TyphoonHaiyan - RW Updates

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Philippines: Philippines Humanitarian Bulletin Issue 6 | 1 June – 3 July 2015

6 July 2015 - 12:41am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Philippines

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Zamboanga Communications Working Group readies over 28,000 remaining IDPs for durable solutions.

  • Back-to-school campaign benefits conflict-affected children in Mamasapano.

  • Communication, accountability and community participation prompted for better humanitarian response and preparedness.

  • Carpenters build resilience in communities affected by Typhoon Haiyan.

FIGURES

Zamboanga Crisis

Number of IDPs remaining in Grandstand evacuation centre: 1,900

Number of IDPs in transitional sites: 15,100

Number of IDPs hosted by relatives and friends or renting temporary homes: 11,300*

Number of IDPs awarded permanent shelters: 2,900**

Number of IDPs received home material assistance: 8,300**

Source: CCCM Cluster (as of 22 June 2015), *Protection Cluster (as of December 2014) **National Housing Authority (June 2015)

Flooding in Mindanao

Number of IDPs: 380

Number of houses damaged: 65+

Source: OCD (ARMM and Regions X and XII) (as of 3 July 2015)

Philippines: Post Haiyan shelter project wraps with 660 families getting resilient houses and households strengthened against disaster

2 July 2015 - 12:04pm
Source: UN Human Settlements Program Country: Philippines

Barangay Pawa, Philippines 2 July 2015— Rising from the wreckage of Super Typhoon Haiyan, 660 families finally completed the building of their houses and 54 community infrastructure projects in 28 communities in Capiz and Iloilo as the Post-Yolanda Support for Safer Homes and Settlements project implemented by UN-Habitat came to a close last month.

Consequently, a handing over ceremony was held at Barangay Pawa, Municipality of Panay, Province of Capiz, Philippines. The project sought to facilitate shelter recovery and rehabilitation in Yolanda-affected communities in Capiz and Iloilo.

Launched in July 2014, it had a startup fund of USD 2.5 million from the Government of Japan, later augmented with USD 946,000 from the Philippines’ Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD).

The primary goal of the project was to capacitate Yolanda-affected communities in the two provinces as well as local government units (LGUs) through a community-driven approach called People’s Process, hinged on enabling a community to champion its own recovery.

Set targets and what was achieved

As the project comes to a head, we revisit targets that were set and how the project fared. The project initially targeted the accelerated recovery for 20 communities, but damage assessment showed a need to extend the reach of the project. Including more communities under an existing national government programme that gives underprivileged communities access to affordable land was done to accommodate as many Yolanda-affected communities as possible.

From the initial target of 20 communities, 28 signed on for the project and the number of resilient core houses to be built was raised from 610 to 660 due to augmentation funds from DSWD. The project was also able to find additional resources from both local government and private entities, enough to raise the number of infrastructure projects from 20 to 54.

The infrastructure component was carried out with the homeowners associations hiring private builders, who eventually built close relationships with the communities. This close relationship saw several of them voluntarily delivering more than the agreed specifications as their donation to the community. This allowed the project to have an impact on the whole community to include families who were unable to receive the new houses.

Initially, 250 carpenters were supposed to be trained on disaster resilient house construction. But with budget savings, the increase in number of houses to be built and strengthened interest among communities, UN-Habitat was able to train 323 semi-skilled artisans and 31 foremen. Of those trained, over 100 carpenters and over 20 foremen were tapped to construct the houses.

Others have now been able to get construction jobs outside the project, with their DRR and construction skills training certificates and solid experience as handy passports to new jobs. Over 170 household self-assessors and guiders (HAGs) were trained to conduct disaster risk reduction trainings and house assessments for 4,000 households in their respective communities. The HAGs eventually also trained families outside their own assigned communities, reaching over 4,500 households.

The impact goes beyond numbers and targets

But the impact of the Post-Yolanda Support for Safer Homes and Settlements goes well beyond numbers and targets. Communities have come together in working towards common goals – be it lowering construction costs by ordering materials in bulk, or evolving from dormant neighborhoods into active ones through organized activities that promote well-being, dignity, and solidarity.

The financial transparency mechanisms set by the project helped instill trust of community members in their leaders, and developed financial literacy that enabled the communities’ finance and auditing committee members to manage millions in project funds―a skill that may serve them well outside the project.

People also discovered their voice and can now ask government and even the private sector for assistance in improving their communities. They realize that they can be more than recipients – they can be collaborators. Many of them are now able to articulate the principles of DRR in shelter recovery and the People’ Process to other communities and have welcomed visits from various entities to discuss their experiences and learning’s in great detail.

Targets have been exceeded with 28 communities served, 660 houses built, 54 community improvements done, and over 4,500 households equipped with DRR know-how. But the major takeaway from the project, which can be carried over in future initiatives, is the full demonstration of how recovery and building resilience thrive best as a shared endeavour—with the communities and families themselves driving the process.

Philippines: Post Haiyan shelter projects wraps with 660 families getting resilient houses and households strengthened against disaster

2 July 2015 - 12:04pm
Source: UN Human Settlements Program Country: Philippines

Barangay Pawa, Philippines 2 July 2015— Rising from the wreckage of Super Typhoon Haiyan, 660 families finally completed the building of their houses and 54 community infrastructure projects in 28 communities in Capiz and Iloilo as the Post-Yolanda Support for Safer Homes and Settlements project implemented by UN-Habitat came to a close last month.

Consequently, a handing over ceremony was held at Barangay Pawa, Municipality of Panay, Province of Capiz, Philippines. The project sought to facilitate shelter recovery and rehabilitation in Yolanda-affected communities in Capiz and Iloilo.

Launched in July 2014, it had a startup fund of USD 2.5 million from the Government of Japan, later augmented with USD 946,000 from the Philippines’ Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD).

The primary goal of the project was to capacitate Yolanda-affected communities in the two provinces as well as local government units (LGUs) through a community-driven approach called People’s Process, hinged on enabling a community to champion its own recovery.

Set targets and what was achieved

As the project comes to a head, we revisit targets that were set and how the project fared. The project initially targeted the accelerated recovery for 20 communities, but damage assessment showed a need to extend the reach of the project. Including more communities under an existing national government programme that gives underprivileged communities access to affordable land was done to accommodate as many Yolanda-affected communities as possible.

From the initial target of 20 communities, 28 signed on for the project and the number of resilient core houses to be built was raised from 610 to 660 due to augmentation funds from DSWD. The project was also able to find additional resources from both local government and private entities, enough to raise the number of infrastructure projects from 20 to 54.

The infrastructure component was carried out with the homeowners associations hiring private builders, who eventually built close relationships with the communities. This close relationship saw several of them voluntarily delivering more than the agreed specifications as their donation to the community. This allowed the project to have an impact on the whole community to include families who were unable to receive the new houses.

Initially, 250 carpenters were supposed to be trained on disaster resilient house construction. But with budget savings, the increase in number of houses to be built and strengthened interest among communities, UN-Habitat was able to train 323 semi-skilled artisans and 31 foremen. Of those trained, over 100 carpenters and over 20 foremen were tapped to construct the houses.

Others have now been able to get construction jobs outside the project, with their DRR and construction skills training certificates and solid experience as handy passports to new jobs. Over 170 household self-assessors and guiders (HAGs) were trained to conduct disaster risk reduction trainings and house assessments for 4,000 households in their respective communities. The HAGs eventually also trained families outside their own assigned communities, reaching over 4,500 households.

The impact goes beyond numbers and targets

But the impact of the Post-Yolanda Support for Safer Homes and Settlements goes well beyond numbers and targets. Communities have come together in working towards common goals – be it lowering construction costs by ordering materials in bulk, or evolving from dormant neighborhoods into active ones through organized activities that promote well-being, dignity, and solidarity.

The financial transparency mechanisms set by the project helped instill trust of community members in their leaders, and developed financial literacy that enabled the communities’ finance and auditing committee members to manage millions in project funds―a skill that may serve them well outside the project.

People also discovered their voice and can now ask government and even the private sector for assistance in improving their communities. They realize that they can be more than recipients – they can be collaborators. Many of them are now able to articulate the principles of DRR in shelter recovery and the People’ Process to other communities and have welcomed visits from various entities to discuss their experiences and learning’s in great detail.

Targets have been exceeded with 28 communities served, 660 houses built, 54 community improvements done, and over 4,500 households equipped with DRR know-how. But the major takeaway from the project, which can be carried over in future initiatives, is the full demonstration of how recovery and building resilience thrive best as a shared endeavour—with the communities and families themselves driving the process.

Philippines: DIY Bamboo Shelter helps ease up the burden of Yolanda survivors' lack of shelters

1 July 2015 - 2:37am
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

CONSUELO B. ALARCON

TACLOBAN CITY, Leyte, July 1 (PIA) –As part of the government’s intervention to help ease up the burden of Yolanda survivors' lack of shelters, the Forest Products Research and Development Institute (FPRDI) in collaboration with the Department of Science and Technology (DOST) Regional Office 8 and the Philippine Council for Agriculture, Acquatic and Natural Resources Research and Development (PCAARRD) inaugurated Monday the “Do it Yourself” (DIY) Bamboo Shelter at DOST grounds, Government Center, Palo, Leyte.

The DIY Bamboo Shelter is a typhoon-resilient yet easy, economical and aesthetically beautiful bamboo house.

DOST-8 regional director Edgardo Esperancilla said the project which is funded by PCAARRD is an offshoot of typhoon Yolanda. It is a low-cost, semi-permanent shelter intended to make housing more accessible to the public particularly the poor.

RD Esperancilla also pointed out the benefits derived from the DIY bamboo shelter. “The other benefits that this house will bring is that, it will help develop and even improve the bamboo industry since many bamboo plantations can be found in Northwest part of Samar and in some parts of Leyte,” Esperancilla said.

Initially, the DIY bamboo shelter was conceptualized as immediate action to help the victims of typhoon Yolanda as temporary shelter. However, this underwent several revisions.

Aside from providing shelter, Feliciano Calora of the Forest and Research Division of PCAARRD said, they want to make sure that these would be a semi-permanent or possibly permanent shelters.

On the other hand, Leyte Leopoldo Dominico L. Petilla, Chairman of the Regional Development Council (RDC) who attended the blessing, looks forward for more positive approach on this project as he explained the usefulness of bamboo plant to the environment.

“Bamboo not only captures around 28% of carbon dioxide from the air than any other plant but it also produces ten percent more of oxygen than any other plant, “the governor said.

The Do It Yourself Bamboo Shelter has a measurement of 24 sq. meters consisting of living room, kitchen, bedroom and can fit in a six-wheeler truck when packed, can be assembled and disassembled within three to four days by four medium built workers; 90 percent of the materials come from renewable sources, cost-effective, environment-friendly and it has readied electrical and water connection.

As the country hurdles environmental issues like climate change and natural disasters and economic problems like the increasing cost of building shelters and limited supply of raw materials, bamboo can be an answer to such challenges.(aen/cba/PIA-8)

Philippines: Yolanda affected communities continue to receive Red Cross assistance

30 June 2015 - 11:00pm
Source: Philippine National Red Cross Country: Philippines

Five months to go before the second year commemoration of super typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan), the Philippine Red Cross (PRC) and its partners continue to provide recovery assistance to Yolanda affected communities and individuals. The Red Cross Movement’s overall response to Yolanda has been collective and massive in terms of the number of areas covered, the variety of services provided, and the amount of assistance given to families and individuals.

Red Cross has been present in Yolanda affected areas since the emergency phase and up to now where recovery operations are ongoing in 10 areas. Recovery assistance provided by the Red Cross include shelter, livelihood, water and sanitation, health facilities construction and rehabilitation, classrooms rehabilitation and repair, and training for capacity building, livelihood support, and disaster risk reduction.

“We have built one of the biggest, if not the biggest, number of houses in Yolanda affected areas. We’re way ahead compared with everybody else, and we’re still building more,” said PRC chairman Richard J. Gordon. As of last week of June, Red Cross’ Typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda) Recovery Operations has reached 71 percent of its shelter commitment target, having built 59,143 houses from the 83,127 target houses to be built, amounting to more than 5.6 billion pesos. This is the largest ever shelter assistance that the Red Cross has provided in any post-disaster operations locally and globally in terms of number of houses built and amount of shelter assistance provided.

The Red Cross is also big in numbers in its livelihood assistance to affected families, having already reached more than 100 percent of its target. “We have already accomplished our target number of beneficiaries for livelihood assistance and we are continuously adding beneficiaries to give more people a fresh start in life,” said Gordon. Out of the 50,000 target livelihood beneficiaries, there are now 58,574 households that have so far benefitted from Red Cross’ livelihood assistance, amounting to almost 586 million pesos. During the emergency phase, almost 91,000 families were given cash relief assistance that amounted to more than 290 million pesos.

Livelihood assistance were given in the form of conditional and unconditional cash grants which the beneficiaries used to bring back sources of income lost from the super typhoon or to start a new livelihood. The livelihood assistance is also supported with skills trainings and enterprise development to further enhance the beneficiaries’ capacity to maintain and improve their sources of livelihood.

Hygiene promotion activities were conducted in communities, participated by more than 30,000 households, who now have increased knowledge on health and hygiene. There are also 25 schools with improved access to water and sanitation facilities, the construction of which amounted to a total of 11.2 million pesos.

Health has also been a major priority effort of the Red Cross with more than 19.2 million pesos used for the repair and reconstruction of 24 health facilities. To help improve people’s health awareness and to equip them with first aid knowledge, community based health and first aid sessions were conducted in 121 communities. In these trainings, 983 community health volunteers were trained which can now attend to health emergencies in their own communities.

There are more than 42,000 individuals who were assisted with medical consultations, health promotion, health care referral, and supplemental feeding. The capabilities of 77 health facilities will be further enhanced with medical equipment that will be provided by the Red Cross supported by the Asian Development Bank.

Education is a top priority as well as schools repaired and rehabilitated by the Red Cross started to open as early as two months after the typhoon. To date, 222 classrooms of the total 400 targeted classrooms have been rehabilitated and constructed, amounting to 27.6 million pesos. A total of 4,681 school kits have already been distributed, and more school kits are to be distributed this school year.

To strengthen the communities’ capacity to handle future disasters, Red Cross 143 teams with 44 members in each community were organized in 192 communities, with a total of 10.057 individual members. These 143 volunteers can provide critical information to the Red Cross in times of disasters that would be the basis for the organization’s response and interventions.

“The work never stops. You’re talking about a cathartic event that traumatised an awful lot of people. So you want the community to be resilient by making sure they know what the hazards are, teach them to prepare early, be prepared to evacuate if they have to, and make sure the cycle of disaster and poverty is at least mitigated by having good systems and policies in place and making sure we have good volunteers,” said Gordon.

Trainings on disaster risk reduction management, first aid, and basic life support were also conducted, further enhancing the communities’ capabilities to handle disasters.

Summing up the whole Red Cross assistance to Yolanda affected areas, PRC secretary general Gwendolyn Pang said that the three-year Yolanda (Haiyan) recovery operation is on track. “We have achieved our targets because of the cooperation and collaboration that we have with our local chapters, volunteers, local government units, our partners, and the beneficiaries themselves,” she said.

The Red Cross and its partners estimate that assistance to Yolanda affected areas will continue into 2016 and beyond, with allocations already set for the continuous repair and construction of shelter and community infrastructure, provision of livelihood assistance, and disaster preparedness and risk reduction programs.

Philippines: ‘Haiyan’-battered Tacloban and Leyte backs children’s protection bill during calamities

24 June 2015 - 2:19am
Source: Save the Children Country: Philippines

(Tacloban City, Leyte) – Tacloban City government and Leyte Provincial Council have signed recently resolutions of support pushing for the passage of House bill 5285 or the Children’s Emergency Relief and Protection Act, a groundbreaking bill that seeks to provide enhanced relief and protection for vulnerable children caught in disasters.

As was one of the worst-hit areas by Typhoon Yolanda and ‘center’ of disaster in November 2013, the province of Leyte and its capital Tacloban city are critical areas of support for the bill.

Ned Olney, Country Director for Save the Children, thanked the provincial and LGU councils for their overwhelming support:

“Thousands of lives were lost in Tacloban and across Leyte to Typhoon Yolanda. Their children bore the brunt of the destruction and sorrow. These communities understand the critical importance of passing the Children’s Emergency Relief and Protection Act. We welcome this support and we strongly urge the Congress and Senate to pass this quickly before the next typhoon season. ”

“We believe that the support of our local government units (LGUs) and the public sends a message that No Child should ever die again to a Typhoon.”

The bill proposes that DSWD and other national agencies develop a comprehensive plan to enhance services, increase protection and services for children before, during and after disasters. Some of the noteworthy provisions include:

improved family tracing for unaccompanied minors, disaggregated data collection to identify children, trainings on child-focused response, restoration of civil documents and setting up a mechanism to limit use of schools are not used as evacuation over an extended period of time.

Today, Save the Children holds a policy forum to discuss the bill with over 100 representatives from LGUs, non-government organizations, community leaders and children in Tacloban.

In a short ceremony during the forum, Save the Children awarded plaques of appreciation to the province of Leyte, Tacloban city and over 10 municipalities across Leyte for passing resolutions of support addressed to the Senate and House of Representatives.

Notes to Editors:

Save the Children is the world’s leading independent children’s rights organization, with members in 29 countries and operational programs in 120. We fight for children’s rights and deliver immediate and lasting improvements to children’s lives worldwide.

Save the Children was established in the Philippines in 1981 and today it is one of the largest child rights organizations in the country.

Save the Children was one of the first humanitarian agencies on the ground when Yolanda struck central Philippines, delivering aid quickly and efficiently even though roads, airports and other vital infrastructure had been damaged. We remain the largest aid agency in some of the hardest hit areas.
Save the Children has reached nearly 800,000 children and adults with essential life-saving aid, recovery and rehabilitation support. We have distributed families food and water; provided medicines and primary health services through our mobile health clinics; repaired classrooms, health facilities and water systems; and provided shelter, household and hygiene items to keep children safe.

About the bill:

The children’s bill which was filed by Rep. Susan Yap (2nd District, Tarlac) in the House of Representatives in September 2014 and has been approved on 3rd Reading last January 2015. There are also six similar measures pending at the Senate. The bill was developed as a result of the many lessons learned and collected from children affected by typhoon Yolanda.

For all media queries and interview opportunities, please contact National Media Manager April Sumaylo on 09173011240 or april.sumaylo@savethechildren.org

Philippines: Philippines: Typhoon Haiyan Emergency appeal operation update n° 12 (MDRPH014)

23 June 2015 - 3:18pm
Source: International Federation of Red Cross And Red Crescent Societies Country: Philippines

Appeal history

  • 8 November 2013: Typhoon Haiyan (locally known as Yolanda) strikes Central Philippines, causing a massive humanitarian impact.

  • Philippine Red Cross (PRC) had been on highest alert since the typhoon was sighted; after landfall, PRC volunteers and staff responded promptly. CHF 475,495 was allocated from IFRC’s Disaster Relief Emergency Fund (DREF).

  • 11 November 2013: The Philippine government declared a state of national calamity and called for international humanitarian assistance. The inter-agency standing committee categorized Typhoon Haiyan a level-3 disaster, requiring global mobilization and response.

  • 12 November 2013: An emergency appeal was launched, on a preliminary basis, for CHF 72.3 million to support 100,000 families (500,000 people) over 18 months.

  • 16 January 2014: A first revision of the emergency appeal was made and budget increased to CHF 126.2 million to support 100,000 families (500,000 people) over 24 months.

  • 30 July 2014: A further revision of the emergency appeal was issued, seeking CHF 99.88 million to support 100,000 households (500,000 people) through December 2016

Solomon Islands: The Pacific - History of Disasters (November 2013 - June 2015)

21 June 2015 - 9:11pm
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Kiribati, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Palau, Solomon Islands, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu

OVERVIEW

The Pacific Region had nine major emergencies between November 2013 and June 2014.The 2014 - 2015 cyclone season has been one of the most active in terms of the number and intensity of cyclones, as well as the length of season. A total of 9 cyclones were observed with five of these having significant humanitarian consequences.

Ethiopia: Courage and commitment: SOS Children’s Villages co-workers who went above and beyond for children

17 June 2015 - 2:07am
Source: SOS Children's Villages International Country: Ethiopia, Philippines, South Sudan

Every day, SOS mothers, aunts, youth leaders and social workers make an impact in the lives of the children and families around them.

The three co-workers whose stories are told here are the winners of the 2015 Helmut Kutin Award, a biannual award named for a former President of SOS Children’s Villages International, which celebrates the achievements of some of our extraordinary caregivers. Finalists are selected by the Hermann Gmeiner Academy Board and then voted for by SOS Children’s Villages employees around the world.

Protecting her children from a typhoon

Maria Merlina Sabela, also known as Nanay Merlina, an SOS mother from the Philippines, was recognised for her courage during Typhoon Yolanda. When the typhoon struck, Merlina made an escape hole in the ceiling.

She and her nine children huddled on their roof while flood waters swirled below. She comforted her children and kept them calm while the typhoon raged around them, damaging their home and everything around it.

Once the danger passed, Merlina was the first to leave the safety of the roof, to check it was safe for her children to come down.

After the typhoon, she strove to repair her house as soon as possible, so her children could come back home. Hers was the first house in the village to be ready for children to move back.

When asked about the impact her mother has had on her life, Merlina’s daughter Bianca* turns to the words of Celine Dion: “The song ‘Because you Love Me’ best describes Nanay Merlina because you, Nanay, were my strength when I was weak... you gave me faith because you believed. I’m everything I am because you love me.”

A mother figure to young women

SOS aunt Abebech Kibret from Ethiopia was recognised for her unfailing support for the children and young people in her village. Abebech spent 16 years as a cook in the village, developing strong bonds with the children and young people there. Now an SOS aunt, she is a mother figure for many of the adults who grew up in the village, receiving regular phone calls and visits.

Lidiya* and Helina* were two young women who had grown up in the village. When they gave birth for the first time, Abebech took on the traditional grandmotherly role, showing them how to look after their new babies.

Another young woman in the village, Hanna*, fell in love and dropped out of school to get married. Abebech convinced her to continue her education and insisted Hanna be given a second chance so she could go back to school. Hanna is now a qualified kindergarten teacher.

Bisrat* is another young woman from the SOS Children’s Village who was inspired by Abebech to become a kindergarten teacher. She says, “When I think about the good deeds of aunt Abebech, my eyes fill with tears of joy. I don’t know where to start, but I can only say that I wouldn’t be here if she were not by my side next to my SOS mother.”

A dangerous journey to keep children safe

Isaac Adowk, a youth leader from South Sudan, received a special distinction from the Hermann Gmeiner Academy Board for his outstanding courage in a dangerous situation. The European Commission featured Isaac and the children’s story on World Humanitarian Day 2014, in the series ‘Humanitarians at Risk’. When rebels entered the SOS Children’s Village, he took the children to safety, facing armed soldiers, a crocodile infested river, and grenade fire during the 200 km journey. Find out more about Isaac’s amazing story.

The trait that unites these three winners is courage: the courage to fight for the children in their care, keeping them safe and encouraging them to reach their full potential.

*Names changed to protect privacy.

Philippines: 2nd Phase of DILG Yolanda rehab pushed in Capiz

16 June 2015 - 10:06pm
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

Following significant gains in reconstruction from Super Typhoon Yolanda, the second phase of the DILG's Recovery Assistance on Yolanda (RAY II) project is now in full swing in Capiz.

Secretary of the Interior and Local Government Mar Roxas said that under RAY II, Capiz received a total of P120.3M, which will subsidize the reconstruction and rehabilitation of 638 barangay facilities like multipurpose halls, public markets, barangay halls, day care centers, and evacuation centers in 395 different barangays in the province.

"We talk about independence from hunger, poverty, economic insecurity. We talk about independence from hopelessness," Roxas said in Roxas City, Capiz, where he convened leaders of various local government units (LGUs) for the distribution of RAY II funds last Saturday (June 13).

This is part of the P1.5B 2015 budget of the national government for the repair of damaged LGU facilities necessary to deliver goods and services to the victims of the typhoon.

Roxas also highlighted the undying spirit and strength of his fellow Capisnons shown in their struggle against hardships bought about by natural calamities. He also assured them that the administration is united with them in this struggle.

Capiz Governor Victor Tanco lauded Roxas for his invaluable service to the Filipinos, regardless of any political intention.

It can be recalled that Capiz was one of the hardest hit areas in the Visayas by Yolanda in 2013.

Most of the residents then believed that it was a long climb to achieving full normalcy in government services, but Roxas and the Aquino administration has delivered on that goal via the 'whole of government approach.’

Philippines: Canadian wood construction manufacturers and UNDP rebuild after Typhoon Haiyan

16 June 2015 - 3:23pm
Source: UN Development Programme Country: Philippines

In the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan, one of the strongest storms recorded in history, the Quebec Wood Export Bureau (QWEB) and UNDP have partnered to provide municipal building solutions to the people of Guiuan in the Philippines.

Four buildings were provided to support local recovery efforts after consulting with Guiuan authorities and the community. The buildings will serve as the town council session hall, the office of the mayor, and will house various key departments like accounting, treasury, and disaster risk reduction and management. One of the units will be used as training center for an agricultural demonstration farm and as an evacuation center in the event of a future disaster.

Restoring basic social services

Every year, millions of people around the world are displaced by conflicts or natural disasters. Less affected communities can find themselves with a population that has doubled or sometimes tripled overnight. Such demographic shifts put added pressure on what are often already strained basic services, and challenge traditional humanitarian, camp-based delivery systems.

In such a context, municipal services need to be bolstered to extend access to water, education, health and housing as well as ensure adequate waste management to the newly arrived populations. The private sector can play a pivotal role in upscaling the ability to offer these basic services.

Typhoon Haiyan caused unprecedented devastation and killed more than 6,000 people. Suddenly the community of Guiuan in Eastern Samar found itself struggling to provide basic social services. In response to this need for humanitarian assistance, QWEB, in partnership with the Société d’habitation du Québec, Natural Resources Canada, and four wood construction manufacturing companies, provided four prefabricated wood buildings to help restore social services in Guiuan. While the prefabricated buildings were manufactured in Quebec, they were designed for quick assembly on-site and engineered to resist typhoon winds up to 251 kilometers per hour.

“We decided to partner with UNDP as the organization—on top of its extensive experience with recovering from disasters—on the ground as it has solid relationships with local authorities. These relationships could facilitate all negotiations with the municipal authorities as well as help us obtain authorizations, hire workers, support the shipping, and customs clearance and provide training on the maintenance of the buildings” noted Alain Boulet, QWEB manager for the wood construction sector.

Three Quebec workers travelled to Guiuan to assemble the buildings and train local labor to help erect the structures. Local workers were shown how to create good foundations, assemble the house kits and customise the buildings. In addition, the maps and blueprints were handed to the General Services unit of the Guiuan municipality so the buildings could continue to be maintained. After two weeks, the local government was using their four new offices.

Exploring a niche market and matching municipal needs

Although partnerships between the UN and private sector can sometimes be challenging due to differing implementation timeframes and corporate cultures, this project was different.

“Our timing is not always aligned, as UNDP consults a lot to make sure projects will respond to local needs and to make sure the beneficiary community will own the project. Businesses most often cannot afford such lengthy processes”, noted Glaucia Boyer from the UNDP Geneva Office. “QWEB, as the one-stop contact and interface for the industry with us, played an essential role reconciling these different agendas. I doubt a company would have been able to invest time and resources in such process”, she added.

This project was possible due to market development work supported by Société d’habitation du Québec and Natural Resources Canada to develop new building solutions and explore new markets. This experience was part of a long-term strategy for Canada’s wood manufacturing sector to play an active role in global post-disaster reconstruction efforts. QWEB and its members were able to forge links with international organizations and showcase a product that can provide vital shelter when a crisis strikes.

“We want to leverage our expertise to develop better housing solutions for people displaced by conflicts and disasters. In addition to the four municipal buildings erected in Guiuan, a QWEB member manufacturer provided 6,775 timber-frame houses to an NGO for the communities affected by the 2010 earthquake in Haïti. This was a tremendous learning experience that helped us understand the reality on the ground, improve our product so it fits the needs and reduces the unit cost by 38 percent”, added Alain Boulet from QWEB.

For the local government, this was also a positive experience. The quick assembly time allowed public servants to resume providing much-needed services to the community.

“This is a very reliable space to hold our temporary office. Some of my colleagues are indeed so impressed by the strength of the buildings that they are keen to build more to host their administration. We could resume quickly the legislative sessions of the Town Council and manage the crisis left by Typhoon Yolanda. We are in a more productive mode in our daily tasks serving the people of Guiuan,” Mayor Christopher Sheen said.

Philippines: Resolving post-disaster displacement: Insights from the Philippines after Typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda)

15 June 2015 - 11:18am
Source: International Organization for Migration, Brookings-LSE Project on Internal Displacement Country: Philippines

By: Angela Sherwood, Megan Bradley, Lorenza Rossi, Rufa Guiam and Bradley Mellicker

In November 2013, the strongest storm ever recorded at landfall devastated the central Philippines. Super Typhoon Haiyan – known in the Philippines as Yolanda – killed 7,000 people and forced more than four million from their homes. One and a half years later, the reconstruction process is well underway. This report examines progress towards the resolution of the displacement crisis caused by Typhoon Haiyan. It also draws out insights from experiences in the Philippines that may help inform the resolution of other post-disaster displacement crises – a challenge that is expected to grow in future owing to the effects of climate change.

The study’s main point of reference is the 2010 IASC Framework on Durable Solutions for Internally Displaced Persons. The findings are based on a survey of over 4,500 Haiyan-affected households, as well as in-depth interviews with policymakers and practitioners, and focus groups in communities struggling to recover from the disaster.

One and a half years after the disaster, only 17.6 percent of the population feels that life has returned to “normal,” with only 32 percent of households able to cover their basic needs, compared to 83 percent before the typhoon. More than 60 percent of families face difficulties accessing services, with displaced households facing particularly pronounced challenges in some areas. This infographic highlights some of the key findings from the study.

Recommendations

The report backstops calls advanced in related research to improve institutional coordination, strengthen local-level capacity building, and increase the engagement of affected communities in relocation processes intended to ensure the safety of families living in areas highly prone to future disasters. It also makes several additional recommendations to the government of the Philippines, and its international supporters:

  1. Recognize curable solutions to displacement as a multi-sectoral concern, including both humanitarian and development inputs, and extending beyond the housing sector.
    2.Redouble investment in the strengthening of evacuation centers, safer construction techniques and other disaster risk reduction programs.
  2. Establish an interactive, rights-based monitoring system for relocation plans, policies and projects, linking local and national levels.
  3. Develop and implement enhanced, culturally sensitive livelihood strategies for the affected areas, based on internally displaced persons’ active participation.
  4. Address fairness concerns in the implementation of aid, and strengthen community-based approaches to humanitarian assistance and recovery.
  5. Ensure that support for durable solutions and disaster risk reduction and management efforts at all levels integrate gender analyses and response to the different needs and capacities of women and men, girls and boys.

World: Longer-term aid needed to stem spike in baby deaths after disasters - experts

12 June 2015 - 7:48pm
Source: Reuters - AlertNet Country: Nepal, Philippines, World

Source: Thomson Reuters Foundation - Fri, 12 Jun 2015 00:01 GMT

Author: Alisa Tang

By Alisa Tang

BANGKOK, June 12 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Families hit by Nepal's recent earthquakes risk losing their babies to hunger and disease over the next year unless they receive long-term help to boost their incomes and rebuild their homes, experts said.

Read the full report on Reuters - AlertNet

World: Addressing the perennial problems of disaster response

11 June 2015 - 1:32pm
Source: DARA Country: Philippines, World

Background study for the Disaster Response Dialogue Conference Manila, Philippines, October 2014

Better cooperation between international and local actors, especially the government, is necessary to help improve the effectiveness of the response to the humanitarian consequences of natural disasters. The Disaster Response Dialogue (DRD) commissioned DARA and HERE-Geneva to conduct an independent study on humanitarian financing to disaster-affected governments and other national actors, looking at how the relationships and cooperation can be improved.

The study highlights as key to greater effectiveness the need for continuous dialogue over the issues affecting victims of disasters and looks at well-known issues in disaster response in order to try to shed new light on them to promote more honest and transparent dialogue.

World: Mainstreaming environment and climate change into humanitarian action

11 June 2015 - 10:37am
Source: Evidence on Demand Country: Indonesia, Pakistan, Philippines, World

This topic guide on mainstreaming environment and climate change into humanitarian action is intended for Climate, Environment, Infrastructure and Livelihoods Advisers in the UK Department for International Development (DFID) and other development professionals. It is presented in 4 main sections and includes a glossary, reference list/bibliography, list of relevant organisations, and an annex with additional background information. It includes 5 case studies.

Section 1 provides an overview of the key reasons that environmental and climate change issues are relevant in the context of humanitarian action, including in the initial, life-saving response phase. Section 2 provides evidence of the relationships between environment, climate change and humanitarian action, describes the relevant humanitarian policies, and identifies key barriers to acting on the relationship. The evidence on relationships alone may not consistently justify raising the level of attention given to the environment in a humanitarian response, particularly during the most acute, life-saving phase. However, the evidence, taken together with the humanitarian policy basis and the fact that some barriers are entirely avoidable, may well do so. Moreover, there are no-regrets actions that can minimise the risk of negative environmental impacts, as illustrated in the case study, Challenges and no-regrets lessons from the field.

Section 3 describes the key junctures or ‘entry points’ at which the environment–climate–humanitarian action relationship can be most effectively acted upon, and provides strategies for doing so. Section 4 provides information on topics of concern to DFID advisers in a humanitarian response. The tables provide general information on the topic area, related environmental issues, typical interventions and additional evidence and information. More background and resources are contained in the Annex. The topics covered include:

  • Water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH)

  • Shelter

  • Food security

  • Energy

  • Debris and waste

  • Land tenure and land use

  • Livelihoods

  • Climate change

This Topic Guide has been produced by Evidence on Demand with the assistance of the UK Department for International Development (DFID) contracted through the Climate, Environment, Infrastructure and Livelihoods Professional Evidence and Applied Knowledge Services (CEIL PEAKS) programme, jointly managed by DAI (which incorporates HTSPE Limited) and IMC Worldwide Limited.

Philippines: Homeless ‘Yolanda’ survivors from Antique town receive shelter aid

11 June 2015 - 8:29am
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

Some 817 families from Laua-an, Antique whose houses were totally damaged by Typhoon Yolanda received their Emergency Shelter Assistance (ESA) of P30,000 each after the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) released some P24.5 million to the local government unit.

ESA provides P30,000 and P10,000 financial assistance to ‘Yolanda’ survivors whose houses were totally and partially damaged, respectively.

Laua-an Mayor Francisco Baladjay said that the ESA is an added resource for the affected families to continue moving on with their lives. “I am very grateful for the assistance the government, through the DSWD, has afforded to us. I will ensure that the aid will be put to good use,” Mayor Baladjay said.

Cherryl Aretano, 24, one of the recipients who is in her eight month of pregnancy, said that the assistance will be used to replace their wooden walls into concrete.

“Kami ay gagawa na ng konkretong bahay dahil ito ay mas matibay kumpara sa bahay na gawa lamang sa kahoy para maprotektahan na rin ang aking sanggol at pamilya. Ito ang natutunan namin mula sa nangyaring trahedya na dulot ng ‘Yolanda.’ Ang bahay namin na gawa sa marupok na bagay ay tinangay ng hangin. Ayaw naming mangyari ulit iyon (We will build a concrete house which is more durable than a wooden house to secure my baby and our family. This is the lesson we learned from ‘Yolanda’. All the light materials were blown by the wind. We do not want this to happen again),” Cheryl added.

The ESA is given to affected families who have no permanent sources of income or whose income is below the poverty threshold of the region; whose houses were partially or totally damaged but are located in safe areas; who are listed in the Disaster Family Access Card (DAFAC); whose heads are not permanent or regular employees and do not have access to housing loans; and whose heads have a fixed monthly salary below P15,000 and have not received the same assistance from other agencies.

Philippines: UNDP and Canada partner to favor recovery in the Philippines

10 June 2015 - 1:37am
Source: UN Development Programme Country: Philippines

Canadian wood construction manufacturers and UNDP rebuild local government infrastructure after Typhoon Haiyan

In aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan, one of the strongest storms recorded on the planet, the Quebec Wood Export Bureau (QWEB) and UNDP have partnered to provide municipal building solutions to the people of Guiuan in the Philippines.

Four buildings were provided to support local recovery efforts after consulting with Guiuan authorities and the community. The buildings will serve as the town council session hall, the office of the mayor and house various key departments like accounting, treasury, and disaster risk reduction and management. One of the units will be used as training center for an agricultural demonstration farm and as an evacuation center in the event of a future disaster.

Restoring basic social services

Every year, millions of people around the world are displaced by conflicts or natural disasters. Less affected communities find themselves with a population that has doubled or sometimes tripled overnight. Such demographic shifts add pressure on often already strained basic services and challenge traditional humanitarian, camp-based delivery systems.

In such a context, municipal services need to be bolstered to extend access to water, education, health, housing as well as ensure adequate waste management to the newly arrived populations. The private sector can play a pivotal role in upscaling the ability to offer these basic services.

Typhoon Haiyan caused unprecedented devastation and killed more than 6,000 people. Suddenly the community of Guiuan in Eastern Samar found itself struggling to provide basic social services. In response to this need for humanitarian assistance, QWEB in partnership with the Société d’habitation du Québec, Natural Resources Canada, and four wood construction manufacturing companies provided four prefabricated wood buildings to help restore social services in Guiuan. While the prefabricated buildings were manufactured in Quebec, they were designed for quick assembly on-site and engineered to resist typhoon winds up to 251 km/h.

“We decided to partner with UNDP as the organization, on top of its extensive on-the-ground experience with recovering from disasters, has solid relationships with local authorities. These relationships could facilitate all negotiations with the municipal authorities as well as help us obtain authorizations, hire workers, support the shipping, and customs clearance and provide training on the maintenance of the buildings” noted Alain Boulet, QWEB manager for the wood construction sector.

Three Quebec workers travelled to Guiuan to assemble the buildings and train local labor to help erect the structures. Local workers were shown how to create good foundations, assemble the house kits and customise the buildings. In addition, the maps and blueprint were handed to the General Services unit of the Guiuan municipality so the buildings could continue to be maintained. After two weeks, the local government was using their four new offices.

Exploring a niche market and matching municipal needs

Although partnerships between the UN and private sector can sometimes be challenging due to differing implementation timeframes and corporate cultures, this project was different.

“Our timing is not always aligned, as UNDP consults a lot to make sure projects will respond to local needs and to make sure the beneficiary community will own the project. Businesses most often cannot afford such lengthy processes”, noted Glaucia Boyer from the UNDP Geneva Office. “QWEB as the one stop contact and interface for the industry with us played an essential role reconciling these different agendas. I doubt a company would have been able to invest time and resources in such process”, she added.

This project was possible due to market development work supported by Société d’habitation du Québec and Natural Resources Canada to develop new building solutions and explore new markets. This experience was part of a long-term strategy for Canada’s wood manufacturing sector to play an active role in global post-disaster reconstruction efforts. QWEB and its members were able to forge links with international organizations and showcase a product that can provide vital shelter when a crisis strikes.

“We want to leverage our expertise to develop better housing solutions for people displaced by conflicts and disasters. In addition to the four municipal buildings erected in Guiuan, a QWEB member manufacturer provided 6,775 timber-frame houses to an NGO for the communities affected by the 2010 earthquake in Haïti. This was a tremendous learning experience that helped us understand the reality on the ground, improve our product so it fits the needs and reduces the unit cost by 38%”, added Alain Boulet from QWEB.

For the local government, this was also a positive experience. The quick assembly time allowed public servants to resume providing much-needed services to the community.

“This is a very reliable space to hold our temporary office. Some of my colleagues are indeed so impressed by the strength of the buildings that they are keen to build more to host their administration. We could resume quickly the legislative sessions of the Town Council and manage the crisis left by Typhoon Yolanda. We are in a more productive mode in our daily tasks serving the people of Guiuan” Mayor Christopher Sheen said.