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Democratic Republic of the Congo: Security Council Extends Arms Embargo on Democratic Republic of Congo, Unanimously Adopting Resolution 2293 (2016)

23 June 2016 - 5:17pm
Source: UN Security Council Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo

SC/12416

7724th Meeting (AM)
Security Council
Meetings Coverage

Measure Reaffirms Sanctions No Longer Apply to Government

The Security Council today extended its arms embargo, asset freeze and travel ban on the Democratic Republic of the Congo until 1 July 2017 and the mandate of the Expert Group assisting the Sanctions Committee through 1 August 2017.

Unanimously adopting resolution 2293 (2016) under Chapter VII of the United Nations Charter, the Council reaffirmed that those measures no longer applied to the supply, sale or transfer of arms and any related materiel to the Government of that country.

By the terms, the 15-member body decided that such measures, imposed by paragraph 1, should not apply to the provision of support to the United Nations Organization Stabilization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUSCO) or the African Union Regional Task Force.

Among other provisions, the Council requested that the Group of Experts gather and analyse information regarding the regional and international support networks to armed groups, supply and transfer of arms, and perpetrators of serious violations of humanitarian law.

Strongly condemning all armed groups operating in the region and their violations of humanitarian and human rights laws, the Council demanded that the Democratic Forces for the Liberation of Rwanda (FDLR), the Allied Democratic Forces (ADF), the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) and others cease immediately all forms of violence, including the exploitation of natural resources, and that their members immediately and permanently disband, lay down their arms, and liberate and demobilize all children from their ranks.

The Council also called on the Government of the Democratic Republic of the Congo to continue to enhance stockpile security, accountability and management of arms and ammunition, and urgently implement a national weapons-marking programme. It also called on the country to pursue its action plan to end sexual violence and violations committed by its armed forces, and address issues of the use of children in armed conflict, illegal exploitation and smuggling of natural resources.

The Council, by further terms, urged the Government and relevant parties to ensure an environment conducive to a free, fair and transparent electoral process. MONUSCO was requested to assist the Sanctions Committee and the Expert Group within its capabilities.

Ignace Gata Mavita wa Lufuta (Democratic Republic of the Congo), speaking after the adoption, thanked the United Nations for providing support to his country’s peace and security efforts, and not applying sanctions against the Government. Noting that any speech coming from the Council could lead to serious consequences on the ground, he pointed out that the focus of the text was sanctions not elections. However, his country’s willingness to ensure a free and inclusive electoral process should not be interpreted as its deferral, he said, expressing hope that the upcoming elections would not be disrupted by violence.

The meeting began at 10:05 a.m. and ended at 10:15 a.m.

Resolution

The full text of resolution 2293(2016) reads as follows:

“The Security Council,

“Recalling its previous resolutions and the statements of its President concerning the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC),

“Reaffirming its strong commitment to the sovereignty, independence, unity and territorial integrity of the DRC, as well as all States in the region and emphasizing the need to respect fully the principles of non-interference, good neighbourliness and regional cooperation,

“Stressing the primary responsibility of the Government of the DRC for ensuring security in its territory and protecting its populations with respect for the rule of law, human rights and international humanitarian law,

“Taking note of the interim report (S/2015/797) and the final report (S/2016/466) of the Group of Experts on the DRC (‘the Group of Experts’) established pursuant to resolution 1533 (2004) and extended pursuant to resolutions 1807 (2008), 1857 (2008), 1896 (2009), 1952 (2010), 2021 (2011), 2078 (2012), 2136 (2014) and 2198 (2015), noting the finding that the linkage between armed groups, criminal networks and illegal exploitation of natural resources contributes to the insecurity in eastern DRC, and taking note of their recommendations,

“Recalling the strategic importance of the implementation of the Peace, Security and Cooperation (PSC) Framework for the DRC and the region, and reiterating its call to all signatories to fulfil promptly, fully and in good faith their respective commitments under this agreement in order to address the root causes of conflict and put an end to recurring cycles of violence,

“Recalling the commitments under the PSC Framework by all States of the region not to interfere in the internal affairs of neighbouring countries, and to neither tolerate nor provide assistance or support of any kind to armed groups, and reiterating its strong condemnation of any and all internal or external support to armed groups active in the region, including through financial, logistical or military support,

“Reiterating its deep concern regarding the security and humanitarian crisis in eastern DRC due to ongoing military activities of foreign and domestic armed groups and the smuggling of Congolese natural resources, in particular gold and ivory, stressing the importance of neutralizing all armed groups, including the Democratic Forces for the Liberation of Rwanda (FDLR), the Allied Democratic Forces (ADF), the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA), and all other armed groups in the DRC, in line with resolution 2277 (2016),

“Reiterating that the durable neutralization of the FDLR remains essential in bringing stability to and protecting civilians of the DRC and the Great Lakes region, recalling that the FDLR is a group under United Nations sanctions whose leaders and members include perpetrators of the 1994 genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda, during which Hutu and others who opposed the genocide were also killed, and have continued to promote and commit ethnically based and other killings in Rwanda and in the DRC, noting the reported military operations undertaken by the Congolese Armed Forces (FARDC) in 2015 and 2016 which have resulted in some destabilization of the FDLR, expressing concern that these operations have been carried out simultaneously with Congolese Mai Mai groups, welcoming the initial resumption of cooperation of the FARDC with the United Nations Organization Stabilization Mission in the DRC (MONUSCO), and calling for the full resumption of cooperation and joint operations, in accordance with MONUSCO’s mandate,

“Condemning the brutal killings of more than 500 civilians in the Beni area since October 2014, expressing deep concern regarding the continued threat posed by armed groups, in particular the ADF, and the persistence of violence in this region, further expressing concern at reports of collaboration between elements of the FARDC and armed groups at a local level, in particular recent reports of individual officers of the FARDC playing a role in the insecurity in the region of Beni, calling for investigations in order to ensure that those responsible are held to account, noting the commitment expressed by the Government of the DRC in its letter of 15 June 2016 (S/2016/542),

“Reaffirming the importance of completing the permanent demobilization of the former 23 March Movement (M23) combatants, stressing the importance of ensuring that its ex-combatants do not regroup or join other armed groups, and calling for the acceleration of the implementation of the Nairobi Declarations and of the disarmament, demobilization, repatriation, reintegration and resettlement (DDRRR) of M23 ex-combatants, including by overcoming obstacles to repatriation, in coordination with the regional States concerned,

“Condemning the illicit flow of weapons within and into the DRC, including their recirculation to and between armed groups, in violation of resolutions 1533 (2004), 1807 (2008), 1857 (2008), 1896 (2009), 1952 (2010), 2021 (2011), 2078 (2012), 2136 (2014) and 2198 (2015), and declaring its determination to continue to monitor closely the implementation of the arms embargo and other measures set out by its resolutions concerning the DRC,

“Acknowledging in this respect the important contribution the Council-mandated arms embargo makes to countering the illicit transfer of small arms and light weapons in the DRC, and in supporting post-conflict peacebuilding, disarmament, demobilization and reintegration of ex-combatants and security sector reform,

“Underlining that the transparent and effective management of its natural resources and ending illegal smuggling and trafficking of such resources are critical for the DRC’s sustainable peace and security, expressing concern at the illegal exploitation and trafficking of natural resources by armed groups, and the negative impact of armed conflict on protected natural areas, commending the efforts of the DRC park rangers and others who seek to protect such areas, encouraging the Government of the DRC to continue efforts to safeguard these areas, and stressing its full respect for the sovereignty of the Government of the DRC over its natural resources and its responsibility to effectively manage these resources in this regard,

“Recalling the linkage between the illegal exploitation of natural resources, including poaching and illegal trafficking of wildlife, illicit trade in such resources, and the proliferation and trafficking of arms as one of the major factors fuelling and exacerbating conflicts in the Great Lakes region, and encouraging the continuation of the regional efforts of the International Conference of the Great Lakes Region (ICGLR) and the governments involved against the illegal exploitation of natural resources, and stressing, in this regard, the importance of regional cooperation and deepening economic integration with special consideration for the exploitation of natural resources,

“Noting the Group of Experts’ findings that there have been positive efforts related to the minerals trade and traceability schemes but that gold remains a serious challenge, recalling the ICGLR’s Lusaka Declaration of the Special Session to Fight Illegal Exploitation of Natural Resources in the Great Lakes Region and its call for industry due diligence, commending the ICGLR’s commitment and progress on this issue and underscoring that it is critical for regional Governments and trading centres, particularly those involved in gold refining and the gold trade to intensify efforts to increase vigilance against smuggling and reduce practices that could undermine the DRC and ICGLR’s regional efforts,

“Noting with concern reports indicating the continued involvement of armed groups, as well as some elements of the FARDC, in the illegal minerals trade, the illegal production and trade of charcoal and wood, and wildlife poaching and trafficking,

“Noting with great concern the persistence of serious human rights abuses and international humanitarian law violations against civilians in the eastern part of the DRC, including summary executions, sexual and gender-based violence and large scale recruitment and use of children committed by armed groups,

“Stressing the crucial importance of a peaceful and credible electoral cycle, in accordance with the Constitution, for stabilization and consolidation of constitutional democracy in the DRC, expressing deep concern at increased restrictions of the political space in the DRC, in particular recent arrests and detention of members of the political opposition and of civil society, as well as restrictions of fundamental freedoms, such as the freedom of expression and opinion, and recalling the need for an open, inclusive and peaceful political dialogue among all stakeholders focused on the holding of elections, while ensuring the protection of fundamental freedoms and human rights, paving the way for peaceful, credible, inclusive, transparent and timely elections in the DRC, particularly presidential and legislative elections by November 2016, in accordance with the Constitution, while respecting the African Charter on Democracy, Elections and Governance,

“Remaining deeply concerned by reports of an increase in serious human rights and international humanitarian law violations committed by some members of the FARDC, the National Intelligence Agency, the Republican Guard and Congolese National Police (PNC), urging all parties to refrain from violence and provocation as well as to respect human rights, and emphasizing that the Government of the DRC must comply with the principle of proportionality in the use of force,

“Recalling the importance of fighting against impunity within all ranks of its security forces, and stressing the need for the Government of the DRC to continue its efforts in this regard and to ensure the professionalism of its security forces,

“Calling for all those responsible for violations of international humanitarian law and violations or abuses of human rights including those involving violence or abuses against children and acts of sexual and gender-based violence, to be swiftly apprehended, brought to justice and held accountable,

“Recalling all its relevant resolutions on women and peace and security, on children and armed conflict, and on the protection of civilians in armed conflicts, also recalling the conclusions of the Security Council Working Group on Children and Armed Conflict pertaining to the parties in armed conflict of the DRC (S/AC.51/2014/3) adopted on 18 September 2014,

“Welcoming the efforts of the Government of the DRC, including the Presidential Adviser on Sexual Violence and the Recruitment of Children, to cooperate with the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict, the Special Representative of the Secretary-General on Sexual Violence, and MONUSCO, to implement the action plan to prevent and end the recruitment and use of children and sexual violence by the FARDC, and to combat impunity for conflict-related sexual violence, including sexual violence committed by the FARDC,

“Noting the critical importance of effective implementation of the sanctions regime, including the key role that neighbouring States, as well as regional and subregional organizations, can play in this regard and encouraging efforts to further enhance cooperation,

“Underlining the fundamental importance of timely and detailed notifications to the Committee concerning arms, ammunition and training as set out in section 11 of the Guidelines of the Committee,

“Determining that the situation in the DRC continues to constitute a threat to international peace and security in the region,

“Acting under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations,

Sanctions regime

“1. Decides to renew until 1 July 2017 the measures on arms imposed by paragraph 1 of resolution 1807 (2008) and reaffirms the provisions of paragraph 5 of that resolution;

“2. Reaffirms that according to paragraph 2 of resolution 1807 (2008), these measures no longer apply to the supply, sale or transfer of arms and related materiel, and the provision of any assistance, advice or training related to military activities to the Government of the DRC;

“3. Decides that the measures imposed by paragraph 1 shall not apply to:

(a) Supplies of arms and related materiel, as well as assistance, advice or training, intended solely for the support of or use by MONUSCO or the African Union-Regional Task Force;

(b) Protective clothing, including flak jackets and military helmets, temporarily exported to the DRC by United Nations personnel, representatives of the media and humanitarian and development workers and associated personnel, for their personal use only;

(c) Other supplies of non-lethal military equipment intended solely for humanitarian or protective use, and related technical assistance and training, as notified in advance to the Committee in accordance with paragraph 5 of resolution 1807 (2008);

(d) Other sales and or supply of arms and related materiel, or provision of assistance or personnel, as approved in advance by the Committee;

“4. Decides to renew, for the period specified in paragraph 1 above, the measures on transport imposed by paragraphs 6 and 8 of resolution 1807 (2008) and reaffirms the provisions of paragraph 7 of that resolution;

“5. Decides to renew, for the period specified in paragraph 1 above, the financial and travel measures imposed by paragraphs 9 and 11 of resolution 1807 (2008) and reaffirms the provisions of paragraphs 10 and 12 of resolution 1807 (2008) in relation to those measures;

“6. Decides that the measures imposed by paragraph 9 of resolution 1807 (2008) shall not apply as per the criteria set out in paragraph 10 of resolution 2078 (2012);

“7. Decides that the measures referred to in paragraph 5 above shall apply to individuals and entities as designated by the Committee for engaging in or providing support for acts that undermine the peace, stability or security of the DRC, and decides that such acts include:

(a) acting in violation of the measures taken by Member States in accordance with paragraph 1 above;

(b) being political and military leaders of foreign armed groups operating in the DRC who impede the disarmament and the voluntary repatriation or resettlement of combatants belonging to those groups;

(c) being political and military leaders of Congolese militias, including those receiving support from outside the DRC, who impede the participation of their combatants in disarmament, demobilization and reintegration processes;

(d) recruiting or using children in armed conflict in the DRC in violation of applicable international law;

(e) planning, directing, or committing acts in the DRC that constitute human rights violations or abuses or violations of international humanitarian law, as applicable, including those acts involving the targeting of civilians, including killing and maiming, rape and other sexual violence, abduction, forced displacement and attacks on schools and hospitals;

(f) obstructing the access to or the distribution of humanitarian assistance in the DRC;

(g) supporting individuals or entities, including armed groups or criminal networks, involved in destabilizing activities in the DRC through the illicit exploitation or trade of natural resources, including gold or wildlife, as well as wildlife products;

(h) acting on behalf of or at the direction of a designated individual or entity, or acting on behalf of or at the direction of an entity owned or controlled by a designated individual or entity;

(i) planning, directing, sponsoring or participating in attacks against MONUSCO peacekeepers or United Nations personnel;

(j) providing financial, material, or technological support for, or goods or services to, a designated individual or entity.

Group of Experts

“8. Decides to extend until 1 August 2017 the mandate of the Group of Experts, expresses its intention to review the mandate and take appropriate action regarding the further extension no later than 1 July 2017, and requests the Secretary-General to take the necessary administrative measures as expeditiously as possible to re-establish the Group of Experts, in consultation with the Committee, drawing, as appropriate, on the expertise of the members of the Group established pursuant to previous resolutions;

“9. Requests the Group of Experts to fulfil its mandate as consolidated below, and to provide to the Council, after discussion with the Committee, a midterm report no later than 30 December 2016, and a final report no later than 15 June 2017, as well as submit monthly updates to the Committee, except in the months where the midterm and final reports are due:

(a) assist the Committee in carrying out its mandate, including through providing the Committee with information relevant to the potential designation of individuals and entities who may be engaging in the activities described in paragraph 7 of this resolution;

(b) gather, examine and analyse information regarding the implementation, with a focus on incidents of non-compliance, of the measures decided in this resolution;

(c) consider and recommend, where appropriate, ways of improving the capabilities of Member States, in particular those in the region, to ensure the measures imposed by this resolution are effectively implemented;

(d) gather, examine and analyse information regarding the regional and international support networks to armed groups and criminal networks in the DRC;

(e) gather, examine and analyse information regarding the supply, sale or transfer of arms, related materiel and related military assistance, including through illicit trafficking networks and the transfer of arms and related materiel to armed groups from the DRC security forces;

(f) gather, examine and analyse information regarding perpetrators of serious violations of international humanitarian law and human rights violations and abuses, including those within the security forces, in the DRC,

(g) evaluate the impact of minerals traceability referred to in paragraph 24 of this resolution and continue collaboration with other forums;

(h) assist the Committee in refining and updating information on the list of individuals and entities subject to the measures imposed by this resolution, including through the provision of identifying information and additional information for the publicly available narrative summary of reasons for listing;

“10. Expresses its full support to the Group of Experts and calls for enhanced cooperation between all States, particularly those in the region, MONUSCO, relevant UN bodies and the Group of Experts, encourages further that all parties and all States ensure cooperation with the Group of Experts by individuals and entities within their jurisdiction or under their control and reiterates its demand that all parties and all States ensure the safety of its members and its support staff, and that all parties and all States, including the DRC and countries of the region, provide unhindered and immediate access, in particular to persons, documents and sites the Group of Experts deems relevant to the execution of its mandate;

“11. Calls upon the Group of Experts to cooperate actively with other Panels or Groups of Experts established by the Security Council, as relevant to the implementation of its mandate;

Armed groups

“12. Strongly condemns all armed groups operating in the region and their violations of international humanitarian law, as well as other applicable international law, and abuses of human rights including attacks on the civilian population, MONUSCO peacekeepers and humanitarian actors, summary executions, sexual and gender-based violence and large scale recruitment and use of children, and reiterates that those responsible will be held accountable;

“13. Demands that the FDLR, the ADF, the LRA and all other armed groups operating in the DRC cease immediately all forms of violence and other destabilizing activities, including the exploitation of natural resources, and that their members immediately and permanently disband, lay down their arms, and liberate and demobilize all children from their ranks;

National and Regional Commitments

“14. Welcomes the progress made to date by the Government of the DRC on ending the recruitment and use of children in armed conflict, urges the Government of the DRC to continue the full implementation and dissemination throughout the military chain of command, including in remote areas, of its commitments made in the action plan signed with the United Nations, and for the protection of girls and boys from sexual violence, and further calls upon the Government of the DRC to ensure that children are not detained on charges related to association with armed groups;

“15. Welcomes efforts made by the Government of the DRC to combat and prevent sexual violence in conflict, including progress made in the fight against impunity, and calls on the Government of DRC to further pursue its action plan commitments to end sexual violence and violations committed by its armed forces and continue efforts in that regard, noting that failure to do so may result in the FARDC being named again in future Secretary-General’s reports on sexual violence;

“16. Stresses the importance of the Government of the DRC actively seeking to hold accountable those responsible for war crimes and crimes against humanity in the country and of regional cooperation to this end, including through its ongoing cooperation with the International Criminal Court, encourages MONUSCO to use its existing authority to assist the government of the DRC in this regard, and calls on all signatories of the PSC Framework to continue to implement their commitments and cooperate fully with one another and the Government of the DRC, as well as MONUSCO to this end;

“17. Recalls that there should be no impunity for any of those responsible for violations of international humanitarian law and violations and abuses of human rights in the DRC and the region, and, in this regard, urges the DRC, all countries in the region and other concerned UN Member States to bring perpetrators to justice and hold them accountable, including those within the security sector;

“18. Calls on the Government of the DRC to continue to enhance stockpile security, accountability and management of arms and ammunition, with the assistance of international partners, to address ongoing reports of diversion to armed groups, as necessary and requested, and to urgently implement a national weapons marking programme, in particular for State-owned firearms, in line with the standards established by the Nairobi Protocol and the Regional Centre on Small Arms;

“19. Emphasizes the primary responsibility of the Government of the DRC to reinforce State authority and governance in eastern DRC, including through effective security sector reform to allow army, police and justice sector reform, and to end impunity for violations and abuses of human rights and violations of international humanitarian law, and urges the Government of the DRC to increase efforts in this regard, in accordance with its national commitments under the PSC Framework;

“20. Urges the Government of the DRC, as well as all relevant parties to ensure an environment conducive to a free, fair, credible, inclusive, transparent, peaceful and timely electoral process, in accordance with the Congolese Constitution, and recalls paragraphs 7, 8, 9 and 10 of resolution 2277 (2016);

“21. Calls upon all States, especially those in the region, to take effective steps to ensure that there is no support, in or from their territories, for armed groups in, or travelling through, the DRC, stressing the need to address the networks of support, the recruitment and use of child soldiers, financing and recruitment of armed groups active in the DRC, as well as the need to address the ongoing collaboration between FARDC elements and armed groups at a local level, and calls upon all States to take steps to hold accountable, where appropriate, leaders and members of the FDLR and other armed groups residing in their countries;

Natural Resources

“22. Further encourages the continuation of efforts by the Government of the DRC to address issues of illegal exploitation and smuggling of natural resources, including holding accountable those elements of the FARDC which participate in the illicit trade of natural resources, particularly gold and wildlife products;

“23. Stresses the need to undertake further efforts to cut off financing for armed groups involved in destabilizing activities through the illicit trade of natural resources, including gold or wildlife products;

“24. Welcomes in this regard the measures taken by the Congolese Government to implement the due diligence guidelines on the supply chain of minerals, as defined by the Group of Experts and the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), recognizes the Congolese Government’s efforts to implement minerals traceability schemes, and calls on all States to assist the DRC, the ICGLR and the countries in the Great Lakes region to develop a responsible minerals trade;

“25. Welcomes measures taken by the Governments in the region to implement the Group of Experts due diligence guidelines, including adopting the Regional Certification Mechanism of the ICGLR into their national legislation, in accordance with OECD Guidance and international practice, requests the extension of the certification process to other Member States in the region, and calls on all States, particularly those in the region, to continue to raise awareness of the due diligence guidelines, including by urging importers, processing industries, including gold refiners, and consumers of Congolese mineral products to exercise due diligence in accordance with paragraph 19 of resolution 1952 (2010);

“26. Encourages the ICGLR and ICGLR Member States to work closely with the industry schemes currently operating in the DRC to ensure sustainability, transparency, and accountability of operations, and further recognizes and encourages the DRC Government’s continued support for the establishment of traceability and diligence systems to allow for the export of artisanal gold;

“27. Continues to encourage the ICGLR to put in place the necessary technical capacity required to support Member States in their fight against the illegal exploitation of natural resources, notes that some ICGLR Member States have made significant progress, and recommends all Member States to fully implement the regional certification scheme and report mineral trade statistics in accordance with paragraph 19 of resolution 1952 (2010);

“28. Encourages all States to continue efforts to end the illicit trade in natural resources, in particular in the gold sector, and to hold those complicit in the illicit trade accountable, as part of broader efforts to ensure that the illicit trade in natural resources is not benefiting sanctioned entities, armed groups or criminal networks, including those with members in the FARDC;

“29. Reaffirms the provisions of paragraphs 7 to 9 of resolution 2021 (2011) and calls upon the DRC and States in the Great Lakes region to cooperate at the regional level to investigate and combat regional criminal networks and armed groups involved in the illegal exploitation of natural resources, including wildlife poaching and trafficking, and require their customs authorities to strengthen their control on exports and imports of minerals from the DRC;

Role of MONUSCO

“30. Recalls the mandate of MONUSCO as outlined in resolution 2277 (2016), in particular in paragraph 31 underlining the importance of enhanced political and conflict-related analysis, including by collecting and analysing information on the criminal networks which support the armed groups, paragraph 36 (ii) regarding the monitoring of the implementation of the arms embargo, and paragraph 36 (iii) on mining activities;

“31. Encourages timely information exchange between MONUSCO and the Group of Experts in line with paragraph 43 of resolution 2277 (2016), and requests MONUSCO to assist the Committee and the Group of Experts, within its capabilities;

Sanctions Committee, Reporting and Review

“32. Calls upon all States, particularly those in the region and those in which individuals and entities designated pursuant to paragraph 7 of this resolution are based, to regularly report to the Committee on the actions they have taken to implement the measures imposed by paragraphs 1, 4 and 5 and recommended in paragraph 8 of resolution 1952 (2010);

“33. Emphasizes the importance for the Committee of holding regular consultations with concerned Member States, as may be necessary, in order to ensure full implementation of the measures set forth in this resolution;

“34. Requests the Committee to report orally, through its Chair, at least once per year to the Council, on the state of the overall work of the Committee, including alongside the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for the DRC on the situation in the DRC as appropriate, and encourages the Chair to hold regular briefings for all interested Member States;

“35. Requests the Committee to identify possible cases of non-compliance with the measures pursuant to paragraphs 1, 4 and 5 above and to determine the appropriate course of action on each case, and requests the Chair, in regular reports to the Council pursuant to paragraph 34 of this resolution, to provide progress reports on the Committee’s work on this issue;

“36. Requests the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict and the Special Representative for Sexual Violence in Conflict to continue sharing relevant information with the Committee in accordance with paragraph 7 of resolution 1960 (2010) and paragraph 9 of resolution 1998 (2011);

“37. Decides that, when appropriate and no later than 1 July 2017, it shall review the measures set forth in this resolution, with a view to adjusting them, as appropriate, in light of the security situation in the DRC, in particular progress in security sector reform and in disarming, demobilizing, repatriating, resettling and reintegrating, as appropriate, Congolese and foreign armed groups, with a particular focus on children among them, and compliance with this resolution;

“38. Decides to remain actively seized of the matter.”

For information media. Not an official record.

Democratic Republic of the Congo: DR Congo arrests 75 militiamen over rapes, killings

23 June 2016 - 4:40pm
Source: Agence France-Presse Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo

Kinshasa, DR Congo | AFP | Thursday 6/23/2016 - 20:33 GMT

Authorities in the Democratic Republic of Congo have arrested a provincial deputy and 74 others accused of belonging to a militia that carried out killings and mass rapes in the country's restive east, the justice minister said Thursday.

South Kivu province lawmaker Frederic Batumike was the leader of the violent group, which goes by the name of "Djeshi ya Yesu" (Jesus' Army), Alexis Thambwe Mwamba said at a press conference in Kinshasa.

He said Batumike was suspected of having ordered the murder last March of Congolese human rights activist Evariste Kasali and the 2012 killing of German national and local land owner Walter Mueller.

The minister also accused the militia of raping around 30 girls, saying that Batumike had hired "a fetishist who told the militiamen to rape very young girls to be assured of acquiring supernatural protection".

Batumike and the other suspects were taken into custody this week in Bukavu, the capital of the country's troubled South Kivu province, the minister added.

There have long been claims of recurrent sexual violence in the resource-rich but volatile region, home to dozens of armed groups.

mbb-str/mj/mfp/pvh

© 1994-2016 Agence France-Presse

Democratic Republic of the Congo: La situation des réfugiés en République Démocratique du Congo

23 June 2016 - 1:21pm
Source: Agency for Technical Cooperation and Development Country: Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo

La République Démocratique du Congo (RDC) fait face à des conflits persistants, principalement dans l’est du pays (provinces du Nord Kivu, Sud Kivu et les nouvelles provinces issues de l’ex-Katanga).

En effet, les habitants de ces régions sont régulièrement victimes des conflits ethniques et des violences générées entre les groupes armés et entre ces derniers et l’armée nationale, les Forces Armées de la RDC (FARDC). Ces conflits entraînent d’importants déplacements de population à l’intérieur du pays. A la fin du mois de mars 2016, les Nations Unies comptaient 1,8 million de déplacés internes en RDC, dont 135 000 personnes ayant fui leurs villages pendant les trois premiers mois de l’année. 916 000 retournés étaient également recensés.

Certaines victimes de violence trouvent également refuge dans les pays avoisinants : au 30 avril 2016, le Bureau des Nations Unies pour les réfugiés (UNHCR) comptait plus de 520 000 Congolais réfugiés dans d’autres pays africains.

Par ailleurs, malgré les conflits persistants, la faiblesse de ces infrastructures et la pauvreté qui touche la région, presque 400 000 personnes auraient trouvé refuge en RDC selon l’UNHCR, dont une majorité de Rwandais et de Centrafricains.

Les défis à relever

En RDC, le manque d’infrastructures médicales, sanitaires, scolaires, de routes et d’accès à une alimentation suffisante et à l’eau potable ne permettent pas à une majorité de la population congolaise de satisfaire à ses besoins de base. L’arrivée des réfugiés augmente la pression sur les ressources disponibles, ce qui peut créer des tensions entre la population locale et les nouveaux arrivants.

Si une partie des réfugiés vit dans des camps pris en charge par l’UNHCR et reçoit de l’assistance (alimentaire, en articles ménagers essentiels, en eau hygiène et assainissement etc.), certains préfèrent rester hors des camps, parmi la population congolaise, et comptent souvent uniquement sur leurs propres ressources ou sur l’aide des Congolais pour vivre. En janvier 2016, dans les provinces du Nord et du Sud Ubangui où vivent des réfugiés centrafricains, l’UNHCR estimait à plus de 27 000 le nombre de personnes réfugiées vivant en dehors des camps.

Les interventions d’ACTED auprès des réfugiés

Depuis 2014, ACTED intervient auprès des réfugiés centrafricains vivant dans les provinces Nord et Sud Ubangui (ex-province de l’Equateur) grâce au soutien du Bureau of Population, Refugees and Migration (BPRM).

Plusieurs types d’activités sont mis en place pour apporter une assistance à ces réfugiés et améliorer leurs conditions de vie. Dans ses projets, ACTED intervient également auprès de la population locale congolaise, elle aussi très vulnérable.

ACTED répond d’abord aux besoins urgents de ces populations, principalement à travers la construction ou la réhabilitation d’infrastructures d’eau, d’hygiène et d’assainissement.

Les équipes d’ACTED RDC forent des points d’eau et construisent des latrines communautaires dans les écoles, les marchés ou les centres de santé. Ces centres sont également équipés de réservoir à eau de pluie, de douches, d’incinérateur et de fosses pour éliminer les déchets et éviter les épidémies. Pour assurer la pérennité de ces infrastructures, ACTED forme la population locale et les réfugiés aux bonnes pratiques d’hygiène et d’assainissement de l’eau, ainsi qu’à l’utilisation des équipements. Des kits d’hygiène et des savons sont distribués aux ménages les plus vulnérables.

Depuis 2015, ACTED mène des programmes d’Activités Génératrices de Revenu pour développer les associations de producteurs locaux et les petits commerces et permettre à leurs membres (dont des réfugiés) d’avoir un meilleur revenu et d’améliorer leurs pratiques et leurs outils.

L’histoire de Gervine

Gervine est une centrafricaine de 36 ans, et mère de 5 enfants.

Gervine a quitté son pays pour fuir la guerre et la violence, et a trouvé refuge en RDC, dans le camp de Boyabu, province du Sud Ubangui. En Centrafrique, Gervine était cultivatrice. Aujourd’hui elle vend des tomates fraîches et des piments dans le camp où elle vit.

Gervine a fait partie des bénéficiaires des distributions de savon mises en place par ACTED dans le camp de Boyabu. Elle « remercie ACTED pour le savon distribué » mais explique qu’elle et sa famille ont encore besoin de l’aide de l’ONG pour pouvoir vivre dans de bonnes conditions.

A Bili, Nord Ubangui, ACTED a mis en place différentes activités génératrices de revenus, en s’appuyant sur les communautés locales.

Ainsi, en janvier 2016, une association de boulangers composée à 96% de femmes a été créée. Cette association permet à ses membres de participer à un mécanisme de vente groupé qui allège leur temps de travail, et leur permet de travailler sans concurrence et de manière équitable. Les membres de cette association font partie de la population congolaise mais aussi de la population réfugiée. Une boutique de vente des matières premières nécessaires à la production de pain a été également créée sous gestion de l’association. Elle permet aux membres de s’approvisionner plus facilement. Trente fours consommant deux fois moins de bois que les fours traditionnels sont également en construction, améliorant l’impact tant économique qu’environnemental de la production de pain à Bili.

Democratic Republic of the Congo: Réduire les violences liées au genre en milieu scolaire

23 June 2016 - 1:13pm
Source: UN Children's Fund Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo

A l’école nous apprenons comment être un bon citoyen. Un bon citoyen est celui qui peut respecter son semblable : filles et garçons, ensemble soyons de bons citoyens.’ Pour réduire les violence liées au genre, les enfants du club ami de l’égalité du genre de la commune de Bagata, à 600 km à l’est de Kinshasa, chantent le texte à haute voix et avec grande conviction.

Un club d’enfants contre les violences basées sur le genre

Les enfants du club se réunissent dans une classe de l’école Ngemba. Ngemba est une école primaire de filles, mais pour les activités du club de sensibilisation sur la question du genre, les garçons de l’école de Mazaya, de l’autre cote de la rue, sont les bienvenus.

Le club a été fondé dans le cadre d’un programme pour la promotion de l’égalité des chances appelé Hommes et Femmes, progressons ensemble. Le Programme est mis en œuvre par le gouvernement de la République Démocratique du Congo et l’UNICEF grâce aux moyens financiers mis à disposition par ce dernier et l’Union européenne.

En encourageant le changement de comportement dans les relations entre garçons et filles et entre hommes et femmes, le programme contribue à réduire les cas des violences basée sur le genre et à une vie plus harmonieuse entre les hommes et les femmes.

La violence contre les filles et les femmes, ainsi que les garçons et les hommes, est un des problèmes de droits humains et de santé publique omniprésents en République Démocratique du Congo, dans les zones de conflit comme de non-conflit.

Abus et exploitation sexuelle, harcèlement sexuel, violences conjugales, pratiques traditionnelles néfastes, dénis des ressources et opportunités aux femmes ont lieu dans les écoles, les foyers, les lieux de travail et dans les espaces publics à travers le pays.

Apprendre à jouer, chanter et faire la vaisselle ensemble

Don Mbula Sambo à 12 ans. Il est membre du club ami de l’égalité du genre de Bagata. Il est assis sur un banc de classe avec son amie Merveille Mwanet (12 ans). Tous deux sont très heureux de faire partie du club qu’ils ont rejoint de leur propre initiative.

‘Ici nous apprenons à jouer ensemble, filles et garçons. Nous chantons ensemble. Nous apprenons aussi qu’il est important de se partager les taches entre filles et garçons, ici au sein du club, dans l’école et au sein de la famille’, souligne Don. Pour lui, c’est devenu normal d’aider aux tâches ménagères à la maison : ‘A la maison, j’aide ma grande sœur à faire la vaisselle. J’aime faire cela.’

Bien que cela soit devenu évident pour lui, il admet que ce n’est pas le cas pour son papa. Ce sont ces petits gestes et changements de comportement qui peuvent contribuer à plus d’égalité entre les filles et garçons.

Prendre les violences basées sur le genre à la racine

L’abbé Godefroid de Caritas Congo qui collabore avec l’UNICEF dans la mise en œuvre du Programme souligne que le programme intervient dans diverses facettes de la vie congolaise dans la Ville-Province de Kinshasa et les provinces de Kwilu, Kwango et Maindombe.

En plus des activités de sensibilisation aux questions du genre dans les écoles, le Programme inclut aussi un volet de microfinance qui vise à rendre les femmes économiquement plus fortes et indépendantes. ‘A Bagata 21 projets de microfinance ont vu le jour depuis le démarrage du programme.

Chaque projet compte entre 25 et 30 membres, hommes et femmes’, explique l’abbé Godefroid. ‘Chaque membre peut obtenir un petit crédit, par exemple pour acheter du sel ou du sucre qu’il peut mettre en vente sur le marché avec une petite marge.’

Par petits pas, le Programme Hommes et Femmes, progressons ensemble contribue à un mode de fonctionnement plus égalitaire entre hommes et femmes et réduit les racines des diverses formes de violences basées sur le genre dont souffre la République Démocratique du Congo.

Angola: Situation Report Yellow Fever, 23 June 2016

23 June 2016 - 1:13pm
Source: World Health Organization Country: Angola, Brazil, Chad, China, Colombia, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Peru, Uganda

SUMMARY

 In Angola the total number of notified cases has increased since early 2016. As of 17 June 2016 a total of 3294 suspected cases have been reported, of which 861 are confirmed. The total number of reported deaths is 347, of which 115 were reported among confirmed cases. Suspected cases have been reported in all provinces, and confirmed cases have been reported in 16 of 18 provinces and 79 of 123 reporting districts.

 Mass vaccination campaigns first began in Luanda and have now expanded to cover most of the other affected parts of Angola. Recently the campaigns have focused on border areas. Despite extensive vaccination efforts circulation of the virus persists.

 As of 20 June, in the Democratic Republic of The Congo (DRC), the total number of notified suspected cases is 1106, with 68 confirmed cases and 75 deaths. Cases have been reported in 22 health zones in five provinces. Of the 68 confirmed cases, 59 were imported from Angola, two are sylvatic and seven are autochthonous.

 Surveillance efforts have increased and vaccination campaigns in DRC have centred on affected zones in Kinshasa and Kongo Central.

 Two additional countries have reported confirmed yellow fever cases imported from Angola: Kenya (two cases) and People’s Republic of China (11 cases). These cases highlight the risk of international spread through non-immunised travellers.

 Six countries (Brazil, Chad, Colombia, Ghana, Peru and Uganda) are currently reporting yellow fever outbreaks or sporadic cases not linked to the Angolan outbreak.

 Following the advice of the Emergency Committee (EC) convened on 19 May 2016, the WHO Director-General decided that urban yellow fever outbreaks in Angola and DRC are serious public health events which warrant intensified national action and enhanced international support. The events do not at this time constitute a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC).

World: Aid Security Monthly Incident Statistics -Part Two, April 2016: 12 Months Trend Reporting, April 2015 to March 2016

23 June 2016 - 12:39pm
Source: European Interagency Security Forum, Insecurity Insight Country: Afghanistan, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Greece, Guinea, Kenya, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, World, Yemen

Humanitarian responses to insecurity with impact on the delivery of aid - Part Two

12-month trends based on open source reported measures to protect humanitarian programmes, staff and assets.

When security deteriorates overall, when fellow humanitarian organisations experience a security incident or when an agency was directly affected, humanitarian organisations may introduce staff protection measures or they may decide to suspend or closure programmes. Such measures affect the delivery of aid. This document is part of a two month’s series that shows open source information on programme suspension and closures as well as staff protection measures (March 2016 - Part One).

Weapons involved that triggered both programme closure or suspension and staff protection measures, as reported in open sources (53 events)

Firearms were the most frequently reported weapon involved in events that triggered programme suspension or closure and staff protection measures (29 events). Programmes in South Sudan and staff in CAR were most affected by firearm use (7 and 3 respectively). On one occasion, Trócaire reported suspended activities in Upper Nile State due to fighting between government and rebel forces (South Sudan).

The use of explosives, by State and Non-State Actors, triggered more reported programme closures or suspension than staff protection measures. Programmes in Syria (3), Afghanistan, South Sudan and Yemen (2 each) were most affected by security measures. An MSF-supported hospital in Sa'ada Governorate sustained damages from a nearby double-tap air strike. Health staff and patients were subsequently evacuated (Yemen).
The Red Cross withdrew workers after arson attacks on Ebola facilities (Boké Region,
Guinea). Two out of three no weapon use events were reported from Greece.

World: Aid Security Monthly Incident Statistics -Part One, March 2016: 12 Months Trend Reporting, April 2015 to March 2016

23 June 2016 - 12:35pm
Source: European Interagency Security Forum, Insecurity Insight Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burundi, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Greece, Guinea, Iraq, Kenya, Mali, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, World, Yemen

Humanitarian responses to insecurity with impact on the delivery of aid - Part One

12-month trends based on open source reported measures to protect humanitarian programmes, staff and assets.

When security deteriorates overall, when fellow humanitarian organisations experience a security incident or when an agency was directly affected, humanitarian organisations often introduce staff protection measures, such as restriction of movement or relocation of staff, or they may decide to suspend or closure programmes. Such measures affect the delivery of aid.

Over the 12-month period, the media reported 39 times on programme suspensions or closures and 14 times on the introduction of staff protection measures. The reported events are clearly only a fraction of all security measures taken by agencies and by no means representative. They highlight, however, the contexts and types of programmes where aid protection measures are publicly discussed. There are probably manifold reasons why humanitarian agencies are prepared to discuss security measures in open sources or why they may want to keep such policies confidential.

Democratic Republic of the Congo: UNHCR DR Congo Factsheet, 31 mai 2016

23 June 2016 - 11:15am
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Angola, Burundi, Central African Republic, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, South Sudan

EN BREF

11.966 Nouveaux réfugiés sud soudanais arrivés en RDC fin 2015.

112.785 Réfugiés centrafricains vivant en RDC.

517.326 Réfugiés de la RDC en Afrique.

2.445 Réfugiés rapatriés de la RDC en 2016.

ACTIVITES PRINCIPALES

  • En mai, 217 nouveaux réfugiés centrafricains (72 ménages) ont été enregistrés et relocalisés au camp de réfugiés de Boyabu. Ils sont arrivés par Batanga, Sud Ubani.

  • 362 réfugiés burundais (139 ménages) ont été relocalisés au camp de Lusenda au mois de mai. Avec ces dernières relocalisations, le total de réfugiés burundais au camp de Lusenda s’élève à 17.210 personnes.

  • Du 18 au 21 mai, une équipe de Radio France Internationale a visité le camp de réfugiés burundais de Lusenda pour le lancement du Club RFI qui aura pour tâche d’organiser des activités culturelles et de divertissement pour les réfugiés. A cette occasion l’équipe de Radio foot internationale a enregistré une émission au camp et deux matchs de football ont été organisés, l’un entre deux équipes de réfugiés et l’autre entre une équipe de réfugiés et une équipe de locaux. Les reportages peuvent être consultés sur rfi.fr (mot clé de recherche ‘Lusenda’).

  • Le HCR a échangé avec le PAM au sujet de la continuation de la distribution des vivres aux réfugiés sud soudanais.

  • Le 25 mai, les partenaires du HCR à savoir ADES, AIRD et CNR ont dépêché des agents à la province du Haut Uele pour accélérer la réponse à l’afflux de réfugiés sud soudanais.

  • Il n’y a pas suffisamment d’infrastructures scolaires à Doruma pour accueillir les réfugiés sud soudanais des derniers afflux. En mai, 3.992 enfants de 5 à 17 ans ont été identifiés. Ils n’ont pas fréquenté l’école parce que l’année scolaire arrive à terme et ils ne peuvent pas être intégrés automatiquement dans le système scolaire congolais. ADSSE, un partenaire du HCR, se chargera des cours de français pendant les vacances scolaires.

Democratic Republic of the Congo: UNHCR DR Congo Factsheet, 31 May 2016

23 June 2016 - 11:10am
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Angola, Burundi, Central African Republic, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Rwanda, South Sudan

HIGHLIGHTS

  • 11,966 Newly arrived South Sudanese refugees in DRC since late 2015.

  • 112,785 Refugees from the Central African Republic in the DRC.

  • 517,326 Congolese refugees in African countries 2,445 Refugees repatriated from DRC in 2016.

MAIN ACTIVITIES

  • In May, 217 newly arrived refugees (72 households) from the Central African Republic were registered and relocated to Boyabu refugee camp. They had arrived in Batanga, in South Ubangi.

  • 362 Burundian refugees (139 households) have been relocated to Lusenda camp in May. These last relocations bring the total of Burundian refugees living in the camp up to 17,210 persons.

  • From 18 to 21 May, a team from Radio France Internationale visited Lusenda camp for the launch of the Club RFI, in charge of organizing entertainment and cultural activities for the refugees. On this occasion, journalists from Radio Foot Internationale recorded the event at the camp and two football matches were organized, one between two refugees’ football teams, the other between refugees and the local community. Reports can be found under rfi.fr (search term ‘Lusenda’).

  • UNHCR has discussed with WFP on continuation of food distribution for South Sudanese refugees.

  • On 25 May, UNHCR’s partners ADES, AIRD and CNR sent staff to Haut Uele province in order to scale up the response to the refugee influx from South Sudan.

  • There is no sufficient school infrastructures in Doruma to accommodate the current South Sudan refugee influx. In May, a total of 3,992 children aged 5-17 years old have been identified. They do not attend school yet as the school year is about to finish and they cannot automatically be integrated into the Congolese educational system. ADSSE, a UNHCR partner, will assist with French language teaching during the school break.

World: Peace & Security Council Report No 81, June 2016

23 June 2016 - 10:02am
Source: Institute for Security Studies Country: Burundi, Chad, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Mali, Morocco, Somalia, Western Sahara, World

In this issue

■ Special focus: Annual meetings in New York

The 10th Joint Consultative Meetings between the PSC and the United Nations Security Council were marked by tension over the agenda and diverse approaches to decisionmaking.

Funding and joint action to prevent crises dominated the open debate in New York on the roles of the United Nations and the African Union in peacekeeping.

The PSC wants African members of the United Nations Security Council to report to it on how they have worked together to defend PSC decisions.

■ Situation Analysis

Adressing the relationship between drought and confl ict in Mali cannot rely on traditional crisis responses.

■ Addis Insight

The AU has been called on to intervene in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, where President Joseph Kabila is suspected of trying to extend his stay in offi ce. But can it be successful?
New developments around Western Sahara could create an opportunity for Africa to assert its position.

United Republic of Tanzania: WFP Tanzania: Country Brief, May 2016

23 June 2016 - 9:58am
Source: World Food Programme Country: Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, United Republic of Tanzania

Highlights

  • WFP Country Director, Richard Ragan, held a live Twitter chat with the public on WFP’s role in assisting to achieve Sustainable Development Goal 2 (End Hunger).

Operational Updates

  • Live Twitter Chat: The United Nations Resident Coordinator’s Office (UNRCO) in Tanzania has launched a ‘Live Twitter Chat’ initiative to raise public awareness about Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and how the UN is achieving them.
    During the second week of May, the focus has been on SDG 2 (End Hunger). WFP’s Country Director, Richard Ragan held a one hour live twitter session where he answered questions from the public about hunger and WFP’s work in Tanzania.

  • Market Access: WFP organised a Training of Trainers (TOT) in Morogoro Region. The TOT used Uganda’s post-harvest loss eradication (PHLE) model. The 16 trained participants, who were chosen by WFP’s partnering NGO’s, will train 2,000 farmers in Morogoro region. The model promotes the use of new hermetic technologies such as metal and plastic silos and Perdue improved crop storage (PICS) bags.

Congo: WFP Republic of Congo Country Brief, May 2016

23 June 2016 - 9:43am
Source: World Food Programme Country: Central African Republic, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo

Highlights

  • The School Feeding Programme is facing critical shortfalls from May 2016 onwards.

  • In May, WFP provided food assistance to 14,647 CAR refugees and to 3,244 DRC refugees.

  • The assistance to DRC refugees will end in June without new donor contributions.

Operational Updates

  • Through the school feeding programme, WFP provides hot meals to 95,000 children and plans to reach 132,000 children through 2018.

  • The distribution of the safety net programme in the newly-selected areas of Sibiti and Owando has been reinstated since November 2015 as WFP received a new contribution from the Government.
    The programme, however, is still suspended in Brazzaville and Pointe Noire due to insufficient resources.

  • WFP is starting a new project with the Agency for Technical Cooperation and Development (ACTED), to promote a Home Grown School Feeding programme. Mandingou and Kayes districts are targeted for the pilot phase.

Democratic Republic of the Congo: WFP Democratic Republic of Congo: Country Brief, May 2016

23 June 2016 - 8:23am
Source: World Food Programme Country: Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, South Sudan

Highlights

  • Mass mobilizations were carried out across the country on 26 May to push the Government to hold elections as planned. Apart from some unrest in Goma city, the mobilizations were by and large peaceful.

  • WFP is delivering emergency food assistance to nearly 30,000 people around Beni territory in North Kivu who have been cut off from assistance by the humanitarian community due to security reasons.

Operational Updates

  • On 26 May, the opposition carried out mass demonstrations in all the large cities in the country.
    The demonstrations were expected to cause unrest and violence, but apart from some clashes between the police and demonstrators in Goma, the marches were peaceful.

  • The Congolese military (FARDC) supported by MONUSCO have launched a military offensive codenamed “Usalama” (“Peace”) against ADF rebels in Beni territory of North Kivu. The offensive follows persistent attacks on civilians by ADF fighters in Beni territory, as well as their increased attacks on FARDC forces and MONUSCO bases in recent weeks.

  • The US and the EU are reviewing the possibility of imposing sanctions in response to the growing patterns of intimidation, harassment, and detention of members of the opposition and civil society leaders across the DRC. The sanctions could include the freezing of assets and travel bans.

  • From 19 – 25 May, USAID undertook a field visit to 4 CAR refugee camps of Bili/Bosobolo,
    Boyabu/Libenge, d’Inke/Gbadolite and Mole/Boyabu to better understand WFP assistance to refugees.

  • WFP responded to several emergencies around Beni territory in North Kivu by providing food assistance to IDPs fleeing insecurity in the area. Humanitarian activity in the area has been on standby in the last months due to security reasons. Nearly 30,000 people will be assisted over the course of the next few months.

  • In May, 11,120 South Sudan refugees who fled their home country due to insecurity to seek refuge in the neighbouring territory of Dungu in Haut-Uele province received 127 mt (reduced ration of 380g) of monthly food assistance.

Democratic Republic of the Congo: Submission to the Committee on the Rights of the Child on child recruitment and the reintegration of girls in DR Congo - April 2016

23 June 2016 - 7:17am
Source: Child Soldiers International Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo

Child Soldiers International presented this report to the Committee on the Rights of the Child in June 2016. It describes progress made by the government of the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) in preventing child recruitment and providing reintegration assistance to girls formerly associated with armed forces and armed groups.

In January-February 2016, a Child Soldiers International research team spent six weeks in North-East DRC to assess programmes for the reintegration of children formerly associated with armed groups, in particular to understand obstacles to the effective reintegration of girls in their communities. This document sets out our preliminary findings and recommendations.

Democratic Republic of the Congo: Launch of emergency vaccination campaigns on the DR Congo and Angola border

23 June 2016 - 4:58am
Source: World Health Organization Country: Angola, Democratic Republic of the Congo

Brazzaville, 22 June 2016 – As the yellow fever outbreak in Angola and Democratic Republic of the Congo continues, the World Health Organization will launch emergency pre-emptive vaccination campaigns on the DR Congo, Angola border and the city of Kinshasa in the DR Congo to halt the epidemic and prevent the risk of further international spread.

The initial phase of the campaign which begins in July will focus on districts where there is high movement of people and intense trade activities, particularly the northern border districts of Angola and targeted border districts in neighbouring countries. Specifically, within a 75-100km belt spanning the border between Angola and DR Congo and targeted health zones/communes at risk in Kinshasa city in the DR Congo. This will create an immune buffer to prevent further international spread.

Important gains in preventive vaccination campaigns have been achieved. So far more than 15 million doses of vaccine have been delivered to Angola and DR Congo. However, the urgent need to accelerate vaccination campaigns and the lack of sufficient funds for field operational activities, remain a challenge in Angola and DR Congo.

“While WHO is working with partners and vaccine manufacturers to increase vaccine production and replenish the emergency stockpile currently being used for this outbreak, it is vital to interrupt transmission, especially in cross-border areas to rapidly bring this outbreak under control and halt further international spread,” said Dr Matshidiso Moeti, the World Health Organization Regional Director for Africa.

Angola and DR Congo are being supported by WHO and partners to strengthen yellow fever screening for evidence at all major points of entry including – Luanda, Kinshasa, Lubumbashi and Matadi. Yellow fever vaccination is being offered at these points of entry for eligible travelers.

“WHO will continue to work with partners to scale up the required human resources, financial and other logistics so that response teams are present in every province of Angola where cases have been reported or where there is high risk. WHO will also continue its resource mobilization efforts as more resources are needed to address the operational challenges in Angola. In addition, to this a multidisciplinary team of experts will next week begin an evaluation of the response efforts in Angola and DR Congo and address any gaps.” the Regional Director added.

As of 13 June 2016, three countries – China, Kenya, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo – had reported cases linked to the Angola outbreak. An alert issued by the Republic of Congo is under investigation by a joint Ministry of Health, WHO and UNICEF team. Two suspected cases of yellow fever earlier reported in Sao Tome and Principe were investigated and have been ruled out. Another outbreak of yellow fever reported in Uganda and not linked to the Angola outbreak has been controlled.

As of 19 June 2016, 1106 suspected cases, including 75 deaths, had been reported in the country in five provinces (Bas-Uélé, Kwango, Tshuapa, Kongo Central and Kinshasa). At least 7 cases are confirmed as locally transmitted. WHO has dispatched multidisciplinary teams to Kongo Central, Kwango and Kinshasa provinces and is supporting the country with active case investigations, reactive vaccination and social mobilization activities.

NOTE TO THE EDITORS:

In light of the increasing concern over the current outbreak, WHO Director-General Dr Margaret Chan, convened an Emergency Committee meeting on 19 May 2016. The Committee concluded that the urban outbreak of yellow fever in Angola and its national and international spread to China, Democratic Republic of the Congo and Kenya does not, at this time, constitute a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC) but is a serious public health event which warrants intensified national action with international support.

WHO is the Secretariat for the International Coordinating Group for Yellow Fever Vaccine Provision (ICG). The ICG maintains an emergency stockpile of yellow fever vaccines to ensure rapid response to outbreaks in high-risk countries. WHO works with its partners in the ICG to control the stockpile of yellow fever vaccines and to manage global supply of the vaccine. The ICG approves and facilitates the dispatch of vaccine to countries in need of emergency response.

The Yellow Fever Initiative is financially supported by the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization (GAVI Alliance), the European Community Humanitarian Office (ECHO), the Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF), ministries of health, and partners in countries.

For more information on yellow fever, please click on http://www.who.int/emergencies/yellow-fever/en/

For media enquiries, please contact:

Ms Pauline Ajello, Emergency Communication, WHO AFRO, Phone: +256772689878, Email: ajellopa@who.int

Ms Dalia Lourenco, Communications Officer, WHO Angola, Phone: +244 9431 78227, Email: dalia.lourenco.levin@gmail.com
Mr Eugene Kabambi, Communications Officer, WHO DRC, Phone: +243 81 715 1697, Email: kabambie@who.int
Ms Alison Clements-Hunt, Emergency Communications, WHO DRC, Phone:+243 81 342 9167, Email: clementshuntal@who.int
Mr Collins Boakye-Agyemang, Regional Communications Advisor, WHO AFRO, Mobile: +242 06520 6565, Email: boakyeagyemangc@who.int

Congo: Launch of emergency vaccination campaigns on the DR Congo and Angola border

23 June 2016 - 4:58am
Source: World Health Organization Country: Angola, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo

Brazzaville, 22 June 2016 – As the yellow fever outbreak in Angola and Democratic Republic of the Congo continues, the World Health Organization will launch emergency pre-emptive vaccination campaigns on the DR Congo, Angola border and the city of Kinshasa in the DR Congo to halt the epidemic and prevent the risk of further international spread. The initial phase of the campaign which begins in July will focus on districts where there is high movement of people and intense trade activities, particularly the northern border districts of Angola and targeted border districts in neighbouring countries. Specifically, within a 75-100km belt spanning the border between Angola and DR Congo and targeted health zones/communes at risk in Kinshasa city in the DR Congo. This will create an immune buffer to prevent further international spread.

Important gains in preventive vaccination campaigns have been achieved. So far more than 15 million doses of vaccine have been delivered to Angola and DR Congo. However, the urgent need to accelerate vaccination campaigns and the lack of sufficient funds for field operational activities, remain a challenge in Angola and DR Congo.

“While WHO is working with partners and vaccine manufacturers to increase vaccine production and replenish the emergency stockpile currently being used for this outbreak, it is vital to interrupt transmission, especially in cross-border areas to rapidly bring this outbreak under control and halt further international spread,” said Dr Matshidiso Moeti, the World Health Organization Regional Director for Africa.

Angola and DR Congo are being supported by WHO and partners to strengthen yellow fever screening for evidence at all major points of entry including – Luanda, Kinshasa, Lubumbashi and Matadi. Yellow fever vaccination is being offered at these points of entry for eligible travelers.

“WHO will continue to work with partners to scale up the required human resources, financial and other logistics so that response teams are present in every province of Angola where cases have been reported or where there is high risk. WHO will also continue its resource mobilization efforts as more resources are needed to address the operational challenges in Angola. In addition, to this a multidisciplinary team of experts will next week begin an evaluation of the response efforts in Angola and DR Congo and address any gaps.” the Regional Director added.

As of 13 June 2016, three countries – China, Kenya, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo – had reported cases linked to the Angola outbreak. An alert issued by the Republic of Congo is under investigation by a joint Ministry of Health, WHO and UNICEF team. Two suspected cases of yellow fever earlier reported in Sao Tome and Principe were investigated and have been ruled out. Another outbreak of yellow fever reported in Uganda and not linked to the Angola outbreak has been controlled.

As of 19 June 2016, 1106 suspected cases, including 75 deaths, had been reported in the country in five provinces (Bas-Uélé, Kwango, Tshuapa, Kongo Central and Kinshasa). At least 7 cases are confirmed as locally transmitted. WHO has dispatched multidisciplinary teams to Kongo Central, Kwango and Kinshasa provinces and is supporting the country with active case investigations, reactive vaccination and social mobilization activities.

NOTE TO THE EDITORS:

In light of the increasing concern over the current outbreak, WHO Director-General Dr Margaret Chan, convened an Emergency Committee meeting on 19 May 2016. The Committee concluded that the urban outbreak of yellow fever in Angola and its national and international spread to China, Democratic Republic of the Congo and Kenya does not, at this time, constitute a Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC) but is a serious public health event which warrants intensified national action with international support.

WHO is the Secretariat for the International Coordinating Group for Yellow Fever Vaccine Provision (ICG). The ICG maintains an emergency stockpile of yellow fever vaccines to ensure rapid response to outbreaks in high-risk countries. WHO works with its partners in the ICG to control the stockpile of yellow fever vaccines and to manage global supply of the vaccine. The ICG approves and facilitates the dispatch of vaccine to countries in need of emergency response.

The Yellow Fever Initiative is financially supported by the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization (GAVI Alliance), the European Community Humanitarian Office (ECHO), the Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF), ministries of health, and partners in countries.

For more information on yellow fever, please click on http://www.who.int/emergencies/yellow-fever/en/

For media enquiries, please contact:

Ms Pauline Ajello, Emergency Communication, WHO AFRO, Phone: +256772689878, Email: ajellopa@who.int

Ms Dalia Lourenco, Communications Officer, WHO Angola, Phone: +244 9431 78227, Email: dalia.lourenco.levin@gmail.com
Mr Eugene Kabambi, Communications Officer, WHO DRC, Phone: +243 81 715 1697, Email: kabambie@who.int
Ms Alison Clements-Hunt, Emergency Communications, WHO DRC, Phone:+243 81 342 9167, Email: clementshuntal@who.int
Mr Collins Boakye-Agyemang, Regional Communications Advisor, WHO AFRO, Mobile: +242 06520 6565, Email: boakyeagyemangc@who.int

World: Number of refugees and internally displaced people by country of origin at end of 2015 - ECHO Daily Map | 22/06/2016

22 June 2016 - 10:54pm
Source: European Commission Humanitarian Aid Office Country: Afghanistan, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Eritrea, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Ukraine, Viet Nam, World

World: NGO Partnerships: Strengthening national capacity - May 2016

22 June 2016 - 2:30pm
Source: World Food Programme Country: Bangladesh, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Philippines, South Sudan, Sudan, United Republic of Tanzania, World

WFP works with a wide range of national and local first responders, including community based organizations, NGOs, Red Cross and Red Crescent National Societies. 75 percent of WFP’s food assistance is delivered together with NGOs. Around 800 of WFP’s more than 1,000 NGO partners are national and local NGOs. These organizations are often the first to respond to crises and remain in the communities they serve before, after and during emergencies.

WFP’s collaboration with NGOs allows beneficiaries to access assistance at speed and scale, brings cost efficiencies, strengthens our accountability to affected populations, and supports innovative approaches to programming.

Capacity Strengthening: the WFP Approach

WFP prioritizes capacity strengthening activities with national and local NGOs. Strengthening their capacity ensures a more sustainable impact of WFP interventions by empowering communities to address their own food challenges and is key to achieving sustainable development.

WFP’s partnerships with NGOs have evolved significantly in recent years, with regular consultations and earlier involvement in programme design, drawing on the close understanding of the local context by national NGOs. WFP aims to work in strategic, qualitative partnership with NGOs throughout the programme cycle.

Key areas in which WFP is working with NGOs include emergency response and preparedness; identifying, treating and monitoring malnutrition; the design of specialized nutritious foods; cash-based transfers; mapping food insecurity and reporting market trends; the empowerment of smallholder farmers; financial and administrative procedures; and supply chain management. These capacity strengthening initiatives are delivered directly by WFP, as well as through experienced international NGO partners with expertise and close local relationships.

Democratic Republic of the Congo: Rendre le sourire aux détenues de la prison de Mbandaka

22 June 2016 - 1:59pm
Source: UN Development Programme Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo

Le pavillon des femmes détenues à la prison centrale est une lueur d’espoir dans l’univers carcéral de Mbandaka. La prison construite en 1929 par les Belges héberge aujourd’hui 300 détenus dont 8 femmes, certaines présentes avec leurs enfants. En 87 ans d’existence, les lieux n’ont jamais été réhabilités. Un seul pavillon possède encore des enceintes closes : il héberge les pensionnaires jugés dangereux, tous logés à la même enseigne : militaires, policiers, civils et adolescents.

Avant les travaux réalisés dans le pavillon des femmes, les détenus hommes et femmes passaient dans la journée dans la cour commune, avec tous les risques que cela peut comporter. Aujourd’hui les choses ont changé. « Le nouveau pavillon humanise la privation de liberté. C’est une joie et une fierté de travailler dans ces conditions. Les détenues logent à présent dans des cellules individuelles sur un lit avec matelas et une moustiquaire. Elles disposent chacune d’un meuble pour ranger les effets personnels. Les pensionnaires ont de l’eau grâce à un réservoir d’une capacité de 2000 litres. Elles disposent d’une toilette et d’une douche qu’elles maintiennent propre » confie Marie Hélène Yuwe Bolala, directrice adjointe de la prison et responsable du pavillon des femmes. « Dormir sur un matelas avec un drap, une couverture et sous une toile moustiquaire en prison relève du luxe réservé aux femmes détenues alors les hommes passent la nuit à même le sol sur des nattes » déclare Marie Hélène. Elle souhaite à présent le démarrage de la formation en coupe et couture afin d’occuper les détenues pendant la journée et de leur donner une perspective d’avenir au sortir de la prison.

La quarantaine révolue, Mboyo soutient que les conditions de détention ont été sérieusement améliorées. « J’ai été condamnée à 3 ans et je suis ici avec mes trois enfants mineurs parce que je n’ai personne à Mbandaka pour les prendre en charge. Mes petits sont maintenant dans des conditions acceptables. Ils dorment sur un matelas et une moustiquaire. En plus, une possibilité de formation en coupe et couture s’offrira bientôt à moi ».

Transformer le concept d’emprisonnement

Le Programme Pluriannuel d’Appui à la Justice (PPAJ) soutenu par le PNUD et la MONUSCO a fait l’une de ses priorités la réhabilitation du pavillon femmes de la prison centrale de Mbandaka dans le cadre de la réforme pénitentiaire. Il s’agissait d’améliorer les conditions de détention et de favoriser la réinsertion socio-économique. Après une évaluation entre le ministère provincial de la Justice, le PNUD et la MONUSCO une entreprise recrutée a exécuté les travaux de réhabilitation pour un coût global de 52 000 dollars et en prenant en compte la sexospécificité des besoins. Le pavillon a été équipé en mobiliers et matériaux évalués à 20 000 dollars comprenant lits, matelas, tables, ustensiles et ainsi que des machines à coudre. Le pavillon rénové a été remis officiellement au ministère de la Justice et Droits Humains en avril 2016.

A cette occasion, Oumar Diallo, Coordonnateur du PPAJ au PNUD, a déclaré « qu’il est de la responsabilité de chaque intervenant dans le domaine de la justice et plus particulièrement de la chaîne pénale de transformer le concept de l’emprisonnement. Ce dernier est souvent caractérisé par une perte de temps exaspérée par la souffrance et l’humiliation dans une période qui devrait être propice pour le développement personnel. Un apprentissage préalable à la libération et à la réinsertion sociale de l’individu serait un bénéfice pour la société dans son ensemble ».

Le Programme Pluriannuel d’Appui à la Justice vise à renforcer la chaîne pénale en développant les capacités de tous ses acteurs en République démocratique du Congo. Il comporte cinq parties à savoir : l’Appui à la coordination sectorielle; l’Appui à l’Administration pénitentiaire; l’Appui à la Police judiciaire; l’Appui aux Juridictions; l’Appui aux Hautes Juridictions et au Conseil Supérieur de la Magistrature. En mars 2016, le PNUD et la MONUSCO avaient participé à la remise de brevets aux dix-neuf détenues de la prison centrale de Makala à Kinshasa.

Marc Ngwanza

Democratic Republic of the Congo: Lubudi dit au revoir au choléra grâce aux Villages Assainis

22 June 2016 - 1:55pm
Source: UN Children's Fund Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo

Reportage à Lubudi

Le programme national Village Assaini a permis de raccorder plus de mille villages à l’eau potable dans la province de l’ex-Katanga pour 2013-2017. Dans la zone de santé de Lubudi, traumatisée il y a encore quelques années par un choléra endémique, c’est un véritable progrès : les maladies hydriques sont en net recul.

A 17km de Lubudi, gros bourg endormi, figé dans le temps, Lubinda apparaît au sortir des herbes hautes de la savane katangaise, et au détour d’une montée rocailleuse. Ce village de terre et propret veut servir d’exemple dans l’assainissement. Chacun à sa manière s’y investit.

Objectif : être un modèle du « village assaini »

Il y a Furaha Kalenga, jolie trentenaire, désignée hygiéniste du village. Chargée de superviser l’entretien de la pompe manuelle, elle collecte également auprès de chaque ménage une petite cagnotte, 500 francs congolais – une somme pour ces villageois -, soit 50 cents de dollars, pour entretenir la pompe. Mais aussi d’autres « mamans », comme Lisette Mashango, occupée à balayer devant sa maison. Pour tous, le forage d’un puits et l’installation d’une pompe à eau fut une bénédiction.

L’eau potable est enfin arrivée à Lubudi

« Avant on était obligés de parcourir plusieurs centaines de mètres jusqu’à la rivière pour puiser de l’eau, explique Lisette Mashango. En plus l’eau pouvait être impropre. Résultat : nos enfants tombaient malades, souffraient de diarrhées et de vomissements ». Son visage s’ouvre alors. « Mais depuis janvier et l’arrivée de la pompe, heureusement cette période pénible est derrière nous, ajoute-t-elle alors qu’à quelques centaines de mètres de là, des ouvriers s’affairent sur le montage d’une troisième pompe.

"On est contents car les enfants ne sont plus malades."

Un soulagement colossal qui s’appuie sur une réduction drastique des maladies diarrhéiques. « Il faut savoir que Lubudi et ses dizaines de milliers d’habitants ne comptait aucun accès à l’eau potable il y a encore deux ans, dit le docteur Robert Kabesya, médecin chef de zone. C’était vraiment catastrophique. Du coup, le choléra était endémique ici. En 2013, on comptait 80 cas et 9 décès. Un an après l’arrivée de l’eau potable, on n’avait plus que 36 cas et seulement 3 décès ».

La fin du choléra est en vue

D’année en année, la situation s’améliore. Depuis le début 2016, aucun décès dû au choléra n’est à déplorer dans la région.

En raison des épidémies chroniques de choléra, la zone de Lubudi, et plus largement l’ex-Katanga, a été considéré comme prioritaire par l’UNICEF et ses partenaires congolais, bénéficiant de l’appui de l’agence américaine de l’USAID.

Nous avons creusé 462 puits dans plus de mille villages dans la province de l’ex-Katanga détaille Mariette Neema Mwesha, administratrice communication à l’UNICEF. « C’est un grand progrès même si on est confrontés à des limites. Les communautés et leurs leaders ont encore du mal à s’approprier les bons comportements hygiéniques ». Raison pour laquelle le programme Villages Assainis demeure plus que jamais une priorité à perpétuer. Tous les acteurs concernés, comme Misao Moloba, s’accrochent aux progrès sanitaires.

Le chef de projet « Eau et Assainissement » de l’ ONG congolaise ATGK supervise la mise en place des pompes dans les villages. témoigne: « On a déjà couvert en un plus de deux ans 60% de la zone de Lubudi ».

"A chaque puits creusé et chaque pompe installée, c’est une grande fierté, une grande satisfaction, car on apporte de l’eau potable."

Le programme national Ecoles et Villages Assainis bénéficie du soutien de la coopération britannique ainsi que de la coopération américaine.