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Nigeria: Boko Haram-Related Violence CERF-funded response (2015-2016) As of 21 July 2016

22 July 2016 - 11:14am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Cameroon, Chad, Niger, Nigeria

Since 2015, the Emergency Relief Coordinator has released more than US$80 million from the Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF) for life-saving assistance in response to Boko Haram-related violence. Some $27.2 million was allocated in March 2015 to responses in Cameroon, Chad, Niger and Nigeria to assist more than 1.6 million internally displaced people, refugees, returnees and host communities; $31 million was provided in late 2015 and early 2016 for live-saving humanitarian response for more than 700,000 affected people in the Lake Chad Basin region; and $23 million was allocated in June to assist 250,000 newly accessible people in Chad and north eastern Nigeria.

Chad: Sahel Crisis 2016: Funding Status as of 22 July 2016

22 July 2016 - 11:08am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Chad, Gambia, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal

Burkina Faso: Sahel Crisis 2016: Funding Status as of 22 July 2016

22 July 2016 - 11:08am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Chad, Gambia, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal

Niger: Niger HRP 2016: Funding Status as of 22 July 2016

22 July 2016 - 9:50am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Niger

Niger: Niger - Diffa: Access, Insecurity and Internal displacements (as of 20 July 2016)

22 July 2016 - 9:35am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Chad, Niger

The security situation in south-eastern Niger continues to deteriorate due to a growing number of attacks by Boko Haram. Since the first Boko Haram attack on the Nigerien territory in February 2015 to date, several other incursions have been reported in the region. These attacks have caused the internal displacement of thousands of people. As a consequence, the humanitarian needs in the region have increased, in a context characterized by limited resources for an adequate response and by localized access challenges

World: Humanitarian assistance to African countries

22 July 2016 - 3:51am
Source: Government of Australia Country: Australia, Cameroon, Chad, Niger, Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan, World

The humanitarian crisis in South Sudan, Somalia and countries in the Lake Chad basin is worsening due to the effects of El Nino and conflict in the region.

Today I announce that the Australian Government will provide a further $17.5 million to support people suffering from severe hunger and malnutrition, and those displaced from their homes and in need of protection from conflict.

Australia will provide $8 million to the South Sudan Humanitarian Fund and the UN High Commissioner for Refugees. This funding will help deliver food, shelter, security, and other vital assistance including to South Sudanese who have fled to neighbouring countries. This brings Australia’s total contribution to South Sudan to more than $50 million since December 2013.

In Somalia, 1.1 million people have been displaced by terrorist activity and conflict. Australia will provide $4.5 million to Somalia, including $2.5 million to World Vision to help build the resilience of Somali communities and $2 million to the Somalia Humanitarian Fund for immediate life-saving assistance, including food, healthcare and water.

Australia will also provide $5 million through the World Food Programme for immediate food supplies, livelihood training and nutrition in the Lake Chad basin region. Over 2.1 million people have been forced to flee their homes as a result of the Boko Haram insurgency and 7.5 million people are in need of urgent food assistance.

This assistance comes from humanitarian funding within the existing Australian Aid budget.

Media enquiries

Minister's office: (02) 6277 7500 DFAT Media Liaison: (02) 6261 1555

Niger: NASA's new mission: improving food security in West Africa

21 July 2016 - 9:55pm
Source: AlertNet Country: Burkina Faso, Ghana, Niger, Senegal

NASA has launched a hub in Niger that will use space-based observations to improve food security

By Nellie Peyton

DAKAR, July 20 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - A drive by NASA to stream climate data to West African nations using its earth-observing satellites could boost crop production in a region hit hard by climate change, experts say.

Read the full article here

World: Oxfam’s Work in Fragile and Conflict-Affected Contexts: Learning event Bangkok February 8–12, 2016

21 July 2016 - 6:48am
Source: Oxfam Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo, India, Myanmar, Niger, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, South Sudan, World

In February 2016, Oxfam hosted its first learning event on working in fragile and conflict-affected contexts in order to bring together a range of Oxfam and partner staff to exchange programmatic and operational learning. This report documents the outcomes and discussions.

A third of the world’s poorest, most vulnerable and marginalised people are estimated to live in fragile and conflict-affected countries. Our work in FCACs aims to address their needs, but we recognise the importance of finding different ways to do this in these challenging contexts. In these environments, conflict is often violent, protracted and mirrored across society. These contexts are also among the most challenging for development agencies to work in. There is limited civil society space and capacity, direct threats to staff and partners and in many cases few opportunities to engage or work with the state.

Progress is often followed by setbacks, making it difficult to plan and operate. Transformative change is unlikely within our usual three to fiveyear strategic planning timeframes and restricted funding cycles. Yet if we are to reach the world’s most vulnerable people, we need to address the drivers of fragility and conflict and find ways of working most suitable to navigating these difficult contexts.

The importance of taking time to reflect and learn on our approach to working in Fragile and Conflict Affected Contexts is a priority for Oxfam as a whole.

Nigeria: GIEWS Country Brief: Nigeria 20-July-2016

21 July 2016 - 4:34am
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Country: Cameroon, Chad, Niger, Nigeria

FOOD SECURITY SNAPSHOT

  • Crop prospects uncertain due to persisting rainfall deficits in many parts of the country
  • Coarse grain prices continued upward trend of previous months, driven mostly by depreciation of local currency
  • Food security situation deteriorated significantly in Borno State, due to impact of civil conflict

Crop prospects uncertain due to rainfall deficits in parts of the country

In the southern part of the country, planting of the 2016 main maize crop was completed in June. According to remote sensing analysis, the onset of the cropping season was delayed and characterized by irregular precipitation, resulting in rainfall deficits in several areas. Harvest prospects remain uncertain in spite of increased precipitation in recent weeks.

In the North, which has only one rainy season, planting of coarse grains is underway. The Boko Haram conflict has had a significant impact on the agricultural sector in the northeast due to livestock losses and reduced agricultural production, destruction of irrigation and farming facilities, and collapse of extension services, including veterinary health facilities. There is a need to provide livelihoods support for IDP populations, recent returnees and local populations in areas that have seen conflict over the past several years. In order to respond to the immediate needs of the affected people, the Government and partner organizations, including FAO, are providing targeted farmers with seeds and a wide range of agriculture based activities aimed to quickly generate food production.

Above-average harvest was gathered in 2015

In spite of the late onset of the 2015 rainy season in the middle and northern parts of the country, above‑average and well‑distributed rainfall from mid‑July benefited crop development in the major producing states of the country. Although civil insecurity and population displacement continued to disrupt farming activities in Borno, Yobe and Adamawa states, official estimates indicated an above average 2015 cereal production. The country’s cereal output in 2015 was estimated at about 24 million tonnes, close to the previous year’s level and 6 percent above average.

Food and fuel prices soar due to depreciation of the Naira

The Central Bank of Nigeria decided to allow the Naira to float against the US dollar as of mid‑June 2016. The change in policy is aimed at harmonizing the official and parallel exchange rates. The measure follows critical foreign currency shortages and a significant depreciation of the Naira on the parallel market caused by the decline in international oil prices. According to the IMF, international crude oil prices fell by 25 percent over 2015, leading to a 40 percent drop in Nigerian exports and doubling the Government deficit. Domestic fuel prices increased by about 67 percent. Prices of imported and local foods also rose significantly.

Coarse grain prices increased steeply from January to May in several markets, including the northern Kano market where millet prices were nearly 80 percent higher than a year earlier, while those of sorghum were more than double their values in May last year and at record highs. Prices of rice were also reportedly high. Increasing prices of both domestic and imported foods were mainly the result of the depreciation of the Naira. Increased fuel and transport costs provided additional support.

High import dependency persists

In 2012, the Government launched the Agriculture Transformation Agenda (ATA) to reduce the country’s reliance on food imports by increasing production of the five key crops, including rice, sorghum and cassava. A number of import substitution measures were introduced to support domestic production, including the mandatory inclusion of 10 percent of cassava flour in bread. Input availability and access were also supported in the framework of the ATA, which aims to make Nigeria self‑sufficient in rice. The Central Bank of Nigeria also banned importers from accessing foreign exchange markets in 41 categories of items, including rice. The ban was partially lifted in October 2015, when imports through the land borders were once again allowed after the payment of appropriate duties and charges. However, these measures amplified informal cross border imports from neighbouring coastal countries resulting in the Nigerian Customs Service to reintroduce the policy to restrict rice imports through land borders as of 25 March 2016.

Nigeria remains a food deficit country with cereal imports (mostly rice and wheat) forecast to exceed 7 million tonnes in 2016. The country is still the largest rice importer in Africa.

Food insecurity reaches extreme level in pockets of Nigeria’s Borno State 1

The continued conflict in the northern part of the country has resulted in widespread disruption in agricultural and marketing activities and has caused massive displacement. According to OCHA, about 2.4 million people have been internally‑displaced. In Borno, about 124 000 new Internally‑Displaced Persons (IDPs) were discovered earlier this year in the following difficult to reach Local Government Areas (LGAs): Dikwa (52 000), Mongonu (35 000), Bama (25 000) and Damboa (9 500). In addition, as of May 2016, about 138 000 people are estimated to have left Nigeria for Niger, nearly 65 000 people have taken refuge in Cameroon and about 7 300 in Chad. The conflict has disrupted commodity movements leading to higher price levels and volatility in the northeast.

The conflict has left a significant portion of the population without access to adequate food, water and health services. The Nigerian Minister of Health has declared a “nutrition emergency” in Borno State. Acute food insecurity is widespread in northeast Nigeria, with the March 2016 Cadre Harmonisé estimating that more than 3 million people are in CH/IPC Phase 3 “Crisis” or worse and in need of urgent humanitarian assistance. Available information, though limited, suggests two areas of particular concern: Local Government Areas (LGAs) adjacent to the Sambisa Forest and LGAs in northern Borno. Areas of concern near the Sambisa Forest include: Bama, Damboa and Gwoza, and parts of Kaga and Konduga in eastern Borno State and Madagali LGA in northern Adamawa State. Between 15 and 21 June, five rapid assessment missions (Government of Nigeria, WFP, IOM, joint UN and MSF) visited the town of Bama, where approximately 25 000 displaced people have concentrated after being liberated from Boko Haram‑controlled areas. The visits confirmed visible malnutrition among adults and children, an extreme scarcity of food and water, very limited health facilities and a lack of functioning markets.

In northern Borno State, Abadam, Gubio, Guzamala, Kukawa, Mobbar, Nganzai and parts of Dikwa, Marte, Mafa, Ngala and Kala/Balge, LGAs remain largely inaccessible to humanitarian agencies. The severity of the food insecurity is unknown, but could be at critical levels given the impact of movement restrictions and ongoing conflict.

Additional areas of concern include greater Maiduguri and southern Yobe State. In April 2016, a joint UN assessment estimated that over 500 000 people required immediate food assistance in and around Maiduguri. In Yobe, the Boko Haram conflict has limited access to parts of Gujba, Gulani and Geidam LGAs. Though these areas are somewhat more accessible than those in Borno, households in more remote areas are likely to be in urgent need of assistance.

Improved and sustained humanitarian access to IDP populations, as well as populations located in active conflict zones, is urgently needed. This improved access should be accompanied by a substantial increase in the provision of life‑saving food, health, nutrition and WASH (Water, Sanitation and Hygiene) assistance already provided by national and state emergency management agencies, NGO partners and other stakeholders. Beyond the immediate needs, livelihoods support is needed for the affected populations both within areas of limited accessibility, as well as other zones in the northeast that have seen conflict over the past several years.

1 This section draws heavily on a recent joint alert by FAO, FEWSNet, CILSS and WFP.

Niger: UNICEF Niger Humanitarian Situation Report, May - June 2016

21 July 2016 - 1:04am
Source: UN Children's Fund Country: Niger, Nigeria

Highlights

  • The insecurity caused by the conflict in the area of Bosso and neighbouring localities (Eastern part of Diffa region) and the attack on the 3rd of June resulted in the single most massive population displacement in Diffa region since the beginning of the crisis in 2013. The displaced fled the localities of Toumour, Yebi, Kanblewa and Bosso. Diffa region was already hosting an estimated 241,000 people (Nigerian refugees, returnees and internally displaced) before this last event. The total number of people displaced is presently estimated to be 280,000 people (including around 69,000 recently displaced following the events of 3rd June), with some of them displaced various times.

  • Despite a tense security environment, aid organizations have managed rapidly to reach the newly arrived in the main “sites” on the “Route Nationale 1” (RN1) especially with the very much needed safe water supply. As of 07 June, UNICEF and its partners provided access to safe water to an additional 27,366 people (out of an estimated target of 36,097 on the 3 main RN1 sites).

  • The bodies of 34 migrants including 22 children who died of thirst were found by a patrol in the North of Niger (between Arlit and Assamaka). It is believed that most of the deceased originated from Kantche. A study undertaken by IOM will support the development of an action plan in support of child protection and education in Kantche.

  • Despite a nationwide measles campaign in December 2015, Niger at week 25 (end June) recorded 2,342 cases of measles with 10 deaths. Six regions have been affected including the capital Niamey (1070 cases at 25th week); and the region of Diffa (35 cases, 5 confirmed at 25th week).

  • UNICEF supported the operational cost and the procurement of 1,430,000 doses of vaccine for the response. Until end of June, 380,104 children 6 months-14 years have been reached to contain the outbreak.

  • At week 25, 1,568 cases of Meningitis (meningococcal C) have been reported with 114 deaths. During week 25: 206,755 people were reached through vaccination with support of various partners including UNICEF.

  • 108 pastoralist children in the Agadez region have received support to finish the schoolyear to avoid drop out in a context of drought and migration of their community in search of pasture for their cattle.

  • Floods in the region of Agadez during the second half of June affected 38 villages and 5271 people. Support has been provided to 5,271 flood affected people.

SITUATION IN NUMBERS

30 June 2016

14,338 Children affected by SAM in Diffa region out of

400,794 Children affected by SAM nationwide (As of HRP 2016)

62,726 Estimated refugee children from Nigeria and returnees from Niger affected out of

114,048 Refugees and returnees from Nigeria (Source DREC, 5th May 2016, partial data, covering 51 sites out of 135, registration still ongoing)

91,274 Estimated internally displaced children out of

165,952 Internally displaced people

UNICEF Appeal 2016
US$ 39.5 million total

Nigeria+ 2016 (Niger)
US $14million (out of total Nigeria+ needs of $97M USD)

Mali: Lancement officiel du projet Paludisme et Maladies Tropicales Négligées au Sahel (P/MTN)

20 July 2016 - 12:14pm
Source: Government of the Republic of Mali Country: Burkina Faso, Mali, Niger

Signé entre la Banque mondiale et la Communauté économique des Etats de l’Afrique de l’Ouest (Cédéao), à travers l’Organisation ouest-africaine de la santé (OOAS) en décembre 2015, le projet Paludisme et maladies tropicales négligées au Sahel (P/MTN) a été officiellement lancé ce mardi à l’hôtel Radisson Blu de Bamako.

La cérémonie de lancement, placée sous le haut patronage du Premier ministre Modibo Kéita, a enregistré la présence du ministre de la Santé et de l’Hygiène publique, Marie-Madeleine Togo, du directeur général de l’OOAS, Xavier Crespin, du représentant résident de la Banque mondiale, Paul Noumba Um, et plusieurs membres du gouvernement.

Le Premier ministre Modibo Kéita a salué l’engagement des partenaires techniques et financiers et invité les pays bénéficiaires à tout mettre en œuvre pour pérenniser les acquis.

Le P/MTN, financé à hauteur de 121 millions de dollars par la Banque mondiale, a pour but d’accroître l’accès et l’utilisation des services à base communautaire harmonisés pour la prévention et le traitement du paludisme et certaines MTN dans les zones transfrontalières des pays bénéficiaires,

Le projet P/MTN couvre 3 pays de la Cédéao (le Burkina Faso, le Mali et le Niger). Il vise aussi à améliorer la collaboration régionale pour de meilleurs résultats dans tous les pays ; à soutenir la mise en œuvre coordonnée des interventions contre le paludisme et les MTN dans les zones frontalières et à renforcer leurs capacités institutionnelles.

Le ministre de la Santé et de l’Hygiène publique a rappelé les résultats atteints et les défis à relever pour l’élimination de ces fléaux. A l’en croire, la mise en œuvre de ce projet régional va permettre non seulement de lutter contre ces maladies, mais aussi contribuer au développement socio-économique des pays bénéficiaires.

"L’idée maîtresse de cette initiative est d’alléger le fardeau énorme du paludisme et des MTN et de contribuer à la réduction de la pauvreté et à l’augmentation de la productivité et à l’amélioration de la qualité de vie des populations concernées", a-t-elle précisé.

Le directeur général de l’OOAS a ajouté que sur les 109 pays touchés par le paludisme dans le monde (données OMS), les prévalences et les mortalités les plus élevées sont observées dans 35 pays, dont 30 en Afrique. Parmi ces pays africains, 13 sont dans l’espace CEDEAO.

Les partenaires techniques et financiers, à travers la Banque mondiale, ont assuré l’OOAS de leur soutien au projet P/MTN.

Source: L'Indicateur du Renouveau

Mali: Point sur la situation alimentaire au Sahel - Suivi de campagne n°183 - début juillet 2016

20 July 2016 - 11:36am
Source: Afrique Verte Country: Burkina Faso, Mali, Niger

Syntèse par pays

Au Niger, la tendance générale des prix des céréales sèches est à la hausse sur les marchés de l’Est (Zinder, Maradi) et du Nord (Agadez) du pays et à la stabilité sur ceux de l’Ouest (Niamey et Tillabéry) qui sont plus arrimés aux marchés du Burkina et du Mali. Pour le riz, on observe une stabilité générale sur les marchés. Seul le sorgho a enregistré une légère baisse sur le marché de Dosso. Les hausses ont été enregistrées : i) pour le mil à Zinder (+11%), à Agadez (+9%), Maradi (+6%) et à Dosso (+3%) ii) pour le sorgho à Zinder (+18%), Maradi (+13%) et à Agadez (+5%) et iii) pour le maïs à Zinder (+22%), à Dosso (+10%) et à Maradi (+5%).

Au Mali, la tendance générale de l’évolution des prix des céréales sur les marchés est à la stabilité. Toutefois, quelques hausses ont été enregistrées à cause de la soudure mais surtout des fortes demandes liées à la fin du mois de carême musulman. Les mouvements à la hausse sont observés : i) pour le riz local à Sikasso (+25%) et à Bamako (+3%), ii) pour le mil à Bamako (+9%), à Kayes (+6%) et à Tombouctou (+2%), iii) pour le sorgho à Bamako (+7%) et à Gao (+3%), et iv) pour le riz importé à Sikasso (+3%). La baisse est enregistrée uniquement pour le riz local à Kayes (-5%). Seul le riz local a enregistré une baisse sur le marché de Kayes (-5%). Le maïs est absent du marché de Tombouctou.

Au Burkina, la tendance générale de l’évolution des prix des céréales est à la stabilité. Toutefois, des baisses ont été observées : i) pour le mil sur les marchés de Dédougou (-3%) et de Ouagadougou (-5%), ii) pour le sorgho sur les marchés de Dédougou (-10%), de Ouagadougou (-9%) et de Tenkodogo (-6%), et iii) pour le maïs sur les marchés de Dédougou (-10%) et Nouna (-6%). Quelques hausses ont aussi été enregistrées, i) pour le mil à Bobo (+17%), et à Nouna (+3%) et ii) pour le maïs à Kongoussi (+9%), Bobo (+7%) et Ouagadougou (+3%).

Nigeria: West and Central Africa: Humanitarian Bulletin, June 2016

20 July 2016 - 11:24am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Commitments made at the World Humanitarian Summit are being transformed into an Action Plan.

  • Some 3.8 million people in the Lake Chad Basin are facing severe food insecurity in the current lean period.

  • Aid groups step up response to people in need across the Lake Chad Basin, where hunger and malnutrition are on the rise.

  • Heavy flooding triggered by torrential rains in Ghana, Chad and Niger.

  • Ebola outbreak is over in the three worst-hit West African countries.

KEY FIGURES

People displaced in recent attacks in Niger - 70K

Severely food insecure people in Lake Chad Basin - 3.8M

People facing crisis level of food insecurity in the Sahel - 6.7M

The World Humanitarian Summit – next steps

With the number of people in need of humanitarian assistance and related funding requirements hitting record high in the past decade, the UN Secretary-General convened a World Humanitarian Summit (WHS) to discuss how and what must be done better to end conflict, alleviate human suffering and reduce risk and vulnerability.

More than 9,000 participants

On 23 - 24 May, more than 9,000 representatives from the UN member states, local and international NGOs, the private sector, affected communities and other stakeholders gathered Istanbul for the WHS, demonstrating an overwhelming support for the Agenda for Humanity.

The diversity of voices heard at the Summit and their convergence around strategic issues and ideas was a first for the humanitarian sector. More than 1,500 pledges and commitments were made on how to better address the unprecedented levels of suffering and vulnerability of people caught up in natural disasters and conflicts; to empower them as agents of their own recovery; and to summon greater political will to prevent and end the wars which are causing so much distress.

West and Central Africa at the WHS The West and Central Africa region was represented at the highest level. Presidents from the Central African Republic, Mali, Mauritania and Niger attended the Summit, as well as high level mission from most other countries of the region. The Economic Community of Central African States (ECCAS) and the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) were also present and particularly engaged in the new Regional Organisations for Humanitarian Action Network (ROHAN).

In collaboration with Governments, United Nations, INGOs and Civil society organisations, the region held two side events featuring panel discussions and representatives from affected communities on the crisis in the Lake Chad Basin, and on Mali and radicalization and stability in the Sahel.

Grand bargain

Whereas many initiatives were launched at the summit, a couple stood out in significance. The launch of the “Grand Bargain” was ground breaking and aimed at ensuring efficiency and transparency by investing in front-line humanitarian action over the next five years. Donors also committed to new funding initiatives to protect women and girls from gender-based violence; to ensure that millions of children in crisis can continue their education; address one of the most urgent priorities of refugees and displaced people around the world; and bridge the gap between humanitarian and development work by creating a new way of working together to reduce needs, manage risks and reach common goals to end needs.

Translating commitments into action

The UN has committed to build on the momentum generated to work in partnership with world leaders and all stakeholders to support the most vulnerable people in the world. All commitments made at the Summit are being aligned and reflected in a Commitment to Action Platform.

This platform will be publicly accessible to allow for self-accountability on commitments made. In September, the UN Secretary-General will report to the General Assembly on the key outcomes of the WHS and propose ways in which to take the commitments forward.

In West and Central Africa, leaders are called upon to prioritize political leadership to address the causes of crises – through preventing conflicts, protecting rights, tackling climate change and resourcing efforts to reduce the risk of disasters and increase community resilience – for the well-being of tens of millions of people who struggle to survive.

Niger: Diffa: (3W) Qui Fait Quoi et Où? (Juin 2016)

20 July 2016 - 11:17am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Niger

World: Aperçu de la situation humanitaire mondiale 2016 - Rapport d'étape de juin

20 July 2016 - 10:41am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Afghanistan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Ecuador, Egypt, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gambia, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Libya, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Rwanda, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, World, Yemen, Zimbabwe

AVANT-PROPOS

Les appels coordonnés par les Nations Unies en 2016 nécessitent un montant sans précédent de $21,6 milliards pour répondre aux besoins de plus de 95,4 millions de personnes dans 40 pays. Depuis que j’ai lancé l’Aperçu de la situation humanitaire mondiale en décembre, le cyclone Winston a balayé les Iles Fidji et un tremblement de terre a dévasté l’Équateur. Les graves effets d’El Niño cette année nous ont amenés à réviser le Document sur les besoins humanitaires de l’Éthiopie et à élaborer un plan de réponse au Zimbabwe. Les besoins de nancement de nouveaux appels lancés depuis décembre (Burundi, Fidji, Haïti, Équateur et Zimbabwe) et des appels révisés sont énoncés dans le document détachable à l’intérieur de ce Rapport d’étape. Les besoins du plan pour le Soudan, en cours d’élaboration, sont également inclus.
Notre appel mondial est actuellement nancé à 25 pour cent. Le Sommet mondial sur l’action humanitaire a fait écho au fait que l’action humanitaire manque cruellement de ressources et nécessite une réponse ef cace et collective immédiate. Le manque de nancement compromet la vie des personnes affectées par les con its ou les catastrophes. Pour ne citer que quelques exemples : le manque de nancement signi e que les Nations Unies et leurs partenaires ne peuvent pas répondre de manière adéquate aux besoins des 13,5 millions de personnes dont la vie a été bouleversée par la crise en Syrie. Cela signi e que l’assistance humanitaire ne peut pas être assurée dans la phase post-électorale cruciale en République Centrafricaine alors que certains partenaires humanitaires cessent leurs opérations dans le pays. Cela signi e également la détérioration de la vie de la moitié de la population du Bassin du Lac Tchad, théâtre de l’une des crises les plus négligées dans le monde. Cela signi e aussi que les partenaires humanitaires au Myanmar ne pourront pas répondre aux besoins en sécurité alimentaire, en santé, en protection et en moyens de subsistance d’un million de personnes en 2016. Au moment où j’écris, j’apprends que les établissements médicaux en Irak sont en train de fermer en raison de l’épuisement du nancement international et de son non-renouvellement.
Nous sommes reconnaissants envers nos bailleurs de fonds pour leur engagement et leur soutien cette année et pour avoir reconnu que les appels coordonnés par les Nations Unies assurent une réponse cohérente, stratégique et bien plani ée aux crises. Nous sommes prêts et résolus à fournir une assistance humanitaire vitale dans le monde partout et à chaque fois que le besoin se manifeste et à tous ceux qui en ont besoin. Le soutien des bailleurs, au cours du premier semestre 2016, nous a permis de dispenser des secours vitaux et salvateurs. Il nous incombe à présent d’investir bien davantage dans la vie des millions de personnes qui portent le poids des crises dans le monde. Leurs besoins ne peuvent pas attendre. Ces nancements permettront à des millions de femmes, de lles, de garçons et d’hommes déplacés d’avoir une nourriture nutritive, de boire une eau saine et de béné cier d’une bonne santé, d’un abri, d’une éducation et d’une protection. L’investissement dans la survie et dans la dignité de millions de personnes dans le besoin est un investissement dans notre humanité commune et partagée.

Stephen O’Brien
Secrétaire général adjoint des Nations Unies aux affaires humanitaires et Coordonna- teur des secours d’urgence

World: Aperçue la situation humanitaire mondial 2016 - Rapport d'étape de juin

20 July 2016 - 10:41am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Afghanistan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Ecuador, Egypt, Ethiopia, Fiji, Gambia, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Libya, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Rwanda, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, World, Yemen, Zimbabwe

AVANT-PROPOS

Les appels coordonnés par les Nations Unies en 2016 nécessitent un montant sans précédent de $21,6 milliards pour répondre aux besoins de plus de 95,4 millions de personnes dans 40 pays. Depuis que j’ai lancé l’Aperçu de la situation humanitaire mondiale en décembre, le cyclone Winston a balayé les Iles Fidji et un tremblement de terre a dévasté l’Équateur. Les graves effets d’El Niño cette année nous ont amenés à réviser le Document sur les besoins humanitaires de l’Éthiopie et à élaborer un plan de réponse au Zimbabwe. Les besoins de nancement de nouveaux appels lancés depuis décembre (Burundi, Fidji, Haïti, Équateur et Zimbabwe) et des appels révisés sont énoncés dans le document détachable à l’intérieur de ce Rapport d’étape. Les besoins du plan pour le Soudan, en cours d’élaboration, sont également inclus.
Notre appel mondial est actuellement nancé à 25 pour cent. Le Sommet mondial sur l’action humanitaire a fait écho au fait que l’action humanitaire manque cruellement de ressources et nécessite une réponse ef cace et collective immédiate. Le manque de nancement compromet la vie des personnes affectées par les con its ou les catastrophes. Pour ne citer que quelques exemples : le manque de nancement signi e que les Nations Unies et leurs partenaires ne peuvent pas répondre de manière adéquate aux besoins des 13,5 millions de personnes dont la vie a été bouleversée par la crise en Syrie. Cela signi e que l’assistance humanitaire ne peut pas être assurée dans la phase post-électorale cruciale en République Centrafricaine alors que certains partenaires humanitaires cessent leurs opérations dans le pays. Cela signi e également la détérioration de la vie de la moitié de la population du Bassin du Lac Tchad, théâtre de l’une des crises les plus négligées dans le monde. Cela signi e aussi que les partenaires humanitaires au Myanmar ne pourront pas répondre aux besoins en sécurité alimentaire, en santé, en protection et en moyens de subsistance d’un million de personnes en 2016. Au moment où j’écris, j’apprends que les établissements médicaux en Irak sont en train de fermer en raison de l’épuisement du nancement international et de son non-renouvellement.
Nous sommes reconnaissants envers nos bailleurs de fonds pour leur engagement et leur soutien cette année et pour avoir reconnu que les appels coordonnés par les Nations Unies assurent une réponse cohérente, stratégique et bien plani ée aux crises. Nous sommes prêts et résolus à fournir une assistance humanitaire vitale dans le monde partout et à chaque fois que le besoin se manifeste et à tous ceux qui en ont besoin. Le soutien des bailleurs, au cours du premier semestre 2016, nous a permis de dispenser des secours vitaux et salvateurs. Il nous incombe à présent d’investir bien davantage dans la vie des millions de personnes qui portent le poids des crises dans le monde. Leurs besoins ne peuvent pas attendre. Ces nancements permettront à des millions de femmes, de lles, de garçons et d’hommes déplacés d’avoir une nourriture nutritive, de boire une eau saine et de béné cier d’une bonne santé, d’un abri, d’une éducation et d’une protection. L’investissement dans la survie et dans la dignité de millions de personnes dans le besoin est un investissement dans notre humanité commune et partagée.

Stephen O’Brien
Secrétaire général adjoint des Nations Unies aux affaires humanitaires et Coordonna- teur des secours d’urgence

Chad: Bassin du lac Tchad: Aperçu de la crise (au 11 juillet 2016)

20 July 2016 - 10:30am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Cameroon, Chad, Niger, Nigeria

Contexte

Le violent conflit dans le Bassin du lac Tchad n’a cessé de s’aggraver. Les raids et les attentats suicides de Boko Haram sur les civils causent des traumatismes généralisés, empêchant les gens d’accéder aux services essentiels et détruisant les infrastructures vitales. Environ 21 millions de personnes vivent dans les zones touchées des quatre pays riverains du Lac Tchad. Le nombre de personnes déplacées dans les zones les plus affectées a triplé depuis les deux dernières années. La plupart des familles déplacées sont hébergées par des communautés qui sont parmi les plus pauvres et les plus vulnérables au monde. L’insécurité alimentaire et la malnutrition dans les régions affectées ont atteint des niveaux alarmants.

Développements récents

70 000 personnes environ ont été déplacées dans la région de Bosso au sud-est du Niger, à la suite des attaques récentes de Boko Haram. L’insécurité s’est aggravée dans la région de Diffa au cours des trois derniers mois alors que le groupe armé fait l’objet de pressions en raison des opérations militaires du Cameroun et du Nigeria. La faim et la malnutrition s’aggravent dans plusieurs régions du Bassin du lac Tchad. Des dizaines de milliers de personnes déplacées dans l’État de Borno au nord-est du Nigeria sont dans des conditions terribles, face à de graves pénuries alimentaires, et souffrent de malnutrition sévère. Les équipes humanitaires atteignent maintenant des zones nouvellement accessibles de Borno, telles que Bama, Damboa, Dikwa et Monguno, et s’emploient à étendre leur réponse. En juin, le Fonds central d'intervention pour les urgences humanitaires (CERF) a dépensé 13 millions de dollars US pour fournir une aide vitale à 250 000 personnes nouvellement accessibles dans le nord-est du Nigeria, et approuvé une allocation de 10 millions de dollars US en réponse à la crise dans la région du Lac et à l’insécurité alimentaire dans la région du Sahel au Tchad.

Chad: Bassin du lac Tchad : le point sur la crise N° 5 (11 juillet 2016)

20 July 2016 - 10:26am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Cameroon, Chad, Niger, Nigeria

Ce bulletin a été publié par OCHA en collaboration avec les partenaires humanitaires. Le prochain bulletin sera publié aux environs du 31 juillet 2016.

Faits saillants régionaux

  • Des niveaux d’urgence en matière de malnutrition aiguë sévère (MAS) et des conditions proches de la famine ont pu être constatés dans l’État de Borno, et en particulier dans 15 camps satellites où vivent quelque 275 000 personnes, et ce, en raison de l’amélioration récente de l’accès humanitaire.

  • Des membres de Boko Haram ont mené plusieurs attaques au cours des semaines passées, conduisant ainsi des dizaines de milliers de personnes à se déplacer dans les régions du Bassin du lac Tchad touchées par les conflits. Dans le secteur de Bosso, au sud-est du Niger, les attaques ont entrainé le déplacement de quelque 70 000 personnes.

  • Au Tchad, l’amélioration de la sécurité a permis aux acteurs humanitaires d’apporter leur aide plus rapidement dans des zones situées dans les parties ouest et nord de la région du lac, difficiles à atteindre auparavant.

  • Un dialogue régional sur la protection s’est tenu à Abuja du 6 au 8 juin, rassemblant des participants des gouvernements du Cameroun, du Tchad, du Niger et du Nigeria, des organisations internationales et régionales, des gouvernements donateurs et la société civile. Les gouvernements se sont mis d’accord sur des mesures visant à apporter plus de protection et d’assistance aux populations du Bassin du lac Tchad, en particulier aux réfugiés et aux personnes déplacées en interne.

  • Les gouvernements du Cameroun, du Nigeria et le représentant régional du HCR (Haut-Commissariat des Nations Unies pour les réfugiés) ont, le 9 juin, paraphé un accord tripartite relatif au rapatriement volontaire des réfugiés nigérians au Cameroun. La signature officielle de ce document est prévue pour le mois de juillet.

  • Le Fonds central de réponse d’urgence (CERF) a approuvé un montant de 10 millions de dollars US en réponse à la crise humanitaire dans la région du Lac et à l’insécurité alimentaire dans la région du Sahel au Tchad. Pour le Nigeria, le CERF a débloqué 13 millions de dollars US, le 27 juin, à titre d’aide vitale aux 250 000 personnes touchées par le conflit dans la région nord-est.

  • Lors du débat consacré aux affaires humanitaires de l'ECOSOC, une réunion parallèle dédiée au Bassin du lac Tchad, « Mettre fin aux besoins du Bassin du lac Tchad », a traité de la meilleure manière d’obtenir des résultats collectifs pour les personnes touchées par la crise.

Nigeria: Nigeria: Food Security Outlook - June 2016 to January 2017

20 July 2016 - 4:09am
Source: Famine Early Warning System Network Country: Cameroon, Chad, Niger, Nigeria

Restricted access to parts of the Northeast contribute to Emergency food insecurity

KEY MESSAGES

  • Conflict in Northeast Nigeria has left a significant portion of the population without access to adequate food, water, and health services. A “nutrition emergency” has been declared in Borno State by the Nigerian Ministry of Health and information from recent rapid assessments, although limited and not statistically representative, also raises the possibility that a Famine (IPC Phase 5) could be occurring in the worst affected and less accessible pockets of the state.

  • The Boko Haram conflict and atypically high staple food prices have substantially restricted food access for most households across large areas in the Lake Chad region. Diminishing community and humanitarian support, below average harvest stocks and restricted income earning opportunities will continue to limit food access in this region. Consequently, affected households will continue to have difficulties meeting their minimal food needs and will remain in Crisis (IPC Phase 3) or Stressed (IPC Phase 2) food insecurity, depending on the zone, through January 2017. Several LGAs with proportionally high IDP populations are expected to be in Emergency (IPC Phase 4) acute food insecurity.

  • The recent decision of the Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) to float the naira against the US dollar will likely lead to further depreciation of the naira. The inflation rate increased from 13.7 percent to 15.6 percent between April and May.
    Consequently, prices of local and imported staples such as rice, millet, maize and sorghum will continue to rise beyond normal levels, limiting purchasing power and food access through the lean season period until harvests in October.

  • Most households outside of the Northeast are engaging in normal income-generating activities, early green harvests as well as livestock and cash crop sales. Some market dependent poor households are unable to meet non-food needs as their food stocks diminish due to the depreciating naira, high food prices, flooding along major floodplains and low purchasing power. Most households will continue to face Minimal (IPC Phase 1) acute food insecurity, although some poor households will face Stressed (IPC Phase 2) through the end of the lean season.

Mali: Humanitarian Implementation Plan (HIP) West Africa (ECHO/-WF/BUD/2016/91000) Last update: 07/06/2016, Version 4

20 July 2016 - 1:52am
Source: European Commission Humanitarian Aid Office Country: Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Chad, Côte d'Ivoire, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Togo

AMOUNT: EUR 158 962 8482

The present Humanitarian Implementation Plan (HIP) was prepared on the basis of financing decision ECHO/WWD/BUD/2016/01000 (Worldwide Decision) and the related General Guidelines for Operational Priorities on Humanitarian Aid (Operational Priorities). The purpose of the HIP and its annex is to serve as a communication tool for ECHO's partners and to assist in the preparation of their proposals. The provisions of the Worldwide Decision and the General Conditions of the Agreement with the European Commission shall take precedence over the provisions in this document.

0 . MAJOR CHANGES SINCE PREVIOUS VERSION OF THE HIP

Third modification as of 07/06/2016 Despite a reasonably good agricultural harvest, according to the latest figure of the Cadre Harmonisé, 9.5 million people are expected to face a food crisis in the Sahel/West Africa region during the upcoming lean season (starting in June). This is a very significant increase in the population currently facing a food crisis, i.e. 6.7 million. In addition, 5.9 million children under five suffer from Global Acute Malnutrition and 1.9 million from Severe Acute Malnutrition. This constitutes an increase of 28% and 14% respectively as compared to last year. In total, 24 areas in four countries are in food crisis (i.e. phase 3 or 4).

Food and nutrition insecurity is further aggravated in areas suffering from conflict, in particular in North Mali and the Lake Chad region, including Niger.

The deteriorating food and nutrition situation is taking place against the background of serious underfunding of the humanitarian response. The UN Sahel Response Plan is only 11% funded (out of the total USD 339 million requested for this year). The initial amount for 2016 of the DG ECHO HIP West Africa was only 54% of the allocation for 2015.

In view of the above, EUR 9.5 million was allocated from the Operational Reserve to provide emergency food and nutrition assistance and facilitate its delivery to the most vulnerable populations facing food crisis in Niger, Mali, Burkina Faso, Senegal and Mauritania, as well as to help address Severe Acute Malnutrition, notably by contributing to the Ready-to-Use Therapeutic Food pipeline in the region. This amount is to be added to the HIP 2016.