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Updated: 1 hour 51 min ago

Pakistan: Pakistan Cash Working Group Dashboard (January - July 2016)

15 hours 46 min ago
Source: World Food Programme, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Food Security Cluster Country: Pakistan

Cash Transfer Programming Training

The CWG conducted the five days, CaLP Level 2 Training was organized under the umbrella of the FSC and with financial support of ECHO in Islamabad from the 30th May to 3 rd June 2016. A total of 21 participants (4 female and 17 males) including l/INGOs from all provinces, donors and UN agencies participated in this training. The training was led by Ms. Agnes Dalmau (CaLP International) and Ms. Rabeea Ahmed (Cash and Voucher Focal Person - WFP) with overall coordination support provided by Habib Wardag (Assistant Cluster Coordinator – CWG, FAO).

The training was organized with an objective to strengthen the capacity of humanitarian actors in cash design and implementation, to share recent research and learning, and encourage advocacy, institutionalization, and coordination in cash transfer programming (CTP). Moreover the training also significantly enhanced the understanding of the participants on how to mainstream gender equality, and nutrition in cash and voucher transfer program initiatives at the national and sub-national level as well.
The two days CTP training for KP/FATA was carried jointly by the Community Restoration Cluster and Food Security Cluster in Peshawar on 26-27 July 2016. A three days CTP training, for the first time integrated with DRR and Nutrition aspects, will take place in the second week of August, 2016. Following the appreciation of the participants and the interest from many more to participate, one more training on CTP is planned for three days in Karachi on 25-27 August 2016.

Pakistan: Pakistan: Daily Situation Report No. – 51 Monsoon 2016 (1300 hrs 29 August 2016 – 1500 hrs 30 August 2016)

30 August 2016 - 8:32am
Source: Government of Pakistan Country: Pakistan
  1. Rivers Flow Situation Reported by Flood Forecasting Division. Annex A.

  2. Past Meteorological Situation and Future Forecast by PMD. Annex B.

  3. Dam Levels Serial Reservoirs Max Conservation Level (Feet) Current Level (Feet) Percentage
    a. Tarbela 1,550.00 1,543.16 99.5%
    b. Mangla 1,242.00 1,237.25 99.6%

  4. Significant Events. Nothing to Report.

  5. Road Situation (NHA and Respective Provinces). All roads across the Country are clear for all types of traffic.

  6. Railway Situation. Nothing to Report.

  7. Preliminary Losses / Damages Reported. Overall details of losses / damages during Monsoon Season 2016 are at Annex C.

  8. Relief Provided Overall details of relief provided during Monsoon Season 2016 are at Annex D.

  9. Any Critical Activity to Report. Nothing to Report.

  10. Any Recommendation. Nil.

Serbia: UNHCR Serbia Update, 25-28 August 2016

30 August 2016 - 4:08am
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Afghanistan, Bulgaria, Croatia, Hungary, Iraq, Pakistan, Serbia, Syrian Arab Republic, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, World

HIGHLIGHTS AND STATISTICS

  • Serbia continued to host around 4,400 new refugees, asylum-seekers and migrants. Over 80% of them were accommodated in governmental facilities, including 1,340 in the five Asylum Centres and 2,216 in Refugee Aid Points/Reception Centres.

  • Less than 350 asylum-seekers (i.e. 1/3 of the peak of over 1,000 on 14 July) still camped in the open on Serbian soil close to the Hungarian “transit zones” near Horgos I and Kelebija border-crossings. Consolidated action by authorities, UNHCR, partners as well as refugee community leaders to encourage asylum-seekers to move to governmental centres instead was effective.

  • While Hungary admitted 120 asylum-seekers into its two “transit zones” during the last four days, UNHCR and partners collected testimonies from over twenty, who reported to have been push-back into Serbia without being allowed access to procedures/protection in Hungary.

  • 249 persons expressed their intent to seek asylum in Serbia, bringing the total for August to 1,740 and for the whole year to 7,876. Jan-July 2016, the Asylum Office of the border-guards issued 50 first instance decisions, which granted subsidiary protection to 16 applicants and refugee status to ten, while rejecting 24 [compared to 16 decisions Jan-July 2015: 14 refugee status and two rejections].

SOUTH

New arrivals from fYRo Macedonia, Bulgaria and other reception facilities continued to be referred to the Reception Centre (RC) in Presevo. It accommodated close to 550 refugees and migrants, most from Afghanistan, followed by Iraq, Pakistan and Syria.

The authorities, UNHCR and all other organizations active in the RC, assisted with food and non-food items, medical services, counselling, interpretation, referrals and recreational activities.

To identify protection and other specific needs as well as available solutions, UNHCR - assisted by SCRM and IOM - completed an individual profiling of 533 residents of the RC.

BELGRADE

In fair weather, up to 600 refugees, asylum seekers and migrants were encountered and assisted in the city centre. They were encouraged to move to the Asylum Centre of Krnjaca, which sheltered over 750.

Various Civil Society Organisations provided assistance, counselling and facilitated many referrals, including to asylum procedures, registration with the police, accommodation in the Asylum Centre and medical services. Unaccompanied minors and separated children were referred to the Centre for Social Work. UNHCR/DRC and MDM doctors treated over 145 refugee/migrant patients every day in the city.

NORTH

The number of asylum seekers in the North dropped to 708 (from a peak of 1,011 on 14 July). Less than half of them, camped in the open on Serbian soil close to the “transit zones” at Horgos I and Kelebija. 63% were women and children from Afghanistan, Iraq or Syria. The SCRM sheltered 400 more asylum-seekers in the Refugee Aid Point (RAP) of Subotica.

The SCRM, UNHCR, and other organizations present provided humanitarian aid, including bottled water, food, fresh fruits, non-food aid, hygiene packages, support to maintenance of the sanitary conditions, medical assistance as well as legal and other counselling. On 26 August, a man from Pakistan, who had been hit by a truck several days before near Horgos in the North and was in a coma due to sustained injuries, unfortunately passed away in Subotica General Hospital.

WEST

The Refugee Aid Points in Sid, Adasevci and Principovac continued sheltering over 1,360 refugees and migrants. Most had been referred by the SCRM from other locations, mainly Horgos and Subotica. On 28 August, 412 stayed in Sid RAP, mainly from Afghanistan or Pakistan, 680 in Adasevci RAP, mainly from Afghanistan, Syria and Iraqi and 271 in Principovac RAP, mainly from Afghanistan.

Civil Society Organizations assisted with food, and non-food as well as medical aid, counselling, referrals, child support, and recreational activities. In order to expand its capacity by another 150 places, the SCRM installed 23 tents on the meadow of RAP Principovac.

Attempts to clandestinely enter Croatia hidden on trains/trucks as well as push-backs from Croatia continued. Media reported on at least two instances when the Serbian police apprehending groups of mainly Afghan and Pakistani men, in Sid and Batrovci border crossing, hidden in vehicles. Additionally, 24 men were encountered in Sid, claiming they managed to enter Croatia the night before but were pushed-back to Serbia.

Pakistan: Crisis Response Bulletin, August 29, 2016 - Volume: 2, Issue: 35

30 August 2016 - 3:51am
Source: Alhasan Systems Country: Afghanistan, India, Pakistan

HIGHLIGHTS:

  • Heavy rainfall floods streets in Rawalpindi

  • Provinces asked to follow National Climate Change policy

  • Preventive measures against Congo virus advised: Experts

  • Pakistan to become water scarce in 4 years

  • Supreme Court rejects review appeals of 16 terror convicts set to hang

  • Pakistan’s Counter- Terrorism Policy

  • CPEC confronts terrorism

  • US urges Pakistan, Afghanistan to work together against terrorism

  • Pakistan won’t allow any terrorist to use its soil for terrorism:COAS

  • Terrorism in Pakistan taking last breaths: PM Nawaz Sharif

  • 13 districts declared high risk in KP anti-polio campaign

  • Congo fever: WHO representative calls for stringent precautions

  • Safe and sound: Regional Blood Centre to become functional

  • Public asked to be cautious on Eidul Azha

  • PM directs to construct 39 new hospitals

Pakistan: Pakistan: HIV/AIDS Cases on the Rise in Sindh - 2016

30 August 2016 - 3:34am
Source: Alhasan Systems Country: Pakistan

Pakistan: Vegetation Analysis Map of Pakistan - 28 August 2016

30 August 2016 - 3:30am
Source: Alhasan Systems Country: Pakistan

Pakistan: Piloting private sector investment to protect KP communities against disaster

30 August 2016 - 12:51am
Source: UN Development Programme Country: Pakistan

As communities around the world begin to experience the impacts of climate change and face recurrent disasters, there has been increasing awareness of the importance of disaster risk reduction (DRR) – taking action to reduce vulnerabilities and exposure and developing more resilient communities. Moreover, since climate change and disasters affect every aspect of life, there is growing understanding that building resilience requires participation from all members of society, including individuals, private and public organizations, civil society and government.

Building resilience is an investment in the future, but is severely challenged by inadequate investment. This is a serious concern in Pakistan, which is amongst the top 10 countries considered to be most at risk of climate change. However, a recent consultative workshop in Peshawar offered a first step towards increasing private investment in DRR.

Private investment offers an important opportunity for DRR in Pakistan. There are 43,965 registered private enterprises in Pakistan, including 687 foreign companies, all of which are obliged by law to fulfil their corporate social responsibility (CSR) as stated in Gazette of Pakistan (Extra-ordinary) 983(I) 2009: “…every company shall provide descriptive and monetary disclosures of the CSR activities undertaken during each financial year”. Thus, the possibility of directing CSR initiatives and investment towards DRR may help to build more resilient communities.

Recognizing the importance for investment and broad participation in building community resilience, public and private sector officials came together at a workshop organized by UNDP Pakistan in Peshawar. Inaugurated by Zulfiqar Ali Khan, President of the Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Chamber of Commerce and Industry, the event was attended by chamber representatives, officials from disaster management authorities (NDMA and PDMA KP), and representatives from private sector organizations in Peshawar. Working together, attendees developed a list of potential areas of involvement for the private sector. This working document will inform the development of a provincial strategy on private partnerships for DRR in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province.

The Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction, adopted globally in 2015, consists of four priorities for action one of which is the increase of investment in DRR for resilience. The Peshawar workshop was a crucial pilot initiative which will help translate the global agenda embodied in the Sendai Framework to the local level. This will hopefully boost the increasing investment to help communities face one of the greatest challenges of our time, and ensure that all members of society are full partners in prioritising disaster risk reduction measures as part of a global climate change adaptation strategy.

UNDP is now working with its private and public partners in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province to demonstrate how to achieve this cross-society commitment, and bring private sector investment to the fore in the crucial task of building community resilience, adapting to climate change, and reducing the impacts of disasters.

Additional links:

Contact Information

For more information, contact:

Mr. Naeem Iqbal, National Project Coordinator, DRR in Pakistan Project, naeem.iqbal@undp.org

Mr. Muhi Usamah, DRR Specialist, muhi.usamah@undp.org

Pakistan: Anti-polio drive put off in three major cities

30 August 2016 - 12:04am
Source: DAWN Group of Newspapers Country: Pakistan

ISLAMABAD/QUETTA: A three-day anti-polio campaign is set to begin in high-risk areas across the country on Monday, but Islamabad, Rawalpindi and Lahore have been excluded from the drive for now because of rains and the T20 cricket tournament.

Although rain has also affected Karachi, the forecast there indicates a clear weather in the coming days and, therefore, the campaign in the city will proceed as per schedule.

Under the three-day campaign and a two-day catch-up, about 6.71 million children under the age of five will be administered oral polio vaccine in Sindh, 5.987m in Punjab, 3.638m in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, 1.683m in Balochistan and 1.065m in Fata.

Around 125,000 personnel, including government employees, lady health workers and temporary workers, will participate in the campaign. These include around 11,991 area in-charges, 3,516 UC medical officers, 94,839 mobile team members, 4,685 fixed team members and 5,638 transit team members.

An official of the polio programme told Dawn that over the past few days, Lahore had seen heavy rains and more rain was expected in the coming days. In addition, the T20 cricket tournament being held in Rawalpindi has diverted a large number of security officials there.

“In Lahore, the campaign will now be carried out from Sept 5 to 8 and that in Rawalpindi from Sept 7 to 10,” he said.

Rana Safdar, head of the Emergency Operations Centre for polio, told Dawn that they were quite serious about this campaign because it was the first of the low-transmission season.

The low-transmission season runs from September to May and is so called because poliovirus remains inactive in low temperatures and can easily be eradicated.

“We don’t want to miss any child for any reason, so we decided to reschedule the polio campaigns in Islamabad, Rawalpindi and Lahore,” he said.

Dr Safdar said that every team would be monitored during the campaign and that provisions were made for third-party monitoring as well.

At least 1.6 million children will be vaccinated against poliovirus during the three-day campaign in 15 districts of Balochistan.

Emergency Operation Center Balochistan coordinator Syed Faisal Ahmed said that 402 fixed and 213 transit points had been established in these districts where 3,875 polio workers would vaccinate 1,636,934 children.

He said the campaign would focus on transit points, especially the Pak-Afghan Friendship Gate, where children under the age of 10 would be administrated polio vaccine to curb transmission of the crippling disease.

About security arrangements during the campaign, Mr Ahmed said Frontier Corps and army personnel would be deployed in sensitive areas of the province to prevent any incident.

The anti-polio drive in Qilla Saifullah, Qilla Abdullah, Naseera­bad, Jaffarabad, Pishin, Loralai, Dera Bugti, Lasbela, Sherani, Quetta, Zhob, Jhal Magsi, Bharkhan, Khuzdar, Musa Khel and other parts of the province would start as per announced dates, he added.

Mr Ahmed urged the media and religious scholars to play their vital role and encourage the parents to get their children vaccinated against polio.

Our Correspondent in Khar adds: Strict security measures have been taken for safety of the health workers engaged in the three-day anti-polio drive beginning in Bajaur Agency on Monday.

An official of the local health department told Dawn on Sunday that over 227,000 children below the age of five would be administered oral polio vaccine during the campaign. A total of 700 teams comprising over 1,500 health workers, teachers and volunteers will take part in the campaign.

The administration has made strict security arrangements across the agency to protect vaccinators from any unpleasant incident during the anti-polio drive.

According to the official, only one polio case has been detected in the entire tribal belt this year — in South Waziristan Agency.

The anti-polio campaign in hilly and remote Chamarkand tehsil was completed on Sunday.

Published in Dawn, August 29th, 2016

Pakistan: KP govt adopts ‘contradictory policy’ on Afghan students

29 August 2016 - 11:18pm
Source: DAWN Group of Newspapers Country: Afghanistan, Pakistan

PESHAWAR: The Khyber Pakhtunkhwa government seems to have adopted a contradictory policy for Afghan students as it does the opposite of what it preaches about their admission to schools and colleges in the province.

The home and tribal affairs department through a letter issued on August 22 had informed the relevant departments that there was no restriction on the grant of admission to Afghan students in the government or private educational institutions throughout the province.

It said the federal Ministry of State and Frontier Regions had also directed that registered refugee students might continue their academic activities in Pakistan and that educational institutions both public and private could entertain their admission applications if they fulfilled the criteria.

“There is no restriction on admission of registered Afghan refugees students in any education institution throughout Khyber Pakhtunkhwa,” said the letter addressed to various education departments.

However, sources told Dawn that the government and private schools and colleges had received verbal instructions from the security apparatus about denial of admission to refugee students.

Schools, colleges denying admission to refugees on verbal instructions

They said the administrations of several colleges in the provincial capital had confirmed that they had been stopped from providing admission to refugees’ students.

Thousands of refugee students are studying in the government and private educational institutions in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa.

The Afghans have a vast network of schools and colleges in Peshawar where refugee children are imparted education.

The government has reserved seats for refugee students in the country’s prestigious professional institutions in Lahore, Karachi and Faisalabad.

However, such seats in professional colleges of Peshawar have been abolished.

Besides refugees, Pakistani government also gives 2,000 scholarships to Afghan students and provides them with admission to professional colleges and universities across the country. The Higher Education Commission in collaboration with Pakistani mission in Kabul processes admission of qualified Afghan students.

A senior government functionary also said schools and colleges had been restricted from admission to refugee students.

“Large numbers of refugees are going back to Afghanistan and therefore, schools and colleges had been asked not to admit refugee students,” said the official. However, he said these instructions did not apply on refugees’ students who were studying in professional institutions.

“But they (refugees’ students in professional institutions) will have to apply for student visas after December 31, 2016 otherwise their admission will be cancelled,” he said. Presently federal government has a policy that all registered refugees would have to go back to their country by the end of December.

Officials said around 60 schools had been closed in refugee camps in the province since their Afghan students had departed to their country.

They said around 20,000 students had left for own country since their families had returned to Afghanistan.

Around 70,000 refugees have returned under the UN voluntary repatriation programme this year.

The repatriation of refugees is gaining momentum with officials expecting the number of returning Afghans to touch the 200,000 mark by the end of the year.

Also, the Afghans are winding up businesses in Peshawar and other parts of the province.

Published in Dawn, August 27th, 2016

Kenya: Kenya: Kakuma New Arrival Registration Trends 2016 (as of 29 August 2016)

29 August 2016 - 9:08am
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Kenya, Nigeria, Pakistan, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Yemen, Zimbabwe

Pakistan: Pakistan: Daily Situation Report No. – 50 Monsoon 2016 (1300 hrs 28 August 2016 – 1500 hrs 29 August 2016)

29 August 2016 - 7:41am
Source: Government of Pakistan Country: Pakistan
  1. Rivers Flow Situation Reported by Flood Forecasting Division. Annex A.

  2. Past Meteorological Situation and Future Forecast by PMD. Annex B.

  3. Dam Levels | Serial Reservoirs | Max Conservation Level (Feet) | Current Level (Feet) | Percentage
    a. Tarbela, 1,550.00, 1,542.58, 99.5%
    b. Mangla, 1,242.00, 1,237.60, 99.6%

  4. Significant Events.A bridge on Karachi – Quetta Road (N-25) at Winder, District Lasbela,
    Balochistan was damaged due to a flash flood on 27 August 2016. Diversion has been provided and maintenance of damaged bridge is underway.

  5. Road Situation (NHA and Respective Provinces). All roads across the Country are clear for all types of traffic.

  6. Railway Situation. Nothing to Report.

  7. Preliminary Losses / Damages Reported. Overall details of losses / damages during Monsoon Season 2016 are at Annex C.

  8. Relief Provided Overall details of relief provided during Monsoon Season 2016 are at Annex D.

  9. Any Critical Activity to Report. Nothing to Report.

  10. Any Recommendation. Nil.

Pakistan: Seven more people die as rain lashes Karachi for second day

29 August 2016 - 4:25am
Source: DAWN Group of Newspapers Country: Pakistan

BHAGWANDAS | IMTIAZ ALI

KARACHI: Seven more persons died in rain-related incidents in the metropolis on Sunday, taking the death toll to 10 in the last two days, police, hospital officials and rescue services said.

The city received 54mm (over 2 two inches) of rain on Sunday — around 110mm (over 4 inches) since Saturday — said a meteorological department official, predicting more thunderstorms and rains for Monday.

The fresh deaths included that of 25-year-old Jabbar Raheem, who was electrocuted in Surjani Town. Mohammed Naseem, Surjani SHO, said the victim was inside a shop in Sector 7-D when he touched an iron pipe and died on the spot. His body was shifted to the Abbasi Shaheed Hospital.

Nazar Khan, 23, was electrocuted while he was sitting near an electric pole outside his home in Quaidabad. His body was shifted to the Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre.

An officer at the Khwaja Ajmer Nagri police station told Dawn that 30-year-old Shoaib died from electrocution in Sector-2 of New Karachi. However, his family did not provide any details nor were they willing to pursue the case.

A Chhipa official said Shoaib’s three-year-old brother was also electrocuted but the boy survived.

A 40-year-old man, identified as Javed Ahmed, died from electrocution near the Dr Ziauddin Hospital in Clifton within the limits of Boat Basin police, according to an Edhi Foundation spokesperson.

Shahzeb Mir, 19, too suffered a similar fate near Navy Gate in T&T Colony in Gizri.

Nazeer Husain, 62, sustained critical injuries when he slipped and fell down from the servant quarters located at the rooftop of the Commissioner House in Civil Lines where some repair work was under way.

He was transported to Civil Hospital Karachi, where he died during treatment. The incident occurred at around noon.

The deceased was a contractor, said Civil Lines SHO Waqar Ahmed Tanoli. The officer added that it was an accidental death hence no legal proceedings would be initiated.

A teenage boy died while his father sustained injuries after a wall collapsed on them in Orangi Town. Orangi SHO Khan Mohammed Shaikh said that Nazar Khan, 18, died and his father, Shirin Khan, 55, sustained injuries when the wall of their house fell down due to rains at Majeed Goth in MPR Colony.

Similar weather expected today

Responding to Dawn queries the met official said that other towns of the province in the eastern, southern and northern parts also received rains on Sunday and similar weather conditions were expected on Monday.

Landhi received the maximum amount of rainfall 54mm. At other areas in the city the amount of rain recorded was: airport/old area (31mm); Jinnah Terminal (30.2); Gulistan-i-Jauher (29.5); Sharea Faisal (31); Nazimabad (3); Gulshan-i-Hadeed (25); PAF Base Masroor (10); Saddar (8); and North Karachi (17.6).

The weatherman said that maximum temperature recorded in the city on Sunday was 29.8 degrees Celsius and minimum temperature recorded was 27.5 degrees Celsius. Humidity — amount of moisture in the atmosphere — was 88 per cent.

The met official said that the weather in the city on Monday was expected to remain partly cloudy / cloudy with chances of thunderstorm rain and maximum temperature was expected to remain between 31 and 33 degrees Celsius.

He said that some other towns in the province also received rain in the past 24 hours. The rain recorded in different towns was: Dadu (61mm); Hyderabad (15); Badin (33); Sukkur (42); Rohri (35); Mirpurkhas (21); Mithi (23); Chhor (13); Tando Jam (25); Islamakot and Nagar Parkar (15); Chhachhro (12); Larkana and Moenjodaro (4).

He said that rain and thundershowers with isolated heavy falls and gusty winds were likely to occur at a number of places in all divisions of Sindh on Monday.

Owing to a choked sewerage and storm-water drains filled with solid waste, many low-lying areas and different places along the main roads, including Sharea Faisal at Natha Khan Goth, remained inundated. As a result long queues of vehicles could be seen moving at a snail’s pace causing traffic jams. Though at some places civic agency staffers could be seen draining the accumulated rainwater, considering the speed at which the work was being carried out, it was bound to take some time before the entire accumulated rainwater would be drained.

Preventive measures

To prevent urban flooding, the Malir district administration on Sunday said they had made “all the required arrangements” to ensure that no more urban settlements were ruined by a sudden gush of rainwater caused by the mountains on the fringes of Karachi.

“We have taken the required arrangements to make sure there is no recurrence of a situation we witnessed three years ago in Saadi Town,” said a spokesman for the Malir administration.

He said the deputy commissioner of Malir had asked his subordinates to take required measures to prevent urban flooding.

“The situation on ground is in control,” said the official. “We are confident that this time all the urban settlements will remain safe.”

Experts say usually rainwater from Balochistan enters the Lyari river creek in North Nazimabad, Surjani, Gadap and Taiser towns before culminating into the Arabian Sea.

“The water that submerged Saadi Town and Amroha Colony must have come from other channels or water bodies, especially when we see that authorities have set up many reservoirs during the last few years,” said an expert.

KE teams remain ‘active’

The fragile system of the electricity utility in the city also collapsed and with many of its transformers etc becoming nonoperational many parts of the metropolis were left without power for several hours causing hardships to citizens.

According to a statement, K-Electric (KE) teams remained active on Sunday as the city experienced another spell of rain. KE’s rapid response teams came into action immediately in the aftermath of rains to address any disruptions in supply.

A majority of the affected feeders were normalised within an hour, said the statement, and most of the feeders affected by the rains on Sunday were re-energised within a few hours.

Uninterrupted supply to strategic installations, including the airport and Dhabeji, was ensured.

KE teams remained in the field to address localised faults and individual queries. Affected areas include Malir, North Karachi, and parts of Gulshan-i-Iqbal.

According to a KE spokesperson, field teams and customer call centre worked round the clock to ensure supply and restoration of power to affected customers in the city.

The KE urged people to inform its staff of any broken wires or complaints by calling 118 or 021-99000. Queries may also be sent via SMS to 8119 or through KE’s digital platforms.

Published in Dawn, August 29th, 2016

Pakistan: Pakistan expands glacier monitoring in effort to cut disaster risk

28 August 2016 - 10:57pm
Source: AlertNet Country: Pakistan

With glaciers melting faster in the face of climate change, flood risk is rising and early warnings will be key

By Saleem Shaikh and Sughra Tunio

ISLAMABAD, Aug 23 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - Pakistan will invest $8.5 million to expand a network of glacier monitoring stations tracking the pace of glacial melt in the Hindu Kush, Karakoram and Himalayan mountain ranges, in an effort to strengthen early warning systems and reduce the impact of flooding in the South Asian country.

Read the full story here

India: Govt plans Rs 2000 crore package for people displaced from PoK

28 August 2016 - 9:55pm
Source: Times of India Country: India, Pakistan

TNN | Aug 29, 2016, 05.35 AM IST

Highlights

•The govt has proposed a Rs 2,000-crore package for people displaced from PoK living in India
•The home ministry is expected to place the details of the package before the Cabinet for approval soon •The government has maintained that PoK and Gilgit-Baltistan are part of J&K

NEW DELHI: With Prime Minister Narendra Modi pitching for the rights of those living in Pakistan-occupied Kashmir and Gilgit-Baltistan regions of Pakistan, the government has proposed a Rs 2,000-crore package for people displaced from PoK living in India. . . The home ministry is expected to place the details of the package before the Cabinet for approval soon, senior ministry officials said.. . It is learnt that J&K government has identified 36,348 such families which will get around Rs 5.5 lakh each. Refugees from Pakistan, mostly from PoK, were settled in different parts of Jammu, Kathua and Rajouri districts over a period of time. They do not have the status of permanent residents.. . Some of the families were displaced during partition in 1947, and others during the 1965 and 1971 wars with Pakistan. The displaced people can cast their votes in Lok Sabha polls but not in the elections to the Jammu & Kashmir assembly.

Jammu and Kashmir Sharanarthi Action Committee (JKSAC), an organisation representing the displaced people of PoK, has maintained that the package should not be seen as final settlement as Rs 9,200 crore was required to settle all of them. .

. The NDA government had in January 2015 approved certain concessions for refugees from Pakistan settled in J&K after considering their problems. These includes special recruitment drives for induction into paramilitary forces, equal employment opportunities in the state and admission for children of refugees in Kendriya Vidyalayas. .

. Modi had for the first time talked about the plight of people of PoK, Gilgit-Baltistan and Balochistan at an all-party meeting convened to discuss the J&K situation on August 12. Three days later, while addressing the nation on Independence Day, he again referred to the three regions under the control of Pakistan.

The government has maintained that PoK and Gilgit-Baltistan are part of J&K. There have been reports that the government is planning to invite the diaspora from PoK and Gilgit-Baltistan for the next Pravasi Bharatiya Diwas to be held in Bengaluru.

Afghanistan: Afghanistan Humanitarian Bulletin Issue 54 | 01 – 31 July 2016

28 August 2016 - 11:07am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Afghanistan, Pakistan

HIGHLIGHTS

• Malnutrition affects 2.7 million people including a million children under the age of five.
Only 35 per cent of children with severe acute malnutrition are being reached and of those, only 25 per cent are actually cured.

• Despite access constraints, conflict and displacement, Medair delivers critical nutrition support in the South

• More than 5,000 people Afghans are returning from Pakistan per day

• Highest amount of civilian casualties for the first six months of 2016 ever recorded in Afghanistan, one-third of them children- UNAMA reports

Malnutrition: the silent killer in Afghanistan

The number of children killed by conflict in 2015 represents less than 1 per cent of the estimated number of children dying due to malnutrition in one year in Afghanistan.

Afghanistan’s children living in the shadow of armed conflict face a real and present danger. Between January and June this year, 388 children lost their lives primarily resulting from ground engagements between anti-government elements and Afghan forces. Another 100,000 children fled from their homes as their parents sought to get them to safety. While the daily battles and skirmishes have a recognisable impact on the lives of children, the unrelenting conflict overshadowing the country for the last decades has considerably impeded development progress. The result is an altogether more dangerous environment for children where, in contrast to the conflict, it is the unseen dangers that are exacting loss of life with implacable ferocity.

Afghanistan has the second highest rate of under-five mortality in the world. For every one thousand babies born, fifty-five will die before the age of five. Eighty-two per cent of these deaths will occur even before the child’s first birthday. Most of these children will die from easily preventable or treatable conditions such as diarrhoea or pneumonia. In Afghanistan these common conditions are made much more dangerous due to the additional presence of malnutrition. An undernourished child is not only weak and less able to withstand an attack of illness, the illness itself also makes the child much more susceptible to becoming malnourished. As such, while rarely cited as a leading cause, malnutrition is the hidden contributing factor in about 45 per cent of all child deaths.

The Afghanistan Nutrition Cluster estimates 2.7 million people are affected by malnutrition including one million children under five with an acute state of malnutrition in need of treatment. In contrast to the palpable impact of violence, the ordinarily hidden nature of malnutrition severely frustrates efforts to confront this considerable threat to young life. Lack of awareness about malnutrition has been identified as one of the top barriers preventing children from accessing treatment.
Rural mothers in Afghanistan lack adequate knowledge about malnutrition and so can rarely identify this as a cause or contributing factor to their child’s ill health. When their child gets a bout of diarrhoea they are unable to understand how a poor or inadequate diet has made them more susceptible to infection through lowered immunity or likewise how the diarrhoea itself prevents absorption of foods, and causes loss of appetite resulting in a vicious cycle of undernutrition and infection.

This lack of knowledge and understanding makes the community mobilisation component of the customary approach to treating malnutrition so important. Once a child becomes malnourished they face a roughly three times higher risk of dying from common communicable diseases than if they were well-nourished. Once they deteriorate to being severely malnourished, typically thirty to fifty per cent of these children die. Working with communities to identify malnutrition and to actively screen and monitor all young children regularly is therefore critical to ensure malnutrition can be identified early and treated immediately. This high level of coverage achieved for treatment programmes through engagement with communities is crucial to the substantial reduction in fatalities that can be achieved through effective Community or Integrated Management of Acute Malnutrition (CMAM/IMAM) programming.

Afghanistan’s IMAM programmes, however, have distinctively low coverage. UNICEF analysis suggests only 38 per cent of health facilities are providing nutrition services. This figure is all the more concerning given that health facilities only cover a generously estimated 60 per cent of the population. What is more, health facility based treatment does little to meet the needs of the children noted above, whose parents are mainly unaware of their condition until they deteriorate to an almost irreparable stage. The community outreach and active case finding is therefore critical to have any traction in combatting the malnutrition crisis faced by Afghanistan’s children.

Enhancing community level programming will be impossible as long as the current approach and services intended to treat malnutrition remain critically under resourced.

Working from the 2001 baseline of a devastated health system and some of the worst health statistics in the world, Afghanistan’s approach to delivering nationwide healthcare through contracting out its provision of services to non-governmental organisations under a Basic Package of Health Services (BPHS) has documented a number of successes.

However, in its current state, the international donor dependent health system is facing multiple challenges in terms of ensuring quality and reducing inequities in access resulting from various internal bottlenecks related to human resources, information management, health system financing and governance as well as supply chain issues.

The persistent poor health indicators for the country and the challenges within the system will be genuinely impossible to overcome while the average per capita budget for provision of BPHS remains at approximately US$5.

In terms of financing a response to malnutrition the under resourcing of BPHS has significant implications. IMAM was officially included in the BPHS in 2010, however this nutrition component has been particularly under-staffed and under resourced. The majority of health facilities do not offer nutrition services and those that do lack dedicated nutrition capacity. Only 50 per cent of facilities surveyed by the Afghanistan National Nutrition Cluster reported their staff (medical doctors, midwifes, nurses) had received training on nutrition in the previous year. With such poor coverage and quality of services it is hardly surprising only 35 per cent of children with severe acute malnutrition are being reached and of those only 25 per cent are actually cured.

Partial attempts to enhance treatment services which focus only on the most severely malnourished children are short sighted. As demonstrated through a recent assessment in Herat, the lack of treatment services for moderately malnourished children only resulted in high numbers of severe cases in the province as the children’s health inevitably worsened. Likewise, ignoring high rates of malnutrition among pregnant mothers not only impacts a woman’s chances of surviving pregnancy but perpetuates an intergenerational cycle of malnutrition. In Afghanistan, this cycle is accentuated by high rates of pregnancy among adolescent girls who themselves often suffer stunted growth due to poor nutrition.

As such they are highly likely to have low-birth-weight babies, significantly contributing to infant mortality and severe short- and long-term adverse health consequences and markedly increasing the chance of malnutrition and irreversible cumulative growth and development deficits.
Malnutrition of pregnant mothers and their young babies can affect the normal brain development of the child impacting their cognitive, motor, and socioemotional skills throughout childhood. The restricted development of these skills puts them at a critical disadvantage as they grow into adults, inhibiting their ability to learn and achieve results in school or find skilled employment. Consequently the ability to provide for and care for their own children is also reduced, thus contributing to the intergenerational transmission of poverty and malnutrition.

The humanitarian community recognizes that alone emergency curative interventions to treat malnutrition will be redundant. Malnutrition is a multidimensional issue with several underlying determinants and influences far from simply consuming sufficient food. Equally important is the existence of a healthy environment, access to safe water and sanitation facilities, provision of health care and shelter, the ability to influence caregiver behaviours and importantly the status a woman has and the choices she is free to make for her health and her child’s health in the society in which she lives. Ultimately peace and security and an enabling environment for all of the above is paramount.
Unfortunately as the conflict shows no sign of abating and the shifting security environment further hinders access to health and nutrition services increasing numbers of children are at risk. While parents seek to protect their children by fleeing from the danger of active conflict, the situation they find themselves in when displaced can be just as life threatening for their children. In the past months, alarming health indicators have been reported among displaced populations, exhibiting extreme vulnerabilities having been displaced repeatedly or for prolonged periods. Food insecurity, limited access to basic services, particularly health care and adequate water and sanitation, contribute to critical circumstances in which children’s risk to infection and disease is exacerbated.
Assessments of displaced populations, both IDPs and refugees, published in the last months have identified emergency levels of severe acute malnutrition among displaced children.

In July the Nutrition cluster revised upwards their financial request under the 2016 Afghanistan Humanitarian Response Plan to $69 million for urgent interventions to treat 285,000 children and 136,000 mothers as well as enhance prevention measures through simple approaches such as promotion of Infant and Young Child Feeding and micronutrient supplementation. The cluster has so far received $56 million however the targets for treatment are well below the actual needs in the country. For the third year running the Afghanistan Common Humanitarian Fund is allocating resources specifically for emergency nutrition projects. The focus of the 2016 allocation will provide treatment for displaced children, ensure complimentary treatment for moderately malnourished children and pregnant women alongside the SAM programmes, and critically enhance access to Therapeutic Feeding Units for the increasing numbers of children that have deteriorated to such critical levels they require hospitalisation.

Serbia: UNHCR Serbia Update, 22-24 August 2016

28 August 2016 - 12:08am
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Afghanistan, Bulgaria, Croatia, Hungary, Iraq, Pakistan, Serbia, Syrian Arab Republic, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, World

HIGHLIGHTS AND STATISTICS

  • Of the estimated 4,400 total new refugees, asylum-seekers and migrants in Serbia, over 78% were accommodated in governmental facilities, including 1,221 in the five Asylum Centres and 2,231 in Refugee Aid Points/Reception Centres.

  • In the late evening of 23 August, a 20 year old Afghan, amongst a group of six men who had entered Serbia irregularly by foot from Bulgaria, was fatally shot by a hunter near Pirot in Eastern Serbia. Media reports that the police have taken the alleged perpetrator in custody while investigating the tragic incident.

  • On 23 August, Minister of Labour, Employment, Veterans and Social Affairs, Aleksandar Vulin and the UNHCR Representative opened the third phase of rehabilitation of the former Tobacco Factory building, which increases the accommodation capacity of the Reception Centre in Preševo by 650 to 1,500 places. The rehabilitation was implemented by DRC, funded mainly by ECHO, through the UNHCR programme.

  • Thanks to consolidated efforts by Serbian authorities, UNHCR and partners, the numbers of asylum-seekers in the North continued to drop, now to around 750. This includes asylum-seekers camping in the open on Serbian soil close to the Hungarian “transit zones” near Horgos I and Kelebija border-crossings, whose numbers fell to 384 from a peak of 1,011 on 14 July.

  • While Hungary admitted 90 asylum seekers into its “transit zones” during the last three days, UNHCR and partners collected reports of over 100 push-backs of asylum-seekers who had attempted to enter Hungary irregularly. A particularly serious allegation of use of force during a push-back was recorded on 23 August, when some 20 Afghan men were found in a village near Sombor. They reported to have entered irregularly into Hungary several days ago and alleged that, when they had been brought back to the border with Serbia, the Hungarian police released five dogs on them. Several asylum-seekers had to be treated for serious dog bite injuries by hospitals in Serbia. One remains hospitalized.

  • 286 persons expressed their intent to seek asylum in Serbia, bringing the total for August to 1,491 and for the year 2016 to 7,627 (statistics courtesy of the Ministry of Interior).

SOUTH

The Presevo Reception Centre (RC) occupancy remained at around 500 during the reporting period. The authorities continued referring new arrivals from fYRo Macedonia, Bulgaria and other reception facilities to the RC.

Majority of the residents are Afghans, followed by Iraqi, Pakistani and Syrians.

The authorities, UNHCR and all organizations present and active in the RC assisted the population with food and non-food items, medical services, counselling, interpretation, referrals and recreational activities.

BELGRADE

Of over a 1,000 refugees, asylum seekers and migrants, over 300 were in the city centre daily, while the authorities continued offering accommodation in Krnjaca AC, which sheltered and accommodated over 700.

Sans papier continue to be received at Krnjaca AC, as well as those with referrals for other ACs, to stay the night and then the following day go to police for registration or to continue to the referred AC. Media reported that the city authorities and SCRM informed Info Park to remove its stand from the park in the coming days.

NGOs and organizations in Belgrade provided assistance, counselling and facilitated many referrals, including to asylum procedures, accommodation to the ACs and medical services. Counselling on asylum may have led in a spike in registered intents to apply for asylum, with 212 registered alone on 24 August. Identified unaccompanied minors were referred to the Centre for Social Work. UNHCR/DRC and MDM doctors treated 60 patients during the day in the city.

NORTH

The number of asylum seekers in the North dropped to 775, half of which (mainly women and children from Afghanistan, Iraq and Syria) camp in the open on Serbian soil close to the “transit zones” at Horgos I and Kelebija.

The SCRM sheltered an additional 380 asylum-seekers in the Refugee Aid Point (RAP) of Subotica.

The SCRM, UNHCR, and other organizations present provided humanitarian aid, including bottled water, food, fresh fruits, non-food aid, hygiene packages, support to maintenance of the sanitary conditions, medical assistance as well as legal and other counselling.

WEST

The Refugee Aid Points in Sid, Adasevci and Principovac hosted over 1,330 refugees and migrants. Most were referred by SCRM from other locations, mainly Horgos and Subotica. On 24 August, there were 403 in Sid RAP, mainly from Afghanistan or Pakistan, 675 in Adasevci RAP, mainly from Afghanistan, Syria and Iraqi and 255 in Principovac RAP, mainly from Afghanistan.

The SCRM and other organizations present assisted with food, non-food, counselling, referrals, medical, child support, recreational activities, etc.

Media reported that the police in Sid apprehended 33 Afghans and Pakistanis attempting to irregularly cross into Croatia, hidden in two wagons of an international freight train. Additionally, 24 men were encountered in Sid, claiming they managed to enter Croatia irregularly but were pushed-back to Serbia.

Pakistan: IMB urges for peak performance to end polio in Pakistan

27 August 2016 - 9:26pm
Source: Government of Pakistan Country: Pakistan

Islamabad, 25 August 2016 - The International Monitoring Board (IMB) of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative has recognized major improvements in performance of the Pakistan polio eradication programme, a transformation from its position three years ago.

The report of the 13th meeting of the IMB highlighted the year on year improvements for the programme in Pakistan: a 59% reduction in cases, a reduction in the proportion of polio positive environmental samples, an overall increase in campaign quality and a reduction in the proportion of missed children, but voiced concern in reaching the goal of interrupting transmission in 2016 without further intensified efforts.

The Government of Pakistan welcomes the recommendations of the IMB, echoing its call for an intense push towards peak performance across all areas of the programme over the next six months.

Minister for National Health Services Saira Afzal Tararsaid that Pakistan is committed to addressing the remaining challenges and ending polio transmission in Pakistan in 2016.

“The IMB has recognized how far Pakistan has come which is clearly due to the strong political will and commitment shown by the country's leadership which has trickled down to all levels of responsibility and effected change. We must commit ourselves to nothing less than leaving no child unvaccinated and vulnerable to this crippling virus,” Tararsaid.

The National Emergency Action Plan (NEAP) 2016-2017, which is driving programme operations, risk assessment and management, oversight and accountability for the Pakistan programme, lays out an ambitious plan to tackle the remaining gaps, also identified by the latest IMB, report head-on.

“Under the NEAP, Pakistan is focused on improving the capacity and reach of its surveillance system to effectively transform it into a “surveillance system for eradication”, which includes an expanded workforce to meet the needs of the programme, more effective Acute Flaccid Paralysis (AFP) surveillance and more innovative ways to expand environment sampling to detect and respond to circulation,” Prime Minister’s Focal Person for Polio Eradication, Senator Ayesha Raza Farooq said.

She added that the programme is using the Emergency Operation Centres across Pakistan, that have provided an essential platform for Government staff and GPEI partners to come together as ‘one team under one roof’, to ensure key leadership is aligned to the urgency of the task ahead and engaged at all levels of the programme.

The Pakistan programme remains dedicated to strengthening operational collaboration across the shared reservoir areas with Afghanistan and ensuring that gaps in performance across the programme are addressed with urgency.

The Independent Monitoring Board (IMB) was convened in November 2010 at the request of the World Health Assembly to monitor and guide the progress of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative’s 2010-2012 Strategic Plan. The IMB releases quarterly reports to provide an honest and transparent external assessment of the progress being made towards polio eradication.

Pakistan: Polio campaign: Registration of children under five starts in selected UCs

27 August 2016 - 9:25pm
Source: Government of Pakistan Country: Pakistan

Pakistan is getting ever closer to achieving its target of polio eradication through exemplary coordination and collaboration of federal and provincial governments at political and administrative level.

To ascertain and validate the existing data about children under five years of age, health departments of respective provincial governments are undertaking an exercise to register and validate the numbers of children under five years of age in various UCs of Karachi, Sukkur, Kashmore, Qambar, Peshawar, Quetta block and North and South Waziristan. Community Health Workers and monitors from the provincial health departments are assigned to ensure all houses and children will be reached when the vaccination campaign begins in August.

The health departments requests parents to cooperate with the community health workers from the local neighborhood in the child registration process. This valuable contribution from the parents and community elders will help the health departments determine the exact numbers of children under five years of age in each of these UCs and ensure that no child is missed in the upcoming vaccination campaigns against polio.

Pakistan: Pakistan: Daily Situation Report No. – 48 Monsoon 2016 (1300 hrs 26 August 2016 – 1300 hrs 27 August 2016)

27 August 2016 - 8:53pm
Source: Government of Pakistan Country: Pakistan
  1. Rivers Flow Situation Reported by Flood Forecasting Division. Annex A.

  2. Past Meteorological Situation and Future Forecast by PMD. Annex B.

  3. Dam Levels: Serial Reservoirs | Max Conservation Level (Feet) | Current Level (Feet) | Percentage
    a. Tarbela 1,550.00 1,541.60 99.4%
    b. Mangla 1,242.00 1,238.75 99.7%

  4. Significant Events. On 27 August 2016 at 1030 hours, Rawalpindi – Sudhnoti Road was blocked due to a landslide at Azad Pattan in Tehsil Kahuta. Efforts are underway to open the road.

  5. Road Situation (NHA and Respective Provinces). All other roads across the Country are clear for all types of traffic.

  6. Railway Situation. Nothing to Report.

  7. Preliminary Losses / Damages Reported.

a. 2 x deaths and 1 x completely damaged house was reported in District Lahore on 26 August 2016.

b. Overall details of losses / damages during Monsoon Season 2016 are at Annex C.

  1. Relief Provided Overall details of relief provided during Monsoon Season 2016 are at Annex D.

  2. Any Critical Activity to Report. Nothing to Report.

  3. Any Recommendation. Nil.

Pakistan: Pakistan: Daily Situation Report No. – 49 Monsoon 2016 (1300 hrs 27 August 2016 – 1300 hrs 28 August 2016)

27 August 2016 - 8:00pm
Source: Government of Pakistan Country: Pakistan
  1. Rivers Flow Situation Reported by Flood Forecasting Division. Annex A.

  2. Past Meteorological Situation and Future Forecast by PMD. Annex B.

  3. Dam Levels | Serial Reservoirs | Max Conservation Level (Feet) | Current Level (Feet) | Percentage a. Tarbela, 1,550.00, 1,541.97, 99.4%
    b. Mangla, 1,242.00, 1,238.15, 99.7%

  4. Significant Events. Due to heavy rains, Flash Flood was reported in Tehsil Uthal and Windar, District Lasbela, Balochistan on 27 August 2016. No loss of life was reported.

  5. Road Situation (NHA and Respective Provinces).

    a. Rawalpindi – Sudhnoti Road was blocked due to a landslide at Azad Pattan in Tehsil Kahuta. Efforts are underway to open the road.

    b. All other roads across the Country are clear for all types of traffic.

  6. Railway Situation. Nothing to Report.

  7. Preliminary Losses / Damages Reported. Overall details of losses / damages during Monsoon Season 2016 are at Annex C.

  8. Relief Provided Overall details of relief provided during Monsoon Season 2016 are at Annex D.

  9. Any Critical Activity to Report. Nothing to Report.

  10. Any Recommendation. Nil.