DRC - ReliefWeb News

Syndicate content
ReliefWeb - Updates
Updated: 14 min 13 sec ago

Democratic Republic of the Congo: Grand Theft Global - Prosecuting the War Crime of Natural Resource Pillage in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

27 January 2015 - 3:19pm
Source: Enough Project Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, Uganda

Executive Summary and Recommendations

From the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) to the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) to Al-Shabaab, many of the world’s most infamous and destabilizing armed actors today finance their activities in part through the illegal exploitation and trade of natural resources. Theft in the context of armed conflict constitutes the war crime of pillage, which is punishable in most domestic jurisdictions and at the International Criminal Court (ICC).

Prosecuting armed actors and their facilitators for natural resource pillage can help reduce incomes for perpetrators of atrocities, combat resource exploitation, and end the impunity that enables illegal financial networks to thrive in conflict zones. Furthermore, investigating pillage can strengthen cases addressing violent atrocity crimes like rape and murder by uncovering critical information about command responsibility and criminal intent. Prosecutions are a direct, effective way to help disrupt conflict financing and improve accountability for economic crimes—like trafficking and money laundering—and the atrocities they fuel.

Despite the prevalence of natural resource-driven armed conflict, rarely are individuals and companies held criminally responsible for natural resource theft in war. From the Horn of Africa across the eastern and central regions of the continent, some of the deadliest ongoing conflicts in modern history are fueled in part by stolen natural resources. The Sudanese government draws income from a deadly gold trade in Darfur, the LRA and Séléka militias in the Central African Republic poach elephants for ivory trafficking, and an illicit charcoal trade in Africa’s oldest national park, Virunga, helps fuel one of the region’s most destabilizing rebel forces, the Forces Démocratiques de Libération du Rwanda (FDLR). The theft of natural resources—primarily minerals—is particularly destabilizing in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Often mined and transported by civilians under threat of extreme violence, minerals provide lucrative incomes to rebels, factions of the Congolese army, and the businesses with which they work, helping to sustain their violent activities. Professor Gregoire Mpungu at Kinshasa University told Enough, “Most places where minerals are being exploited, rape is also going on.” In some cases, theft in eastern Congo is highly orchestrated, spanning multiple countries and involving a range of actors. In the Great Lakes region, these networks include indicted war criminals, militias, business people, and government officials. Beyond the war zones, these networks involve corporations, front companies, traffickers, banks, and other actors in the international system that benefit from theft and money laundering.

Policymakers and nongovernmental organizations worldwide are paying increasing attention to combating natural resource-driven conflict in Africa’s Great Lakes region, spurring new efforts to cut off funding to armed groups in Congo. The U.N. and U.S. sanctions regimes for Congo address illegal natural resource exploitation linked to armed groups. Government agencies in the United States and Africa’s Great Lakes region have introduced new border enforcement programs to curb the illegal trade of wildlife and ivory. The conflict minerals disclosure requirements of the 2010 U.S. Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act are among several new initiatives aimed at spurring more responsible supply chain management, and a number of companies have taken leading roles in reducing the global demand for untraceable minerals that may help fuel armed violence in Congo. Many of these initiatives have helped reduce income to armed groups, stimulated more formal minerals markets, and increased transparency and accountability related to illegal activities. Global efforts to address violent conflict associated with Congo’s lucrative natural resources, however, are missing one powerful tool: criminal prosecution for the theft of those resources. Accountability for war crimes is a critical component of sustainable peace, with the potential to achieve goals that regulation and sanctions schemes cannot. Prosecuting widespread natural resource pillage would combat the impunity that allows these crimes to continue. Prosecutions could undermine the power of key actors who orchestrate criminal networks by physically removing them from crime scenes. Prosecutions invite the participation of victims and witnesses, and prosecutions can result in the seizure of a defendant’s assets in order to provide reparations for victims, helping to restore dignity and cohesion among affected communities. Prosecutions, unlike sanctions or supply chain regulations, create a public record of how crimes are committed. Such records deconstruct and expose how economic incentives interact with and enable atrocities, which is critical for preventing their recurrence.

Research conducted by the Enough Project in eastern Congo and The Hague reveals broad support, especially among affected communities and Congolese human rights defenders, for the prosecution of natural resource pillage. “Economic crimes are part of daily life here,” said one member of the bar in eastern Congo. “Mafia practices find good breeding ground here, and they’re mostly focused on natural resources—minerals and forests.” A Congolese ex-minister said, “It’s a compelling idea: go after the worst human rights violators for economic crimes.”

The Congolese military justice system, the ICC, and national courts in numerous countries can prosecute the worst suspected perpetrators of this crime—some of whom are already facing trial in The Hague, and some of whom continue to fan the flames of conflict. Many national jurisdictions can also prosecute the individuals and companies that knowingly purchase or otherwise appropriate resources that were illegally acquired during armed conflict.

A number of steps, if begun now, will help advance cases and seed accountability for these crimes. Congo needs to increase the independence and expertise in its military court system and establish specialized mixed chambers to prosecute high-level war crimes cases, including natural resource pillage. The International Criminal Court has a number of cases in its docket addressing crimes that may have been fueled by the theft of natural resources, but the court needs specialized expertise in economic crimes and a comprehensive strategy for investigating the theft of natural resources as it relates to atrocity crimes. National jurisdictions and law enforcement agencies can address individuals and corporate entities further up the international supply chain that support, facilitate, and benefit from theft in Congo’s armed conflict. By building more independent legal structures and expertise in the regions where theft in war occurs, and by encouraging better coordination among international actors with the power to investigate and apprehend individuals and entities implicated in natural resource theft, policymakers and legal practitioners could break new ground toward ending the world’s worst resource-driven violence.

Recommendations

  1. International Criminal Court Chief Prosecutor Fatou Bensouda should revive the court’s financial crimes unit, which was discontinued for lack of effectiveness. With the resource support of the ICC Assembly of State Parties, she should appoint special advisors on financial forensics and natural resource theft, and she should develop a comprehensive approach to investigating and prosecuting widespread pillage. In particular, her office should expand investigations in Congo, the Central African Republic, and Sudan to cover natural resource pillage, especially theft of minerals and ivory. Congolese authorities and the U.N. peacekeeping mission in Congo, MONUSCO, should cooperate in the joint effort to collect evidence, apprehend indictees, and protect witnesses and victims.

  2. U.N. and U.S. Special Envoys to Congo and the region, Said Djinnit and Russ Feingold, and European Union Senior Coordinator for the Great Lakes Koen Vervaeke, should pressure the Congolese government to strengthen protections against political interference and intimidation in the military justice system. Djinnit, Feingold, and Vervaeke should encourage the appointment of high-ranking judges in the east and prevent the unnecessary transfer of cases to different jurisdictions mid-adjudication. Individuals within the military justice system suspected of tampering with or destroying evidence or intimidating witnesses, investigators, or jurists working on pillage cases should be held responsible.

  3. The U.S. Department of State’s Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement (INL) should support MONUSCO’s justice unit and prosecution support cells as they assist their national counterparts in gathering evidence—physical, documentary and testimonial—on the war crime of natural resource pillage and atrocity crimes.

  4. Djinnit, Feingold, and U.S. Ambassador-At-Large for War Crimes Issues Stephen Rapp should intensify their efforts to support the establishment of specialized mixed chambers in Congo, which could prosecute natural resource pillage and atrocity crimes. Building on the significant support they have shown the proposal thus far, the envoys should continue to encourage Congo’s new justice minister, Alexis Thambwe Mwamba, to present the draft bill of mixed chambers draft bill to the national assembly for approval, while also highlighting the importance of the bill among members of the Congolese national assembly. In the event of the establishment of the mixed chambers, the U.N. Security Council should issue a resolution to enforce the court’s regional jurisdiction and the extraditions of accused individuals in Rwanda and Uganda.

  5. As it conducts its investigations, the U. N. Group of Experts in Congo should investigate financial flows stemming from minerals trafficking with attention to the elements of the war crime of pillage. The Group should submit evidence of pillage to the ICC and any relevant national courts, including those within Congo’s military justice system.

  6. The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and the International Center for Transitional Justice should provide training on investigating and prosecuting the war crime of pillage for investigators, lawyers, and judges in Congo. Ambassador Rapp should encourage the Congolese army to open its military archives to those investigating the war crime of natural resource pillage and other atrocity crimes to improve access to evidence and crucial information related to military command and control.

Democratic Republic of the Congo: Ituri: 63 enfants sortis de la milice Mai-Maï Simba à Mambasa

27 January 2015 - 3:12pm
Source: Radio Okapi Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo

Soixante-trois enfants sont sortis, depuis six mois, de la milice Maï-Maï Simba, en territoire de Mambasa, en Ituri (Province Orientale). Ces mineurs ont été répertoriés la semaine passée par l’Unité d’exécution du programme de désarmement, démobilisation et réinsertion ( UE PNDDR). Le responsable de cette structure en Ituri, René Sileki, rapporte que ces enfants ont fui la milice suite aux conditions de vie difficiles dans le maquis.

« Ces enfants ont fui le groupe armé compte tenu des conditions qui ne sont pas bonnes. Ils ont fui d’eux-mêmes le groupe armé. C’est pourquoi ils se retrouvent dans la communauté. Ils se cachent avec crainte qu’ils soient récupérés par les FARDC », explique René Sileki.

La même source plaide pour la sensibilisation des forces de l’ordre pour qu’elles ne considèrent pas ces enfants comme des ennemis.

René Sileki annonce également la prise en charge des enfants pour faciliter leur réinsertion dans leurs communautés.

«Ces enfants vont bénéficier du programme de réinsertion socio-économique à travers l’apprentissage de certains métiers comme la mécanique, la menuiserie et autres », a-t-il expliqué.

Ces enfants étaient kidnappés par la milice Maï-Maï Simba dans les foyers miniers où ils exploitaient de l’or.

Democratic Republic of the Congo: RD Congo : L'agence nationale de renseignement affirme détenir un activiste

27 January 2015 - 3:07pm
Source: Human Rights Watch Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo

Christopher Ngoyi doit être autorisé à recevoir immédiatement des visites d'un avocat et de sa famille

(Kinshasa, le 27 janvier 2015) – Les autorités de la République démocratique du Congo devraient fournir immédiatement des informations sur l’endroit où se trouve le défenseur des droits humains Christopher Ngoyi Mutamba, et sur des charges éventuelles contre lui, a déclaré Human Rights Watch aujourd’hui. On craint que Ngoyi n’ait été victime de disparition forcée depuis son arrestation le 21 janvier 2015.

Un haut responsable des services de renseignements de la République démocratique du Congo a déclaré à Human Rights Watch le 26 janvier que Ngoyi était détenu par les services de renseignement congolais, mais le lieu de sa détention n'a pas été divulgué, et il n'a pas été autorisé à recevoir des visites de sa famille ou d'un avocat. Les autorités devraient le libérer immédiatement, sauf s’il est mis en accusation pour un délit crédible.

« Chaque jour qui passe augmente les inquiétudes pour la sécurité de l’activiste Christopher Ngoyi », a déclaré Ida Sawyer, chercheuse senior sur la RD Congo à Human Rights Watch. « Les autorités congolaises devraient immédiatement et publiquement faire connaître l’endroit où il se trouve et le libérer s’il a été détenu illégalement ou pour des raisons politiques. »

Ngoyi, 55 ans, président de l’organisation de défense des droits humains Synergie Congo Culture et Développement, était engagé dans la mobilisation du public en vue des manifestations contre les propositions de modifications de la loi électorale le 12 janvier et pendant la semaine du 19 janvier, dans la capitale, Kinshasa.

Le 21 janvier, vers 20h, plusieurs hommes, dont certains portant des uniformes de la police militaire, ont accosté Ngoyi alors qu’il rencontrait des collègues dans un bar en plein air de la commune de Kalamu à Kinshasa. Ils l’ont contraint à monter à bord d’une jeep blanche non immatriculée et sont partis.

Plus tôt ce jour-là, Ngoyi faisait partie d’une délégation d’activistes des droits humains et de dirigeants de partis d’opposition, dont des membres du parlement, qui se sont rendus à l’Hôpital général de Kinshasa pour apporter leur soutien aux personnes blessées pendant les manifestations. Juste après que la délégation ait quitté l’hôpital, des militaires appartenant à un détachement de la Garde républicaine chargée de la sécurité présidentielle sont entrés dans l’hôpital et ont ouvert le feu sans distinction, blessant trois visiteurs.

Le lendemain matin suivant l’arrestation de Ngoyi, une jeep transportant des hommes vêtus d’uniformes de la police militaire était stationnée devant la maison de Ngoyi dans la commune de Barumbu à Kinshasa vers 4h du matin. Vers 5h30, environ six hommes en civil sont entrés à son domicile et ont montré un mandat de perquisition à des membres de sa famille. Ils ont ensuite fouillé la maison et emporté des documents appartenant à Ngoyi. Ils ont indiqué à la famille de Ngoyi que celui-ci était détenu à l’auditorat militaire du district de Gombe.

Des membres de la famille et des collègues de Ngoyi se sont rendus à l’auditorat militaire de Gombe, ainsi que dans d’autres lieux de détention officiels et prisons de Kinshasa, mais ils n’ont pas réussi à le localiser. Les autorités leur ont déclaré que Ngoyi n’était pas détenu dans ces établissements. Les militants congolais des droits humains ont exprimé leur préoccupation pour la vie et la sécurité physique de Ngoyi.

Le 26 janvier, l’administrateur général de l’Agence Nationale de Renseignement (ANR), Kalev Mutond, a informé Human Rights Watch que Ngoyi était détenu par l’ANR, mais il n’a pas donné d’autres détails quant au motif de son arrestation ni à son lieu de détention.

Les disparitions forcées sont définies par le droit international comme l’arrestation ou la détention d’une personne par des responsables du gouvernement ou leurs agents, suivie du refus de reconnaître la privation de liberté, ou de révéler le sort de la personne ou le lieu où elle se trouve. Les disparitions forcées violent une série de droits humains fondamentaux protégés en vertu du Pacte International relatif aux Droits Civils et Politiques, auquel la RD Congo est un État partie, notamment les interdictions d’arrestation et la détention arbitraires, de l’usage de la torture et autres traitements cruels, inhumains ou dégradants, et des exécutions extrajudiciaires.

« Le gouvernement devrait immédiatement informer la famille de Ngoyi de l’endroit où celui-ci se trouve et des raisons pour lesquelles il est détenu », a déclaré Ida Sawyer. « Les autorités devraient aussi assurer qu’il n’est ni torturé ni maltraité, et qu’il a accès à un avocat, de la nourriture, et des soins médicaux. »

Ngoyi est le coordinateur national d’un réseau d’organisations congolaises de la société civile. Il est également co-fondateur de Sauvons le Congo, une coalition de partis politiques et d’organisations de la société civile créée en 2014 pour lutter contre des propositions de modifications de la constitution, dont certaines permettraient au Président Joseph Kabila de se maintenir au pouvoir au-delà de la limite de deux mandats établie par la constitution.

Le 17 janvier 2015, l’Assemblée nationale congolaise a adopté des modifications de la loi électorale qui exigeraient un recensement national avant les prochaines élections et pourraient ainsi retarder de façon considérable les élections présidentielle et législatives prévues pour 2016. Un tel retard aurait permis à Joseph Kabila de prolonger son mandat.

Le 23 janvier, après une semaine de manifestations publiques à Kinshasa et dans d’autres villes qui ont dégénéré en violences à la suite de la répression policière, le Sénat a adopté une version amendée de la loi, indiquant clairement que les élections ne seraient pas subordonnées à la réalisation d’un recensement et que le calendrier électoral de la constitution serait respecté. Le 25 janvier, l’Assemblée nationale a adopté une version de la loi qui n’exigeait pas qu’un recensement national soit organisé avant les élections. Le président de l’Assemblée nationale, Aubin Minaku, a déclaré après le vote que les membres du parlement avaient écouté le peuple qui les avait élus.

Human Rights Watch a confirmé que 36 personnes au moins ont été tuées durant les manifestations à Kinshasa, dont au moins 21 ont été tuées par balles par la police et par des militaires de la Garde républicaine ayant eu recours à une force meurtrière excessive ou non nécessaire. Human Rights Watch poursuit ses enquêtes sur les circonstances exactes des autres décès ainsi que sur des informations crédibles à propos d’autres meurtres. Human Rights Watch s’entretient avec des témoins, des membres des familles des victimes et des employés d’hôpitaux, et se rend dans des hôpitaux et des endroits à Kinshasa où se sont déroulées des manifestations.

Les autorités ont également arrêté arbitrairement plusieurs dirigeants de l’opposition en lien avec les manifestations.

« La façon dont les autorités ont traité le cas de Ngoyi est extrêmement préoccupante », a conclu Ida Sawyer. « Elle envoie un signal inquiétant selon lequel le gouvernement cherche à réduire au silence les voix politiquement discordantes et les actions en faveur des droits humains plus généralement. »

Democratic Republic of the Congo: MONUSCO backs local development plan in Mitwaba

27 January 2015 - 2:55pm
Source: UN Organization Stabilization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo

Mitwaba, 15 - 17 January – The Department of plan and Civil Society in South Katanga organized from 15 to 17 January a capacity-building workshop on local development planning in Mitwaba, a locality situated more than 450 Km from Lubumbashi.

The workshop was attended by about forty participants mainly from the public service, civil society organizations as well as from the different sectors and districts of Mitwaba; it received logistic and financial support from MONUSCO, through its Civil Affairs section in Lubumbashi and the International NGO Rescue Committee (IRC).

The organizers of the workshop said its overall objective was to contribute to upgrading State Authority in the territory of Mitwaba and setting enabling conditions for a democratic dialogue that would lead to good governance and genuine local planning.

Its aim was also to build capacities for the stakeholders involved in the local planning process, to identify the specific needs for a smooth functioning of the administrative services, especially those relating to the marital status and to enhance civil society’s participation to the stabilization process.

The workshop helped put in place appropriate mechanisms to facilitate effective collaboration between the various local partners and contribute to the reduction of community tensions and conflicts.

The local Planning Department is looking to organize a forum shortly on the development of districts and sectors in the Haut Katanga.

Participants highlighted that no development could be envisaged without peace. So, civil society organizations in Mitwaba reiterated their appeal for the deployment of MONUSCO peacekeepers in Mitwaba to ensure the security of civilian populations.

The territory of Mitwaba has a surface area of more than 25,000 Km2 and roughly 400,000 people. Mitwaba has one city, two sectors and one district. Its big agglomerations have no infrastructures at all. Roads are very bad; the majority of schools were burnt down by the Mai-Mai militia members. Farmers and growers are victims of insecurity.

For MONUSCO, Mitwaba is high in its priority agenda for security situation remains fragile. The last raids by the Mai-Mai were reported in November in the village Kaya, 300 Km away from Lubumbashi. It is very urgent to reinforce State Authority in the territory of Mitwaba, said the workshop organizers.

Democratic Republic of the Congo: Loi électorale en RDC : après les violences, quel apaisement ?

27 January 2015 - 2:34pm
Source: Agence France-Presse Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo

Kinshasa, RD Congo | AFP | mardi 27/01/2015 - 19:06 GMT

par Marc JOURDIER

La disposition litigieuse a été retirée après quatre jours de violences meurtrières, mais la nouvelle loi électorale adoptée dimanche en République démocratique du Congo ne semble en mesure d'apaiser aucune des craintes exprimées par ceux qui redoutent de voir le président Joseph Kabila s'accrocher au pouvoir au-delà de 2016.

Q. Joseph Kabila est-il prêt à quitter le pouvoir ?

C'est la question qui occupe tout le champ politique depuis un an et demi.

Le président, qui a hérité des rênes du pays en 2001 à la mort de son père, Laurent-Désiré Kabila, chef rebelle arrivé à la tête de l’État par les armes, a été élu président pour la première fois en 2006 avant d'être réélu en 2011 lors d'élections marquées par des fraudes massives. La Constitution lui interdit de briguer un troisième quinquennat, mais ses détracteurs le soupçonnent de chercher à tout faire pour rester en place après fin 2016.

"Fondamentalement, le clan présidentiel a la même volonté: rester au pouvoir", note une source proche du gouvernement.

L'opposition a d'abord accusé le président congolais de vouloir parvenir à ses fins à l'occasion d'une révision constitutionnelle dont le projet avaient été déposé au Parlement, sans jamais être rendu public.

Fin octobre, au Burkina Faso, le président Blaise Compaoré a été contraint à la fuite alors qu'il cherchait à obtenir une révision de la Constitution qui lui permette de se succéder à lui-même. Peu après le soulèvement populaire de Ouagadougou, le gouvernement congolais a retiré ses textes.

Selon un diplomate à Kinshasa, Ouagadougou "a été un vrai signal d'alerte" pour le pouvoir, qui a alors changé son fusil d'épaule pour "faire passer une révision de la loi électorale".

Q. Que prévoyait l'alinéa litigieux du projet de loi ?

Il liait l'organisation de la présidentielle devant avoir lieu fin 2016 au résultat d'un recensement général de la population devant commencer cette année, le dernier recensement remontant à 1984. Mais selon plusieurs analystes, un recensement général dans ce grand pays pratiquement dépourvu d'infrastructures pourrait prendre jusqu'à trois ans.

Selon l'opposition, cette référence au recensement était une manœuvre pour retarder l'élection présidentielle de 2016.

Q. Qu'est-ce qui pose problème dans la nouvelle loi?

"La substance [du texte initial] reste" car "on revient au recensement pour les législatives", analyse Jacques Ndjoli, un des quinze sénateurs s'étant abstenus lors du vote.

La disposition litigieuse portant sur la présidentielle a été supprimée, mais l'article qui concerne l'organisation des législatives conditionne leur tenue aux résultats d'un recensement général. Il dispose en effet que le nombre de députés de chaque circonscription et de chaque province est déterminé par un calcul impliquant de connaître "le nombre total d'habitants" du pays et des provinces.

Or la Commission électorale nationale indépendante (Céni), chargée d'organiser les scrutins et présidée par un proche de M. Kabila, indiquait encore récemment que pour des raisons logistiques et financières, la présidentielle et les législatives doivent avoir lieu le même jour.

Le texte mène droit à un "glissement du calendrier électoral", estime un des dirigeants du collectif d'opposants à la loi, qui exige désormais de la Céni la publication d'un calendrier complet pour les scrutins à venir, jusqu'à a présidentielle comprise.

L'ONU, l'Union européenne et les États-Unis ont également exhorté la Céni à le faire sans tarder et le département d'État américain a invité M. Kabila "à réaffirmer que l'élection présidentielle aura lieu en 2016 au plus tard".

Q. L'opposition a-t-elle gagné comme elle le dit ?

Non, mais les dirigeants du collectif d'opposants à la loi ne l'admettent pas publiquement car ils ne veulent pas apparaître comme ceux qui mettent de l'huile sur le feu après les dernières violences.

Selon un diplomate en poste à Kinshasa, le retrait de la disposition contestée "a été un beau tour de passe-passe, beaucoup de gens ont été roulés dans la farine".

"On a le sentiment qu'une crise a été réglée [par le Parlement dimanche] mais qu'à la première occasion les durs du régime recommenceront" à agir pour permettre à M. Kabila de rester au pouvoir, note ce même diplomate.

Indépendamment même du contenu de la loi, "le calendrier commence à être de plus en plus serré. L'expérience des élections précédentes a montré qu'il faut lancer les opérations électorales un an et demi en avance pour avoir une logistique électorale correctement en place dans un pays de 2,3 millions de km2", explique Thierry Vircoulon, directeur du projet Afrique centrale du cercle de réflexion International Crisis Group (ICG).

mj/hab/tsz

© 1994-2015 Agence France-Presse

Democratic Republic of the Congo: Fonds Commun Humanitaire: Rapport Trimestriel #2, octobre – décembre 2014

27 January 2015 - 2:33pm
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo

Faits saillants

  • En septembre 2014, 2.565.403 $US ont été octroyé par le Coordinateur Humanitaire à l’UNICEF, au PAM et à UNHAS afin de répondre à la Fièvre Hémorragique Virale Ebola en Equateur. Près de 250.000 personnes étaient ciblées par ces projets. Ce financement est venu en complément du CERF Rapid Response pour 1.955.395 $US accordé à l’OMS et l’UNICEF.

  • Mi-décembre, le Coordinateur Humanitaire a initié l’allocation standard 2014 du Fonds Commun Humanitaire pour un montant de 30 millions de dollars américains. Les fiches de projet sont attendues pour la fin décembre.

  • Mi-septembre, une étude commanditée par le Suède et mise en oeuvre par le cabinet indépendant Price Water House Cooper et portant sur la Gestion des Risques au sein du Fonds Commun Humanitaire a été réalisée. Elle a été suivie fin octobre par une « évaluation du Fonds Commun Humanitaire RDC ».

  • Début décembre s’est tenu le Comité Consultatif du Fonds Commun Humanitaire (CCFCH) au cours duquel une présentation des conclusions du rapport de PWC a été faite par le représentant de la Suède. Suite aux conclusions positives de cette mission, la Suède a repris ses subventions au Fonds Commun Humanitaire

  • Au cours des deux derniers mois de l’année, le Fonds Commun a reçu près de 27 millions de dollars US (Irlande (1.849.650 $US) ; UK (15.676.000 $US) ; Suède (7.933.200 $US) et Norvège (1.466.921 $US)). La Belgique a, également, annoncé une subvention de 4 millions d’euros au Fonds Commun soit 4.931.120$US.

Democratic Republic of the Congo: Profil humanitaire du Nord-Kivu, décembre 2014

27 January 2015 - 2:25pm
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, Uganda

Le profil humanitaire du Nord-Kivu se veut être un outil de mobilisation de ressources et de préparation aux urgences mis à jour trimestriellement pour informer la communauté humanitaire sur les principaux enjeux humanitaires de la province.

La Province du Nord – Kivu, située à l’Est de la RDC jouit d’un climat tropical avec un relief volcanique et montagneux. Elle s’étend sur une surface de 59 631 Km² (soit 2,5% de la superficie nationale) avec 5 687 820 habitants (PNDS, 2010) et une densité de 102 habitants par Km². L’espérance de vie de sa population est estimée à la naissance à 43,7 ans. Son Chef-lieu est la ville de Goma hébergeant environ 493 993 habitants.

Elle est limitée à l’Est par les Républiques de l'Ouganda et du Rwanda (Sud-Est), au Nord et à l’Ouest par la Province Orientale, au Sud-Ouest par la Province du Maniema et au Sud par la province du Sud Kivu.
Sur le plan administratif, la Province du Nord- Kivu est subdivisée en 6 Territoires (Beni, Lubero,
Rutshuru, , Masisi, Nyiragongo et Walikale. Goma reste le chef-lieu), 3 Villes, 10 Communes, 17 Collectivités dont 10 Chefferies et 7 Secteurs), 97 Groupements, 5 Cités, 5.178 Villages.

La Province du Nord Kivu est accessible par voies routières, lacustres et aériennes

World: Analysing Child Poverty and Deprivation in sub-Saharan Africa

27 January 2015 - 12:56pm
Source: UN Children's Fund Country: Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Swaziland, Togo, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, World, Zimbabwe

New study on child poverty in Sub-Saharan Africa

Two thirds of children in sub-Saharan Africa experience multiple deprivations

New UNICEF study provides extensive new data and analysis of multidimensional child poverty

(26 January 2015 - Florence, Italy) A recent study on multidimensional poverty in sub-Saharan Africa sheds new light on the most critical deprivations facing children. "Analysing Child Poverty and Deprivation in sub-Saharan Africa", produced by the UNICEF Office of Research - Innocenti, looks at incidence and intensity of child deprivation The 30 countries included in the study represent 78% of the region’s total population.

In the countries analysed, 67% of all children or 247 million children below the age of 18 suffer two or more deprivations at the same time. An estimated 23% of all children, or 87 million are extremely deprived, experiencing four to five deprivations simultaneously.

"This is the first study to quantify multidimensional child poverty in sub-Saharan Africa using data on individual children," said Sudhanshu Handa, Chief of Social and Economic Policy with the UNICEF Office of Research - Innocenti. "A key finding is that national child poverty rankings differ depending on whether one uses monetary or multidimensional child poverty as the yardstick. This has important policy implications. It highlights the need to go beyond simple monetary measures when assessing child well-being." The MODA methodology allows comparability across countries by standardizing indicators and thresholds.

Using the UNICEF Office of Research multiple overlapping deprivation analysis tool, or MODA, in-depth deprivation mapping and analysis is now possible, allowing policies to better target child poverty. For example, malnutrition for young children in the countries studied is similar in rural and urban areas at about 40%, but malnutrition in rural areas is far more often associated with other deprivations such as poor health and low access to sanitation. This finding provides clear evidence that malnutrition in rural areas is one of multiple issues affecting children’s well-being, while in urban areas malnutrition is more likely to be a stand-alone problem.

While two thirds of all children studied experience multiple deprivations, the new paper makes it clear that large differences in incidence occur across countries. The difference between countries with the lowest and the highest multiple deprivation rates is 60 percentage points, ranging from the low of 30% in Gabon to 90% in Ethiopia. Overall, the multidimensional deprivation headcount in the sampled countries is highest in Ethiopia and in countries located at the centre of the African continent: Chad, DR Congo, Niger, and Central African Republic.

According to Handa: "MODA can be viewed as the child focused version of the Multidimensional Poverty index or MPI, a measure of poverty that goes beyond income to look at deprivations such as water, housing, education and health. The indicators that go into MODA are selected for their relevance to child well-being. This allows us to measure child deprivation directly, for each individual child, considered extremely important from an equity stand point." MODA analysis offers some important new methods for analysing the unique experience of multiple deprivations in childhood. It uses the individual child as the unit of measurement rather than the household, as is most often the case in poverty analysis. It categorizes deprivations in an age-appropriate manner allowing for differential analysis of children 0-4 and 5-17. By taking a holistic view of the child it promotes departure from compartmentalized, sector-based approaches.

"The multiple child deprivation approach allows governments to pinpoint exactly which specific deprivations are most important for children. And by looking at overlaps among dimensions, governments can assess whether a single sector or multi-sector approach would be more cost-effective in addressing child poverty. Knowing the exact deprivations children suffer allows precise identification of interventions that can more efficiently address their suffering", said Handa.

In some cases it becomes clear that even where income poverty is low children may be experiencing multiple deprivations. For example, in Gabon, income poverty is 6%, yet 30% of all children experience two or more deprivations. Across 28 of the countries studied monetary poverty is 50% while the rate of multidimensional deprivation in these countries is 68%, underlining the fact that income and deprivation poverty are conceptually different. More clear evidence that both should be used as complementary measures to identify the most vulnerable children and appropriate policy responses.

An in-depth study of Mali provides further examples of how MODA can improve policy and provision. The highest rates of child deprivation are found in Tombouctou and Kidal: regions which do not have the highest monetary poverty rates. Hence, the tool shows us where to start in order to combat child deprivation directly. The Mali analysis also shows that for children age 0-23 months the highest single deprivation is nutrition. For children age 5-14 years on the other hand the highest single deprivation is child labour. These clearly direct us to the sectors that need to be addressed to tackle age-specific child deprivation.

For further information please contact:

Dale Rutstein, Chief of Communication
UNICEF Office of Research - Innocenti
Tel: + 39 335 758 2585
Email: drutstein@unicef.org

Patrizia Faustini, Senior communication Assistant
UNICEF Office of Research - Innocenti
Tel: +39 055 203 3253
Email: pfaustini@unicef.org

Benin: Analysing Child Poverty and Deprivation in sub-Saharan Africa

27 January 2015 - 12:56pm
Source: UN Children's Fund Country: Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Swaziland, Togo, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Zimbabwe

New study on child poverty in Sub-Saharan Africa

Two thirds of children in sub-Saharan Africa experience multiple deprivations

New UNICEF study provides extensive new data and analysis of multidimensional child poverty

(26 January 2015 - Florence, Italy) A recent study on multidimensional poverty in sub-Saharan Africa sheds new light on the most critical deprivations facing children. "Analysing Child Poverty and Deprivation in sub-Saharan Africa", produced by the UNICEF Office of Research - Innocenti, looks at incidence and intensity of child deprivation The 30 countries included in the study represent 78% of the region’s total population.

In the countries analysed, 67% of all children or 247 million children below the age of 18 suffer two or more deprivations at the same time. An estimated 23% of all children, or 87 million are extremely deprived, experiencing four to five deprivations simultaneously.

"This is the first study to quantify multidimensional child poverty in sub-Saharan Africa using data on individual children," said Sudhanshu Handa, Chief of Social and Economic Policy with the UNICEF Office of Research - Innocenti. "A key finding is that national child poverty rankings differ depending on whether one uses monetary or multidimensional child poverty as the yardstick. This has important policy implications. It highlights the need to go beyond simple monetary measures when assessing child well-being." The MODA methodology allows comparability across countries by standardizing indicators and thresholds.

Using the UNICEF Office of Research multiple overlapping deprivation analysis tool, or MODA, in-depth deprivation mapping and analysis is now possible, allowing policies to better target child poverty. For example, malnutrition for young children in the countries studied is similar in rural and urban areas at about 40%, but malnutrition in rural areas is far more often associated with other deprivations such as poor health and low access to sanitation. This finding provides clear evidence that malnutrition in rural areas is one of multiple issues affecting children’s well-being, while in urban areas malnutrition is more likely to be a stand-alone problem.

While two thirds of all children studied experience multiple deprivations, the new paper makes it clear that large differences in incidence occur across countries. The difference between countries with the lowest and the highest multiple deprivation rates is 60 percentage points, ranging from the low of 30% in Gabon to 90% in Ethiopia. Overall, the multidimensional deprivation headcount in the sampled countries is highest in Ethiopia and in countries located at the centre of the African continent: Chad, DR Congo, Niger, and Central African Republic.

According to Handa: "MODA can be viewed as the child focused version of the Multidimensional Poverty index or MPI, a measure of poverty that goes beyond income to look at deprivations such as water, housing, education and health. The indicators that go into MODA are selected for their relevance to child well-being. This allows us to measure child deprivation directly, for each individual child, considered extremely important from an equity stand point." MODA analysis offers some important new methods for analysing the unique experience of multiple deprivations in childhood. It uses the individual child as the unit of measurement rather than the household, as is most often the case in poverty analysis. It categorizes deprivations in an age-appropriate manner allowing for differential analysis of children 0-4 and 5-17. By taking a holistic view of the child it promotes departure from compartmentalized, sector-based approaches.

"The multiple child deprivation approach allows governments to pinpoint exactly which specific deprivations are most important for children. And by looking at overlaps among dimensions, governments can assess whether a single sector or multi-sector approach would be more cost-effective in addressing child poverty. Knowing the exact deprivations children suffer allows precise identification of interventions that can more efficiently address their suffering", said Handa.

In some cases it becomes clear that even where income poverty is low children may be experiencing multiple deprivations. For example, in Gabon, income poverty is 6%, yet 30% of all children experience two or more deprivations. Across 28 of the countries studied monetary poverty is 50% while the rate of multidimensional deprivation in these countries is 68%, underlining the fact that income and deprivation poverty are conceptually different. More clear evidence that both should be used as complementary measures to identify the most vulnerable children and appropriate policy responses.

An in-depth study of Mali provides further examples of how MODA can improve policy and provision. The highest rates of child deprivation are found in Tombouctou and Kidal: regions which do not have the highest monetary poverty rates. Hence, the tool shows us where to start in order to combat child deprivation directly. The Mali analysis also shows that for children age 0-23 months the highest single deprivation is nutrition. For children age 5-14 years on the other hand the highest single deprivation is child labour. These clearly direct us to the sectors that need to be addressed to tackle age-specific child deprivation.

For further information please contact:

Dale Rutstein, Chief of Communication
UNICEF Office of Research - Innocenti
Tel: + 39 335 758 2585
Email: drutstein@unicef.org

Patrizia Faustini, Senior communication Assistant
UNICEF Office of Research - Innocenti
Tel: +39 055 203 3253
Email: pfaustini@unicef.org

World: Global Emergency Overview Snapshot 21-27 January 2015

27 January 2015 - 10:43am
Source: Assessment Capacities Project Country: Afghanistan, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guatemala, Guinea, Haiti, Honduras, India, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Liberia, Libya, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Namibia, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Uganda, Ukraine, World, Yemen

Snapshot 21-27 January

Nigeria: Boko Haram attacks continue, with Borno state capital Maiduguri and nearby military bases targeted on 25 January. Security forces pushed BH back from Maiduguri, but further attacks are expected. BH also raided villages in Michika local government area, Adamawa state. There are reports that BH has forbidden the use of vehicles in areas under its control.

Ukraine: 13–21 January has been the deadliest period since the ceasefire declaration of 5 September. The death toll had increased by 200 since the beginning of January, with at least 5,086 people killed in total as of 21 January. 10,948 people have been wounded. The number of IDPs has increased by almost 50,000 since 14 January.

Updated: 27/01/2015. Next update: 03/02/2015

Global Emergency Overview Web Interface

Democratic Republic of the Congo: Much aid, little long-term impact in DRC

27 January 2015 - 9:23am
Source: IRIN Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo

NAIROBI, 27 January 2015 (IRIN) - Aid agencies have sunk hundreds of millions of dollars into eastern Democratic Republic of Congo in the past two decades. But seeing little long-term impact or prospect of stability, some are now calling for an overhaul of the way aid is delivered in the long-troubled region.

Eastern DRC has been plagued by war and instability since 1994, when thousands of ethnic Hutus, including soldiers and militias responsible for the Rwandan genocide, poured over the border from Rwanda. Conflicts over land and resources have displaced millions of Congolese, many of them repeatedly.

The UN says there were about 2.7 million internally displaced persons (IDPs) in DRC in 2014, the majority of them in the east. Aid workers are also bracing for an expected military offensive by UN and government forces against a long-standing rebel group in North Kivu that will likely prompt tens of thousands more impoverished Congolese to flee their homes.

The calls for change come just as officials in DRC's North Kivu province press for the closure of IDP camps, and as donors cut back funding for a region whose intractable problems have been overshadowed by newer crises, from the war in Syria to the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. "Standard humanitarian responses are inadequate . when crisis and emergency are constant," the Norwegian Refugee Council wrote in a recent project paper. "They may even contribute to the breakdown of existing coping mechanisms."

The three-year NRC project, funded by the British government, is one of several initiatives seeking better understanding of how people experience and adapt to displacement. The research should help make aid groups more effective in helping both IDPs and host communities rebound from shocks.

Other humanitarian groups have similarly begun searching for ways to help entire communities better deal with the endless waves of violence and displacement, even as they scramble to keep the immediate victims alive.

The International Organization for Migration and the UN Refugee Agency, UNHCR, last year launched a pilot project to track displacement and profile IDPs living with host families in order to better comprehend their needs.

Such studies have produced few concrete answers so far. However, some directions in which they might lead seem clear, and aid workers hope that lessons learned in DRC could be instructive in other prolonged displacement crises, such as that in Syria.

“We can continue pouring money into spontaneous responses, but if people are going to be staying in a place for 25 years, it needs to be considered today what that means for public services and for inter-community relations,” Solenne Delga, emergency program manager for U.S.-based aid group Mercy Corps, told IRIN. “We can’t just continue doing emergency response in a context of prolonged conflict.”

Targeting

One push is to arrive at a common – and likely broader - definition of “vulnerability”, a category of need under which much humanitarian aid is allocated.

According to a report published this month by Mercy Corps and World Vision, another international relief organization, aid patterns have failed to reflect the fact that most IDPs in North Kivu – the focus of much of the ongoing research – have found refuge in host communities rather than in camps.

As a consequence, many of those IDPs have received little or no support, while the heavy burden on the host communities also has been neglected.

As well as depleting the meagre resources of the hosts, massive influxes of displaced persons have in places pushed up land prices, fuelled criminality and undermined social cohesion, said the report, which drew on scores of interviews and group discussions. Meanwhile, infrastructure in fast-growing urban areas such as the provincial capital Goma has failed to keep up.

“The humanitarian community has defined vulnerability criteria which mainly target IDPs only, and this leaves host communities, also affected by conflict and displacement, feeling increasingly deprived,” the report said. “This has led to frustration towards the international community as well as stoked inter-community tension.”

For Brooke Lauten, protection and advocacy adviser for the Norwegian Refugee Council, only when living long term with host communities is recognised as a fundamental right of IDPs will aid agencies be well placed to provide effective help in such situations.

“We need to figure out what integration looks like, whether it is in their place of origin or in a new location, and program toward that a bit more,” she said.

Resilience

With traditional forms of assistance, including food aid, emergency shelter and essential household items doing little to help people restore livelihoods or repair torn social networks, humanitarians are searching for new ways to boost the resilience of both individuals and communities.

According to Mercy Corps, one way is to extend services such as sanitation or education to communities surrounding IDP camps and to secure them for the longer term. This makes particular sense, the group argues, in urban areas likely to receive future waves of displacement.

In Goma, Mercy Corps has worked with donors and authorities to replace the trucking of water to IDP camps with a permanent, sustainable water supply system. “It is a question of looking at the absorption capacity of the host community to make sure these services will still be available to the community and are able to scale up in case of displacement,” Delga said. Moreover, if the camps are closed, the services will still be available to surrounding communities and any IDPs who settle there.

Mobility

The Mercy Corps/World Vision report also noted that, while conflict has disrupted traditional livelihoods, many of those affected by insecurity have developed their own flexible and innovative coping strategies.

These include commuting between their rural homes and urban areas, partly for reasons of security but also in order to secure diverse sources of income. This can result in family members spreading out geographically and redistributing tasks among themselves in ways very different from their previous, more settled rural lives.

Humanitarian actors should recognize that such “hybrid durable solutions” bolster economic development and social cohesion, and thus should be recognized and supported, the report said.

Finding ways to support the livelihoods of IDPs has become more urgent as funding for emergency programs dries up. Last year, the UN’s World Food Programme slashed its food aid to IDPs in camps. Relief groups said the sudden cuts forced some IDPs to adopt “negative coping strategies,” such as women entering into prostitution or families pulling children out of school.

Delga said UN agencies and others were trying to negotiate more access for IDPs to small plots of land around Goma so that they could grow their own food. Securing such access as well as other forms of livelihood support should be integrated into humanitarian responses, she argued.

Return

Still, finding so-called “durable solutions” for IDPs remains the holy grail for humanitarians, marking as it does an exit strategy for fatigued relief workers and their donors. Under international norms, durable solutions entail IDPs either returning home, integrating locally or resettling elsewhere.

However, according to a study released in December by the Brookings Institution, a Washington-based think tank, aid actors in eastern DRC have found it “completely impossible” to achieve any “real transition” toward such outcomes.

Congolese authorities strongly favour return as the best solution for IDPs, especially since UN and government forces routed the M23 movement, another major rebel group in North Kivu, at the end of 2013.

Many IDPs living near Goma did return to their home areas after M23’s demise. However, Mercy Corps said a significant number trickled back to Goma after failing to cope with the loss of property and services needed to find their feet.

The new reports said humanitarians could do much more to ensure those returning home succeed, for instance with timely assistance to rebuild homes and fields, establish basic services and regain access to their land.

Camp closures

With dozens of armed groups still at large in North Kivu, aid workers say many IDPs remain unwilling to go back to areas such as Masisi, where they feel insecure or might not be able to return to their fields.

Concern that IDPs may be forced back to unsafe areas were fanned in December when NorthKivu’s governor abruptly shut down a camp in Kawanja, in the province’s Rutshuru Territory, arguing that the camp had encouraged a culture of dependence and become a base for criminals.

Authorities have vowed to close all of the around 50 camps in the province though they have announced no timetable. Some of the camps - established to provide only short-term security - have been operating for years.

sg/am/ha

Democratic Republic of the Congo: Witnessing the Democratic Republic of the Congo Transform Vaccination Programs Firsthand

27 January 2015 - 1:28am
Source: Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo

Enrique Paz

When the Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) launched forty years ago, less than 5% of children worldwide received vaccines in their first year of life. Now, thanks to global efforts largely supported by Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, 83% of children receive vaccinations before their first birthday.

I believe statistics can be telling, but the best way to understand how vaccines reach children – and how they sometimes do not – is to look at what happens in the field. To give these numbers context, I recently spent a week in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) visiting health clinics and speaking with health care workers.

So, let’s rewind to the start of my trip. It begins in Makala, a small municipality in the capital of the DRC.

When my team and I arrived in Makala, we were taken to an old church that had been transformed into a health clinic. I peered through a small window that let in just enough light to reveal two beds, a nutrition scale, a registration desk and an immunization schedule hanging on the wall. Sitting on one bed, a patient received serum treatments for what was likely cholera.

Soon thereafter, four health workers greeted us and explained the nuts and bolts of their immunization program. They vaccinate people in the community twice a week and conduct outreach weekly at four sites. They also use several data management tools, including a simple innovation called the “Jeton.” When children miss a vaccination session, health workers deliver the Jeton (a slip of paper with the date of the next session) to those children’s homes, speak personally with their caregivers about the importance of vaccination and ask caregivers to bring the Jeton to the next session. This system has reduced dropouts significantly over the past months and also allows the Makala center to track the impact of their outreach.

Throughout my field visit to the center in Makala and to other centers across the country, challenges health systems face in the DRC were clear. The DRC still struggles with internal conflict, roads lack infrastructure and many health districts rely on unpaid or underpaid volunteers. These factors cause hurdles for immunization programs. The DRC is among the five countries with the fewest vaccinated children for DPT3 (243,879) and OPV3 (254,499).

Yet, I also left the DRC encouraged. Today, the vast majority of districts have over 80% DTP3 coverage, whereas only 15% of districts met this target in 2003. While the Makala center was small, it was well-managed and health care workers were organized and enthusiastic.

The DRC is an example of a place where a smart investment can go far. Gavi investment in the DRC has specifically emphasized rehabilitating health centers – like the one in Makala - and providing educational opportunities and salary supplements to healthcare workers. With Gavi seeking new and increased commitments from donor countries, it is as important as ever to relay the importance of these local immunization programs.

I hope to take another trip to the DRC soon. When I do, I hope to report even stronger programs, enhanced solutions and ultimately more children reached by lifesaving vaccines.

Democratic Republic of the Congo: DR Congo authorities stifle anti-Kabila protest

26 January 2015 - 12:14pm
Source: Agence France-Presse Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo

Kinshasa, DR Congo | AFP | Monday 26/1/2015 - 16:41 GMT | by Marthe BOSUANDOLE

A call by the Congolese opposition for peaceful demonstrations to oust President Joseph Kabila went unheeded Monday as authorities maintained a crippling block on text messages and social networks used to rally demonstrators.

Only about 50 people gathered at the headquarters of veteran opposition leader Etienne Tshisekedi's Union for Democracy and Social Progress (UPDS) in the capital Kinshasa, despite the party calling for mass protests.

The small crowd dispersed shortly before midday (1100 GMT) when several jeeploads of police arrived at the scene after authorities warned no opposition demonstrations would be permitted, AFP correspondents said.

The tropical city of 10 million people was mostly quiet Monday, a week after bloody protests over an electoral bill seen as enabling Kabila to hang onto power beyond the end of his mandate in 2016.

Following a Senate amendment, both house of parliament agreed Sunday to drop a controversial provision in the bill making any presidential poll contingent on a new voters' roll being drawn up after a census - a process that had been expected to take years.

But the final text of the legislation still leaves uncertainty over the timing of a series of elections in the troubled central African nation, including whether presidential polls will be held by the end of Kabila's second five-year term next year.

The bill sparked violent clashes between police and protesters in which 42 people were killed and dozens wounded, according to rights monitors.

The government denied that that demonstrators were killed by police, saying 11 looters were shot dead by private security guards and that a police officer was also killed.

Reacting to the violence, Tshisekedi, who has headed the opposition since the 1960-1997 regime of Mobutu Sese Seko, urged the Congolese people to take to the streets to oust Kabila's "dying regime".

Tshisekedi, 82, who is currently in Belgium for medical treatment, has accused Kabila's regime of flouting the constitution and engaging in acts of "provocation" that "risks installing a climate of generalised chaos."

On Monday, residents in Kinshasa were still barred from using mobile phones to send text messages or connect to the internet, part of a telecommunications clampdown imposed last week.

But life in the city had otherwise returned to normal, with schools reopened and the streets bustling with people and traffic.

The police and military presence around parliament -- focal point of last week's demonstrations -- had also been scaled back.

  • 'Tighter and tighter' -

The constitution bans Kabila from seeking re-election after two five-year terms.

Yet the law passed on Sunday still raises thorny issues in the vast, mineral-rich country, whose eastern provinces have been rocked by years of militia violence.

The state has less than two years to organise four sets of elections: local and provincial votes due this year, and then parliamentary polls and the presidential in 2016.

"The timetable is starting to get tighter and tighter," warned Thierry Vircoulon, central African project director for the International Crisis Group (ICG).

A diplomatic source predicted that, despite the concessions on the electoral bill, "hardliners in the regime will start again at the first chance they get" to try to keep Kabila in power.

Reception of Radio France Internationale (RFI) was scrambled Monday morning in Kinshasa.

Last week, the authorities suspended the French radio's broadcasts across DR Congo for 24 hours in the wake of Tshisekedi's call for demonstrations.

mj/hab/nb/cb

Democratic Republic of the Congo: Le feu et la pluie

26 January 2015 - 12:13pm
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo

L'histoire de Célestine

La pluie s'abat sur les ruines brûlées de ce qui était, il y a quelques semaines encore, un refuge pour des milliers de personnes déplacées dans la province instable du Nord-Kivu en République démocratique du Congo. Des douzaines d'anciens habitants, principalement des femmes et des enfants, se rassemblent autour de nous pour raconter leur dernière rencontre avec la peur, ainsi que leur fuite.

Parmi eux il y a une femme de 48 ans, mère de trois enfants, que j'appellerai Célestine. Pour se protéger de la pluie qui tombe ici à Rutshuru, à 70 kilomètres au nord de Goma, elle tient un petit bout de bâche en plastique au-dessus de la tête.

Célestine nous raconte qu'elle a vécu ici sur le site de Kiwanja pendant six ans; elle est arrivée après que les FDLR, groupe rebelle rwandais basé dans les provinces orientales du Congo, l'ont forcée à quitter son domicile, à Nyamitwitwi, de l'autre côté des montagnes à l'ouest. « Les FDLR violaient les femmes et tabassaient les hommes », dit-elle. « Les gens ont fui, et le village a été abandonné. »

Il y a quelques semaines, elle a dû fuir de nouveau. Le 2 décembre, les 2 300 résidents du site de Kiwanja, à Rutshuru, ont soudainement reçu l'ordre de partir et de rentrer chez eux. Moins d'un jour après, leurs abris de fortune ont été entièrement incendiés.

Célestine n'a plus de « chez-soi » où elle pourrait retourner. « Les FDLR continuent de faire la loi dans la région », explique-t-elle. « Ils sont toujours là. Le camp des FDLR est maintenant dans mes champs. Comment pourrais-je rentrer? Je ne peux pas demander aux rebelles de quitter mes champs. C'est impossible. »

Son mari et elle souffrent tous les deux de tuberculose. Ils ont trouvé refuge dans la cour d'une famille à proximité; ils dorment dehors à même le sol boueux avec leurs trois enfants. Mais ils ne sont pas seuls. Vingt-trois autres familles campent dans la même cour intérieure.

« Comment pourrais-je rentrer? Je ne peux pas demander aux rebelles de quitter mes champs. C'est impossible. »

Célestine continue d'être bouleversée par son expulsion récente. « Nous avons vu des policiers et des soldats entrer sur le site », dit-elle. « Ils nous ont dit de quitter le site sinon ils allaient nous frapper. Lorsque nous avons compris qu'il y avait une menace, nous avons commencé à rassembler nos affaires. Nous avons pris ce que nous avons pu. Le président du site nous a dit qu'en restant, nous risquions notre vie. »

Bon nombre des personnes qui vivaient dans le camp ont tout perdu. Certains étaient partis travailler dans les champs ou ramasser du bois pour le feu; leurs biens ont été volés ou détruits. « Le lendemain, des camions sont venus nous chercher », dit Célestine. « Certains sont montés dans les camions. Nous sommes restés. »

Comme Célestine, de nombreuses personnes ici n'ont plus de foyer. Et elles craignent de ne pas être en sécurité dans leur village.

« Nous ne pouvons retourner chez nous parce que la région est toujours occupée par les groupes armés.»

« Nous ne pouvons pas retourner chez nous parce que la région est toujours occupée par les groupes armés », dit Francine, qui est âgée de 26 ans et qui élève seule ses quatre enfants. « C'est la raison pour laquelle nous sommes ici. »

Célestine a appris à ses dépens la dangerosité de la situation. « À un moment donné, j'ai voulu rentrer chez moi avec ma fille », me dit-elle. « Lorsque nous sommes arrivées, ils nous ont violées. J'ai réussi à m'enfuir avec ma fille et j'ai décidé que je ne quitterai plus jamais le Kiwanja. »

Les organisations humanitaires distribuaient de la nourriture et aidaient, sous d'autres formes, les résidents du site de Kiwanja, avant sa fermeture. Il était déjà difficile pour les personnes de nourrir leurs enfants et de les envoyer à l'école. Maintenant, cela est presque impossible.

« Certaines d'entre nous travaillaient dans les champs de la population locale pour cueillir le nzombe et le vendre », dit Francine, utilisant un terme local pour désigner les feuilles de manioc. « D'autres se rendaient dans les zones occupées par les FDLR pour acheter du charbon de bois, et elles revenaient. Mais elles couraient le risque d'être violées. »

Célestine confirme que les personnes ici ont besoin d'aide. « Lors la destruction du site, nous avons perdu nos ustensiles de cuisine, nos bâches en plastique et nos couvertures. »

Plus de 40 000 personnes déplacées ont volontairement quitté les camps autour de Goma depuis la fin de 2013, essentiellement parce que la paix a été restaurée dans les régions où elles sont retournées. Mais beaucoup d'autres, soit plus de 210 000 personnes au dernier recensement, vivent toujours dans les 60 installations de personnes déplacées réparties dans la province du Nord-Kivu.

« Nous demandons au gouvernement d'assurer la sécurité de nos villages afin que nous puissions rentrer », dit Célestine. « Nous n'avons pas besoin de séjourner dans un site (pour personnes déplacées). Le gouvernement doit mettre un terme à la violence dans nos villages afin que nous puissions de nouveau accéder à nos champs. »

Ce soir, Célestine dormira encore dehors sous la pluie. Elle rêvera qu'elle rentre chez elle.

Democratic Republic of the Congo: Les FDLR dans la ligne de mire des Nations Unies

26 January 2015 - 12:02pm
Source: IRIN Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda

Nairobi, 26 janvier 2015 (IRIN) - Au cours des prochains jours, une unité spécialisée de la Mission militaire des Nations Unies en République démocratique du Congo doit lancer des opérations contre les Forces démocratiques de libération du Rwanda (FDLR) en collaboration avec l’armée congolaise. Les FDLR sont un groupe rebelle qui sème le chaos depuis 20 ans dans l’est du pays.

Plus tôt ce mois-ci, le Conseil de sécurité a autorisé l’opération, qui sera menée par la Brigade d’intervention de la Mission des Nations Unies pour la stabilisation en RDC (MONUSCO).

IRIN présente certains éléments clés relatifs à l’offensive à venir contre les FDLR.

• Les FDLR ont été créées par des anciens combattants des milices hutues Interahamwe et des ex-Forces armées rwandaises (FAR), qui sont responsables d’une grande partie des meurtres commis pendant le génocide rwandais de 1994.

• Le groupe est accusé d’une série de crimes odieux, et notamment de meurtres et de viols à grande échelle. Plusieurs de ses leaders ont été inculpés pour des crimes de guerre, dont certains en lien avec le génocide.

• Les FDLR, qui rassemblaient à un moment donné quelque 20 000 combattants rwandais, ne comptent plus que quelques milliers d’hommes. Les Hutus congolais sont particulièrement nombreux dans leurs rangs. Au cours de l’année qui vient de se terminer, des milliers de combattants et leurs personnes à charge se sont rendus dans le cadre du processus de démobilisation et sont retournés au Rwanda.

• À l’exception d’une poignée d’hommes, les combattants des FDLR ont ignoré la date limite pour le désarmement, qui était fixée au 2 janvier 2015. Le Conseil de sécurité des Nations Unies a alors décidé d’autoriser l’opération.

• Ce n’est pas la première fois qu’une offensive est menée contre les FDLR. En 2009, les forces de la RDC et du Rwanda avaient lancé une attaque contre le groupe avec le soutien des Nations Unies. L’attaque avait eu des conséquences désastreuses : près d’un million de civils avaient en effet dû fuir leurs foyers. Des groupes de défense des droits de l’homme ont accusé l’armée congolaise d’avoir commis des violations généralisées contre des civils, et notamment des centaines de meurtres.

• Les combattants qui appartiennent toujours aux FDLR vivent dans des régions montagneuses couvertes de forêts et des zones marécageuses difficiles d’accès dont la superficie équivaut plus ou moins à celle de la Belgique. Ils sont souvent mêlés avec les civils. L’offensive risque d’en être grandement compliquée.

• À l’approche de cette offensive anticipée, on s’inquiète à nouveau des retombées humanitaires qu’elle pourrait avoir, en particulier en ce qui concerne l’accès aux populations dans le besoin.

• La position de la Tanzanie, qui a fourni des soldats pour la Brigade d’intervention, est ambiguë. Plus tôt ce mois-ci, Jakaya Kikwete a dit qu’il appuyait l’offensive alors qu’il avait auparavant appelé le Rwanda à tenter de négocier avec les FDLR. En 2014, son gouvernement avait décrit les membres du groupe comme des « combattants de la liberté ».

am/rh – gd/amz

Uganda: Uganda rebel Ongwen: victim turned killer

26 January 2015 - 10:42am
Source: Agence France-Presse Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda

Kampala, Uganda | AFP | Monday 26/1/2015 - 15:14 GMT

Abducted by gunmen as a 10-year-old boy on his way to school, Dominic Ongwen rose to become one of the most feared commanders in Uganda's brutal Lord's Resistance Army (LRA).

The former child soldier, now in his mid-30s, made his first appearance before the International Criminal Court (ICC) on Monday accused of war crimes and crimes against humanity.

He was transferred to the ICC in The Hague last week following his surrender to US special forces earlier this month in the Central African Republic.

Ongwen, known as the "White Ant", is the first leader of the brutal Ugandan rebel army led by the fugitive Joseph Kony to appear before the ICC, created to try the world's worst crimes.

The son of school teachers, he was abducted as a child before being forced into the rebel army and becoming a willing perpetrator of violence.

He rose swiftly through the LRA ranks, quickly being singled out for his murderous loyalty and tactical ability and taking command of one of the army's four brigades.

Ongwen led quick and lethal raids -- carrying out massacres, rapes, mutilations and abductions -- before disappearing into the bush.

Ongwen's men -- with trademark dreadlocks, mismatched uniforms and AK-47 rifles fitted with bayonets -- carried out thousands of abductions of children.

  • Punishment raids -

Boys were taken to be soldiers or porters, girls were taken as sex slaves.

They also excelled in punishment raids where they would slice the lips and ears off victims as a grim calling card.

Under the leadership of self-proclaimed prophet Kony, the LRA is accused of kidnapping tens of thousands of children during its nearly three-decade long insurgency.

Between 2002 and 2003, Ongwen is thought to have directed bloody campaigns in northern Uganda that butchered or abducted thousands.

He is also accused of playing a central role in revenge attacks on civilians in the troubled Democratic Republic of Congo.

In recent years, however, he was reportedly sidelined after falling out with Kony over his execution of another commander.

Hailing from the northern Ugandan district of Gulu, Ongwen was known "as much for his volatile nature as his bravery", according to the LRA Crisis Tracker, which monitors the rebels.

Years of psychological trauma are also said to have taken their toll with Ongwen earning a reputation for flying into murderous rages.

Mark Kersten, a London-based academic focusing on international justice, described Ongwen as "both a victim and a perpetrator of international crimes" and said efforts to prosecute him could raise difficult questions.

"When is a victim a perpetrator and a perpetrator a victim? The line is much more murky than we tend to assume," he said.

bur-pjm/sb/txw

Central African Republic: Central African Republic: Humanitarian Snapshot (as of January 2015)

26 January 2015 - 10:41am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo

2.7 million people are still in need based on 2015’s humanitarian Strategic Response Plan for the Central African Republic. The relative severity requirement by sub-prefecture shows that the humanitarian situation one year after the outbreak of the crisis is still important and continuing to be despite the progress of humanitarian actors deployment on the field and sectoral response already made over of 2014.

Uganda: Un chef de la rébellion ougandaise LRA pour la première fois devant la CPI

26 January 2015 - 10:39am
Source: Agence France-Presse Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo, Uganda

La Haye, Pays-Bas | AFP | lundi 26/01/2015 - 14:38 GMT

par Maude BRULARD

Dominic Ongwen, l'un des principaux chefs de la sanguinaire rébellion ougandaise de la LRA, a comparu lundi pour la première fois devant la Cour pénale internationale (CPI), qui le soupçonne de crimes de guerre et de crimes contre l'humanité.

Vêtu d'un costume bleu, d'une chemise blanche et d'une cravate à carreaux dans les mêmes tons, Dominic Ongwen a écouté le début de l'audience de manière attentive et calme.

A la demande de la juge Ekaterina Trendafilova, ce dirigeant de l'Armée de résistance du Seigneur (LRA) a confirmé son identité : "Mon nom est Dominic Ongwen et je suis un citoyen de l'Ouganda, du nord de l'Ouganda".

Cette audience intervient quelques jours après le transfert à La Haye de M. Ongwen, qui s'était constitué prisonnier auprès des forces spéciales américaines en Centrafrique début janvier, une reddition qui a porté un coup sévère à la LRA.

Commandée depuis sa création il y a une trentaine d'années par Joseph Kony, la LRA a depuis semé la terreur dans plusieurs pays d'Afrique centrale.

S'exprimant en ancholi, la langue utilisée par la LRA, Dominic Ongwen a rappelé qu'il avait lui-même été enlevé par les soldats de Joseph Kony.

"J'ai été emmené dans la brousse quand j'avais 14 ans", a-t-il ajouté, soulignant avoir été un combattant "jusqu'à son arrivée à la Cour".

"Je voudrais remercier Dieu pour avoir créé le Paradis et la Terre, avec tous ceux qui sont sur la Terre", a également lancé cet homme aux cheveux courts et au visage fatigué.

Premier membre de la LRA à comparaître devant la CPI, Dominic Ongwen était recherché depuis près de dix ans par la Cour pour crimes contre l'humanité et crimes de guerre. Les Etats-Unis offraient cinq millions de dollars pour sa capture.

-60.000 enfants enlevés-

Créée aux alentours de 1987, la LRA opérait alors dans le nord de l'Ouganda, où elle a multiplié les exactions (enlèvements d'enfants transformés en soldats et en esclaves, mutilations et massacres de civils).

Elle en a été chassée au milieu des années 2000 par l'armée ougandaise, avant de s'éparpiller dans les forêts équatoriales des pays alentour, dont la Centrafrique.

Selon l'ONU, la rébellion a, depuis sa création, tué plus de 100.000 personnes en Afrique centrale et enlevé plus de 60.000 enfants.

La juge Trendafilova a lu ses droits à Dominic Ongwen, lui rappelant qu'il pouvait suivre les procédures dans une langue qu'il comprend.

M. Ongwen est accusé de sept crimes contre l'humanité et crimes de guerre: il est poursuivi notamment pour meurtre, réduction en esclavage et traitements cruels.

La prochaine comparution de Dominic Ongwen doit avoir lieu le 24 août, pour des audiences destinées à évaluer les preuves rassemblées par le procureur et décider si un procès doit être tenu ou non.

Pour la procureure, le transfert de Dominic Ongwen rapproche l'accusation un peu plus de son objectif, à savoir "faire cesser le règne de la terreur imposé par la LRA dans la région des Grands Lacs".

Chef des opérations de la LRA, troisième dans l'échelle de commandement de la milice, Dominic Ongwen aurait été enlevé alors qu'il rentrait de l'école.

Des victimes de la LRA ont raconté les rites initiatiques brutaux de la milice, des enrôlés de force contraints de mordre et matraquer amis et parents à mort, de boire du sang.

En dépit de sa jeunesse, il avait très vite été repéré pour sa loyauté dans le crime, son courage au combat et ses qualités de tacticien.

Les ONG ont néanmoins souligné que le passé de Dominic Ongwen pourrait constituer des circonstances atténuantes, si un jugement de culpabilité devait être rendu à son encontre.

"La CPI l'accuse en partie des même crimes qui ont été commis à son encontre", a déclaré un chercheur spécialiste de la LRA, Ledio Cakaj.

Joseph Kony reste le dernier dirigeant de la milice toujours en liberté, selon l'armée ougandaise. La LRA, qui mêle notamment références chrétiennes, islamiques et croyances Acholi, ne compterait plus que 150 hommes environ.

mbr/cjo/dom

World: Género y Paz Nº 4 - Enero 2015

26 January 2015 - 8:08am
Source: School for a Culture of Peace Country: Colombia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Iraq, Niger, Serbia, Syrian Arab Republic, Ukraine, World

En este número destacamos:

  • Violencia contra las mujeres por Boko Haram en Nigeria

  • Impactos de género del conflicto en Ucrania

  • Violencia contra personas LGTBI en conflictos armados

  • Participación de organizaciones de mujeres en las negociaciones de paz de Colombia

Impacto de los conflictos

ISIS

Nuevos informes y testimonios recogidos por medios de comunicación confirman el grave impacto de la violencia sexual perpetrada por el grupo armado Estado Islámico (ISIS) en sus áreas de influencia en Iraq y Siria. Una reciente investigación de Amnistía Internacional (AI) concluyó que las mujeres y niñas de la minoría yazidí secuestradas en agosto por la organización en el norte de Iraq han sido víctimas de brutales abusos, incluyendo torturas, violaciones y matrimonios forzados.

El informe de AI detalla que muchas de ellas han sido sometidas a una situación de esclavitud sexual, siendo vendidas u ofrecidas como “regalos” a combatientes de ISIS o a personas del entorno de apoyo al grupo. Se calcula que centenares y hasta miles de personas fueron capturadas por el grupo en la zona de Sinjar, de las cuales unas 300 han logrado escapar. En sus testimonios, algunas de ellas subrayan que en medio de la desesperación muchas mujeres en cautiverio han buscado el suicidio como vía para escapar de las agresiones.

En declaraciones a la BBC, supervivientes de ISIS han precisado que tras algunos intentos, muchas veces frustrados, algunas han conseguido quitarse la vida. Asimismo, han detallado las dinámicas del mercado de esclavas puesto en marcha por ISIS, que incluso habría elaborado un panfleto (con formato preguntas y respuestas) sobre cómo tratarlas en el que se evidencia que las consideran como una “propiedad” de los milicianos.

AI destacó que las supervivientes se ven doblemente afectadas, ya que además de sufrir un grave trauma como consecuencia de los abusos, padecen por la pérdida de familiares, asesinados o aún secuestrados por ISIS. Paralelamente, medios de prensa y el gobierno iraquí informaron en diciembre que ISIS habría ejecutado a 150 mujeres, algunas de ellas embarazadas, que se negaron a casarse con milicianos del grupo radical. La masacre se habría producido en Fallujah, en la provincia de Anbar, y las víctimas habrían sido arrojadas a fosas comunes.

Previamente, ISIS había ejecutado en público, en Mosul, a la activista por los derechos de las mujeres Samira Salih al-Nuaimi, quien había criticado al grupo en las redes sociales. En este contexto, el gobierno alemán anunció a finales de diciembre que planea la apertura de un centro de ayuda a las víctimas de violencia sexual perpetrada por los yihadistas. Se espera que la institución acoja a un centenar de mujeres procedentes de Iraq y Siria.

World: Gender and Peace No.4 - January 2015

26 January 2015 - 8:02am
Source: School for a Culture of Peace Country: Colombia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Iraq, Niger, Serbia, Syrian Arab Republic, Ukraine, World

This issue features:

  • Violence against women committed by Boko Haram in Nigeria

  • Impacts on gender of the conflict in Ukraine

  • Violence against LGTBI people in armed conflict

  • Participation of women’s organisations in peace negotiations in Colombia

Impact of conflicts

ISIS

New reports and accounts collected by the media confirm the serious impact of the sexual violence perpetrated by the armed group Islamic State (ISIS) in its areas of influence in Iraq and Syria. A recent investigation conducted by Amnesty International (AI) concluded that the Yazidi minority women and girls abducted by the organisation in northern Iraq in August have been victims of brutal abuse, including torture, rape and forced marriage. The AI report details that many of them have been subjected to sexual slavery, sold or offered as “gifts” to ISIS combatants and to people supporting the group.

It is estimated that hundreds and possibly thousands of people were captured by the group in the region of Sinjar, of which around 300 have managed to escape. In their testimonies, some say that in the midst of despair, many women have attempted suicide in order to escape their situation. Speaking to the BBC, ISIS survivors have indicated that after several attempts, which are usually unsuccessful, some have managed to take their own lives.

They also detailed the dynamics of the slave market set up by ISIS, which even created a pamphlet in question-and answer format on how to treat them, evidently considering them the “property” of the militants. Amnesty International said that the survivors are doubly affected: in addition to severe trauma as a result of their abuse, they suffer from the loss of relatives killed or kidnapped by ISIS. The Iraqi media and government said in December that the radical group had executed 150 women, some of them pregnant, after refusing to marry its militiamen. The massacre reportedly occurred in Fallujah, in Anbar governorate, and the victims were buried in mass graves. Previously, in Mosul, ISIS publicly executed women’s rights activist Samira Salih al-Nuaimi after she criticised the group on social networks. In this context, the German government announced in late December that it is planning to open a support centre for victims of sexual violence perpetrated by jihadists. The institution is expected to receive around 100 women coming from Iraq and Syria.