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Myanmar: Two dead in Buddhist-Muslim unrest in Myanmar: police

3 July 2014 - 12:07am
Source: Agence France-Presse Country: Myanmar

07/03/2014 04:44 GMT

YANGON, July 3, 2014 (AFP) - Two people have been killed during Buddhist-Muslim violence in Myanmar's second-largest city, police said Thursday after security forces fired rubber bullets to disperse hundreds of rioters.

Myanmar has been shaken by several waves of sectarian conflict in recent years that have cast a shadow over its emergence from decades of repressive military rule.

At least 250 people have been killed and tens of thousands left homeless since 2012 by inter-communal violence that has largely targeted Muslims.

Police fired rubber bullets during the night on Tuesday into Wednesday to disperse hundreds of rioters, some armed with sticks and knives, who took to the streets and attacked a Muslim teashop after an accusation of rape, the authorities said.

"There are two dead," a police officer, who did not want to be named, told AFP by telephone from the central city of Mandalay, without providing further details.

In a monthly radio address, Myanmar's reformist President Thein Sein called for an end to religious hatred.

"As our country is a multi-racial and -religious nation, the current reform process will be successful only when stability is maintained through the co-operation of all the citizens by living harmoniously with one another," he said according to an official transcript.

"For the reform to be successful, I would like to urge all to avoid instigation and behaviour that incite hatred among our fellow citizens," he said.

The former general has been credited with pushing through dramatic reforms since the former junta handed power to a nominally civilian government in 2011.

But the sectarian conflicts have provided a major test for his administration and prompted warnings that the country's fragile transition towards democracy could be at risk.

Radical monks have been accused of stoking religious tensions with fiery warnings that Buddhism is under threat from Islam.

A prominent hardline monk, Wirathu, posted a link to online allegations against the teashop owners on his Facebook page just hours before the latest unrest flared up.

Rioters smashed or set fire to several cars and threw bricks and bottles at some houses, according to the state-controlled New Light of Myanmar newspaper.

It said that about 450 rioters with sticks and knives took to the streets, despite an increased security presence.

"We are investigating this riot and will take action against those involved in the mob attack," Mandalay police chief Zaw Win Aung was quoted as saying.

He said extra security forces would be deployed to restore order.

Myanmar's Muslims account for an estimated four percent of the roughly 60 million population in a country where for many people Buddhism forms an intrinsic part of national identity.

nan/dr/jah

© 1994-2014 Agence France-Presse

Myanmar: Burma – Complex Emergency Fact Sheet #3 (FY) 2014

2 July 2014 - 8:10pm
Source: US Agency for International Development Country: Myanmar, United States of America preview

Highlights

  • U.N. agencies and international non-government organizations (NGOs) resume relief operations in Rakhine State.

  • Fighting between Government of Burma (GoB) forces and the Kachin Independence Army (KIA) generates new displacement in Kachin and northern Shan states.

Thailand: Travel Restrictions Tighten for Burmese Refugees in Thailand

2 July 2014 - 11:12am
Source: Irrawaddy Country: Myanmar, Thailand

By SAW YAN NAING

RANGOON — The Thai junta, which has been ruling the country under martial law since May 22, has reportedly stepped up restrictions on the movement of more than 120,000 Burmese refugees living in camps along the Thai-Burma border.

Speaking with The Irrawaddy on Tuesday, Saw Honest, chairman of the Mae La refugee camp, said those restrictions included a general ban on travel outside the camps and a curfew.

“Refugees are banned from leaving the camp to seek jobs. Refugees are banned from leaving their homes from 6 pm to 6 am,” he said. “Only those who have special conditions such as medical treatment or other emergency cases can travel, but need to seek official permission.

“Respective Thai security units at every camp informed us about the regulations. We are not allowed to go outside the camp, refugees have been warned not to engage in logging and drug dealing,” added Saw Honest, who oversees the administration of Mae La, the largest Thai border camp, where some 40,000 Burmese refugees reside.

“Those who violate the rules will be punished. And for those who repeatedly violate the rules, their names will be deleted from refugee camp [registries], and they will no longer be allowed to live in the camp, and they may even be deported back to Burma,” he added.

Saw Honest said refugees with special circumstances requiring travel outside the camps, such as for education or health reasons, were required to seek official permission from the respective Thai security units at the camps before traveling beyond their confines.

“We have a problem with the restrictions,” Saw Honest said. “But we can’t do anything now as it is the order of the Thai army. We may sort it out to ease the restrictions later because it is not a good time to do it now.”

He said the restrictions had been communicated to refugees after a meeting between local Thai authorities and community-based organizations in Mae La and other camps on Tuesday.

“We held a meeting and informed the refugees about the rules. The plan just started today. But we don’t know how long it will last, as they didn’t tell us. I think it might last until next election,” Saw Honest said. The Thai junta, which has branded itself the National Council for Peace and Order, has said it plans to hold an election in October of next year.

The orders come amid an ongoing reform program enacted by the junta that has included a sweeping crackdown on undocumented migrant workers that has forced more than 200,000 Cambodian laborers to return home. Hundreds of Burmese migrant workers have also been scrutinized, detained and deported back to Burma since early June.

The latest development is likely to affect daily life for tens of thousands of Burmese refugees, some of whom have lived in the camps for 25 years—a span during which Thailand has seen three coups. There are nine refugee camps spread across the Thai-Burma border.

Duncan McArthur, partnership director of The Border Consortium (TBC), a nongovernmental organization that has been providing humanitarian aid to the Burmese refugees for more than 20 years, told The Irrawaddy on Tuesday that Thai authorities were applying restrictions already on the books.

“TBC understands that the Thai district authorities have been ordered to enforce existing regulations more strictly, which will include restricting refugee movements outside of camps. Refugees with special circumstances will still be able to apply for permission to travel.

“District authorities in Tak province have called a series of meetings with UNHCR [UN High Commissioner for Refugees] and NGOs this week to clarify the situation,” McArthur said. “However, we understand that there will be no change in policy relating to the provision of humanitarian assistance to refugees.”

He said the TBC was not aware of any plans for Thai authorities to conduct identity checks at the camps. “Refugee status determination procedures have essentially been suspended since 2005, and we are not expecting official screening processes for unregistered refugees to resume any time soon,” according to McArthur.

But Ye Min, a Burmese refugee at the Nu Po border camp, claimed that screening, official or otherwise, would be taking place.

“They [Thai army] want to know how many people are real refugees and how many people illegally came to stay in the camp and lack proper documents,” he said.

Ye Min added that there were fears among the refugee population that those without proper documents, such as UN registration cards recognized by the Thai government, would be deported. Rumors were circulating that even UN cardholders would be subject to deportation or would have their status as a recognized refugee revoked if found traveling or residing outside the camps, Ye Min claimed.

Meanwhile, the UNHCR held a meeting on June 27 with Karen community-based organizations including the Karen Refugees Committee, Karen Women’s Organization, Karen Youth Organizations, and Karen Office for Relief and Development (KORD), seeking opinions from refugees about the ongoing peace process between the Burmese government and ethnic armed groups.

Asked about claims of impending refugee screenings, UNHCR spokeswoman Vivian Tan told The Irrawaddy on Tuesday that the UN refugee agency had not been informed of any such plan.

Led by Thailand’s Internal Security Operations Command (ISOC) and attended by representatives from four provinces including Tak, as well as NGOs, the UNHCR and other Thai authorities, a three-day meeting was held from June 17-19 in Mae Sot, Thailand, to discuss repatriation plans for refugees on the Thai-Burma border.

Over the last three years, the Burmese government and most ethnic armed groups have signed bilateral ceasefire agreements. Now, amid ongoing negotiations for a nationwide ceasefire accord, discussions among Thai authorities and aid groups on the border have turned to the eventual return of Burmese refugees to their homeland.

Thai authorities’ previously stated policy on the refugees is that they would be allowed to return to Burma on a purely voluntary basis.

McArthur said TBC was not aware of any change regarding that stance.

“TBC’s independent assessment remains that the conditions are not yet conducive for a voluntary return of refugees nor their sustainable reintegration in safety and with dignity,” he added.

World: Le sort des enfants en temps de conflit armé - Rapport du Secrétaire général (A/68/878–S/2014/339)

2 July 2014 - 8:41am
Source: UN Security Council, UN General Assembly Country: Afghanistan, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, India, Iraq, Lebanon, Mali, Myanmar, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Somalia, Syrian Arab Republic, Thailand, Uganda, World, Yemen, South Sudan

Assemblée générale Soixante-huitième session Point 65 de l’ordre du jour Promotion et protection des droits de l’enfant

Conseil de sécurité Soixante-neuvième année

I. Introduction

  1. Soumis en application de la résolution 2068 (2012), par laquelle le Conseil de sécurité m’a prié de continuer à lui présenter, tous les ans, des rapports sur l’application de ses résolutions et des déclarations de son président concernant les enfants et les conflits armés, le présent rapport couvre la période allant de janvier à décembre 2013.

  2. Le rapport renseigne sur les tendances mondiales de l’impact des conflits armés sur les enfants en 2013 et les principales activités et initiatives menées en exécution des résolutions du Conseil de sécurité sur la question et les conclusions de son groupe de travail. Comme le précédent rapport (A/67/845-S/2013/245), le présent rapport rend compte de la coopération entre les partenaires concernant la question du sort des enfants en temps de conflit armé, y compris au sein du système des Nations Unies.

  3. Conformément aux résolutions du Conseil de sécurité sur la question, le rapport donne dans ses annexes la liste des parties qui recrutent et utilisent des enfants, commettent des violences sexuelles sur la personne d’enfants, des meurtres ou des atteintes à leur intégrité physique en violation du droit international, attaquent systématiquement les écoles et hôpitaux, ainsi que le personnel protégé, ou menacent de le faire.

  4. L’ONU a constaté et vérifié toutes les informations consignées dans le présent rapport. Elle a signalé les cas où des facteurs comme l’insécurité ou les restrictions d’accès l’ont empêchée de recueillir ou de vérifier des informations en toute indépendance. Le présent rapport est le fruit de vastes consultations menées au sein du système des Nations Unies, au Siège et sur le terrain, et avec les États Membres concernés.

  5. En application de la résolution 1612 (2005) du Conseil de sécurité et pour identifier les situations relevant de son mandat, ma Représentante spéciale pour les enfants et les conflits armés s’est guidée sur les critères dégagés par le droit international humanitaire et la jurisprudence internationale pour déterminer l’existence d’un conflit armé. Dans l’exercice de son mandat, elle a adopté une démarche pragmatique fondée sur la coopération et axée sur l’aspect humanitaire, le but étant d’assurer une protection étendue et efficace des enfants en détresse en temps de conflit. La mention dans le présent rapport de telle ou telle situation ne vaut pas qualification juridique de ladite situation et la mention de telle ou telle partie non étatique ne préjuge pas son statut juridique.

Myanmar: Myanmar/Kachin: WASH Cluster Snapshot, June 2014

2 July 2014 - 8:14am
Source: UN Children's Fund, WASH Cluster Country: Myanmar preview

Highlights of the month

  • Training of WASH Partners on 4W matrix realised in North Shan
  • Three days WASH training in Lashio were organized focusing on HP essentials, PHAST approach and KAP survey. 35 participants from 7 WASH cluster members
  • Preparation of cross line missions for Laiza and Mai Ja Yang
  • Technical support to WASH members for Technical briefs development in the perspective of Mid term Wash cluster review /learning workshop (25-26 June)
  • Finalization and sharing of Capacity building assessment report
  • Joint site planning WASH / Shelter clusters in North

Myanmar: Myanmar: Internal Displacement in Myanmar (1 June 2014)

2 July 2014 - 6:31am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Myanmar preview

Myanmar: Myanmar: Internal Displacement in Rakhine State (1 May 2014)

2 July 2014 - 6:29am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Myanmar preview

Myanmar: Myanmar: IDP Sites in Kachin and northern Shan States (1 June 2014)

2 July 2014 - 6:27am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Myanmar preview

Myanmar: Myanmar: Internal Displacement in Kachin and northern Shan States, as of 1 June 2014

2 July 2014 - 6:21am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Myanmar preview

Myanmar: Sectarian unrest shakes major Myanmar city

2 July 2014 - 4:39am
Source: Agence France-Presse Country: Myanmar

07/02/2014 08:36 GMT

YANGON, July 2, 2014 (AFP) - Myanmar police fired warning shots after an angry mob attacked Muslim property in the central city of Mandalay, authorities said Wednesday, in the latest eruption of religious unrest to shake the Buddhist-majority nation.

Around five people were injured as rioters hurled stones at a Muslim teashop and surrounding buildings on Tuesday night, said Lieutenant Colonel Zaw Min Oo of Mandalay region police.

"We fired three warning shots to control the crowd," he told AFP, adding that the situation was calm on Wednesday morning, with an increased security presence in the area.

Myanmar has been convulsed by several waves of sectarian conflict in recent years that have cast a shadow over its emergence from military rule.

A senior police official who did not want to be named told AFP that the Mandalay rioters, who were armed with knives and stones, had been spurred on by claims against people from the teashop.

"The shop owners were accused of rape a few days ago. The violence started after those accusations were spread and created religious tension," he said.

One Muslim resident in Mandalay said the mob swelled into the hundreds as police struggled to contain the unrest late Tuesday.

Attacks against Muslims -- who make up at least four percent of the population -- have exposed deep rifts in Myanmar.

At least 250 people have been killed and tens of thousands left homeless since 2012 by inter-communal violence that has largely targeted Muslims and has often been provoked by rumours or individual criminal acts.

Hardline monk Wirathu posted a link to online allegations against the teashop owners on his Facebook page just hours before the unrest sparked.

The cleric is part of a radical wing of the Buddhist clergy that has been accused of stoking sectarian tensions with fiery warnings that Buddhism is under threat from Islam.

The radical Buddhists have proposed boycotts of Muslim businesses and supported controversial curbs on religious freedoms that are now being considered by the government.

hla-nan/klm/pj/dr/sm

© 1994-2014 Agence France-Presse

World: Los niños y los conflictos armados - Informe del Secretario General (A/68/878–S/2014/339)

2 July 2014 - 4:27am
Source: UN Security Council, UN General Assembly Country: Afghanistan, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, India, Iraq, Lebanon, Libya, Mali, Myanmar, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Somalia, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Thailand, Uganda, World, Yemen, South Sudan preview

Asamblea General
Sexagésimo octavo período de sesiones
Tema 65 del programa
Promoción y protección de los derechos del niño

Consejo de Seguridad
Sexagésimo noveno año

I. Introducción

1.El presente informe, que abarca el período comprendido entre enero y diciembre de 2013, se presenta en cumplimiento de lo dispuesto en la resolución 2068 (2012) del Consejo de Seguridad, en la que el Consejo me solicitó que le siguiera presentando informes anuales sobre la aplicación de sus resoluciones y de las declaraciones de su Presidencia relativas a los niños y los conflictos armados.

2.En el informe se destacan las tendencias mundiales en relación con los efectos de los conflictos armados en los niños en 2013 y las principales actividades e iniciativas con respecto a la aplicación de las resoluciones pertinentes del Consejo de Seguridad y las conclusiones de su Grupo de Trabajo sobre los Niños y los Conflictos Armados. A modo de seguimiento del informe anterior (A/67/845-S/2013/245), en este informe se presentan datos actualizados sobre la cooperación entre los asociados del programa sobre los niños y los conflictos armados, incluso dentro del sistema de las Naciones Unidas.

3.De conformidad con las resoluciones del Consejo de Seguridad sobre los niños y los conflictos armados, en los anexos del presente informe se incluyen listas de las partes que, en contravención del derecho internacional, reclutan o utilizan niños, cometen actos de violencia sexual contra niños o causan la muerte o mutilación de niños o llevan a cabo ataques frecuentes contra escuelas u hospitales o agresiones o amenazas de agresión frecuentes contra personal protegido.

4.Las Naciones Unidas han investigado y documentado toda la información que se presenta en este informe y han verificado su exactitud. En los casos en que factores como la inseguridad o las restricciones de acceso limitaron la capacidad para obtener o verificar la información de modo independiente, esto se hace constar.
Durante la preparación del informe se celebraron amplias consultas en el seno de las Naciones Unidas, tanto en la Sede como sobre el terreno, y con los Estados Miembros pertinentes.

5.De conformidad con lo dispuesto en la resolución 1612 (2005) del Consejo de Seguridad, y para determinar las situaciones que abarca su mandato, mi Representante Especial para la Cuestión de los Niños y los Conflictos Armados se atiene a los criterios que recogen el derecho internacional humanitario y la jurisprudencia internacional para determinar la existencia de un conflicto armado.
En el desempeño de su mandato, mi Representante Especial ha adoptado un enfoque pragmático y de cooperación en este ámbito haciendo hincapié en los principios humanitarios, a fin de proporcionar una protección amplia y eficaz a los niños afectados por los conflictos que se encuentran en situaciones preocupantes. La referencia a una situación no es una determinación jurídica y la mención de una parte no estatal no afecta a su estatuto jurídico.

World: Internews Europe: Annual Review 2013

2 July 2014 - 3:47am
Source: Internews Network Country: Côte d'Ivoire, Haiti, Iraq, Kenya, Mali, Myanmar, Pakistan, Philippines, Somalia, World preview

Internews Europe’s global programme team successfully implemented an ambitious portfolio of projects in 2013 to support local media and information systems in some of the most fragile, crisis-hit and poorest countries of the world.

The latest edition of Internews Europe's 2013 Annual Review summarises achievements across a diverse range of projects in more than 30 countries worldwide.

World: Communications with Communities Asia-­Pacific Newsletter June 2014

2 July 2014 - 2:32am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Fiji, Indonesia, Myanmar, Philippines, Solomon Islands, World preview

This update seeks to support growth in innovative policy, practice and partnerships in humanitarian action to better communicate with disaster­affected communities. Readers are encouraged to forward this email through their own networks.

**Myanmar **

OCHA Myanmar's May 2014 edition of the Humanitarian Bulletin talks about strengthening humanitarian partners' accountability to affected populations (AAP). ­­­ OCHA hosted a meeting with First Response Radio (FRR) on 11 June. Attended by Internews, BBC Media Action, International Media Support (IMS), UNICEF, MSF, UNHCR, UNIC, MIMU and Solidarities International. A general overview of FRR work in response to Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines was shared. FRR is also looking to set up an office in Cambodia to support its operations in the region. ­­­ BBC Media Action held its 'Lifeline Workshop' from 16 to 18 June with some 30 participants, including government, humanitarian agencies and media working on simulations and Lifeline broadcasting. During this workshop, partners felt the need to build on the momentum through forming a coordinated approach to preparedness work, including targeted training sessions for clusters and government which should be tied in with contingency plan and future humanitarian simulation exercises.



World: Communications with Communities Asia-­Pacific Newsletter June 2014

2 July 2014 - 2:32am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Fiji, Indonesia, Myanmar, Philippines, Solomon Islands, World preview

This update seeks to support growth in innovative policy, practice and partnerships in humanitarian action to better communicate with disaster­affected communities. Readers are encouraged to forward this email through their own networks.

**Myanmar **

OCHA Myanmar's May 2014 edition of the Humanitarian Bulletin talks about strengthening humanitarian partners' accountability to affected populations (AAP). ­­­ OCHA hosted a meeting with First Response Radio (FRR) on 11 June. Attended by Internews, BBC Media Action, International Media Support (IMS), UNICEF, MSF, UNHCR, UNIC, MIMU and Solidarities International. A general overview of FRR work in response to Typhoon Haiyan in the Philippines was shared. FRR is also looking to set up an office in Cambodia to support its operations in the region. ­­­ BBC Media Action held its 'Lifeline Workshop' from 16 to 18 June with some 30 participants, including government, humanitarian agencies and media working on simulations and Lifeline broadcasting. During this workshop, partners felt the need to build on the momentum through forming a coordinated approach to preparedness work, including targeted training sessions for clusters and government which should be tied in with contingency plan and future humanitarian simulation exercises.



World: World Bank: Human Rights Status Report and Action Plan

2 July 2014 - 12:16am
Source: Human Rights Watch Country: Myanmar, Uganda, World preview

Since Jim Yong Kim took office as the president of the World Bank Group on July 1, 2012, he has overseen meaningful advances in tackling discrimination, in certain instances improved its analysis of and response to human rights risks, and worked to learn from the Group's past mistakes. To be effective, these advances need to be broadened and institutionalized. Kim's presidency has coincided with a number of developments within the Bank, including the review and update of the World Bank's safeguard policies and an increased recognition of the importance of civic participation and social accountability following the popular uprisings in the Middle East and North Africa, providing him with important opportunities to entrench human rights reforms. In April 2013, Human Rights Watch wrote to Kim proposing an agenda advancing human rights in his presidency.

This paper is an assessment of the World Bank Group's progress in three key human rights areas that are central to the Group's goals of eradicating extreme poverty and promoting shared prosperity. It outlines steps that the Group should take to build upon the gains that it has made to:

  • Advance the elimination of all forms of discrimination;
  • Foster a World Bank Group that respects and protects human rights in all that it does; and
  • Support an environment in which community members and civil society can freely and effectively hold their governments and international institutions to account.

Myanmar: The ICRC in Myanmar - 30 Jun 2014

1 July 2014 - 9:26pm
Source: International Committee of the Red Cross Country: Myanmar

Overview

The ICRC established a permanent presence in Myanmar in 1986. Since January 2013 it has been gradually expanding its activities in the country, providing vital humanitarian assistance to people affected by intercommunal violence in Rakhine State and armed conflict in the northeast of the country. It works to improve access to health-care services and clean water, and to restore livelihoods. The organization also visits places of detention throughout Myanmar and maintains a regular dialogue with the authorities on detainee welfare issues. Many of its programmes in support of needy communities are carried out jointly with the Myanmar Red Cross.

Visiting detainees

The Myanmar government granted the ICRC approval to resume visits to places of detention in 2013, after a five-year gap. Since visits resumed, the ICRC has conducted sanitation and health infrastructure projects that have improved living conditions for more than 30,000 detainees.

During prison visits, ICRC staff tour the premises to evaluate living conditions and treatment and to talk in private with the detainees of their choice. They only discuss findings and recommendations concerning detainee welfare with the authorities concerned.

The ICRC also organizes family visits and helps detainees to stay in touch with their relatives through exchanging letters bearing family news (Red Cross messages).

Improving health-care access

The ICRC strives to strengthen the health-care system in areas affected by violence and armed conflict, and in Kachin State works towards this objective in both government and non-government controlled areas. Projects are currently underway to overhaul water, sanitation and waste management infrastructure in 14 health facilities (hospitals and health-care centres) in Rakhine State and Kachin State. The ICRC also donates medicine and medical consumables to health-care facilities and supports their vaccination programmes. It develops the expertise of Myanmar medical personnel through delivering training in areas such as primary trauma care and weapon-wounded surgical techniques, and through training and financial support to midwives and other key staff.

Physical rehabilitation services

Landmines and unexploded ordnance are a serious issue in Myanmar and continue to claim victims. For more than 20 years, the ICRC has provided financial and technical support to physical rehabilitation programmes in the country. Since 2013, nearly 6,000 physically disabled people have received artificial limbs at centres supported by the ICRC, such as the Myanmar Red Cross-run centre in Hpa-an.

The ICRC and the Red Cross also run a physical rehabilitation outreach programme enabling disabled patients from remote areas in eight regions to be fitted with artificial limbs.

Supporting needy communities

The ICRC seeks to help communities affected by intercommunal violence and armed conflict, particularly those living in remote villages or in camps for displaced people. With the Myanmar Red Cross, the organization delivers drinking water to tens of thousands of needy people in Rakhine State. Its economic security programmes provide winter clothing, household items such as cooking sets and bedding, agricultural tools, seed and fertilizers, fishing nets, and vocational training to communities affected by violence, thereby supporting the livelihoods of thousands of families in both Rakhine and Kachin States.

Promoting humanitarian law

The ICRC promotes respect for international humanitarian law (IHL) through conducting workshops for the Myanmar Army and armed non-state actors, and by sponsoring government officials and academics to attend regional conferences and courses, including a postgraduate course in IHL offered by the NALSAR Law University in Hyderabad, India. The ICRC also delivers seminars on human rights and international norms of policing to the Myanmar police force.

Partnership with the Myanmar Red Cross

The ICRC works in close cooperation with the Myanmar Red Cross in organizational development, disaster risk reduction and response, and restoring family links. It contributes strongly to training Red Cross staff and volunteers in a variety of areas including first aid, and the dissemination of both international humanitarian and human rights law.

Organizational presence in Myanmar

Besides its delegation in Yangon, the ICRC has offices in Rakhine State (Sittwe and Mrauk-U), Kayen State (Hpa-an), Kachin State (Myitkyina) and in Mandalay, from where it covers Shan State.

World: Children and armed conflict - Report of the Secretary-General (A/68/878–S/2014/339)

1 July 2014 - 1:37pm
Source: UN Security Council, UN General Assembly Country: Afghanistan, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, India, Iraq, Lebanon, Libya, Mali, Myanmar, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Somalia, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Thailand, Uganda, World, Yemen, South Sudan
  1. The present report, which covers the period from January to December 2013, is submitted pursuant to Security Council resolution 2068 (2012), by which the Council requested me to continue to submit annual reports on the implementation of its resolutions and presidential statements on children and armed conflict.

  2. The report highlights global trends regarding the impact of armed conflict on children in 2013 and the main activities and initiatives with regard to the implementation of relevant Security Council resolutions and the conclusions of its Working Group on Children and Armed Conflict. In follow-up to the previous report (A/67/845-S/2013/245), it provides an update on the cooperation among partners to the children and armed conflict agenda, including within the United Nations system.

  3. In line with the resolutions of the Security Council on children and armed conflict, the present report includes in its annexes a list of parties that engage in the recruitment and use of children, sexual violence against children, the killing and maiming of children, recurrent attacks on schools and/or hospitals and recurrent attacks or threats of attacks against protected personnel, in contravention of international law.

  4. All information presented in this report has been documented, vetted, and verified for accuracy by the United Nations. In situations where the ability to obtain or independently verify information is hampered by factors such as insecurity or access restrictions, it is qualified as such. The preparation of the report involved broad consultations within the United Nations, at Headquarters and in the field, and with relevant Member States.

  5. Pursuant to Security Council resolution 1612 (2005), and in identifying situations that fall within the scope of her mandate, my Special Representative for Children and Armed Conflict is guided by the criteria found in international humanitarian law and international jurisprudence for determining the existence of an armed conflict. In the implementation of her mandate, my Special Representative has adopted a pragmatic and cooperative approach on the issue, with an emphasis on humanitarian principles, aimed at ensuring broad and effective protection for children affected by conflict in situations of concern. Reference to a situation is not a legal determination, and reference to a non-State party does not affect its legal status.

Myanmar: Internal displacement due to conflict and inter-communal violence in Myanmar (July 2014)

1 July 2014 - 9:07am
Source: Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre Country: Myanmar preview

Map indicating available information on numbers of IDPs in the south-east (southern Shan, Kayah, Kayin, and Mon states as well as Bago and Tanintharyi regions), Kachin and northern Shan states, Rakhine state, and Mandalay region.

Myanmar: Comprehensive solutions needed for recent and long-term IDPs alike

Myanmar: Myanmar: Comprehensive solutions needed for recent and long-term IDPs alike

1 July 2014 - 9:03am
Source: Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre Country: Myanmar preview

Executive summary

IDMC estimates that there are up to 642,600 internally displaced people (IDPs) in Myanmar, forced to flee their homes by armed conflict and inter-communal violence. The figure includes up to 400,000 people living in protracted displacement as a result of conflict in the south-east of the country – in southern Shan, Kayah, Kayin and Mon states and Bago and Tanintharyi regions - and 98,000 displaced by conflict in Kachin and northern Shan states since 2011. It also includes around 140,000 people displaced by inter-communal violence in Rakhine state since 2012, and more than 5,000 who fled their homes in Mandalay region in 2013. Disasters brought on by natural hazards and forced evictions linked to land grabs and the exploitation of natural resources have caused further displacement, including in areas where people have already fled conflict and violence.

Landmines and unexploded ordnance constitute a significant obstacle to IDPs’ return in Kachin, northern Shan and the south-east. Internally displaced women and girls in Kachin and northern Shan face the threat of sexual violence. Muslim IDPs in Rakhine are confined to camps, where they have little or no access to health care, education or livelihoods, and shelters are in need of maintenance in Rakhine, Kachin and northern Shan. In the south-east, on the other hand, many IDPs are thought to be well on their way to achieving durable solutions through return or local integration, but estimating their number and gauging their outstanding needs is a challenge.

Myanmar has no policy or legislation on internal displacement, and the government’s response has varied from region to region. Following the signing of ceasefire agreements, IDPs in the south-east should be better consulted and should be enabled to participate more in peace negotiations to ensure that their needs and aspirations in terms of durable solutions are addressed. UN mechanisms such as clusters and sectors coordinate the international response in Rakhine, Kachin and northern Shan, but generally humanitarian access is difficult in Rakhine, and in areas of Kachin and northern Shan not under government control.