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Niger: GIEWS Country Brief: Niger 23-March-2017

25 March 2017 - 11:11pm
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Country: Mali, Niger, Nigeria

FOOD SECURITY SNAPSHOT

  • Adequate rains in 2016 facilitated crop development in most regions; bumper crop gathered for second consecutive year

  • Coarse grain prices increased in recent months and remained above their year earlier levels

  • Humanitarian assistance continues to be needed, including for Nigerian and Malian refugees

Bumper crop harvested in 2016

Harvesting of the 2016 cereal crops was completed in November 2016. The cropping season was characterized by adequate precipitation and soil water reserves in most monitored rainfall stations. As a result, preliminary estimates put the aggregate 2016 cereal output at about 5.9 million tonnes, 9 percent above the 2015 bumper levels and about 25 percent above the five-year average. Production of millet, the most important staple crop, increased by 16 percent compared to 2015. Pastures have been regenerating countrywide, improving livestock conditions.

A bumper crop was gathered in 2015. The aggregate cereals production in 2015 was estimated at some 5.4 million tonnes about 11 percent above the 2014 output.

Coarse grain prices increased recently in most markets

The Niger is highly dependent on imports of coarse grains (millet, sorghum and maize) from its neighbours, Nigeria and Benin, to cover its cereal requirements. Reflecting ample supplies following the recent harvests, coarse grain prices dropped steeply in October and November in most markets. The steep depreciation of the Nigerian Naira also made imported products cheaper in Niger. However, millet prices were on the increase since December 2016 and in February they were over 29 percent above their year-earlier levels. Prices reached high levels following the sharp increases in mid-2016 when seasonal trends were exacerbated by concerns about crop performance in some areas due to unfavourable weather. The strong demand from institutional bodies for the replenishment of their stocks have also put pressure on cereal prices in recent months.

Continued assistance still needed for vulnerable people, including refugees

The Niger hosts a large number of refugees due to the continuing civil conflict in neighbouring Mali and Nigeria. As of February 2017, Over 119 000 people are estimated to have left Nigeria for the Diffa Region of the Niger; while an additional 61 000 Malian refugees are still living in the Niger. The refugee crisis has exacerbated an already fragile food situation. Moreover, there are more than 121 000 IDPs in the country which has been struck by successive severe food crises in recent years that resulted in the depletion of household assets and high level of indebtedness. The food security situation has remained difficult in several parts of the country due to the lingering effects of the previous crises and the impact of recent years’ erratic rains on crops and pastures in some regions. Several segments of the population still need food and non-food assistance to restore their livelihoods and enable them to have better access to food. About 327 000 people are estimated to be in Phase 3: “Crisis” and above, according to the last analysis of the “Cadre Harmonisé” (Harmonized Framework) conducted in the country.

Mali: Mali: Emergency Dashboard, March 2017

24 March 2017 - 11:50am
Source: World Food Programme Country: Burkina Faso, Mali, Mauritania, Niger

Gambia: Monthly Mixed Migration Summary West Africa, February 2017

24 March 2017 - 8:33am
Source: Regional Mixed Migration Secretariat Country: Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Chad, Côte d'Ivoire, Gambia, Guinea, Italy, Liberia, Libya, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, South Africa, Spain, World

Monthly regional mixed migration summary for February 2017 covering mixed migration events, incidents, trends and data for the West Africa region

Nigeria: Famine Threatens Millions Across Africa and the Middle East

24 March 2017 - 12:16am
Source: Médecins du Monde Country: Chad, Ethiopia, Kenya, Niger, Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan, Uganda, Yemen

We are on the precipice of another humanitarian crisis. The famine that is raging in Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan, and Yemen is threatening the lives of millions of people. The crisis is urgent, complex and vast. Without swift action, alarming food shortages in Ethiopia, Chad, Kenya, Uganda, and Niger, could also spiral into crisis.

Crop failures brought on by climate change, combined with conflicts that have forced entire villages from their land, have caused the onset of famine in four countries across Africa and the Middle East. An estimated 20 million people – including 1.4 million children – are already suffering from malnutrition, and if the global community fails to act, the ongoing food shortages and widespread poverty in these countries will cause unthinkable suffering and unnecessary deaths.

As a member organization of Consortium 12-12, a Belgian non-profit platform, Doctors of the World is working to distribute food and water, provide medical care, improve hygiene and strengthen the agricultural capabilities of these communities in three of the famine-affected countries: Nigeria, Somalia and Yemen.

Nigeria

Since 2014, the north eastern state of Borno in Nigeria has been struggling to contain the extremist group known as Boko Haram. Over 20,000 people have died as a result of the insurgency and 2.6 million have been displaced. The medical needs in Nigeria are immense: 30% of medical facilities have been destroyed in the conflict, severely debilitating the health infrastructure in the area.

DotW’s General Director of International Operations, Jean-Francois Corty reported that “Boko Haram have continuously attacked medical facilities, targeting and killing medical personnel. There is a constant shortage of drugs and equipment. 90% of the current health infrastructure does not know how to treat cases of malnutrition in children. This is a humanitarian crisis that is quickly becoming forgotten.”

Since 2016, we have operated two mobile clinics in Borno state. We provide primary medical care to displaced communities and malnutrition treatment to children and pregnant women. After observing the situation, Jean-Francois added, “The population needs clean water, food and shelter. The situation is alarming and access to food is at serious risk, because people can no longer fish or breed cattle”. Doctors of the World has sent 10 tons of equipment to the area, but far more aid is needed.

Somalia

Somalia has been plagued by civil war for over 20 years, and 6.2 million people current live without food security. Doctors of the World has been working in the town of Bosaso in Northern Somalia in Puntland since 2011. There are currently 50,000 displaced people in Bosaso, including Somalis fleeing fighting in southern parts of the country and those fleeing fighting across the Gulf of Aden in Yemen. We provide medicine, equipment, and technical support to eight public health centers, and focus on primary medical care, and maternal and child health.

Yemen

The war in Yemen has claimed over 10,000 lives and left 3 million displaced since 2014. As a result, Yemen is currently facing the largest food emergency in the world and 65% of Yemenis currently do not have reliable access to food. The price of food spiked severely in September 2016, as the conflict in the country escalated. Around 7 million people in Yemen depend entirely on food assistance, with the rate of child malnutrition being one of the highest in the world. Doctors of the World began working in Yemen in 2015, focusing mainly on food security and child health. We now support 5 health centers and one maternity clinic in the governorates of Sana’a and Ibb. We also operate an emergency team, which provides assistance and emergency supplies to conflict areas

Donate to support communities affected by the famine in Africa and the Middle East. For the latest information on the famine, follow us on Facebook and Twitter, or sign up for updates.

World: From coast to coast: Africa unites to tackle threat of polio

23 March 2017 - 10:04pm
Source: Global Polio Eradication Initiative Country: Benin, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Guinea, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, World

116 million children to be immunized from coast to coast across the continent, as regional emergency outbreak response intensifies

More than 190 000 polio vaccinators in 13 countries across west and central Africa will immunize over 116 million children over the next week, to tackle the last remaining stronghold of polio on the continent.

The synchronized vaccination campaign, one of the largest of its kind ever implemented in Africa, is part of urgent measures to permanently stop polio on the continent.  All children under five years of age in the 13 countries – Benin, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of Congo, Guinea, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria and Sierra Leone – will be simultaneously immunized in a coordinated effort to raise childhood immunity to polio across the continent. In August 2016, four children were paralysed by the disease in security-compromised areas in Borno state, north-eastern Nigeria, widely considered to be the only place on the continent where the virus maintains its grip.

“Twenty years ago, Nelson Mandela launched the pan-African ‘Kick Polio Out of Africa’ campaign,” said Dr Matshidiso Moeti, WHO Regional Director for Africa.  “At that time, every single country on the continent was endemic to polio, and every year, more than 75 000 children were paralysed for life by this terrible disease.  Thanks to the dedication of governments, communities, parents and health workers, this disease is now beaten back to this final reservoir.”

Dr Moeti cautioned, however, that progress was fragile, given the epidemic-prone nature of the virus.  Although confined to a comparatively small region of the continent, experts warned that the virus could easily spread to under-protected areas of neighbouring countries. That is why regional public health ministers from five Lake Chad Basin countries – Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Niger and Nigeria – declared the outbreak a regional public health emergency and have committed to multiple synchronized immunization campaigns.

UNICEF Regional Director for West and Central Africa, Ms Marie-Pierre Poirier, stated that with the strong commitment of Africa’s leaders, there was confidence that this last remaining polio reservoir could be wiped out, hereby protecting all future generations of African children from the crippling effects of this disease once and for all. “Polio eradication will be an unparalleled victory, which will not only save all future generations of children from the grip of a disease that is entirely preventable – but will show the world what Africa can do when it unites behind a common goal.”

To stop the potentially dangerous spread of the disease as soon as possible, volunteers will deliver bivalent oral polio vaccine (bOPV) to every house across all cities, towns and villages of the 13 countries.  To succeed, this army of volunteers and health workers will work up to 12 hours per day, travelling on foot or bicycle, in often stifling humidity and temperatures in excess of 40°C.  Each vaccination team will carry the vaccine in special carrier bags, filled with ice packs to ensure the vaccine remains below the required 8°C.

“This extraordinary coordinated response is precisely what is needed to stop this polio outbreak,” said Michael K McGovern, Chair of Rotary’s International PolioPlus Committee .  “Every aspect of civil society in these African countries is coming together, every community, every parent and every community leader, to achieve one common goal: to protect their children from life-long paralysis caused by this deadly disease.”

The full engagement of political and community leaders at every level – right down to the district – is considered critical to the success of the campaign.  It is only through the full participation of this leadership that all sectors of civil society are mobilized to ensure every child is reached.

World: D’une côte à l’autre : l’Afrique s’unit pour combattre la menace de la poliomyélite

23 March 2017 - 12:31pm
Source: World Health Organization, UN Children's Fund Country: Benin, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Guinea, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, World

Avec l’intensification de la riposte régionale d’urgence à la flambée, 116 millions d’enfants vont être vaccinés sur tout le continent

23 mars 2017 – Genève/Brazzaville/New York/Dakar : Plus de 190 000 vaccinateurs dans 13 pays d’Afrique de l’Ouest et d’Afrique centrale vont vacciner plus de 116 millions d’enfants la semaine prochaine pour faire disparaître le dernier bastion de la poliomyélite sur ce continent.

La campagne de vaccination synchronisée, l’une des plus grandes jamais organisées en Afrique, fait partie des mesures urgentes pour mettre définitivement fin à la poliomyélite sur ce continent. Tous les enfants de moins de cinq ans dans les 13 pays – Bénin, Cameroun, Côte d’Ivoire, Guinée, Libéria, Mali, Mauritanie, Niger, Nigéria, République centrafricaine, République démocratique du Congo, Sierra Leone et Tchad – seront simultanément vaccinés dans le cadre d’un effort coordonné pour renforcer l’immunité des enfants contre la poliomyélite à l’échelle continentale. En août 2016, quatre enfants ont été paralysés par cette maladie dans des zones d’insécurité de l’État de Borno, au nord-est du Nigéria, généralement considéré comme étant le dernier endroit en Afrique où le virus reste implanté.

« Il y a 20 ans, Nelson Mandela a lancé la campagne panafricaine ‘Bouter la polio hors d’Afrique’ », a rappelé le Dr Matshidiso Moeti, Directeur régional de l’OMS pour l’Afrique. « À cette époque, la poliomyélite était endémique dans chaque pays du continent et, chaque année, cette terrible maladie paralysait plus de 75 000 enfants pour tout le reste de leur vie. Grâce au dévouement des gouvernements, des communautés, des parents et des personnels de santé, elle est maintenant combattue jusque dans son dernier réservoir. »

Le Dr Moeti a prévenu cependant que ce progrès était fragile, compte tenu du potentiel épidémique du virus. Bien que confiné dans une région proportionnellement petite du continent, les experts ont averti que le virus pouvait se propager facilement dans des zones mal protégées des pays limitrophes. C’est la raison pour laquelle les Ministres de la santé publique des cinq pays du bassin du Lac Tchad – le Cameroun, le Niger, le Nigéria, la République centrafricaine et le Tchad – ont déclaré que la flambée était une urgence régionale de santé publique et se sont engagés à organiser de multiples campagnes de vaccination synchronisées.

La Directrice régionale de l’UNICEF pour l’Afrique de l’Ouest et l’Afrique centrale, Mme Marie‑Pierre Poirier, a déclaré qu’avec l’engagement résolu des dirigeants africains, on peut s’attendre à ce que ce dernier réservoir finisse par être balayé, assurant ainsi la protection une bonne fois pour toutes de toutes les futures générations d’enfants africains contre les effets invalidants de la poliomyélite. « L’éradication sera une victoire sans égale, qui préservera toutes les futures générations d’enfants de l’emprise d’une maladie qu’on peut totalement éviter, mais qui montrera aussi au monde ce que l’Afrique peut faire lorsqu’elle s’unit pour un but commun. »

Pour stopper dès que possible la propagation potentiellement dangereuse de la poliomyélite, des bénévoles apporteront le vaccin antipoliomyélitique oral bivalent (VPOb) dans chaque maison de chaque ville, grande ou petite, et de chaque village dans les 13 pays. Pour réussir, tous ces bénévoles et agents de santé travailleront jusqu’à 12 heures par jour, se déplaçant à pied ou en vélo, souvent dans une humidité suffocante et avec des températures dépassant les 40 °C. Chaque équipe transportera le vaccin dans des sacs spéciaux, remplis d’accumulateurs de froid pour garantir qu’il reste à une température inférieure aux 8 °C requis.

« Cette extraordinaire action coordonnée est précisément ce qu’il faut pour mettre fin à cette flambée de poliomyélite », s’est félicité Michael K. McGovern, Président du Comité PolioPlus du Rotary’s International. « Tous les aspects de la société civile dans ces pays africains s’unissent – chaque communauté, chaque parent et chaque responsable local – pour atteindre un but commun : protéger leurs enfants de la paralysie définitive causée par cette maladie mortelle. »

On estime que l’engagement total des dirigeants politiques et des responsables locaux à tous les niveaux, jusqu’au moindre district, est essentiel pour le succès de la campagne. Ce n’est qu’avec la participation sans réserve de tous ces chefs de file que tous les secteurs de la société civile se mobilisent pour garantir la vaccination de chaque enfant.

-Fin-

Notes aux rédactions : Le vaccin antipoliomyélitique oral bivalent (VPOb) immunise contre deux des trois sérotypes de poliovirus sauvage : 1 et 3. Le poliovirus sauvage de type 2 a été éradiqué.

L’Initiative mondiale pour l’éradication de la poliomyélite (IMEP) est dirigée par les gouvernements nationaux sous la houlette de l’Organisation mondiale de la Santé (OMS), du Rotary International, des Centers for Disease Control and Prevention des États-Unis d’Amérique (CDC) et du Fonds des Nations Unies pour l’enfance (UNICEF), avec l’appui de la Fondation Bill & Melinda Gates. Depuis son lancement à l’Assemblée mondiale de la Santé de 1988, l’IMEP a réduit de plus de 99 % l’incidence mondiale de la poliomyélite. Elle reçoit l’appui financier des gouvernements des pays affectés, des fondations du secteur privé, des gouvernements donateurs, d’organisations multilatérales, de personnes privées, d’organisations humanitaires et non gouvernementales et d’entreprises. La liste complète des contributeurs peut être consultée sur : http://polioeradication.org/financing/donors/

Pour en savoir plus, prendre contact avec :

Tarik Jasarevic, Organisation mondiale de la Santé jasarevict@who.int +41 79 367 6241
Patrick Rose, UNICEF, prose@unicef.org, +221 786 380 250
Rod Curtis, UNICEF Relations extérieures (État de Borno, Nigéria) rcurtis@unicef.org
+1 917 618 7555

Nigeria: 2017 Nigeria Regional Refugee Response Plan: Funding snapshot as of 20-Mar-17

23 March 2017 - 11:17am
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Cameroon, Chad, Niger, Nigeria

World: From coast to coast: Africa unites to tackle threat of polio

23 March 2017 - 6:06am
Source: World Health Organization, UN Children's Fund Country: Benin, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Guinea, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, World

116 million children to be immunized from coast to coast across the continent, as regional emergency outbreak response intensifies

23 March 2017 – Geneva/Brazzaville/New York/Dakar: More than 190 000 polio vaccinators in 13 countries across west and central Africa will immunize more than 116 million children over the next week, to tackle the last remaining stronghold of polio on the continent.

The synchronized vaccination campaign, one of the largest of its kind ever implemented in Africa, is part of urgent measures to permanently stop polio on the continent. All children under five years of age in the 13 countries – Benin, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Côte d’Ivoire, Democratic Republic of Congo, Guinea, Liberia, Mali, Mauritania, Niger, Nigeria and Sierra Leone – will be simultaneously immunized in a coordinated effort to raise childhood immunity to polio across the continent. In August 2016, four children were paralysed by the disease in security-compromised areas in Borno state, north-eastern Nigeria, widely considered to be the only place on the continent where the virus maintains its grip.

“Twenty years ago, Nelson Mandela launched the pan-African ‘Kick Polio Out of Africa’ campaign,” said Dr Matshidiso Moeti, WHO Regional Director for Africa. “At that time, every single country on the continent was endemic to polio, and every year, more than 75 000 children were paralysed for life by this terrible disease. Thanks to the dedication of governments, communities, parents and health workers, this disease is now beaten back to this final reservoir.”

Dr Moeti cautioned, however, that progress was fragile, given the epidemic-prone nature of the virus. Although confined to a comparatively small region of the continent, experts warned that the virus could easily spread to under-protected areas of neighbouring countries. That is why regional public health ministers from five Lake Chad Basin countries - Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Niger and Nigeria – declared the outbreak a regional public health emergency and have committed to multiple synchronized immunization campaigns.

UNICEF Regional Director for West and Central Africa, Ms Marie-Pierre Poirier, stated that with the strong commitment of Africa’s leaders, there was confidence that this last remaining polio reservoir could be wiped out, hereby protecting all future generations of African children from the crippling effects of this disease once and for all. “Polio eradication will be an unparalleled victory, which will not only save all future generations of children from the grip of a disease that is entirely preventable – but will show the world what Africa can do when it unites behind a common goal.”

To stop the potentially dangerous spread of the disease as soon as possible, volunteers will deliver bivalent oral polio vaccine (bOPV) to every house across all cities, towns and villages of the 13 countries. To succeed, this army of volunteers and health workers will work up to 12 hours per day, travelling on foot or bicycle, in often stifling humidity and temperatures in excess of 40°C. Each vaccination team will carry the vaccine in special carrier bags, filled with ice packs to ensure the vaccine remains below the required 8°C.

"This extraordinary coordinated response is precisely what is needed to stop this polio outbreak," said Michael K McGovern, Chair of Rotary’s International PolioPlus Committee. "Every aspect of civil society in these African countries is coming together, every community, every parent and every community leader, to achieve one common goal: to protect their children from life-long paralysis caused by this deadly disease."

The full engagement of political and community leaders at every level – right down to the district – is considered critical to the success of the campaign. It is only through the full participation of this leadership that all sectors of civil society are mobilized to ensure every child is reached.

Mali: Mali: UNHCR Operational Update 01-28 February 2017

23 March 2017 - 4:43am
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Burkina Faso, Mali, Mauritania, Niger

KEY FIGURES

600 Mauritanian refugees who expressed their interest in being naturalised have their file being handled by a legal consulting company that supports the naturalization process

50 Protection incidents have been reported in north and central regions of Mali since January 2017

FUNDING

USD 40 million requested for the operation

PRIORITIES

  • 7 partners targeted to receive support and capacity development for the response of humanitarian needs of IDPs
  • 1,000 Malian refugee returnees targeted to receive production kits for agriculture/livestock/fishery activities
  • 4,000 protection incidents planned to be reported
  • 1,500 Mauritanian refugee children targeted to be enrolled in primary education
  • 3,500 Mauritanian refugees targeted to receive production kits for agriculture/livestock/fishery activities
  • 400 urban households targeted to receive cash grants

HIGHLIGHTS

A delegation of the Senior Transformative Agenda Implementation Team (STAIT) visited Mali from 13rd to 20th February with the aim of improving the efficiency of the humanitarian response in Mali. The mission focused on leadership, coordination, access and accountability to affected populations, protection, and the humanitarian-development nexus in the context of an integrated mission. UNHCR took an active part in the visit.

On 8 and 9 February was held in Bamako a national workshop on the revision of the protection cluster strategy in presence of 36 participants from national authorities, UN agencies, NGOs regional clusters and MINUSMA.

The 8th meeting of the tripartite commission UNHCR/Mali/Niger was held in Niamey on 23 and 24 February on the repatriation of Malian refugees in Niger. The 2nd meeting of the tripartite commission UNHCR/Mali/Mauritania took place in Nouakchott on 28 February. A work plan for March to May 2017 was drafted.

Project proposals for underfunded CERF funding have been submitted for the Mali situation. UNHCR submitted two projects: one to the NFI/Shelter Cluster for an amount of 300.000 USD, and one to the Protection Cluster for 300.000 USD. In total, USD 7 million have been allocated under the underfunded CERF budget for Mali this year.

Mali: UNHCR - West Africa 2017 Funding Update as of 21 March 2017 (All figures are displayed in USD)

23 March 2017 - 1:12am
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Burkina Faso, Côte d'Ivoire, Ghana, Guinea, Liberia, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal

285.0 M required for 2017

15.0 M contributions received, representing 4% of requirement

270.0 M funding gap for West Africa

World: Innovative vaccine could prevent thousands of child deaths from diarrhoea

22 March 2017 - 5:00pm
Source: Médecins Sans Frontières Country: Niger, World

An innovative new vaccine which could prevent large numbers of children from dying of diarrhoea in sub-Saharan Africa has been successfully trialled in Niger, announced international medical organisation Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders (MSF) today.

Rotavirus infection is the leading cause of severe diarrhoea and kills an estimated 1,300 children each day, primarily in sub-Saharan Africa. A new and innovative vaccine – known as BRV-PV – has been shown to be both safe and effective against rotavirus, according to the results of a recent trial in Niger, published in the New England Journal of Medicine on 23 March. Moreover, the new vaccine is particularly adapted to the strains found in sub-Saharan Africa.

Diarrhoea is the second biggest cause of death in infants and children. Most of these deaths occur in low-income countries, in places where access to water and sanitation is limited, and where people are unable to get the medical care that could save their child’s life. In such situations, preventive measures such as vaccinations have an enormous impact.

“This is a game-changer”, says MSF’s Dr Micaela Serafini, MSF Medical Director. “We believe that the new vaccine can bring protection against rotavirus to the children who need it most.”

Currently two vaccines exist against rotavirus, but they must be kept refrigerated at all times. The most innovative aspect of the new vaccine is that it is heat stable, so it does not require refrigeration. This will make it much easier to reach communities in remote areas who have limited access to health services and who are most in need of the vaccine.

The new vaccine is also adapted to the type of rotavirus most commonly found in sub-Saharan countries. It is affordable, with a price of under US$2.50, which is much cheaper than the lowest price of rotavirus vaccines currently available. This should allow it to be rolled out quickly as part of routine immunisation programmes. The new vaccine, manufactured by Serum Institute of India Pvt Ltd, will also fill the current supply gaps for the existing vaccines.

An efficacy trial of the BRV-PV vaccine – conducted by MSF’s research and epidemiology branch, Epicentre, in collaboration with the Nigerien Ministry of Health, the Serum Institute of India Pvt Ltd, the Cincinnati Children’s Hospital and other partners – was recently conducted in Niger’s Maradi region, involving more than 4,000 children under two years old. Results showed that the vaccine has no safety concerns and has been proven efficacious against severe gastroenteritis.

The BRV-PV vaccine is currently under review by the World Health Organization (WHO) for prequalification. Once approved, low-income countries will be able to procure the vaccine at an affordable price and roll it out in their countries.

“The success of this trial shows that research and development into vaccines that are specifically adapted for use in low-income countries yields results,” says Dr Serafini. “The quicker this vaccine is prequalified by the WHO, the sooner it can be used to prevent the deaths of thousands of children in the countries where it is needed most.”

Nigeria: Nigeria Regional Refugee Response Plan: January- December 2016: End of Year Report

22 March 2017 - 1:22pm
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Cameroon, Chad, Niger, Nigeria

REGIONAL OVERVIEW

Introduction

In 2016, the operational and security situation in the Lake Chad Basin countries remained extremely challenging for Governments, humanitarians, Nigerian refugees, IDPs and host communities in Cameroon, Chad and Niger. The region is notoriously characterised by extreme poverty, harsh climatic conditions and poor infrastructure. A great majority of the region’s inhabitants have limited access to basic services and a number of epidemic outbreaks did nothing to improve their situation throughout the year. As of 31 December 2016, the Lake Chad Basin countries were hosting 200,987 Nigerian refugees. The conflict had also internally displaced 192,912 persons in Cameroon’s Far North region, 82,260 in Chad’s Lake region and 184,230 persons in Niger’s Diffa region.

By mid-2016, the Nigerian Armed Forces, with support from the Multinational Joint Task Force (MNJTF), had succeeded in regaining territory formerly occupied by Boko Haram insurgents in north-eastern Nigeria, freeing an estimated 800,000 people in communities formerly held controlled by the terrorist group, mainly in Borno, Yobe and Adamawa states. To a limited extent they were also able to neutralize Boko Haram cells in Chad, Cameroon and Niger. However, these gains were overshadowed by increased hit and run attacks from Boko Haram insurgents, including suicide bombings, kidnappings, abductions, forced recruitment, looting and livestock theft. Boko Haram abused populations on a wide scale and committed grave human rights violations including systematic acts of sexual and gender based violence (SGBV). Due to the volatile security situation, thousands of host community members in the three countries of asylum ended up in situations of displacement themselves.

Niger’s Diffa region experienced a severe setback in May and June, after the terrorist group had attacked military personnel, killing 32 and causing the displacement of 70,000 people over the course of one week, most of whom settled spontaneously alongside the Route Nationale 1 for security reasons, but with no immediate access to food, water, sanitation or other basic services, posing new challenges to the delivery of humanitarian assistance.

Nigerian refugees in Cameroon, who had preferred to stay close to the border, decided to move towards protection services and safety, by registering in Minawao refugee camp. As a result, RRRP partners had to cope with a steadily growing population in an already congested camp. In addition, Nigerians from newly liberated areas in north-eastern Nigeria fled across the borders, to access humanitarian assistance, as conditions in Nigerian IDP camps were below minimum standards across the board.

Despite many setbacks, RRRP partners managed to meet a number of the key objectives outlined in the 2016 Nigeria RRRP.

At the political level, the most significant step was certainly the establishment of the Abuja Action Statement, a joint commitment made by the governments of Nigeria, Cameroon, Chad, and Niger, to implement the Regional Strategic Protection Framework for the Lake Chad Basin situation. The Action Statement was signed at the Regional Protection Dialogue, organized in Abuja, Nigeria from 6 to 8 June 2016 by the Government of Nigeria and facilitated by UNHCR, where high-level government representatives of Nigeria, Cameroon, Chad and Niger, donors, UN agencies, NGOs and civil society discussed key protection concerns and priorities regarding the Lake Chad Basin.

Chad: Afrique de l’Ouest et du Centre: Aperçu humanitaire hebdomadaire (14 – 20 mars 2017)

21 March 2017 - 8:28am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Mali, Niger

TCHAD

UN INCENDIE DÉTRUIT DES ABRIS DANS UN CAMP DE RÉFUGIÉS

Une réponse humanitaire rapide est en cours à la suite d'un incendie, le 15 mars, dans le camp de réfugiés de Dosseye, au sud du Tchad. Le feu, dont la cause est encore inconnue, a détruit plusieurs abris, des vivres et des articles ménagers. Aucune victime n'a été signalée. Le camp de Dosseye accueille plus de 12 000 réfugiés de la République centrafricaine.

CONGO

20 PERSONNES INFECTÉES PAR LA VARIOLE DU SINGE, 3 DÉCÈS

Une flambée de variole du singe a infecté 20 personnes et causé trois décès dans le département de Likouala, au nord, a confirmé le ministère de la Santé le 16 mars.
Les patients reçoivent des soins médicaux gratuits et les autorités ont intensifié la surveillance épidémiologique et interdit la manipulation des singes et autres animaux sauvages. La variole du singe est transmise d'un singe infecté à l'homme, puis d'une personne à l'autre. Il n’existe pas de vaccin contre le virus et seuls les symptômes sont traités. La dernière épidémie a eu lieu en 2003 dans le même département.

NIGER

PLUS DE 500 CAS SUSPECTS DE MÉNINGITE

Quatre districts sanitaires (Niamey 2, Niamey 3, Ouallam et Tillabéry) ont atteint le seuil d'alerte pour la méningite avec plus de 5 cas pour 100 000 habitants par semaine. Au total, les autorités sanitaires ont enregistré 511 cas suspects et 34 décès entre le 2 janvier et le 12 mars. La saison épidémiologique de la méningite s'étend de décembre à juin.

L’INSÉCURITÉ ENTRAVE L’ACCÈS À L’ÉDUCATION À DIFFA

La scolarisation continue d'être entravée par l'insécurité et les mouvements de population dans la région sud de Diffa. Trente écoles accueillant 1 280 écoliers restent fermées, tandis que 121 écoles ont été rouvertes en octobre 2016 avec le soutien du ministère de l'Éducation.

MALI

UN GROUPE ARMÉ SIGNE UN ACCORD DE PROTECTION DES ENFANTS

Le 17 mars, la Coordination des Mouvements de l'Azawad (CMA), une coalition de mouvements armés signataires de l'accord de paix de juin 2015, a signé un plan d'action avec l'ONU pour mettre fin et empêcher le recrutement et l'utilisation, la violence sexuelle et toutes les autres graves violations des droits de l'enfant. Le plan est contraignant pour toutes les entités de la CMA et comprend des mesures concrètes pour mettre fin et prévenir le recrutement et l'abus des enfants.

DES TRAVAILLEURS HUMANITAIRES ATTAQUÉS

Plusieurs attaques contre des travailleurs humanitaires locaux et internationaux ont été signalées entre le 11 et le 13 mars dans les régions de Gao, Tombouctou et Mopti, tuant une personne et faisant plusieurs blessés. Des hommes armés ont détourné des véhicules et des équipements et ont pris en embuscade des camions transportant de l'aide alimentaire.
Les incidents ont incité les organisations concernées à chercher d'autres moyens d'aider les personnes affectées.

Chad: West and Central Africa: Weekly Regional Humanitarian Snapshot (14 - 20 March 2017)

21 March 2017 - 8:09am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Mali, Niger

CHAD

FIRE DESTROYS SHELTERS AT REFUGEE CAMP

A rapid humanitarian response is underway following a fire at Dosseye refugee camp in southern Chad on 15 March. The fire, whose cause is still unknown, destroyed several huts, food stocks and household items. No casualties were reported. Dosseye camp hosts more than 12,000 refugees from the Central African Republic.

CONGO

MONKEYPOX INFECTS 20, KILLS THREE

An outbreak of monkeypox has infected 20 people and caused three deaths in the northern Likouala department, the Ministry of Health confirmed on 16 March. Patients are receiving free medical care and the authorities have ramped up epidemiological surveillance and banned the handling of monkeys and other wild animals. Monkeypox is transmitted from an infected monkey to humans and then from one person to another. There is no vaccine against the virus and only the symptoms are treated. The country’s last outbreak was in 2003 in the same department.

NIGER

OVER 500 SUSPECTED MENINGITIS CASES

Four health districts (Niamey 2, Niamey 3, Ouallam and Tillabéry) have reached the alert threshold for meningitis with more than 5 cases per 100,000 inhabitants per week. In total, health authorities have registered 511 suspected cases and 34 deaths between 2 January and 12 March. The meningitis epidemiological season runs from December to June.

NIGER

INSECURITY IMPEDES EDUCATION IN DIFFA

School attendance continues to be hampered by insecurity and population movements in the southern Diffa region.

Thirty schools hosting 1,280 students remain closed, while 121 schools were re-opened in October 2016 with the support of the Ministry of Education.

MALI

ARMED GROUP SIGNS CHILD PROTECTION DEAL

On 17 March, the Coordination des Mouvements de l’Azawad (CMA), a coalition of armed movements signatory to the June 2015 peace agreement, signed an action plan with the UN to end and prevent the recruitment and use, sexual violence and all other grave violations against children. The plan is binding on all CMA entities and includes concrete measures to end and prevent child recruitment and abuse.

AID WORKERS ATTACKED

Several attacks against local and international humanitarian workers have been reported between 11 and 13 March in Gao, Timbuktu and Mopti regions, killing one person and leaving several injured. Gunmen hijacked vehicles and equipment and ambushed trucks transporting food aid. The incidents have prompted affected organisations to seek alternative means to assist those in need.

Niger: Niger Key Message Update, March 2017

21 March 2017 - 5:29am
Source: Famine Early Warning System Network Country: Niger

Food insecurity is observed locally as a result of poor pastoral performance and security crisis.

Key Messages
- Cereal availabilities remain at average to below average levels due to weak trade flows due to product exit restrictions that cause high prices in Nigeria’s source markets. Prices in Niger markets remained broadly stable between January and February 2017, but in March are generally higher than the February levels as well as the average.
- For livestock, the availability of fodder is low and the need for complementary feed is estimated at 35,000 tones, of which 2,000 tones are being sold at moderate prices by the Government. This operations makes it possible to stabilize the price of a bag of livestock feed at 4,000 FCFA, which is an average price for this time of the year. Livestock prices continue their downward trend compared to the average, a situation unfavorable to pastoralists who are net buyers of cereals.
- Food insecurity will remain Minimal (IPC Phase 1) until September in the majority of households, but some pockets of certain livelihood zones, will experience Stressed (IPC Phase 2) between March and July 2017, as a result of the deterioration of purchasing power for food and the insufficiency of financial means to ensure essential needs. Crisis (IPC Phase 3) is possible for poor households from June to July in the absence of assistance.
- Crisis (IPC Phase 3) acute food insecurity will persist in the Diffa region until September 2017. The persistent security crisis has severely reduced food and income access for poor households and has resulted in the displacement of many households that are now dependent on humanitarian aid. In some parts of the region, humanitarian access difficulties result in inadequate aid coverage and inadequate food availability that are likely to worsen nutritional outcomes over the coming months.

World: Mixed Migration Flows in the Mediterranean and Beyond: Compilation of available data and information - Reporting period 1 Feb - 28 Feb 2017

20 March 2017 - 5:36pm
Source: International Organization for Migration Country: Afghanistan, Algeria, Bangladesh, Belgium, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Egypt, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Finland, France, Gambia, Germany, Greece, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Hungary, India, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Liberia, Libya, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Mali, Malta, Morocco, Myanmar, Netherlands, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Portugal, Romania, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Slovakia, Slovenia, Somalia, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Sweden, Switzerland, Syrian Arab Republic, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Togo, Tunisia, Turkey, World

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Until 28 February 2017, there were 13,439 cumulative arrivals to Italy, compared to 9,101 arrivals recorded in the same month in 2016 (a 48% increase). Greece has seen a 98% lower number of arrivals in February 2017 when compared to the same period in 2016, 2,611 and 125,494 respectively.

  • According to available data, there have been 17,479 new arrivals to Greece, Italy and Bulgaria, as countries of first arrival to Europe since the beginning of 2017 till 28 of February 2017.

  • By the end of February, total number of migrants and refugees stranded in Greece and in the Western Balkans reached 75,514. Since the implementation of the EU-Turkey Statement on the 18th of March, the number of migrants and refugees stranded in Greece increased by 46%. For the rest of the countries, please read page 5.

  • As of 28 February 2017, there have been 13,552 indi-viduals relocated to 24 European countries. Please see the new page on relocations for more information.

  • As of 28 February 2017, a total of 915 migrants and refugees were readmitted from Greece to Turkey as part of the EU-Turkey Statement with last readmis-sion taking place on 7 March 2017. The majority of migrants and refugees were Pakistani, Syrian, Afghan, Algerian and Bangladeshi nationals. See Tur-key section.

  • Information about “contingency countries” in the Western Balkans (Albania, Kosovo (SCR 1244)*, Montenegro, and Bosnia and Herzegovina) is on page 30

  • For information on this report, including details on the sources of this report’s data and tallying method-ologies used, please see page 31.

  • For more updates on the Central Mediterranean route, please check IOM’s Mediterranean portal with most recent DTM report from Libya and Niger.

*References to Kosovo should be understood in the context of the United Nations Security Council resolution 1244 (1999)

Niger: Niger HRP 2017: Funding Status as of 20 March 2017

20 March 2017 - 1:45pm
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Niger

Niger: Niger: Measuring Illicit Arms Flows

20 March 2017 - 11:49am
Source: Small Arms Survey Country: Niger

First Publication in New Briefing Paper Series: Measuring Illicit Arms Flows in Niger

Measuring Illicit Arms Flows: Niger—the first in a new series of Briefing Papers launched today by the Small Arms Survey— examines the measurement of illicit arms flows in Niger in the context of the UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), specifically SDG 16.

Based on field research conducted in Niger, the Briefing Paper maps the national and international bodies that collect data relevant to monitoring the evolution of illicit arms flows in and through Niger. It also discusses the relevance of Indicator 16.4.2 and suggests ways to improve the monitoring of progress towards the achievement of SDG Target 16.4 in Niger, and more widely in Africa. The Paper is the third in a series of four publications on measuring illicit arms flows in selected countries.

Key findings:

  • Niger’s security forces seize weapons and ammunition and keep useful records. The quality of data collection varies greatly between institutions, however, and a central, national database of seizure-related information is crucially lacking.

  • Though Niger is primarily a transit route for weapons circulating in the region, measuring illicit arms flows in the country is key to understanding the evolution of trafficking trends in the wider region

  • In the absence of comprehensive data on arms seizures in Niger, other indicators should also be used, including the fluctuation in materiel pricing and reports on the use of firearms in acts of violence.

Download Full Report from Small Arms Survey

Nigeria: Nigeria: Office of Transition InitiativesResults - Dandal Kura Radio

20 March 2017 - 10:37am
Source: US Agency for International Development Country: Cameroon, Chad, Niger, Nigeria

PROBLEM:

Northeast Nigeria and the larger Lake Chad Basin (LCB) region continue to face threats from Boko Haram. The militant group originates from Borno state, the homeland of the region’s Kanuri people.

WHAT WE’RE DOING:

USAID/OTI’s Nigeria Regional Transition Initiative helped create Dandal Kura (“meeting place” in Kanuri), a radio station with daily broadcasts of locally sourced Kanuri-language radio programs to the Lake Chad Basin region.

WHY:

To build a stronger sense of community and belonging among Kanuri speakers and to give them a voice so they will be less likely to turn to groups like Boko Haram for identity and belonging.

Niger: WFP Niger Country Brief, February 2017

20 March 2017 - 7:14am
Source: World Food Programme Country: Mali, Niger, Nigeria

Highlights

  • A joint WFP/UNHCR sensitization mission took place in Intikane ZAR for the newly relocated Malian refugees from Tazalit ZAR on the implementation of assistance on the basis of needs and capacity.

  • Critical funding gap is having extremely negative consequences on planned resilience and hunger season activities. New contributions are urgently needed to avoid losing achievements gained over the past three years.

  • Coupled with the effects on school meal activities of severe underfunding, the consequences of the 2017 pastoral crisis is increasing pupil dropout rates, in particular amongst children of nomad communities.

Operational Updates

  • Distributions of commodity vouchers for school meals activities started. This type of assistance helps to create a direct connection between local production, education, nutrition and women empowerment. Food goods were delivered by farmer organizations in four communes (Falwel and Sokordé in the Dosso region, and Djirataoua and Guidan Amoumoune in Maradi) and by WFP providers in all other communes. Awareness raising sessions were carried out alongside distributions.

  • Multiple discussions took place between the Ministry of Education, WFP and UNICEF to identify solutions for the increasing drop-out rate of pupils in nomadic areas.
    Communities of these areas are the most affected by the pastoral crisis developed as a consequence of the fodder deficit during the 2016-17 agro-pastoral campaign.

  • The final phase of the joint WFP-Ministry of Primary and Secondary Education mission presented the Adolescent Strategy to national technical services at the regional levels.
    The Adolescent Strategy, which aims at improving nutrition and education of adolescents of very poor households, will be launched in March in all communes where WFP implements integrated activities.

  • WFP contributed to the finalization of the budget/costing plan of the National Multisector Policy on Nutrition Security for 2017. This policy will be finalized and officially launched in March and will involve all government sectors with the aim of eradicating malnutrition in Niger.

  • The first Steering Committee meeting of the "Fortification of Processed Food Products in Niger" project took place. The aim is to improve the quality and availability of nutritional food in Niger by promoting the consolidation of local food chains derived from "primary" processing, in particular those resulting from the milling of cereals, legumes and the extraction of seed oil.

  • A meeting with the government 3N Initiative reviewed and planned the scale up of community-based participatory planning (CBPP) activities for at least 80 integrated sites in 2017. During the meeting focal points were designated amongst government, partner and UN representatives who will hold the role of trainers for the CBPP sites.

  • A boot-camp on asset creation techniques took place during the last week of February involving both WFP staff and national technical services, providing tools to produce high quality assets and strengthen national capacities.

  • WFP provided policy advice and technical assistance on the finalization of the Sustainable Development and Inclusive Growth Strategy 2035, with a special attention on integrating the Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 2 agenda.

  • WFP continued its efforts to capitalize on lessons learned by identifying and publishing best practices on Rome-based Agencies integrated approach in Dargué and Maradi.

  • UNHAS continues to provide air transport services to the humanitarian community in all five regions of Niger. In February, UNHAS transported 1,370 passengers and 2,218 mt of cargo.