnership/2014/

Media contact:
Defence Media Operations (02) 6127 1999

Philippines: Post-typhoon clean up begins in Philippines

16 July 2014 - 11:48pm
Source: Australian Broadcasting Corporation Country: Australia, Philippines

A clean up is under way in the Philippines after the battering inflicted by Typhoon Rammasun.

It was the most powerful storm to hit the country this year, passing just south of the capital Manila as it carved a path across the main island of Luzon.

Unlike last year, when Super Typhoon Haiyan killed thousands, the death toll this time has been put at around 20.

Australia is among those to have offered emergency relief supplies.

Presenter: Sen Lam

Speaker: Orla Fagan, spokeswoman for the United Nations Office for the Co-ordination of Humanitarian Affairs, Manila.

(Audio)

Palau: Improved access to safe water for the Haiyan affected people

16 July 2014 - 12:20am
Source: UN Development Programme Country: Palau

Some 200 people of Kayangel, a small island of Palau are now taking support from a UNDP project for having improved access to water through renewable and sustainable solar water pumping systems. It is expected that the new system will improve the stable access of power to run the pumps in Kayangel, in turn improving access to freshwater for the inhabitants of the island.

As a detrimental consequence of climate change, the people of Kayangel had been affected severely by the super typhoon Haiyan that struck the South-East Asia and the Pacific in 2013 and left behind many people vulnerable and homeless. It destroyed almost everything of about 20, 000 Palauans from which they are still struggling to regain a modest living.

Like many island nations, Palau, located in the western Pacific has low-lying islands which are sensitive to the consequences of climate change and more prone to climatic hazards such as cyclones, tidal surges droughts and changed temperatures. Hence, they are keen to adopt climate change mitigating and adaptation measures, such as increasing the use of renewable energy and reducing dependence on fossil fuel based energy.

To ensuring safe drinking water a project titled “The Pacific Island Greenhouse Gas Abatement through Renewable Energy (PIGGAREP) is now being implemented at Kayangel with funding from the Global Environment Facility and Denmark/SIDS DOCK and having a close cooperation with the European Union. UNDP alongside with its implementing partner, the Secretariat for the Regional Pacific Environment Programme, SPREP implements climate change mitigation projects in across 14 countries in the Pacific region, the solar water pump project in Kayangel, Palau is one of them. The project provides with two solar water pumps, a water storage tank, and a chlorinator to improve water access for the affected people which in turn will contribute to reduced reliance on fossil fuel based energy in the days to come. It provides valuable experience with renewable solar energy as a source of power and helps increasing water storage capacity and improves the quality of the water being pumped from the aquifer.

Clarissa Adelbai, Grants Manager at Palau Public Utilities Cooperation and National Coordinator for the PIGGAREP project, is glad that water management and sustainable energy solutions receive concerted donor attentions.

“We look forward to again being able to access water from the aquifer, and the use of solar powered water pumps which should be an environmental friendly and equally a cost effective solution for us.” says Clarissa Adelbai.

“We already started our work for the installation of solar water pump and I am very much hopeful that the people of Kayangel will enjoy the taste of clean surface water by December 2014”. She further added.

UNDP works in close partnership with the Governments of the Pacific region alongside other development partners, providing them with technical, normative and analytical expertise; funds; and organizational and coordination support to assist in efforts to attain their development aspirations with having regional and national projects/ programmes in the areas of Democratic Governance, Sustainable Livelihoods/Poverty Reduction, Crisis Prevention and Recovery, Environment and Energy and Gender Mainstreaming etc.

Philippines: Ploumen: Appreciation for relief work in the Philippines

15 July 2014 - 2:34pm
Source: Government of the Netherlands Country: Philippines

Aid organisations are working hard to rebuild the Philippines in the wake of the devastation caused by Typhoon Haiyan in November 2013, in which 6,000 people died and millions were made homeless. This was the conclusion drawn by the Minister for Foreign Trade and Development Cooperation Lilianne Ploumen following her visit to the affected area with the President of the World Bank Jim Yong Kim.

‘It is wonderful to see how hard people on the island of Leyte are working to rebuild homes and schools, with the support of aid organisations,’ Ms Ploumen said. ‘The worst typhoon in living memory caused immeasurable damage and the scars are still raw. But little by little, the people worst affected are beginning to see a more promising future.’

Shortly after the disaster the Dutch government earmarked six million euros in emergency aid. A Ministry of Defence aeroplane made two trips to fly relief supplies to the affected area, as did a KLM plane. And the joint Dutch aid agencies collected 36 million euros in donations for emergency aid and reconstruction through the Giro 555 appeal.

Relief work is in full swing. Since the typhoon struck, 4.6 million people have received food aid and accommodation has been provided for 570,000 families. Schools, hospitals and public buildings are being rebuilt.

Almost 6 million people lost their source of income as a result of the disaster. Aid organisations have set up cash-for-work initiatives and are providing vocational courses so that people can retrain in professions such as carpentry. Support for small businesses is available in the form of financing and loans. The Filipino government has also launched the FAITH programme, a public website which shows how aid is being used.

‘Much has been achieved over the last eight months, but there is still a long way to go,’ Ms Ploumen said. ‘The Filipino government is investing in better housing and wants to make the country more resistant to natural disasters, which are affecting this region with increasing frequency. There is little sense in building poor-quality housing or using the same unsafe locations as before. This is now being taken into account.’

Aid organisations say that the scale of the disaster area (approximately the size of Portugal) poses a real challenge. The aid effort is also being slowed down by the lack of clarity about land ownership rights.

‘To maximise efficiency, organisations like the World Bank are working together to ensure that aid efforts are as well-coordinated as possible. I’ve been able to see that with my own eyes here in the disaster area, together with President Kim of the World Bank. There is still a lot of human suffering, but fortunately aid activities are well coordinated and are being carried out efficiently,’ Ms Ploumen said.

Dutch Risk Reduction Team

Since 6 July five experts from the Dutch Risk Reduction (DRR) Team have been in the Philippines to identify how to make the country more resistant to future natural disasters. They presented their initial findings and recommendations during Ms Ploumen’s visit.

In recent days the team, consisting of experts from Royal HaskoningDHV, Deltares, the Red Cross, Wetlands and Cordaid, has met with the authorities in Manila, spoken to local experts and authorities in Tacloban and made field visits to the affected area. They are examining the option of strengthening the coastline by creating barriers, planting mangrove trees and reclaiming land.

‘The Filipino authorities I have spoken to are enthusiastic about Dutch expertise,’ said Ms Ploumen. ‘Our water sector has a great deal of experience that can be used to prevent the next hurricane claiming so many victims.’ The team is expected to publish an advisory report at the end of this week.

The DRR Team, a joint initiative of Ms Ploumen and the Minister of Infrastructure and the Environment, Melanie Schultz van Haegen, is a pool of experts representing businesses, knowledge institutions, NGOs and government in the Dutch water sector who can be deployed at short notice in the event of floods, drought and water pollution. The team focuses on reconstruction and prevention rather than emergency aid. While the main focus is on advising on solutions, the teams can also identify or help create opportunities for Dutch companies to get involved.

World: Global Emergency Overview Snapshot 9 - 15 July

15 July 2014 - 10:29am
Source: Assessment Capacities Project Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guatemala, Guinea, Haiti, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Liberia, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Paraguay, Philippines, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Uganda, World, Yemen, South Sudan preview

Snapshot 9–15 July

oPT: 178 Palestinians have been killed since the launch of Israel’s Operation Protective Edge on 8 July. Around 17,000 people have sought shelter in UNRWA schools. Rockets from Syria and Lebanon have hit the north of Israel, raising fears of the conflict spreading.

Democratic Republic of Congo: More than 30,000 people are estimated to have been displaced in North Kivu, South Kivu, and Katanga in June, due to FARDC military operations and fighting between armed groups.

Syria: Host populations are struggling to cope with growing camp populations, and people in informal settlements are receiving very little assistance. The population of Lattakia and Tartous has grown by 50%. The conflict death toll has passed 170,000.

Updated: 15/07/2014. Next update: 22/07/2014

Global Emergency Overview Web Interface

Philippines: As another typhoon hits Philippines Oxfam warns there are not enough evacuation centres to keep people safe

15 July 2014 - 8:10am
Source: Oxfam Country: Philippines

Tacloban City, Leyte – International agency Oxfam said today as another typhoon hits the Philippines there are insufficient evacuation centres available to keep people safe.

“This typhoon is powerful but not the same strength as last year’s super typhoon. With people still living in vulnerable areas and makeshift shelters there is an urgency to help them get away from danger and into safe areas,” said Justin Morgan, country director of international aid agency Oxfam who is currently in Tacloban.

Typhoon Rammasun bore down on the Philippines Monday evening. Strong winds destroyed some tents, while rain and flood water began to seep into makeshift homes in and around Tacloban one of the worse hit areas by typhoon Haiyan.

The typhoon is expected to intensify Tuesday afternoon, with a maximum speed of 101-185 kilometers per hour. Eastern Samar and Northern Leyte also devastated by last year’s super typhoon are among those areas that are expected to be affected by the latest typhoon.

Eight months after super typhoon Haiyan hit many survivors continue to live in tents or damaged houses which are not strong enough to withstand even small storms. An estimated 40 per cent of disaster-affected households are currently living in temporary shelters, increasing their vulnerability to future storms.

Thousands of families in Tacloban have been evacuated to safer areas, with the majority going to the Astrodome.

Many evacuation centres were damaged or destroyed by Haiyan. In some areas, only 8 per cent of evacuation centres pre-Haiyan are still standing. This means that people living in coastal areas and other high risk zones will not have anywhere to go for safety as the typhoon season hits again.

“Governments need to prioritise the construction of safe evacuation centres, update their contingency plans, if we are to be better prepared for this year’s typhoon season. The relocation process must begin immediately, accompanied by proper consultations with affected communities,” said Morgan.

Contact: In Philippines : Rhea Catada, Media Manager, +639173654649 rcatada@oxfam.org.uk ;
In UK: Ian Bray 01865 472289, 07721 461339

Oxfam has been operating in the Philippines since 1978. It is responding to the typhoon Haiyan disaster in Leyte, Eastern Samar and Cebu provinces and has supported 650,000 people. Oxfam has provided clean drinking water and sanitation products and facilities, as well as emergency food security and shelter assistance. It is also supporting poor families to make a living through cash for work initiatives such as debris and coconut tree clearing, rice seed distributions and fishing boat repairs and rebuilding.

Philippines: Kim Announces New Planned Funding for Filipinos Hit by Typhoon Haiyan

15 July 2014 - 2:47am
Source: World Bank Country: Philippines

More than $62 million planned for jobs, roads and bridges

TANAUAN (LEYTE), JULY 14, 2014 – World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim today reaffirmed the institution’s support for the Philippines’ reconstruction efforts during his visit to communities affected by Typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda) in Leyte, announcing that the organization was preparing more funding soon.

Kim announced that the World Bank Group next month will submit the Philippine Rural Development Project to its Board of Executive Directors. The proposed project includes more than $62 million targeted to boost the incomes of farmers and fishermen and repair 230 kilometers of farm-to-market roads in Central Philippines that was badly hit by the super typhoon.

“I am here to reaffirm the World Bank Group’s support for the courageous Filipinos who are rebuilding from the ruins of Typhoon Haiyan," said Kim. “While much more can be done and needs to be done, I am encouraged to see the government, civil society, private sector, and local communities rebuilding access roads, irrigation facilities, shelters and schools for those affected by the disaster in Palo and Tanauan in Leyte.”

The $62 million is part of a US$508.25 million project designed to raise rural incomes and boost productivity for farmers and fishermen nationwide. The World Bank already had announced nearly US$1 billion in financial assistance in the immediate aftermath of the typhoon.

Kim is on a two-day visit to the Philippines to discuss with the Philippine Government how the WBG can help deliver better development results following the recent endorsement of a new partnership strategy for the Philippines by its Board of Executive Directors.

The new partnership strategy supports the country’s goal of promoting and sustaining growth, which reduces poverty and creates jobs. Under this new strategy, the World Bank Group is committed to providing US$3.2 billion in assistance over four years, and will continue to share global knowledge and good practices.

Expressing sympathies to people who lost their loved ones and incomes to the monstrous typhoon, Kim said he was pleased to see communities are making progress recovering from the disaster.

The Philippines is the third-most vulnerable country in the world to extreme weather-related events, earthquakes, sea-level rise, and storm surges. Experts says climate change and related natural disasters are the “new normal” for countries like the Philippines, threatening to put prosperity out of reach for millions of people and set back decades of development.

“The poor are disproportionately affected by disasters and are the least able to cope. If we don't build resilience to climate change and natural disasters, we won't end poverty,” said Kim. “The World Bank Group is working closely with the government and others to help communities improve their defense against those threats.”

== End==

Additional Information:

Just last month, the Department of Social Welfare and Development and government partners, including the World Bank, Asian Development Bank, and the Australian government, launched the KALAHI CIDSS-NCDDP, otherwise known as the Kapit-Bisig Laban sa Kahirapan-Comprehensive and Integrated Delivery of Social Services, in Ormoc City.

The World Bank is providing US$479 million in financing for this project and estimates that it will benefit more than 8 million people, including 5 million living in Yolanda-affected communities.

Using a community-driven approach, KALAHI CIDSS-NCDDP empowers poor communities to organize themselves, analyze their situation, prepare project proposals to address their common problems, and compete for block grants to finance their projects. These projects include local infrastructure, such as water systems, school buildings, day care centers, health stations, roads, and bridges. Community members are also responsible for the implementation and maintenance of these projects.

MEDIA CONTACTS

In Washington
Carl Hanlon
Tel : +1 (202) 473-8087
chanlon@worldbank.org

In Manila
Dave Llorito
Tel : +63-2-465-2512
dllorito@worldbank.org

PRESS RELEASE NO: 15/1

Philippines: Kim Announces New Planned Funding for Filipinos Hit by Typhoon Haiyan

15 July 2014 - 2:47am
Source: World Bank Country: Philippines

More than $62 million planned for jobs, roads and bridges

TANAUAN (LEYTE), JULY 14, 2014 – World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim today reaffirmed the institution’s support for the Philippines’ reconstruction efforts during his visit to communities affected by Typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda) in Leyte, announcing that the organization was preparing more funding soon.

Kim announced that the World Bank Group next month will submit the Philippine Rural Development Project to its Board of Executive Directors. The proposed project includes more than $62 million targeted to boost the incomes of farmers and fishermen and repair 230 kilometers of farm-to-market roads in Central Philippines that was badly hit by the super typhoon.

“I am here to reaffirm the World Bank Group’s support for the courageous Filipinos who are rebuilding from the ruins of Typhoon Haiyan," said Kim. “While much more can be done and needs to be done, I am encouraged to see the government, civil society, private sector, and local communities rebuilding access roads, irrigation facilities, shelters and schools for those affected by the disaster in Palo and Tanauan in Leyte.”

The $62 million is part of a US$508.25 million project designed to raise rural incomes and boost productivity for farmers and fishermen nationwide. The World Bank already had announced nearly US$1 billion in financial assistance in the immediate aftermath of the typhoon.

Kim is on a two-day visit to the Philippines to discuss with the Philippine Government how the WBG can help deliver better development results following the recent endorsement of a new partnership strategy for the Philippines by its Board of Executive Directors.

The new partnership strategy supports the country’s goal of promoting and sustaining growth, which reduces poverty and creates jobs. Under this new strategy, the World Bank Group is committed to providing US$3.2 billion in assistance over four years, and will continue to share global knowledge and good practices.

Expressing sympathies to people who lost their loved ones and incomes to the monstrous typhoon, Kim said he was pleased to see communities are making progress recovering from the disaster.

The Philippines is the third-most vulnerable country in the world to extreme weather-related events, earthquakes, sea-level rise, and storm surges. Experts says climate change and related natural disasters are the “new normal” for countries like the Philippines, threatening to put prosperity out of reach for millions of people and set back decades of development.

“The poor are disproportionately affected by disasters and are the least able to cope. If we don't build resilience to climate change and natural disasters, we won't end poverty,” said Kim. “The World Bank Group is working closely with the government and others to help communities improve their defense against those threats.”

== End==

Additional Information:

Just last month, the Department of Social Welfare and Development and government partners, including the World Bank, Asian Development Bank, and the Australian government, launched the KALAHI CIDSS-NCDDP, otherwise known as the Kapit-Bisig Laban sa Kahirapan-Comprehensive and Integrated Delivery of Social Services, in Ormoc City.

The World Bank is providing US$479 million in financing for this project and estimates that it will benefit more than 8 million people, including 5 million living in Yolanda-affected communities.

Using a community-driven approach, KALAHI CIDSS-NCDDP empowers poor communities to organize themselves, analyze their situation, prepare project proposals to address their common problems, and compete for block grants to finance their projects. These projects include local infrastructure, such as water systems, school buildings, day care centers, health stations, roads, and bridges. Community members are also responsible for the implementation and maintenance of these projects.

MEDIA CONTACTS

In Washington
Carl Hanlon
Tel : +1 (202) 473-8087
chanlon@worldbank.org

In Manila
Dave Llorito
Tel : +63-2-465-2512
dllorito@worldbank.org

PRESS RELEASE NO: 15/1

Philippines: Philippines braces for first major storm of the season

14 July 2014 - 5:47am
Source: Agence France-Presse Country: Philippines

07/14/2014 09:17 GMT

MANILA, July 14, 2014 (AFP) - Thousands of people living in coastal areas of the Philippines were preparing on Monday to evacuate as the first major storm of the rainy season barrelled towards the archipelago.

Tropical Storm Rammasun is expected to hit fishing communities in the eastern Philippines late Tuesday and then bring heavy rain to Manila and other heavily populated northern areas, civil defence officials said.

The Philippines is hit by about 20 major storms a year, many of them deadly, and Rammasun will be the first to make landfall since the rainy season began last month.

Authorities said they were taking every precaution to avoid fatalities, after Super Typhoon Haiyan left about 7,300 people dead or missing when it tore across the central Philippines in November last year.

"We are already warning the public to be on alert for possible effects of the weather disturbance: landslides, flash floods, strong rains and winds," said Alexander Pama, head of the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council.

Miguel Villafuerte, governor of Camarines Sur province in southern Luzon which is expected to be hit hard by the storm, said many people in vulnerable areas were already being urged to flee.

"We are extra-cautious because of what happened with Yolanda last year," he said, using the local name for Haiyan.

The disaster management council said it had already alerted over 1,300 villages susceptible to floods or landslides they were in Ramassun's direct path and residents should be prepared to shelter in evacuation centres.

The second level of a three-step storm alert has been raised over the Bicol archipelago southeast of Manila, where the storm is expected to first hit. Classes on all levels have already been suspended.

Heavy rain is also expected to fall over the central islands that bore the brunt of Haiyan and where thousands of people are still living in tents or other makeshift evacuation centres.

Storm alerts have also been hoisted for the more than 12 million people in Manila, with some classes having already been suspended.

The new storm is expected to bring 7.5 to 15 millimetres (0.3 to 0.6 inches) of rainfall per hour, the disaster council said.

Council spokeswoman Mina Marasigan warned that the storm could become even more powerful as it moves across the sea.

She said there were concerns it might bring rainfall comparable to Typhoon Xangsane in 2006, which killed more than 200 people and displaced nearly two million due largely to widespread and heavy flooding.

mm/kma/sm

© 1994-2014 Agence France-Presse