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World: Asia-Pacific Humanitarian Bulletin July - December 2014

11 February 2015 - 12:23am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Bangladesh, Cambodia, China, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, India, Indonesia, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Myanmar, Nepal, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Timor-Leste, World

NATURAL DISASTERS AND CONFLICTS IN ASIA-PACIFIC

FEWER LIVES LOST

In 2014, Asia and the Pacific experienced 126 natural disasters, which affected a total of 85 million people. Significantly, casualties were a quarter of what they were in 2013, with nearly 4,000 people killed by disasters in the region. Floods and landslides were the primary causes of death according to the Centre for Research on the Epidemiology of Disasters (CRED).

There were fewer large-scale disaster events in Asia and the Pacific in 2014. Although hazards including floods and approaching storms put people at risk, the absence of severe catastrophes meant that loss of life from natural disasters were much lower. In many places, improved preparedness measures and early warning systems, as well as larger evacuations, consistently moved people to safety and reduced the number of casualties.

Overall, China, India and the Philippines experienced the greatest number of disasters in 2014 with a large amount of people exposed to a variety of hazards. Cyclone Hudhud struck India’s east coast as a Category 4 storm in early October with wind speeds of over 190 km/h. Despite its destructive force, early evacuations of around half a million people kept the number of casualties at a comparatively low 84. Similarly, one of the largest peace-time evacuations of people from Typhoon Hagupit in the Philippines prevented major losses with a total of 18 deaths. The typhoon made landfall as a Category 3 storm, weaker than Super Typhoon Haiyan that killed more than 6,000 people the year before. A total of nine typhoons hit the Philippines in 2014.

Although 2014 saw fewer incidences, the overall disaster risk situation has not changed. Major floods in India, particularly around Jammu and Kashmir, China and Indonesia once again affected almost 23 million people. Large landslides in Nepal caused 484 deaths and affected more than 185,000 people. At the same time, China experienced a major drought that affected 27.5 million people.

Thailand: Bon Luk Medical Update January 2015

10 February 2015 - 11:43pm
Source: Jungle Aid Country: Myanmar, Thailand

The drive to Bon Luk is always a challenging one. As soon as we arrived at the village, the medical team was ready to start. Dr Laura, who saw 33 patients, worked closely with Nid doing the translation and Joanna recording patient data. We distributed loads of personal hygiene items like soaps, lice combs and tooth-brushes to children as well as grown-ups.

Meanwhile, our assessment team, including Garry and Charlotte, was talking to villagers – with Nid alternating between clinic and assessment whenever possible. We received a list of 20 students who will be graduating from village primary school and will be going to secondary school in towns next school year. We will find out which ones of these need help with that. At Jungle Aid we aim to support and encourage children to attend school until 16 years.

We were happy to see that the fish pond is growing and we discussed with the villager who is managing this. The number of fishes that was initially funded has grown from 2,000 to 2,500. Some of the fishes were consumed and some were sold. Right now there are 500 fishes left in the pond and there are 4,000 THB left on the budget to buy more fish. The villager will buy more fishes in these upcoming weeks.

He has also replaced one big pig with two smaller female pigs (of different ages). He will use somebody else’s male pig for breeding when the females are of age. While we are happy to see the progress and his understanding / implementing in our suggestions to grow his enterprise, we were concerned by the effect of the dry season on his greens farm which isn’t producing much for the children at the orphanage. That is going to be our priority for these upcoming months. We did also ask him to find ways to collaborate with villagers that have chickens. If possible, the idea is to put a chicken coup on top of the fish pond and let the chicken droppings supplement fish food. We will follow up on this on our future trips.

We walked around in the village and were pleased to see that the village has been maintaining overall cleanliness and trash baskets are being used well. After a successful clinic and assessment, we gave out the clothes, shoes, books, colour pencils and toys that had been donated from Lertlah School in Bangkok. Books, colour pencils and flip flops were an instant hit with the children. Children as well as volunteers had a great time showing off their creative talent.

The day was well documented in photographs by Carl. All volunteers were loaded back in to the truck for the dusty journey home.

After an amazing day with incredible volunteers and incredible people we work with, we were heading back home.

Thank you for supporting the work we do…….

Thailand: Bon Luk Medical Update January 2015

10 February 2015 - 11:43pm
Source: Jungle Aid Country: Myanmar, Thailand

The drive to Bon Luk is always a challenging one. As soon as we arrived at the village, the medical team was ready to start. Dr Laura, who saw 33 patients, worked closely with Nid doing the translation and Joanna recording patient data. We distributed loads of personal hygiene items like soaps, lice combs and tooth-brushes to children as well as grown-ups.

Meanwhile, our assessment team, including Garry and Charlotte, was talking to villagers – with Nid alternating between clinic and assessment whenever possible. We received a list of 20 students who will be graduating from village primary school and will be going to secondary school in towns next school year. We will find out which ones of these need help with that. At Jungle Aid we aim to support and encourage children to attend school until 16 years.

We were happy to see that the fish pond is growing and we discussed with the villager who is managing this. The number of fishes that was initially funded has grown from 2,000 to 2,500. Some of the fishes were consumed and some were sold. Right now there are 500 fishes left in the pond and there are 4,000 THB left on the budget to buy more fish. The villager will buy more fishes in these upcoming weeks.

He has also replaced one big pig with two smaller female pigs (of different ages). He will use somebody else’s male pig for breeding when the females are of age. While we are happy to see the progress and his understanding / implementing in our suggestions to grow his enterprise, we were concerned by the effect of the dry season on his greens farm which isn’t producing much for the children at the orphanage. That is going to be our priority for these upcoming months. We did also ask him to find ways to collaborate with villagers that have chickens. If possible, the idea is to put a chicken coup on top of the fish pond and let the chicken droppings supplement fish food. We will follow up on this on our future trips.

We walked around in the village and were pleased to see that the village has been maintaining overall cleanliness and trash baskets are being used well. After a successful clinic and assessment, we gave out the clothes, shoes, books, colour pencils and toys that had been donated from Lertlah School in Bangkok. Books, colour pencils and flip flops were an instant hit with the children. Children as well as volunteers had a great time showing off their creative talent.

The day was well documented in photographs by Carl. All volunteers were loaded back in to the truck for the dusty journey home.

After an amazing day with incredible volunteers and incredible people we work with, we were heading back home.

Thank you for supporting the work we do…….

Myanmar: Myanmar, Japan discuss natural disaster management

10 February 2015 - 8:55pm
Source: New Light of Myanmar Country: Japan, Myanmar

Nay Pyi Taw, 10 Feb— Dr Daw Myat Myat Ohn Khin, Union Minister for Social Welfare, Relief and Resettlement and also Chair of the National Disaster Preparedness Work Committee, accepted a Japanese delegation led by Mr Kenichiro Ueno, Parliamentary Vice Minister for Land, Infrastructure,
Transport and Tourism, here on Tuesday.

Their discussions involved measures being taken in line with the law and regulations on disaster preparedness, philanthropic services, the opening of a disaster management training school, issues related to the third UN conference on natural disaster risks reduction to be held in Japan, and technical cooperation with Japan. Myanmar will have its first natural disaster management school in Hinthata, Ayeyawady Region.—MNA

Myanmar: Hundreds of Villagers Still Displaced in Hpakant

10 February 2015 - 7:48pm
Source: Irrawaddy Country: Myanmar

By SAN YAMIN AUNG

RANGOON — Hundreds of villagers remain in isolated displacement camps in Kachin State’s Hpakant Township, nearly one month after they fled their homes amid conflict between rebel and government troops, aid workers said.

Sources providing aid to the internally displaced persons (IDPs) told The Irrawaddy that while many of the 2,000 villagers originally displaced by the violence had returned home, about 700 are still living in makeshift camps because they fear further conflict.

“The problem is most people don’t want to go back,” said Mya Aye, a member of the 88 Generation Peace and Open Society (88GPOS), which has been visiting the area and providing some basic assistance.

Fighting broke out between the Burma Army and the Kachin Independence Army (KIA) on Jan. 15 near Aung Bar Lay village in jade-rich Hpakant.

Around 2,000 villagers were believed to have been displaced by the conflict, including students and schoolteachers, who fled to churches and monasteries in other villages. Local sources said that most of the displaced took shelter in Kan Si village, near Aung Bar Lay.

The conflict appeared to be triggered by an incident on Jan. 14, when the KIA apprehended a state minister and three police officers overseeing construction of a road. The minister was released the same day, while the officers remained in rebel custody until Jan. 19.

Mya Aye said that the 88GPOS representatives were in Hpakant as recently as Feb. 5 on a delivery mission, during which they went to Kan Si, Lone Khin and Aung Bar Lay villages.

Both Kan Si and Aung Bar Lay are currently under the control of the Burma Army, he said, causing trepidation among IDPs in Lone Khin and surrounding areas about returning to their homes. Some of the areas near Aung Bar Lay remain under rebel control.

While many have returned home from the IDP camps, local sources described their circumstances as equally dire, claiming that they are “trapped” by mobility restrictions.

“Refugees and trapped villagers are facing difficulties since they can’t work for a living and they can’t travel freely outside,” said Tin Soe, chairman of the Hpakant chapter of the National League for Democracy.

Mya Aye said that villagers are not allowed to travel freely through San Khar gate, which lies between government-controlled territories and Hpakant.

“The people from Hpakant and Lone Khin are not allowed to travel inside Kan Si and Aung Bar Lay without approval from the [Burma] Army,” he said, while those inside the two government-run villages are not allowed to leave without special approval.

Sar Gyi, a spokesperson for the Kachin Development Networking Group (KDNG), said that travel restrictions are not only preventing villagers from working, but also limiting available aid.

“All aid groups coming to give supplies to trapped villagers should be allowed to access the area freely,” he said, “and villagers shouldn’t be held as hostages during this conflict.”

Clashes between government troops and the KIA have flared intermittently since a ceasefire broke down in mid-2011, with an estimated 100,000 people having been displaced by the violence.

The KIA is one of the only major ethnic armed groups in Burma that has not reached a bilateral pact with the government, even as negotiators continue their push for an inclusive, nationwide agreement to conclude the country’s myriad other insurgencies.

Kachin State is among the world’s last remaining sources of jade, and is also rich in other gems, minerals and valuable timber. Resource extraction has long been both a major cause and source of revenue for conflict in the remote ethnic state bordering China.

Myanmar: Open for Business? Corporate Crime and Abuses at Myanmar Copper Mine

10 February 2015 - 2:01pm
Source: Amnesty Country: Myanmar

Myanmar: Foreign mining companies colluding in serious abuses and illegality

Canadian and Chinese mining interests have profited from, and in some cases colluded with the Myanmar authorities in serious human rights abuses and illegal activity around the Monywa copper mine complex, which includes the notorious Letpadaung mine, Amnesty International said in a report released today.

Open for Business? Corporate Crime and Abuses at Myanmar Copper Mine describes how large-scale forced evictions and serious pollution linked to the mine have destroyed livelihoods and exposed thousands of people to health risks. Community protests have been met with excessive force by police, including, on one occasion, the use of white phosphorous, a highly toxic and explosive substance.

Amnesty International also found evidence of illegal activity including possible breaches of economic sanctions.

“Myanmar offers the perfect storm of a rich natural resource base, a weak legal system and an economy dominated by military and special interests. The government has forcibly evicted people, crushed all attempts at peaceful protest and displayed a complete unwillingness to hold companies to account,” said Meghna Abraham, Amnesty International’s Corporate Crimes Researcher.

“The Monywa project is a cautionary tale on investment in Myanmar, where corporate projects are too often marked by abuses and communities are ripped apart in the pursuit of profit. Construction of the Letpadaung mine must be halted immediately until rights issues have been addressed.”

Amnesty International’s report includes evidence of:

  • Thousands of people forcibly evicted in the 1990s, in violation of international law, to make way for investment by Canadian company Ivanhoe Mines (now Turquoise Hill Resources); the company knew their investment would lead to the evictions, yet did nothing. It profited from more than a decade of copper mining, carried out in partnership with Myanmar’s military government, without attempting to address the thousands left destitute.

  • Thousands more people forcibly evicted since 2011 to make way for the Letpadaung mine, which is run by Chinese company Wanbao and Union of Myanmar Economic Holdings (UMEHL), the economic arm of the Myanmar military. Wanbao directly engaged in forced evictions, and colluded with the authorities, including by providing bulldozers to destroy crops.

  • In November 2012 security forces used white phosphorous, a highly toxic explosive substance, in a deliberate attack on villagers and monks who were protesting the negative impacts of the Letpadaung mine. More than 100 people were injured, with some suffering horrific burns and lifelong disability. Part of the attack was launched from inside the Wanbao company compound. The use of white phosphorous by the security forces against the protestors constituted torture – a crime under international law.

  • In December 2014 one woman died and several other people were injured when police opened fire on protestors at the Letpadaung site. Protests against the mine have repeatedly been met by excessive use of force by police.

  • Ivanhoe Mines was involved, through its Monywa investment, in the sale of copper to a “who’s-who” of the Myanmar military. These sales took place when economic sanctions were still in force. Ivanhoe lied publically about the copper sales, and its subsidiary may have breached UK economic sanctions. When Ivanhoe Mines divested from Myanmar it did so in a highly secretive process involving legal entities in the British Virgin Islands. Amnesty International’s investigation found evidence that Ivanhoe Mines and legal entities associated with the company may have breached Canadian and UK economic sanctions during the divestment. The organization is calling on Canada and the UK to initiate criminal investigations into the issue.

  • The military-owned conglomerate UMEHL illegally operated a sulphuric acid factory linked to the Monywa mine for six years. When this was exposed, the factory was approved by the authorities, who made no attempt to take punitive action against UMEHL.

    “The people living around Monwya and Letpadaung have suffered more than two decades of abuse linked to the business operations of Canadian, Myanmar and now Chinese corporations. Investment can help Myanmar, but this project benefits the companies while harming the people,” said Meghna Abraham.

Amnesty International calls for:

  • Investigations by Canada and China into the activities of Ivanhoe Mines and Wanbao in Myanmar. Canadian and UK authorities to investigate whether Ivanhoe Mines and related legal entities breached Canadian and/or UK economic sanctions.

  • All construction of the Letpadaung mine to be halted until the abuses are addressed. Investigations by the Myanmar authorities into the police response to protests at Letpadaung, including the use of while phosphorous and the role played by Wanbao in allowing the police to use a company compound to launch part of the attack.

  • The Myanmar authorities to provide adequate compensation and resettlement to people who were forcibly evicted and to reform its legal framework to better protect rights of mine-affected communities.

Background

The Monywa project comprises the Sabetaung and Kyisintaung (S&K) and the Letpadaung copper mines. S&K has been operational since the 1980s. Letpadaung is under construction.

In 1996 Canadian company Ivanhoe Mines Ltd. entered into a joint venture with a Myanmar state company, Mining Enterprise No. 1 (ME1), to set up the Myanmar Ivanhoe Copper Company Limited (MICCL), in which both held a 50 per cent interest. MICCL operated the S&K mine.

In 2007 Ivanhoe Mines decided to divest from Myanmar and established a third-party-Trust to which its Myanmar assets were transferred.

In 2010 it was announced that China North Industries Corporation (NORINCO) and UMEHL had entered into an agreement about the Monywa project, which includes both S&K and Letpadaung mines. Subsidiaries of Wanbao Mining Ltd (owned by NORINCO) operate both mines today The process by which the ME1-Ivanhoe Mines assets transferred to the China-Myanmar military partnership of Wanbao-UMHEL has never been disclosed.

Amnesty International approached the companies named in this report for comments on the allegations against them. Where responses were provided, these have been incorporated in the report.

Myanmar: Open for Business? Corporate Crime and Abuses at Myanmar Copper Mine

10 February 2015 - 2:01pm
Source: Amnesty Country: Myanmar

Myanmar: Foreign mining companies colluding in serious abuses and illegality

Canadian and Chinese mining interests have profited from, and in some cases colluded with the Myanmar authorities in serious human rights abuses and illegal activity around the Monywa copper mine complex, which includes the notorious Letpadaung mine, Amnesty International said in a report released today.

Open for Business? Corporate Crime and Abuses at Myanmar Copper Mine describes how large-scale forced evictions and serious pollution linked to the mine have destroyed livelihoods and exposed thousands of people to health risks. Community protests have been met with excessive force by police, including, on one occasion, the use of white phosphorous, a highly toxic and explosive substance.

Amnesty International also found evidence of illegal activity including possible breaches of economic sanctions.

“Myanmar offers the perfect storm of a rich natural resource base, a weak legal system and an economy dominated by military and special interests. The government has forcibly evicted people, crushed all attempts at peaceful protest and displayed a complete unwillingness to hold companies to account,” said Meghna Abraham, Amnesty International’s Corporate Crimes Researcher.

“The Monywa project is a cautionary tale on investment in Myanmar, where corporate projects are too often marked by abuses and communities are ripped apart in the pursuit of profit. Construction of the Letpadaung mine must be halted immediately until rights issues have been addressed.”

Amnesty International’s report includes evidence of:

  • Thousands of people forcibly evicted in the 1990s, in violation of international law, to make way for investment by Canadian company Ivanhoe Mines (now Turquoise Hill Resources); the company knew their investment would lead to the evictions, yet did nothing. It profited from more than a decade of copper mining, carried out in partnership with Myanmar’s military government, without attempting to address the thousands left destitute.

  • Thousands more people forcibly evicted since 2011 to make way for the Letpadaung mine, which is run by Chinese company Wanbao and Union of Myanmar Economic Holdings (UMEHL), the economic arm of the Myanmar military. Wanbao directly engaged in forced evictions, and colluded with the authorities, including by providing bulldozers to destroy crops.

  • In November 2012 security forces used white phosphorous, a highly toxic explosive substance, in a deliberate attack on villagers and monks who were protesting the negative impacts of the Letpadaung mine. More than 100 people were injured, with some suffering horrific burns and lifelong disability. Part of the attack was launched from inside the Wanbao company compound. The use of white phosphorous by the security forces against the protestors constituted torture – a crime under international law.

  • In December 2014 one woman died and several other people were injured when police opened fire on protestors at the Letpadaung site. Protests against the mine have repeatedly been met by excessive use of force by police.

  • Ivanhoe Mines was involved, through its Monywa investment, in the sale of copper to a “who’s-who” of the Myanmar military. These sales took place when economic sanctions were still in force. Ivanhoe lied publically about the copper sales, and its subsidiary may have breached UK economic sanctions. When Ivanhoe Mines divested from Myanmar it did so in a highly secretive process involving legal entities in the British Virgin Islands. Amnesty International’s investigation found evidence that Ivanhoe Mines and legal entities associated with the company may have breached Canadian and UK economic sanctions during the divestment. The organization is calling on Canada and the UK to initiate criminal investigations into the issue.

  • The military-owned conglomerate UMEHL illegally operated a sulphuric acid factory linked to the Monywa mine for six years. When this was exposed, the factory was approved by the authorities, who made no attempt to take punitive action against UMEHL.

    “The people living around Monwya and Letpadaung have suffered more than two decades of abuse linked to the business operations of Canadian, Myanmar and now Chinese corporations. Investment can help Myanmar, but this project benefits the companies while harming the people,” said Meghna Abraham.

Amnesty International calls for:

  • Investigations by Canada and China into the activities of Ivanhoe Mines and Wanbao in Myanmar. Canadian and UK authorities to investigate whether Ivanhoe Mines and related legal entities breached Canadian and/or UK economic sanctions.

  • All construction of the Letpadaung mine to be halted until the abuses are addressed. Investigations by the Myanmar authorities into the police response to protests at Letpadaung, including the use of while phosphorous and the role played by Wanbao in allowing the police to use a company compound to launch part of the attack.

  • The Myanmar authorities to provide adequate compensation and resettlement to people who were forcibly evicted and to reform its legal framework to better protect rights of mine-affected communities.

Background

The Monywa project comprises the Sabetaung and Kyisintaung (S&K) and the Letpadaung copper mines. S&K has been operational since the 1980s. Letpadaung is under construction.

In 1996 Canadian company Ivanhoe Mines Ltd. entered into a joint venture with a Myanmar state company, Mining Enterprise No. 1 (ME1), to set up the Myanmar Ivanhoe Copper Company Limited (MICCL), in which both held a 50 per cent interest. MICCL operated the S&K mine.

In 2007 Ivanhoe Mines decided to divest from Myanmar and established a third-party-Trust to which its Myanmar assets were transferred.

In 2010 it was announced that China North Industries Corporation (NORINCO) and UMEHL had entered into an agreement about the Monywa project, which includes both S&K and Letpadaung mines. Subsidiaries of Wanbao Mining Ltd (owned by NORINCO) operate both mines today The process by which the ME1-Ivanhoe Mines assets transferred to the China-Myanmar military partnership of Wanbao-UMHEL has never been disclosed.

Amnesty International approached the companies named in this report for comments on the allegations against them. Where responses were provided, these have been incorporated in the report.

World: Global Emergency Overview Snapshot 4-10 February 2015

10 February 2015 - 10:41am
Source: Assessment Capacities Project Country: Afghanistan, Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guatemala, Guinea, Haiti, Honduras, India, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Liberia, Libya, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Namibia, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Uganda, World, Yemen

Snapshot 4–10 February 2015

Guinea: An increase in Ebola case numbers has been reported for the second consecutive week. Resistance to the response remains high in Forecariah, worst affected by the outbreak; though ten prefectures have reported at least one incident of resistance. Clashes between armed forces and the community were reported in Matoto, Conakry.

Niger and Cameroon: The past week has seen a further deterioration in the crisis related to Boko Haram, as the Nigeria-based group carried out its first attacks in Niger – in Diffa region, where most refugees are living – as well as further attacks in the Far North region of Cameroon.

Updated: 10/02/2015. Next update: 17/02/2015

Global Emergency Overview Web Interface

Myanmar: Violence flares in Myanmar, China border area

10 February 2015 - 6:40am
Source: Agence France-Presse Country: China, Myanmar

Yangon, Myanmar | Tuesday 2/10/2015 - 11:16 GMT

Clashes have flared between Myanmar's army and rebels in an ethnic Chinese northern border area, state media said Tuesday, as multiple conflicts in minority regions overshadow efforts to agree a countrywide ceasefire.

Resurgence of conflict in the Kokang area of Shan state, which had been largely dormant for nearly six years, saw rebel troops attack Myanmar military positions in the area on Monday.

"While the State is making all-out efforts for reaching a nation-wide ceasefire, the renegade groups of Kokang have ambushed the troops of the Tatmadaw (army)," said a report in the English language Global New Light of Myanmar.

It said the clashes in the predominantly ethnic Chinese area of Kokang had stoked "worries" among local people that there would be "recurring fighting there".

The fighting comes as conflict between the military and armed ethnic minority groups rages in other parts of Shan and northern Kachin states, casting doubts over government efforts to ink a nationwide ceasefire deal.

Myanmar had hoped to sign the long-delayed agreement on Thursday, as the country celebrates its annual Union Day celebrations.

But officials said a full deal was not yet on the table.

"We will not be able to sign the Nationwide Ceasefire Accord because there are some negotiation points still left to discuss," Hla Maung Shwe, a negotiator with the Myanmar Peace Centre, told AFP.

Myanmar's government, which replaced junta rule in 2011, has vowed to end the civil wars that have been flaring on and off since independence as a key part of its reforms.

Conflict between the government and Kachin Independence Army (KIA) has festered since a 17-year ceasefire between rebels and the government collapsed in 2011, driving almost 100,000 civilians from their homes.

Fighting has increasingly spread to northern Shan state, where last week the Ta'ang National Liberation Army (TNLA) accused Myanmar's army of using two helicopter gunships against its positions in another part of Shan state.

In 2009 more than 30,000 people flooded over the border into China as Myanmar's army launched an offensive against Kokang rebels.

The fighting earned Myanmar's then junta government a rare rebuke from Beijing, the country's powerful northern neighbour which at the time was almost its sole ally on the international stage.

On Monday Xinhua reported that hundreds of Kokang rebels had launched assaults on four areas that afternoon.

The United Nations local representative on Thursday raised concerns about violence last month around Kachin's Hpakant township, a jade-rich area near the border with China, which trapped hundreds of civilians.

hla/klm/apj/as

© 1994-2015 Agence France-Presse

World: Launch of the “Disaster Recovery Toolkit” developed by the Tsunami Global Lessons Learned Project

10 February 2015 - 2:55am
Source: Asian Disaster Preparedness Center, Tsunami Global Lessons Learned Project Country: India, Indonesia, Kenya, Malaysia, Maldives, Myanmar, Seychelles, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Thailand, United Republic of Tanzania, World

Ten years have passed since the Indian Ocean Earthquake and Tsunami of December 2004. With a view to gathering, learning and sharing from experiences of the 2004 earthquake and tsunami, and other disasters in the region that occurred between 1993 and 2013, the Tsunami Global Lessons Learned Project (TGLLP) was created. The project sought to deliver three principle outcomes: a global lessons learned study, a Discovery Channel documentary tracking the recovery, and a disaster recovery toolkit for recovery practitioners. The first of these outcomes was a report entitled The Tsunami Legacy: Innovations, Breakthroughs and Challenges was officially released on 24 April 2009 at a ceremony at the United Nations Headquarters in New York. The Disaster Recovery Toolkit forms the third deliverable, and it is this that has been developed by the Tsunami Global Lessons Learned Project Steering Committee (TGLLP-SC) in partnership with the Asian Disaster Preparedness Centre (ADPC). The ‘Toolkit’ is targeted at practitioners responsible for implementing recovery programmes, their objective to provide a ‘how to’ guide on development, implementing and managing complex post-disaster recovery programmes.

The TGLLP Disaster Recovery Toolkit contains six books that can be downloaded here:

Handbook for Disaster Recovery Practitioners
Training Manual - Learning Workshop on Recovery and Reconstruction
Guidance on Critical Facilities
Guidance on Housing
Guidance on Land Use Planning
Guidance on Livelihood

Myanmar: Myanmar: Kachin & Northern Shan States - IDPs Location List (1/Jan/2015)

10 February 2015 - 1:20am
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees, Haiti Shelter Cluster, CCCM Cluster Country: Myanmar

Myanmar: Myanmar: Kachin & Northern Shan States - IDPs Location List (1/Jan/2015)

10 February 2015 - 1:20am
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees, CCCM Cluster, Shelter Cluster Country: Myanmar

Myanmar: Myanmar: Kachin & Northern Shan States - IDPs Location List (1-Jan-2015)

10 February 2015 - 1:20am
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees, Haiti Shelter Cluster, CCCM Cluster Country: Myanmar

Myanmar: Myanmar: Kachin & Northern Shan CCCM Dashboard (1/Jan/2015)

10 February 2015 - 1:16am
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees, Myanmar Information Management Unit, CCCM Cluster, Shelter Cluster Country: Myanmar

Myanmar: Myanmar: Kachin & Northern Shan CCCM Dashboard (1-Jan-2015)

10 February 2015 - 1:16am
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees, Myanmar Information Management Unit, CCCM Cluster, Shelter Cluster Country: Myanmar

Myanmar: Myanmar: Kachin & Northern Shan CCCM Dashboard (1-Jan-2015)

10 February 2015 - 1:16am
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees, Myanmar Information Management Unit, CCCM Cluster, Shelter Cluster Country: Myanmar

Myanmar: Myanmar: Kachin NFI Coverage & Gaps (1/Jan/2015)

10 February 2015 - 1:12am
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees, Myanmar Information Management Unit, CCCM Cluster, Shelter Cluster Country: Myanmar

Myanmar: Myanmar: Rakhine - IDPs Camp List (1-Jan-2015)

10 February 2015 - 1:09am
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees, Haiti Shelter Cluster, CCCM Cluster Country: Myanmar

Myanmar: Myanmar: Rakhine - IDPs Camp List (1-Jan-2015)

10 February 2015 - 1:09am
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees, CCCM Cluster, Shelter Cluster Country: Myanmar

Myanmar: Myanmar: Rakhine NFI Coverage & Gaps (1-Jan-2015)

10 February 2015 - 1:03am
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees, Myanmar Information Management Unit, CCCM Cluster, Shelter Cluster Country: Myanmar