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Democratic Republic of the Congo: DRC: Katanga measles epidemic keeps worsening

1 September 2015 - 11:42am
Source: Médecins Sans Frontières Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo

In June, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) raised the alarm about the measles epidemic that has been raging in Katanga Province, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) since March. The situation has now deteriorated further and sufficient resources are lacking.

With more than 20,000 cases and 300 deaths officially reported in 2015, the measles outbreak in Katanga is the largest since 2011, when MSF immunised 2.1 million children against the disease.

"In June, 10 health districts out of the 68 in Katanga were facing an epidemic situation. Today that number has more than doubled and continues to grow, while the Congolese government has still not made any official declaration about the epidemic," says Jean-Guy Vataux, MSF Head of Mission in DRC.

The delay in acknowledging the gravity of the epidemic may have held up the release of funds, hindering a timely response. The United Nations finally announced on August 19 the disbursement of $2.4 million to help the government and humanitarian actors responding to the outbreak. But Jean-Guy Vataux warns that money alone is not enough. "We need more actors in the field. MSF remains one of only two organisations in Katanga today involved in treating measles and immunising children against it."

MSF teams are currently deployed in more than 10 health zones in Katanga, supporting local health authorities. During the last three months, MSF treated more than 20,000 measles-infected patients in 5 hospitals and approximately 100 health posts, and also vaccinated above 300,000 children. Measles is now almost endemic in the region and particularly dangerous for the very young already exposed to other pathologies such as malaria and acute malnutrition.

"Every day we discover new deaths related to measles that have not been accounted for. The absence of free care in public health facilities often discourages mothers from taking their sick children," says Augustin Ngoyi, MSF coordinator of the response. "In a village of 500 inhabitants two hours’ drive from Kabalo, more than 30 children under 5 years of age have died in the last 2 months. Their little graves are still visible in the cemetery. This represents one third of this age group in the community."

The geography of Katanga, with challenging access to some remote villages in the heart of the forest, is the main factor limiting the implementation of vaccination campaigns. “The vaccine against measles is very effective but it is not well suited to this type of environment," says Aurore Taconet, MSF vaccination referent in Paris. "It requires a thorough cold chain that is difficult to maintain in such conditions, and a second booster dose at least one month after the first. Such constraints mean huge needs in terms of equipment and human resources, and therefore a significant cost. "

Vaccination against measles and other diseases is normally part of the routine immunisation performed in Congolese health centres. Catch-up campaigns to raise the proportion of vaccinated children are also organised every year. But Dr Michel Janssens, MSF medical coordinator on site, says that many children seem to be missing out. "An epidemic of this magnitude should not occur if the reported immunisation coverage rates against measles in Katanga are accurate," he says. "It would be more pertinent and economical for the government and its donors to improve the efficiency of the routine immunisation program instead of launching highly expensive emergency responses once the situation is catastrophic."

Democratic Republic of the Congo: DRC: Katanga measles epidemic keeps

1 September 2015 - 11:42am
Source: Médecins Sans Frontières Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo

In June, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) raised the alarm about the measles epidemic that has been raging in Katanga Province, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) since March. The situation has now deteriorated further and sufficient resources are lacking.

With more than 20,000 cases and 300 deaths officially reported in 2015, the measles outbreak in Katanga is the largest since 2011, when MSF immunised 2.1 million children against the disease.

"In June, 10 health districts out of the 68 in Katanga were facing an epidemic situation. Today that number has more than doubled and continues to grow, while the Congolese government has still not made any official declaration about the epidemic," says Jean-Guy Vataux, MSF Head of Mission in DRC.

The delay in acknowledging the gravity of the epidemic may have held up the release of funds, hindering a timely response. The United Nations finally announced on August 19 the disbursement of $2.4 million to help the government and humanitarian actors responding to the outbreak. But Jean-Guy Vataux warns that money alone is not enough. "We need more actors in the field. MSF remains one of only two organisations in Katanga today involved in treating measles and immunising children against it."

MSF teams are currently deployed in more than 10 health zones in Katanga, supporting local health authorities. During the last three months, MSF treated more than 20,000 measles-infected patients in 5 hospitals and approximately 100 health posts, and also vaccinated above 300,000 children. Measles is now almost endemic in the region and particularly dangerous for the very young already exposed to other pathologies such as malaria and acute malnutrition.

"Every day we discover new deaths related to measles that have not been accounted for. The absence of free care in public health facilities often discourages mothers from taking their sick children," says Augustin Ngoyi, MSF coordinator of the response. "In a village of 500 inhabitants two hours’ drive from Kabalo, more than 30 children under 5 years of age have died in the last 2 months. Their little graves are still visible in the cemetery. This represents one third of this age group in the community."

The geography of Katanga, with challenging access to some remote villages in the heart of the forest, is the main factor limiting the implementation of vaccination campaigns. “The vaccine against measles is very effective but it is not well suited to this type of environment," says Aurore Taconet, MSF vaccination referent in Paris. "It requires a thorough cold chain that is difficult to maintain in such conditions, and a second booster dose at least one month after the first. Such constraints mean huge needs in terms of equipment and human resources, and therefore a significant cost. "

Vaccination against measles and other diseases is normally part of the routine immunisation performed in Congolese health centres. Catch-up campaigns to raise the proportion of vaccinated children are also organised every year. But Dr Michel Janssens, MSF medical coordinator on site, says that many children seem to be missing out. "An epidemic of this magnitude should not occur if the reported immunisation coverage rates against measles in Katanga are accurate," he says. "It would be more pertinent and economical for the government and its donors to improve the efficiency of the routine immunisation program instead of launching highly expensive emergency responses once the situation is catastrophic."

Burundi: UNHCR - Burundi situation - 2015 Income (USD) as of 1 September 2015

1 September 2015 - 11:19am
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania

United Republic of Tanzania: Burundi Refugee Situation - Tanzania: Places of origin of registered Burundian refugees (as of 27 August 2015)

1 September 2015 - 11:16am
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, United Republic of Tanzania

Burundi: Burundi Situation: Displacement of Burundians into Neighbouring Countries (as of 28 August 2015)

1 September 2015 - 10:45am
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Zambia

Burundi: UNHCR Regional Update 14 - Burundi Situation, 28 August 2015

1 September 2015 - 10:09am
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Zambia

HIGHLIGHTS

  • A total of 193,357 Burundian refugees and asylum-seekers have arrived in the neighbouring countries of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), the United Republic of Tanzania, Rwanda, as well as Uganda and Zambia since April 2015. The situation in Burundi remains volatile with continued incidents of sporadic violence in the country.

  • The new cabinet of Burundi’s President Pierre Nkurunziza was sworn in on 25 August which included some members of the opposition. Other members of the opposition said the ministers had no legitimacy after disputed elections.

Democratic Republic of the Congo: Statement from the nineteenth Southern Africa Regional Climate Outlook Forum (SARCOF-19), Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of Congo, 26 – 28 August 2015

1 September 2015 - 8:16am
Source: Southern African Development Community Country: Angola, Botswana, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, South Africa, United Republic of Tanzania, Zimbabwe

SUMMARY
The bulk of the southern tier states of continental Southern African Development Community (SADC) is likely to receive normal to below-normal rainfall for the period October to December (OND) 2015 and the January to March (JFM) 2016. However, most Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) northern Angola, Tanzania, north-eastern Zambia, northern Malawi, northern Mozambique, the Islands States of Mauritius, Seychelles and eastern-most Madagascar are more likely to receive normal to above-normal rainfall. Northernmost of Tanzania and Madagascar are more likely to receive above-normal to normal rainfall.

THE NINETEENTH SOUTHERN AFRICA REGIONAL CLIMATE OUTLOOK FORUM

The Nineteenth Southern Africa Regional Climate Outlook Forum was held in Kinshasa,
DRC from 26 to 28 August 2015 to present a consensus outlook for the 2015/2016 rainfall season over the SADC region. Climate scientists from the SADC National Meteorological and/or Hydrological Services (NMHSs), the SADC Climate Services Centre (CSC) formulated this outlook. Additional products from other global climate prediction centres namely, European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecast (ECMWF), International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI), UK Met Office and Bureau of Meteorology, Australia (BoM) were considered in formulation of the consensus seasonal climate outlook. This outlook covers the major rainfall season in SADC countries, i.e. from October 2015 to March 2016. The outlooks are presented in overlapping three-monthly periods as follows: October-November- December (OND); November-December-January (NDJ); December-January-February (DJF); and January-February-March (JFM)

Central African Republic: Central African Republic Situation: Regional Refugee Response Plan (RRRP) Monthly Regional Overview - July 2015

1 September 2015 - 5:32am
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo

REGIONAL SITUATION ANALYSIS

In the month of July, new CAR refugees have been registered in Cameroon and the Republic of the Congo (RoC), amounting to a total of 468,511. At the same time, the situation of internal displacement has seen a decrease in the number of IDPs (368,8591).

Even if the violence has diminished, security remains volatile and unpredictable and continues hindering the work of relief organizations, including in the capital city Bangui2 and in neighbouring countries. In Chad, further to the arrest in Sarh of two suspected members of BH, local authorities have restricted the access to the main market in Maro. In Cameroon, after a military operation of MINUSCA at the border to dismantle armed groups positions, insecurity has raised and rebel groups have reportedly been seen in Cameroon (Bombe-Bakari,Gbiti, Garoua Boulai).

In July, the new UN’s Humanitarian Coordinator, Mr Aurelien Agbenonci, took officially his functions stating that if the shortfall for aid will not be met, the UN “won’t be able to continue humanitarian activities until the end of the year”. In fact only 31% of the UN humanitarian appeal for the CAR and only 18% funding for the RRRP have been received.

On 22 July the CAR’s highest court has overturned a decision by the transitional parliament that would have barred tens of thousands of refugees who had fled to neighbouring countries from voting in October’s presidential election.

In July WFP targeted some 981,000 beneficiaries across the five countries, however, urgent resources are needed as WFP expects breaks in the food supply pipeline affecting several commodities by the end of August.

United Republic of Tanzania: Burundian Refugees in Tanzania - Daily Statistics (30 Aug 2015)

1 September 2015 - 4:01am
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Rwanda, Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania

World: Preventing conflict in Central Africa: ECCAS caught between ambitions, challenges and reality

1 September 2015 - 2:25am
Source: Institute for Security Studies Country: Angola, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, World

Summary

The Economic Community of Central African States (ECCAS) has a long way to go in preventing regional crises. Many challenges remain in making the infrastructure (especially the Central African Early Warning Mechanism and the Central African Multinational Force) operational and effective, and there is a gap between ambition and reality.

These obstacles and challenges include ECCAS’ highly centralised and state-focused structure; a narrow, militaristic approach to security issues; and the wider institutional setting. Matters of responsibility in relation to the African Union also remain unresolved. With regard to the cross-border dimension of security issues and the high number of upcoming elections in the region, ECCAS’ participation in maintaining peace appears crucial.

About the author:

Angela Meyer is a researcher and expert on regional security cooperation in Central Africa. She is a board director and founding member of the Organisation for International Dialogue and Conflict Management (IDC) in Vienna, and holds a PhD in political sciences from Sciences-Po Paris and Vienna University. in 2015, Angela Meyer was a guest researcher in the Conflict Prevention and Risk Analysis division at the Institute for Security Studies.

World: WFP Aviation Operational Snapshot, January - June 2015

1 September 2015 - 1:28am
Source: World Food Programme Country: Afghanistan, Central African Republic, Chad, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Kenya, Liberia, Mauritania, Nepal, Niger, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, World, Yemen

Between January and June 2015, UNHAS operated flights in 17 countries, serving more than 300 scheduled destinations.

More than 3,400 mt of cargo airlifted — One third transported in response to the EVD outbreak

Highlights

To reach the most vulnerable in some of the world's most remote and challenging locations, airdrops for life-saving food deliveries are organized as a last resort. In May, the World Food Programme (WFP) carried out its first successful airdrop of vegetable oil in South Sudan.

WFP Aviation arranges airlifts to ensure vital humanitarian cargo reaches populations in need promptly. In April, following escalation of violence in Yemen, essential medical items were airlifted from the United Arab Emirates to Sana’a (via Djibouti) on behalf of the humanitarian community.

Democratic Republic of the Congo: CPI : Procès de Bosco Ntaganda pour crimes en RD Congo

1 September 2015 - 12:49am
Source: Human Rights Watch Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo

La Procureure de la Cour pénale internationale et les tribunaux nationaux devraient mettre fin à l’impunité qui persiste

(La Haye) – L’ouverture du procès de Bosco Ntaganda le 2 septembre 2015 devant la Cour pénale internationale (CPI) montre que les individus soupçonnés de crimes internationaux graves en fuite peuvent un jour être traduits en justice, a déclaré Human Rights Watch aujourd’hui.

La CPI a délivré en 2006 son premier mandat d’arrêt sous scellés à l’encontre de Ntaganda, à l’époque commandant rebelle, pour des crimes qui auraient été commis dans l’est de la République démocratique du Congo, mais il a échappé à la justice et a continué à commander des troupes responsables d’atrocités jusqu’à sa reddition en 2013. La comparution de Ntaganda devant la CPI est une victoire pour les victimes, pour leurs familles, ainsi que pour les militants des droits humains à travers la RD Congo, a souligné Human Rights Watch.

« Voir Bosco Ntaganda sur le banc des accusés envoie un message fort aux autres individus impliqués dans des exactions graves au Congo, les avertissant qu’un jour ils risquent, eux aussi, d’être traduits en justice », a relevé Géraldine Mattioli-Zeltner, directrice de plaidoyer au Programme de justice internationale de Human Rights Watch. « Le long délai qui s’est écoulé avant que Ntaganda ne soit finalement amené devant la CPI témoigne du besoin d’action internationale concertée dans ce type d’affaires. »

Ntaganda est inculpé de 13 chefs de crimes de guerre et de 5 chefs de crimes contre l’humanité, pour meurtre et tentative de meurtre, attaques contre des civils, viol et esclavage sexuel, enrôlement et utilisation d'enfants soldats, pillage et persécution, perpétrés dans le district de l’Ituri, dans le nord-est de la RD Congo en 2002 et 2003.

En 2012 et 2013, le Bureau du Procureur a élargi les charges portées contre Ntaganda, lesquelles ne portaient initialement que sur l’enrôlement et l’utilisation d'enfants soldats. Les chefs d’accusation actuels sont davantage représentatifs des crimes graves que Ntaganda et les troupes se trouvant sous son commandement auraient perpétrés en Ituri et ils ouvriront la porte à la justice pour davantage de victimes et leurs familles, a fait remarquer Human Rights Watch.

Au cours des années qui ont suivi les hostilités en Ituri, Ntaganda a rejoint d’autres groupes armés et a continué à diriger des soldats impliqués dans des exactions graves dans les provinces des Kivus, dans l’est de la RD Congo. En janvier 2009, dans le cadre d’un accord de paix mettant fin à une précédente rébellion, le gouvernement congolais l'a nommé général au sein de l'armée congolaise. Il est demeuré à ce poste jusqu’à ce que lui et quelques autres prennent la tête d’une mutinerie et créent un nouveau groupe rebelle, le M23, fin mars 2012.

À la suite de luttes internes au sein du M23, et après avoir apparemment perdu le soutien de ses alliés au Rwanda voisin, Ntaganda s’est livré volontairement à l’ambassade des États-Unis à Kigali (Rwanda) en mars 2013 et a demandé son transfèrement à la CPI.

Le procès de Ntaganda devant la CPI ne porte que sur les crimes qui auraient été commis en Ituri, les atrocités perpétrées par les troupes se trouvant sous son commandement dans le Nord-Kivu n’ayant en grande partie donné lieu à aucune action judiciaire devant la CPI ou devant des tribunaux nationaux.

Les recherches menées pendant de nombreuses années par Human Rights Watch, le Groupe d’experts des Nations Unies et d’autres organisations montrent clairement que de hauts responsables politiques et militaires de la RD Congo, du Rwanda et de l’Ouganda ont apporté un soutien financier, militaire et politique important à des groupes armés violents dans les provinces de l’Ituri et des Kivus, alors qu’ils étaient pleinement conscients que ces groupes armés se livraient à des violations généralisées du droit international humanitaire et des droits humains.

Pour contribuer de manière significative à la justice en RD Congo, la Procureure de la CPI devrait aller au-delà des procédures engagées à l’encontre de commandants rebelles locaux et aussi enquêter sur le rôle joué par de hauts responsables politiques et militaires ougandais, rwandais et congolais dans les crimes perpétrés, a souligné Human Rights Watch.

D’autres dirigeants rebelles du M23 ayant un lourd passé de violations graves des droits humains se trouvent actuellement au Rwanda et en Ouganda et n’ont jamais été traduits en justice. Si l’on ne poursuit pas les autres commandants auteurs d’exactions lors de procès équitables et crédibles, la commission de futures exactions semble plus probable.

Un mandat d’arrêt de la CPI en rapport avec la RD Congo demeure en attente d’exécution : celui délivré à l’encontre de Sylvestre Mudacumura, le commandant militaire d’un autre groupe armé responsable d’exactions généralisées dans l’est de la RD Congo, notamment de massacres ethniques, de viols et d’incendie d’habitations. Mudacumura est toujours en fuite dans l’est de la RD Congo. Les autorités congolaises et les Casques bleus de l’ONU en RD Congo devraient redoubler leurs efforts pour l’arrêter et le transférer à la CPI, a déclaré Human Rights Watch.

« Le chemin jalonné de sang qui a mené Ntaganda à la CPI témoigne du très lourd tribut que paient les civils à l’impunité », a noté Géraldine Mattioli-Zeltner. « La CPI et les autorités congolaises devraient multiplier leurs efforts et collaborer pour arrêter et traduire en justice d’autres responsables de crimes graves et leurs alliés complices de ces crimes. »

Democratic Republic of the Congo: ICC: Trial of Bosco Ntaganda for Congo Crimes

1 September 2015 - 12:36am
Source: Human Rights Watch Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo

To download video: http://media.hrw.org/index.asp?ID=SLDNL&lang=ENG&showEmbargoed=true

Hague Prosecutor, National Courts Should Close ‘Impunity Gap’

(The Hague, September 1, 2015) – The opening of the trial of Bosco Ntaganda on September 2, 2015, at the International Criminal Court (ICC) sends the message that elusive suspects in grave international crimes may someday be brought to justice, Human Rights Watch said today.

The ICC issued its first sealed arrest warrant against Ntaganda, a rebel commander at the time, in 2006 for alleged crimes committed in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, but he evaded justice and continued to command troops responsible for atrocities until his surrender in 2013. Ntaganda’s appearance at the ICC is a victory for victims, their families, and human rights activists across Congo, Human Rights Watch said.

“Seeing Bosco Ntaganda in the dock sends a powerful message to others implicated in grave abuses in Congo that one day they too may be brought to justice,” said Geraldine Mattioli-Zeltner, international justice advocacy director at Human Rights Watch. “The long delay in apprehending Ntaganda shows the need for concerted international action in these cases.”

Ntaganda faces 13 counts of war crimes and 5 counts of crimes against humanity, for murder and attempted murder, attacks against civilians, rape and sexual slavery, the recruitment and use of child soldiers, pillaging, and persecution in northeastern Congo’s Ituri district in 2002 and 2003.

In 2012 and 2013, the Office of the Prosecutor expanded the charges against Ntaganda, which initially only included the recruitment and use of child soldiers. The updated charges are more representative of the grave crimes that he and troops under his command allegedly committed in Ituri, and it will open the door to justice for more victims and their families, Human Rights Watch said.

In the years after the hostilities in Ituri, Ntaganda joined other armed groups and continued to lead troops implicated in grave abuses in the Kivu provinces of eastern Congo. In January 2009, under a peace deal ending a previous rebellion, the Congolese government named him a general in the Congolese army. He remained in that post until he and others led a mutiny and created a new rebel group, the M23, late March 2012.

Following infighting within the M23, and the apparent loss of support from his backers in neighboring Rwanda, Ntaganda surrendered voluntarily to the United States embassy in Kigali, Rwanda, in March 2013 and requested to be transferred to the ICC.

The trial against Ntaganda at the ICC only relates to crimes allegedly committed in Ituri, leaving atrocities committed by troops under his command in North Kivu largely unaddressed at the ICC and before national courts.

Research by Human Rights Watch, the United Nations Group of Experts, and other organizations over many years has clearly demonstrated that senior political and military officials in Congo, Rwanda, and Uganda provided important financial, military, and political support to abusive armed groups in Ituri and the Kivu provinces, fully aware that these armed groups were engaged in widespread violations of international humanitarian and human rights law.

To make a significant contribution to justice in Congo, the ICC prosecutor should go beyond local rebel commanders and also investigate the role of high-level officials and officers in Uganda, Rwanda, and Congo for their role in the crimes, Human Rights Watch said.

Other M23 rebel leaders with long histories of grave abuses are now in Rwanda and Uganda and have not faced justice. Without bringing other abusive commanders to justice in fair and credible trials, future abuses are more likely.

There is one outstanding Congo-related ICC arrest warrant against Sylvestre Mudacumura, the military commander of another armed group responsible for widespread abuses in eastern Congo, including ethnic massacres, rape, and the burning of homes. Mudacumura remains at large in eastern Congo. Congolese authorities and UN peacekeepers there should renew their efforts to arrest and transfer him to the ICC, Human Rights Watch said.

“Ntaganda’s blood-stained path to the ICC demonstrates the terribly high price that civilians pay for impunity,” Mattioli-Zeltner said. “ICC and Congolese authorities should redouble their efforts and work together to arrest and bring to justice others responsible for grave crimes and their backers who are complicit in them.”

For more information on the Ntaganda case at the ICC, please check Human Rights Watch’s questions and answers document: https://www.hrw.org/news/2015/08/27/icc-trial-bosco-ntaganda-alleged-crimes-democratic-republic-congo

For more information on Human Rights Watch research into crimes committed by Ntaganda and troops under his command, please visit: http://www.hrw.org/topic/international-justice/bosco-ntaganda

Democratic Republic of the Congo: Nord-Kivu : le chef milicien Ngoa Bisire se rend à la Monusco

31 August 2015 - 11:39pm
Source: Radio Okapi Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo

Le chef milicien Raïa Mutomboki, Ngoa Bisire et ses dépendants se sont rendus le week-end dernier à la Mission des Nations unies pour la stabilisation en RDC (Monusco) dans le territoire de Walikale au Nord-Kivu. Le vice-gouverneur de la province, Feller Lutaichirwa, a indiqué, lundi 31 août, que cette reddition est le fruit du dialogue sur la paix et la sécurité initié dans cette région. Ngoa Bisire et quatre de ses dépendants ont déjà été transférés au camp de transit DDRRR (démobilisation, désarmement, réinsertion, réintégration et rapatriement) de la Monusco à Munigi.

D'autres miliciens sont encore à Walikale, selon des sources locales. Mais le programme DDRRR ne donne aucune précision sur le nombre de dépendants ayant rendu leurs armes.

Sur place à Walikale, Delphin Mbaenda, chef de la milice Maï-Maï Kifuafua se serait opposé à la reddition de son frère Ngoa.

Le vice-gouverneur pense que ce serait une erreur de la part de Delphin Mbaenda, de remettre en cause les efforts du gouvernement et de la notabilité pour pacifier le territoire de Walikale.

«S’ils ont des reproches à faire à Ngoa, ils n'ont qu'à formuler des plaintes parce que la justice va s'en occuper. L'appel que nous faisons est la cessation des hostilités. On ne peut pas s'en prendre aux sensibilisateurs qui sont venus leur apporter la paix», a affirmé Feller Lutaichirwa.

Par ailleurs, certaines sources font état des tensions qui s'observent dans la région de Ntoto où trois notables seraient enlevés par le chef rebelle Delphin Mbaenda de Kifuafua. Prince Kihangi du Bedewa et Mwami Kiroba, chef de secteurà Walikale, seraient parmi les personnes kidnappées.

L'administrateur du territoire de Walikale, Marie Claire Bangwene, ne confirme pas l'enlèvement supposé de trois notables.

Il a indiqué que ces notables poursuivent leur mission de sensibilisation dans la région, sauf qu'ils ne sont pas joignables. Ces derniers étaient en mission de sensibilisation dans la région de Ntoto pour appeler les miliciens à déposer les armes.

World: Field Exchange No. 50 (August 2015)

31 August 2015 - 1:57pm
Source: Emergency Nutrition Network Country: Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, India, Kenya, Lebanon, Malawi, Mali, Nigeria, Philippines, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Uganda, World

Editorial

As this half centenary issue of Field Exchange contains a number of guest editorials by individuals who were involved in Field Exchange from the start, we are going to keep this one short. It is pretty much 20 years since the idea of a Field Exchange and the ENN was mooted at an inter-agency conference in Addis Ababa. A throw away comment by Helen Young at the meeting planted the seed of an idea; Helen remarked that the Addis meeting was unusually productive as it brought together field practitioners, academics and donors who could all learn from each-other and wouldn’t it be great if we could find a forum to enable this kind of ‘exchange’ to take place more regularly. The acorn tree that is now Field Exchange and the ENN grew from this one comment.

For the editors of Field Exchange, there has always been one core principle that has held sway. It is that the written word has unique value. Emerging from the ashes of the Great Lakes emergency in 1994/5 where mistakes and learning from previous decades appear not to have been heeded, Field Exchange was predicated on the realisation that institutional memory is fragile and that the written word can uniquely preserve learning. There is nothing wrong with the ‘oral tradition’ but memories are fallible in a way that the written word is not.

Over the 20 years of editing Field Exchange, we have also come to see how the process of writing up field experiences adds value. Those who put pen to paper are compelled to organize their thoughts and learning logically, to self-examine and to make only claims or recommendations that can be supported by written evidence which in turn can be scrutinised by others. Elements of learning that take place through the writing process would almost certainly not occur if simply recounted orally. The written word promotes accountability for what is said. Furthermore, it enables dissemination of learning at scale. The ENN has also learnt that even in situations where draft articles are withdrawn from publication (very othen for reasons of sensitivity and risk to programmers), the very process of writing has enabled the authors(s) and their organisation(s) to learn from the programme experience even though this learning may not be disseminated more widely.

Whether the written word appears in print or digitally is perhaps less important but is still relevant. Many of our readers only have limited or expensive online access. Furthermore, it is notable (if not a little surprising) to find in Field Exchange evaluations that our readers still have a strong attachment to the hard copy even when they have online access. Flicking through the pages of Field Exchange in a life that is dominated by ‘screen time’ for many may well be a welcome relief and a better reading (and learning) experience. We, of course, now produce Field Exchange (and its sister publication Nutrition Exchange) both in print, e-copy and online: we also plan to embrace multi-media developments, which may allow for wider and cheaper dissemination to our readership Over the years, the ENN has expanded into a range of activities including technical reviews, operational research, technical meeting facilitation, and development of guidance and training material.

Our activities are largely informed by from the privileged overview of the sector we obtain through pulling together Field Exchange. This expanded scope of work is thus a product of your work in contributing to the publication. Field Exchange has therefore been, and remains, the cornerstone of what ENN does.

On to the edition in hand; as ever, we have a wide range of articles covering innovations and challenges in programming. A special section looks at lessons and plans for delivering treatment of severe acute malnutrition (SAM) at scale in Northern Nigeria, with three articles by UNICEF/ACF/Mark Myatt; ACF; and Results for Development (R4D) on the topics of coverage, costs, cost-effectiveness and financial sustainability of CMAM. This includes a proposed sampling based approach to estimate the number of deaths averted by the Nigerian CMAM programme which is accompanied by two ‘peer review’ postscripts.

An editorial by CIFF, a lead investor in the Northern Nigerian CMAM programming, introduces the section. Also on the theme of CMAM in Nigeria, an article by MSF documents malnutrition peaks associated with malaria peaks and highlights the fact that medical care typically does not come under CMAM funding, is implemented by different ministries and agencies and is often under resourced.

The logistical challenges of nutrition programming are reflected in an article from South Sudan by ACF, UNICEF and CDC, which describes the technical innovations that enabled nutrition surveillance in a vulnerable but quite inaccessible population. The response to flooding in Malawi in early 2015 is the topic of another article around CMAM by Concern. Whilst providing immediate support, they found lack of surge capacity and sub-standard existing SAM treatment services, despite longstanding external investment in the recent past. How to sustain long term CMAM programming once the NGOs ‘go home’, remains the 'million dollar question'.

At the other end of the spectrum, an article by Help Age International describes the burden of care and experiences of non-communicable disease (NCD) programming in Lebanon amongst older Syrian refugees and vulnerable Lebanese. It reflects there is progress but a lot yet to be done to meet NCD and associated nutrition needs in humanitarian programming. The remaining articles cover a range of topics – infant feeding support in the Philippines from the perspective of a local NGO responding to Typhoon Haiyan in 2013; experiences of the Sustainable Nutrition and Agriculture Promotion (SNAP) programme in the Ebola response in Sierra Leone authored by IMC and ACDI-VOCA; and UNICEF experiences of a combined SMARTSQUEAC survey in Chad that saved on time and costs.

We have a run on views pieces in this edition, as well as a rich mixture of research summaries.

An article by Ajay Kumar Sinha, Dolon Bhattacharyya and Raj Bhandari on the challenges of undernutrition in India provides a fascinating insight into the complexities of national and sub-national programming and highlights the need for coordinated actions. India also features in a research summary from MSF that shares great insights into community perceptions and behaviour around SAM treatment in Bihar. Resilience and nutrition is the topic of an article by Jan Eijkenaar which provides insights into the ECHO funded Global Alliance for Resilience Initiative in the Sahel. There are also some must read articles on accountability to affected populations, a topic that hasn’t featured strongly in Field Exchange in the past and to which we all too easily pay ‘lip service’. One piece describes ground breaking work in the Philippines by Margie Buchanan-Smith et al and the other is a very personal but experience based viewpoint by Andy Featherstone on progress and pitfalls around accountability over the last 20 years or so.

As a final word, we would like to thank all those authors who have written material for Field Exchange in the past and encourage those who are thinking about writing in the future to get in touch with us to discuss potential topics. We are here to support you in many different ways, from a ‘brainstorming’ conversation to review of a fledgling idea to editing. In this issue, we’ve included a guide to the process to help. Over the years, our content has become more ‘technical’ but we welcome more informal contributions too; it is great to see a few letters in this edition and we would love to receive more.

We would also like to thank our many readers for taking an interest in the publication and sincerely hope that the hard won experiences and learning that appear in Field Exchange quickly and positively continue to inform your personal practice and agency programming for the benefit of those with whom you work. So here is Field Exchange 50 – Enjoy!

Jeremy Shoham & Marie McGrath Field Exchange Co-editors

Democratic Republic of the Congo: In Bunia, MONUSCO sets up a committee to denounce sexual exploitation and abuse (SEA)

31 August 2015 - 11:28am
Source: UN Organization Stabilization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo

Bunia 28 August 2015: MONUSCO conduct and discipline unit in Bunia convened in the conference room of its headquarters local actors as well as substantive sections to set up a whistleblowing mechanism to denounce and prevent any act of sexual exploitation and abuse by the United Nations staff.

The meeting was attended by delegates from the United Nations Joint Human Rights Bureau, advisors on women related matters, child protection section, local human rights NGOs, Congolese National Police and Lawyers. At the end of the discussions, decision was made to set up a joint committee (MONUSCO and local actors) to reporting any allegations against the UN staff on sexual exploitation and abuse.

Moreover, the committee is tasked to update the local population on the UN code of conduct and the means available to fight sexual abuse and exploitation committed by United Nations staff public awareness campaigns, radio programs and plays. Participants highlighted that meetings with NGOs and local populations should continue to bring the two parties to avoid making false accusations which would tarnish the UN image.

Pending the designation of focal points and a monthly meeting with the latter, the idea of setting up a green number to make available to the populations every information needed over the issue submitted for the attention of the population are ongoing.

Laurent Sam OUSSOU

Democratic Republic of the Congo: South-Kivu: Mr. Mamadou Pethe Diallo, new UN humanitarian coordinator’s visit to the DRC

31 August 2015 - 11:20am
Source: UN Organization Stabilization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo

Bukavu, 27 August 2015 — Dr. Mamadou Pethe Diallo, the new Deputy Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General in charge of humanitarian affairs made his first visit to South Kivu province.

Upon arriving at Kavumu airport on Thursday 27 August, the Deputy Special Representative made a courtesy call to provincial authorities in Bukavu, South-Kivu and visited Panzi hospital.

At the end of the meeting with Dr. Denis Mukwege who provide medical care to raped women and girls in Panzi hospital, the Deputy-Special Representative declared “it is our dearest hope to see that the persons treated in Panzi hospital recover physically and morally and return home.” We are very encouraged to see “Dr. Mukwege and his staff dedicate themselves to treating raped women and children.”

The UN delegation was received by the vice-governor Gabriel Kalonda Mbulu. He then took the opportunity to express his gratitude to the provincial authorities for the “excellent collaboration maintained with MONUSCO-South-Kivu and the whole family of the humanitarian actors and development agencies of the United Nations system operating in the province..”

Dr. Mamadou P. Diallo also discussed the need to come up with a contingency response to the natural disasters in order to minimize their impact when responding to a question asked about the earthquake that hit the South-Kivu province in the small hours of Friday 7 August 2015 referring to the earthquake an “an alarming signal designed to awaken us”.

Appointed on 11 May 2015 by Mr. Ban Ki-Moon, Dr. Mamadou P. Diallo succeeded the former Deputy Special Representative Moustapha Soumaré and inherit all the tasks performed by his predecessor, as resident coordinator, humanitarian coordinator and resident representative of the United Nations Development Program.

Alain Likota

Kenya: Kenya - Kakuma Refugee Camp: Weekly New Registration Population Composition 23rd- 29th Aug 2015

31 August 2015 - 9:25am
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Uganda

United Republic of Tanzania: Burundian Refugees in Tanzania - Daily Statistics (28 Aug 2015)

31 August 2015 - 9:20am
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Rwanda, Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania

Central African Republic: C.A.R. Regional Impact Situation Report #17, 30 August 2015

31 August 2015 - 4:56am
Source: World Food Programme Country: Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo

Situation update

WFP’s C.A.R. Regional Emergency Operation (EMOP) 200799 began on 1 January 2015 and spans across five affected countries. More than 870,000 beneficiaries were reached in July through the EMOP, representing 80 percent of planned figures. In August, WFP is targeting more than one million beneficiaries across the five countries.

The C.A.R. EMOP urgently needs resources to deliver on food assistance activities until the end of the year. It is paramount that WFP be able to confirm contributions as early as possible, due to the lead times required to procure and position food. Delays may result in reduced rations or the suspension of several activities in the coming months.