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Philippines: NDRRMC Update Sitrep No. 04 re Preparedness Measures and Effects for Tropical Storm Marce (I.N. Tokage)

1 December 2016 - 7:17pm
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

I. SITUATION OVERVIEW

23 November 2016

The LPA east of Mindanao has developed into a Tropical Depression (TD) and was named "MARCE" with maximum sustained winds of up to 45 kph near the center and gustiness of up to 55 kph. It is forecasted to move West Northwest at 17 kph.

Tropical Cyclone Warning Signal (TCWS) No. 1 is hoisted over Southern Leyte, Bohol, Siquijor, Surigao del Norte, Surigao del Sur, Dinagat Island, Agusan del Norte, Agusan del Sur, Misamis Oriental and Camiguin.

24 November 2016

At around 5:00 PM, TD "MARCE" has made landfall over Siargao Island, Surigao Del Norte. TCWS No. -I is hoisted over Romblon, Cuyo Island, Calamian Group and Oriental Mindoro, Occidental Mindoro and Masbate, Biliran, Southern part of Samar, Southern part of eastern Samar, Leyte, Southern Leyte, Bohol, Cebu including Bantayan and Camotes Islands, Siquijor, Negros Oriental, Negros Occidental, Iloilo, Capiz, Aklan, Antique, Guimaras, Surigao del Norte including Siargao Island, Surigao del Sur, Dinagat Islands, Agusan del Norte, Agusan del Sur, Misamis Oriental and Camiguin.

25 November 2016

"MARCE" has intensified into a Tropical Storm as it moves toward Panay Island with maximum sustained winds of 65 kph near the center and gustiness of up to 110 kph and forecasted to move west northwest at 24 kph.

TCWS No. 2 was hoisted over Romblon, Calamian Group of Islands, Southern Occidental Mindoro and Southern Oriental Mindoro in Luzon and Northern Negros Occidental, Iloilo, Capiz, Aklan and Northern Antique in Visayas. While TCWS No. 1 was hoisted over Northern Palawan including Cuyo Rest of Oriental Mindoro, Rest of Occidental Mindoro including Lubang Island, Masbate including Burias and Ticao Island, Biliran, Samar, Northern Samar, Eastern Samar, Leyte, Southern Leyte, Bohol, Cebu including Bantayan and Camotes Islands, Negros Oriental, Rest of Negros Occidental, Rest of Antique and Guimaras.

TS "MARCE" has made five (5) landfalls since 24 November 2016 in the following areas:

  • 1st landfall in Siargao Island, Surigao del Norte at 5:00 PM, 24 November 2016

  • 2nd landfall in Abuyog, Leyte at 8:30 PM, 24 November 2016

  • 3rd landfall in Daan Bantayan, Cebu City at 1:30 AM, 25 November 2016

  • 4th landfall in Caries, Iloilo at 5:00 AM, 25 November 2016

  • 5th landfall in Calamian Groups of Island at 6:00 PM, 25 November 2016

TS "MARCE" has a maximum sustained winds of 65 kph near the center and gustiness of up to 100 kph and forecasted to move west northwest at 22 kph.

TCWS No. 2 was also raised over Calamian Group of Islands, Cuyo Island, Southern Occidental Mindoro and Southern Oriental Mindoro. While TCWS No. 1 is hoisted over the rest of Occidental Mindoro, rest of Oriental Mindoro, Northern Palawan, Romblon, Aklan and Antique.

26 November 2016

TS "MARCE" has slightly intensified as it continues to traverse the Philippine Sea. At 10:00 AM today, the center of Tropical Storm "MARCE" was estimated based on all evailable data at 335 km West of Calapan City, Oriental Mindoro with maximum winds of up to 75 kph near the center and gustiness of up to 95 kph and forecasted to move Northwest at 15 kph.

All TCWS has been lifted.

27 November 2016

At 4:00 PM today, the center of Tropical Storm "MARCE" was estimated based on all available data at 230 km Northwest of Dagupan City, Pangasinan with maximum winds of 75 kph near the center and gustiness of up to 95 kph. It is forecast to move North Northeast at 11 kph. It is expected to leave the PAR on 28 November 2016.

World: CrisisWatch November 2016

1 December 2016 - 4:10pm
Source: International Crisis Group Country: Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, China, Colombia, Côte d'Ivoire, Cyprus, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Guatemala, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, India, Indonesia, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Libya, Mali, Mauritania, Mexico, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Paraguay, Philippines, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Serbia, Somalia, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, Thailand, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), Western Sahara, World, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Global Overview NOVEMBER 2016

November saw violence escalate again in Syria, Myanmar, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and Cameroon. Attacks by pro-regime forces on rebel strongholds in Syria resumed, causing significant civilian casualties. In Myanmar’s Rakhine state intensifying violence displaced tens of thousands of Rohingya Muslims, while a major attack by armed groups near the Chinese border threatened to undermine the country’s fragile ethnic peace process. In DRC, violence rose in the east and the regime continued to repress dissent, underscoring the risk that renewed protests, likely in December when President Kabila’s second term officially ends, could turn violent. In Cameroon, Boko Haram stepped up its attacks in the Far North and minority English-speakers clashed with security forces in the North West region. The victory of Donald Trump in the U.S. presidential election on 8 November created uncertainty about possible shifts in future U.S. foreign policy priorities and positions, including on a number of conflicts and prominent geostrategic arenas – among them the future of the historic multilateral nuclear accord with Iran.

World: Zika virus, Microcephaly and Guillain-Barré syndrome Situation Report, 1 December 2016

1 December 2016 - 11:57am
Source: World Health Organization Country: American Samoa, Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Aruba (The Netherlands), Bahamas, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belize, Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Bonaire, Saint Eustatius and Saba (The Netherlands), Brazil, British Virgin Islands, Cambodia, Cayman Islands, Chile, Colombia, Cook Islands, Costa Rica, Cuba, Curaçao (The Netherlands), Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Fiji, French Guiana (France), French Polynesia (France), Gabon, Grenada, Guadeloupe (France), Guatemala, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Indonesia, Jamaica, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Malaysia, Maldives, Marshall Islands, Martinique (France), Mexico, Micronesia (Federated States of), Myanmar, New Caledonia (France), Nicaragua, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Puerto Rico (The United States of America), Saint Barthélemy (France), Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Martin (France), Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Singapore, Sint Maarten (The Netherlands), Solomon Islands, Suriname, Thailand, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Turks and Caicos Islands, United States of America, United States Virgin Islands, Vanuatu, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), Viet Nam, World

KEY UPDATES

  • Countries and territories reporting mosquito-borne Zika virus infections for the first time in the past week:
    • None
  • Countries and territories reporting microcephaly and other central nervous system (CNS) malformations potentially associated with Zika virus infection for the first time in the past week:
    • None
  • Countries and territories reporting Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) cases associated with Zika virus infection for the first time in the past week:
  • The Plurinational State of Bolivia

ANALYSIS

  • Overall, the global risk assessment has not changed. Zika virus continues to spread geographically to areas where competent vectors are present. Although a decline in cases of Zika infection has been reported in some countries, or in some parts of countries, vigilance needs to remain high.

SITUATION

  • Seventy-five countries and territories (Fig. 1, Table 1) have reported evidence of mosquito-borne Zika virus transmission since 2007 (69 with reports from 2015 onwards), of which:
    • Fifty-eight with a reported outbreak from 2015 onwards (Fig. 2, Table 1).
    • Seven with having possible endemic transmission or evidence of local mosquito-borne Zika infections in 2016.
  • Ten with evidence of local mosquito-borne Zika infections in or before 2015, but without documentation of cases in 2016, or with the outbreak terminated.
  • Twelve countries have reported evidence of person-to-person transmission of Zika virus (Table 2).
  • Twenty-eight countries or territories have reported microcephaly and other CNS malformations potentially associated with Zika virus infection, or suggestive of congenital infection (Table 3).
  • Twenty countries or territories have reported an increased incidence of GBS and/or laboratory confirmation of a Zika virus infection among GBS cases (Table 4).
  • The first Zika case in Myanmar reported on 4 November was confirmed by the Ministry of Health and Sport (MoHS). According to the final case report, there have been no additional cases of Zika detected in the last month despite a community-wide search for Zika cases. The MoHS concluded that this case was not due to local mosquito-borne transmission but possibly through person-to-person transmission. The husband of the case had recent travel history to multiple countries that have reported evidence of local mosquito-borne Zika infections in 2016.

Philippines: Drones in Humanitarian Action Case Study No.9: Using Drone Imagery for real-time information after Typhoon Haiyan in The Philippines

1 December 2016 - 10:50am
Source: Swiss Foundation for Mine Action, CartONG Country: Philippines

In late 2013, Danoffice IT used its Huginn X1 quadcopter drone during the emergency response to the worst ever Typhoon to hit The Philippines. This initiative — a pilot project conducted in partnership with humanitarian response teams on the ground — provided useful insights into the type of operational infrastructure needed to deploy drones effectively in emergencies. The drones were deployed later than anticipated, which limited the impact of the use of drones in decision-making or planning.

Background

Typhoon Haiyan (known locally as Yolanda) affected The Philippines in early November 2013.
With a death toll of over 6,300 and 14 million people affected, it was the most severe typhoon on record for the Southeast Asian island state. The city of Tacloban, in Leyte province, was one of the worst affected areas and was at the epicenter of the emergency response. Widespread flooding and destruction blocked and destroyed roadways, making it challenging or impossible to reach some communities and presented significant logistical challenges to delivering supplies to those in need.

To help support the response, Danoffice IT, a private company and distributor of the Huginn X1 Quadcopter, sent an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) and one of their UAV experts to Tacloban.
Danoffice IT partnered with the American search and rescue NGO Team Rubicon and assisted several other NGOs and organizations over a 2-½ week stay in The Philippines.

Philippines: Drones in Humanitarian Action Case Study No.5: Testing the Utility of Mapping Drones for Early Recovery in the Philippines

1 December 2016 - 10:27am
Source: Swiss Foundation for Mine Action, CartONG Country: Philippines

A project employing drones in the wake of Typhoon Haiyan explored how aerial imagery might support recovery and reconstruction activities. Ultimately, the imagery captured by drones became useful in both a tactical and strategic sense during the retrofitting of shelters, and helped not only to identify and verify the shelter sites, but also to help determine the placement of latrines. The mission provided a rich learning experience on the operational use of aerial robotics in a disaster recovery context.

Background

In November 2013, the Philippines experienced one of the strongest and deadliest tropical cyclones ever recorded. Typhoon Haiyan resulted in well over 6 000 deaths and devastated the city of Tacloban along with the islands of Leyte and Panaon, among other regions. The Category 5 super typhoon also displaced more than 6 million people and left almost 2 million more homeless. One of the first international humanitarian organizations to respond was Medair. They arrived in country just 48 hours after the typhoon to conduct their initial disaster damage and needs assessments, but their efforts were hampered by the lack of accurate and up-to-date maps of the region. In fact, in many instances Medair teams had to rely on hand drawn maps or outdated imagery provided by Google.

This lack of accurate geographic data explains why Medair teamed up with the Swissbased Drone Adventures group in March 2014. Medair was keen to explore what role aerial imagery could play in providing better maps and believed that this imagery could also potentially support shelter construction and more specifically an element of disaster risk reduction (DRR) within shelter construction. To this end, over the course of six days, Drone Adventures used fixed-wing UAVs called eBees to carry out aerial surveys of Tacloban,
Dulag and Julita municipalities and of the east coast of Leyte to assess the disaster damage and to support shelter reconstruction activities. The use of drones did not take place within the emergency phase but was rather carried out to explore how aerial imagery might support the recovery and reconstruction activities.

Philippines: Reconstruction aid project for Central Philippines after typhoon

1 December 2016 - 12:09am
Source: Japanese Red Cross Society Country: Japan, Philippines

Completion of renovation and reconstruction of 96 classrooms in 9 schools

The reconstruction aid project of the Japanese Red Cross Society (JRCS), which has supported the central Philippines 3 years ago, where there was huge damage by ‘Haiyan’; the super typhoon in November will be completed by the end of this year. 96 classrooms in 9 schools have been renovated and reconstruction on Leyte Island was completed this July. Lessons have started in new school buildings. An overall reconstruction aid project is making a final push toward urban development in 5 villages of the northern area of Cebu Island.

A move towards safety and health management

Many people were killed and houses and public complexes were destroyed by fierce rainstorms and the tidal wave of the No. 30 Typhoon in 2013. JRCS has promoted reconstruction aid projects with 3-year-planned cooperation with the Philippine Red Cross.

The target for renovation and reconstruction of school facilities was Tacloban city and surrounding areas on Leyte Island where many schools and buildings were destroyed by rainstorms and flooding. Making good use of relief funds of about 200 million yen collected in Japan, 20 classrooms which had been completely destroyed have been reconstructed and 76 classrooms whose roofs and pillars were broken have been restored.

JRCS assigned building engineer, Minoru Fujii, who gave technical advice to firms responsible for construction and negotiated and coordinated with the schools. Fujii says, ‘Construction has been completed with no accidents and students are able to learn again. I’m happy if the workers make use of this knowledge of safety and health management at the next construction site.’

Students who had been having their lessons in the temporary classrooms were able to begin lessons in their original classrooms for the first time in 3 years.

Rebuilding for a better life

On Cebu island, which prospers from tourism, many inhabitants of the northern farming villages which were destroyed by the typhoon were of lower income and the daily life infrastructure was poor. With the current overall reconstruction aid project, JRCS has tackled 5 fields: housing, health, sanitation, Disaster Risk Reduction and livelihood. The project is underway with the inhabitant volunteers, endeavoring to, not only ‘return to the previous way of life,’ but also to try to keep damage to a minimum in the region in the event of another future disaster.

This April in Daanbantayan County on the northern tip of Cebu Island JRCS was responsible for the reconstruction of 135 houses and renovation of 778 houses of the disaster victims. Tapel, whose house was completely destroyed in the typhoon, delivered his appreciation message with tears over and over again, ‘Now we can live with our children in this house. This makes us very happy, thank you. ’ Also, an assessment was carried out at the 5 afflicted villages concerning sewage water, disposal of waste, and unclean water being the outbreak of infectious diseases. Workshops will be held with the inhabitants regarding these problems. Creation of a disaster prevention map was also recommended.   The JRCS reconstruction project enters its final phase trying to make the local area an attractive, comfortable, and safe place to live.

World: Accelerating efforts to end AIDS by 2030

30 November 2016 - 11:19pm
Source: World Health Organization Country: Cambodia, China, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Viet Nam, World

MANILA, 1 December 2016 - On World AIDS Day, the World Health Organization Regional Office for the Western Pacific calls on Member States to accelerate efforts to end AIDS by 2030. By providing for HIV prevention, testing, and treatment to all to reach the 2030 goal, countries will be making a smart investment that will avert AIDS-related deaths and new HIV infections, especially among children.

"We must all work even harder to address the critical gaps in HIV services, prevention, testing and treatment, especially among populations at risk," said Dr Shin Young-soo, WHO Regional Director for the Western Pacific. "WHO will continue to provide robust support for countries to scale up HIV services in order to achieve the 90-90-90 targets by 2020."

The 90-90-90 targets are: 90% of people living with HIV should know their status; 90% of diagnosed people should receive treatment; and 90% of treated people should have achieved viral suppression by 2020.

What is HIV?

The Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) targets the immune system and weakens people's defence systems against infections and some types of cancer. As the virus destroys and impairs the function of immune cells, infected individuals gradually become immunodeficient. Immunodeficiency results in increased susceptibility to a wide range of infections and diseases that people with healthy immune systems can fight off.

The most advanced stage of HIV infection is Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS), which can take from 2 to 15 years to develop depending on the individual. AIDS is defined by the development of certain cancers, infections or other severe clinical manifestations.

HIV can be suppressed by combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) consisting of three or more antiretroviral (ARV) drugs. ART does not cure HIV infection but controls the virus's ability to reproduce itself within a person's body, and allows an individual's immune system to strengthen and regain the capacity to fight off infections. ART has the potential both to reduce deaths and ill-health among HIV-infected people, and to improve their quality of life.

HIV/AIDS in the Western Pacific Region

In the Western Pacific, the estimated number of people living with HIV reached 1.4 million in 2015, with 96 000 people newly infected with HIV. Forty-four thousand people died from AIDS-related causes in 2015. Meanwhile, only 47% (680 000) of people living with HIV had access to antiretroviral therapy.

While the Region is making progress in HIV treatment, challenges remain in relation to stigma and discrimination and ensuring access to both, prevention and treatment services, especially for populations at risk. Cambodia, China, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, the Philippines and Viet Nam together make up approximately 94% of the regional HIV burden, based on 2015 estimates.

Furthermore, many of the HIV prevention, testing, treatment and care services fail to reach those at greatest risk, such as men who have sex with men, sex workers, transgender people, people who inject drugs and people in prisons and closed settings. Reaching these groups requires innovations in HIV services delivery that is beyond health facilities, including access to self-testing. They must be fully included in AIDS responses, and services and care should be made available to them.

Studies showed that self-testing more than doubles the uptake of HIV testing among men who have sex with men. The tests provide results within 20 minutes and can be used in a setting that is private, discreet and convenient.

HIV prevention

Individuals can reduce the risk of HIV infection by limiting exposure to risk factors. Key approaches for HIV prevention, which are often used in combination, include: (1) male and female condom use; (2) testing and counselling for HIV and STIs; (3) voluntary medical male circumcision; (4) antiretroviral use for prevention; and (5) harm reduction for people who inject drugs.

WHO response

WHO has developed evidence-based recommendations to guide country actions, including consolidated guidelines on the use of antiretroviral drugs for treating and preventing HIV infection, HIV testing services, comprehensive services for key populations, and HIV strategic information.

WHO is focusing its support to 35 "fast-track" countries which have the highest burdens of HIV and where the greatest impact can be achieved. In the Western Pacific Region, China and Viet Nam have been identified as "fast-track" countries. Between 2014 and 2016, WHO supported over 90% of 'fast-track' countries to adapt their testing and treatment policies; over 80% in strategic information and accelerate their services for key populations, such as such as men who have sex with men, sex workers, transgender people, people who inject drugs and people in prisons and closed settings.

"Together we can and should work towards ending AIDS by 2030. We are on the right path. So we must never waver in our determination to achieve this noble goal. Let's continue this journey with all our partners and realize a day when the scourge of AIDS can finally be ended," said Dr Shin.

For further information, please contact

Mr Eloi Yao

Public Information Officer

Telephone: +632 528 9992

E-mail: yaoe@who.int

Mr Ruel E. Serrano

Public Information Office

Telephone: +63 2 528 9993

E-mail: serranor@who.int

Philippines: DOLE-1 distributes over P1M worth of livelihood assistance to Ilocos Norte farmers

29 November 2016 - 11:11pm
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

LAOAG CITY, November 30 (PIA) – The Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE) in the Ilocos has recently distributed livelihood assistance to some 105 drought-affected farmers from Pinili, Ilocos Norte.

On November 26, Labor Sec. Silvestre H. Bello III led the turn-over of P1,155,000 worth of assistance to Pinili Mayor Samuel Pagdilao, Sr.

“Hindi po pala kailangang maging tigang din ang bulsa pag tigang ang lupa, (Drought season doesn’t mean dry pockets),” said Aurelio Fernandez, one of the beneficiaries.

Fernandez, from barangay Valbuena, has regained his hope after receiving livelihood assistance from the labor department.

Like Fernandez, other farmers in Pinili town reported that the El Nino phenomenon has affected their farmlands since January and has destroyed their vegetables and garlic crops.

The dry spell has resulted in significant reduction in farming productivity and revenue.

With the DOLE’s livelihood assistance, the affected farmers need not rely solely on farming for income because they can are given alternative livelihood from livestock production and selling, dairying and bull services.

“Each farmer-beneficiary will be given one caraheifer worth P35,000 while two farmers will have one bull each worth P50,000,” DOLE-1 Regional Director Henry John Jalbuena said.

Taken from the Kabuhayan component of the DOLE Integrated Livelihood and Emergency Employment Program (DILEEP), the assistance forms part of the labor agency’s contribution to the government’s efforts to mitigate the impacts of the El Niño on farmers who are among the DOLE’s marginalized clients.

Meanwhile, water and irrigation experts advised farmers here to use the alternate wet and dry (AWD) method on the province's farmlands to counter the effect of dry period. (JNPD/CJDG/PIA-1, Ilocos Norte with reports from Arly Sta. Ana-Valdez of DOLE-1)

World: Global Climate Risk Index 2017: Who Suffers Most From Extreme Weather Events? Weather-related Loss Events in 2015 and 1996 to 2015

29 November 2016 - 4:48pm
Source: Germanwatch Country: Angola, Bahamas, Bangladesh, Burundi, Cabo Verde, Chile, Djibouti, Dominica, Ethiopia, Gambia, Ghana, Guatemala, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Honduras, India, Madagascar, Malawi, Mauritania, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nicaragua, Niger, Pakistan, Philippines, South Africa, Thailand, Vanuatu, Viet Nam, World, Zimbabwe

Who Suffers Most From Extreme Weather Events? Weather-related Loss Events in 2015 and 1996 to 2015

The Global Climate Risk Index 2017 analyses to what extent countries have been affected by the impacts of weather-related loss events (storms, floods, heat waves etc.). This year’s 12th edition of the analysis reconfirms that, according to the Climate Risk Index, less developed countries are generally more affected than industrialised countries. Regarding future climate change, the Climate Risk Index may serve as a red flag for already existing vulnerability that may further increase in regions where extreme events will become more frequent or more severe due to climate change. While some vulnerable developing countries are frequently hit by extreme events, there are also some others where such disasters are a rare occurrence.

The most recent data available – from 2015 and 1996–2015 – were taken into account to produce the following key messages:

According to the Germanwatch Global Climate Risk Index, Honduras, Myanmar and Haiti were the countries most affected by extreme weather events between 1996 and 2015.

In 2015, Mozambique, Dominica as well as Malawi were at the top of the list of the most affected countries.

Altogether, more than 528 000 people died as a direct result of nearly 11 000 extreme weather events; and losses between 1996 and 2015 amounted to around 3.08 trillion US$ (in Purchasing Power Parities). The host region of the UN climate summit 2016 – the continent of Africa – is severely affected by climatic events with four countries ranking among the 10 countries worldwide most affected in 2015 – Mozambique (1st), Malawi (3rd), Ghana and Madagascar (joint 8th position).

Precipitation, floods and landslides were the major causes of damage in 2015. A high incidence of extreme precipitation supports the scientific expectations of accelerated hydrological cycles caused by climate warming.

Most of the affected countries in the Bottom 10 of the long-term index have a high ranking due to exceptional catastrophes. Over the last few years another category of countries has been gaining relevance: Countries like the Philippines and Pakistan that are recurrently affected by catastrophes continuously rank among the most affected countries both in the long term index and in the index for the respective year for the last six years.

Of the ten most affected countries (1996–2015), nine were developing countries in the low income or lower-middle income country group, while only one was classified as an upper-middle income country.

The climate summit in Marrakesh is giving the “go-ahead” on developing the “rulebook” for the Paris Agreement, including the global adaptation goal, adaptation communication systems, and finance assessment systems for building resilience. A review of the UNFCCC’s work on loss and damage provides the opportunity to better detail the next 5-year’s work on loss and damage, in relation to the climate regime, as well as to better understand exactly how loss and damage should be taken up under the Paris Agreement. View

Philippines: Documentation and Review of RapidFTR in the Philippines following Typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda)

29 November 2016 - 7:05am
Source: UN Children's Fund Country: Philippines

1. Background

Typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda) hit the Philippines on 8 November 2013 affecting 16 million people, causing some 6,300 deaths, displacing 4.1 million people and damaging or destroying 1.1 million houses. Early reports indicated there were significant numbers of unaccompanied and separated children (UASC). Such children are particularly at risk of violence, exploitation, abuse and trafficking. National police records show that the provinces of Leyte and Eastern Samar and other areas, which were badly affected by the typhoon, are known hot spots for the trafficking of women and children and other forms of gender-based violence. There was thus a real potential for unaccompanied children to leave their affected areas through a number of unpatrolled exit routes.

Actions to prevent further separations and respond to unaccompanied and separated children are a priority in all emergencies. The decision to implement Rapid Family Tracing and Reunification (RapidFTR) in selected municipalities of the affected areas was taken in view of UNICEF’s commitment to prevent and address family separation and global experience in this effort. Experience shows that many children – particularly those recently and accidentally separated – can be rapidly reunited, and further separations can be prevented if urgent action is taken. RapidFTR was originally designed for this kind of rapid-onset emergency; however, it had only been used in refugee situations before Typhoon Haiyan. RapidFTR was deemed an appropriate tool and Haiyan allowed it the first opportunity to be piloted in such a situation.

Nine months after RapidFTR was implemented in Haiyan-affected areas, a Real Time Evaluation was conducted and achievements in its implementation were noted. The evaluation, however, also commented that “proper follow up of cases and case management in general suffered from the limited capacities of social workers in the municipalities.”

In the last quarter of 2014, it was decided that a documentation and review of the deployment and implementation of RapidFTR as part of the Haiyan emergency response is recommended in order to explore the potential for continued use of RapidFTR in future emergencies, including as part of Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR). The documentation will include a systematic review of RapidFTR implementation in the Typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda) emergency, thus ensuring the most appropriate application of RapidFTR in the future .

2. Objectives of the documentation and review

Based on the terms of reference, the following were the objectives of the documentation and review:

• To document the implementation and experience of the RapidFTR technology in the emergency response in Regions VI, VII and VIII3, including how this approach was effective in reaching and documenting unaccompanied and separated children and supporting necessary follow-up.

• To document and understand the acceptance and application of RapidFTR by government partners and communities, including community perceptions and understanding of the utility and importance of RapidFTR.

• To consider the possible impact of RapidFTR in strengthening child protection systems that existed in communities prior to the emergency, including through training and capacity building on RapidFTR use.

• To document and analyse the effectiveness of the process of adapting RapidFTR in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan, thus providing guidance for future emergencies on how to deploy RapidFTR, including to ensure sustainability and necessary follow-up procedures are established, particularly to reach the most vulnerable and isolated communities.

• To review and follow up on issues raised from initial RapidFTR mission report, including:

  • attention to previously existing UASC cases;

  • older unaccompanied children who fled the area in search of employment, noting the risk of migration and trafficking; and

    • need for greater community understanding around the concept of ‘unaccompanied or separated’; or ‘children who have lost both parents and may need support’.

• To document and assess RapidFTR implementation in the Philippines against global and national minimum standards.

• To provide recommendations for RapidFTR training/capacity building in DRR.

• To explore prospects for greater ownership and involvement with RapidFTR by government partners. (See Appendix E for terms of reference for the consultancy.)

Philippines: Strengthening Child Protection Systems in the Philippines: Child Protection in Emergencies

29 November 2016 - 6:55am
Source: UN Children's Fund Country: Philippines

Executive Summary

The Philippines is a growing socio-economic presence in South-East Asia. It has an annual growth rate of more than 7 per cent, and is one of the most densely populated countries in the world. The well-being and successful growth and development of children in the Philippines are vital to the achievement of national development goals and targets. The centrality of children to the national agenda is clearly reflected in Philippine Government strategies and development policies.

In November 2013 Typhoon Haiyan/Yolanda struck the Visayan Islands. It had a devastating impact on the Philippines, and highlighted the risks posed to this nation of 7,000 islands by the growing threat of climate change. The particular threats to children in this situation (including separation from family and parents, displacement from home/shelter/schools, exposure to violence and abuse, and a lack of safe spaces where they could access basic services and psychosocial care and support), demonstrated that the existing Child Protection (CP) Systems had been severely disrupted and were in most cases not functional. In the immediate aftermath, systems were unable to cope with the protection needs of thousands of displaced and highly vulnerable children.

The UNICEF Philippines Child Protection section has made efforts in recent years to prioritize CP Systems Building as a strategy for development, in contrast to previous programmes and projects that targeted specific groups of children. However, limited programme resources did not encourage extensive work in this area. Then, the emergency resources generated in the global response to Typhoon Haiyan/Yolanda suddenly provided a critical opportunity to direct response and relief efforts towards CP Systems strengthening, in an effort to ‘build back better’ and address the damage to the system resulting from the emergency. It also afforded an opportunity to address pre-existing weaknesses in the CP System.

This report reviews and analyses how the CP work implemented during Typhoon Haiyan/Yolanda provided an opportunity to tackle the problem of CP Systems building while responding to the immediate need for relief and recovery during the emergency and its aftermath* .

The Typhoon Haiyan/Yolanda emergency generated a huge, multi-level humanitarian response by a range of national and international actors, which worked very well in many respects. Specifically, UNICEF Child Protection recognized the demand for support to CP Systems as part of longer-term response and recovery, and worked with the Government, local communities and partners to strengthen CP Systems and identify key child protection needs.

UNICEF initiatives to support CP Systems strengthening during the emergency response and recovery included Project Cooperation Agreements (PCAs) with civil society organisations to strengthen Local Councils for the Protection of Children (LCPC), and support for priority Local Government Units (LGUs). A unique feature of the emergency response in an effort to channel resources more directly to community-based systems and institutions was the provision of funds directly to LGUs. This facilitated targeted work planning by each sector to design the best response. Substantial progress on CP Systems building was achieved, primarily through LCPC strengthening in the 40 Haiyan/Yolanda-affected priority LGUs. A report, ‘Documentation of Child Protection Systems Strengthening Initiatives in Typhoon Haiyan Areas’, captures this work.

UNICEF established partnerships through PCAs with nine agencies, all of which emphasized elements of CP Systems building, targeting CP priorities including strengthening social work, and establishing national guidelines for Child-Friendly Spaces (CFS) and psychosocial support (PSS).

A key initiative was UNICEF’s partnership with the Development Academy of the Philippines to enhance the Child-Friendly Local Governance Course to incorporate Child Protection in Emergencies (CPiE), and thereby strengthen the capacity of LGUs nationwide to better prepare and respond.

UNICEF also funded social workers in target Haiyan/Yolanda-affected municipalities to follow up on outstanding cases, especially those concerning children separated from caregivers and families during the emergency.

In addition, UNICEF is working with a local non-governmental organization (NGO) to replace civil registration documentation including birth certificates to some 80,000 people, using mobile outreach services to reach poor women and children from the most affected areas.

Despite these significant achievements, numerous challenges remain in the emergency response and efforts to address CP Systems Building as an integral component of the Haiyan/Yolanda strategic response. These include maintaining momentum for a sustainable recovery, and strengthening national and local CP systems in the process.

The primary purpose of this report is to explore the extent to which the emergency response has contributed to strengthening the national CP system in the Philippines, and how it might continue to do so.

This report finds clear evidence that considerable progress has been made against system strengthening indicators, as a result of international and national collaboration after Typhoon Haiyan/Yolanda, and through CP efforts in ongoing conflict regions. CP and family welfare are established on the agendas of both the Government and, importantly, community organisations, including barangay councils.1 The work of international agencies in initiating and supporting disaster relief and recovery efforts has added significantly to the arsenal of national child protective priorities and mechanisms in the Philippines. Learning and innovation introduced during the response to the ongoing conflict in parts of the country also provide valuable lessons that might be expanded to national level.

However, despite these achievements, challenges still face some aspects of CP systems strengthening work.

Myanmar: UNHCR South East Asia 2016 Funding Update as of 17 November 2016

29 November 2016 - 12:54am
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Bangladesh, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Thailand
  • 139.7 M required for 2016
  • 44.1 M contributions received, representing 32% of requirements
  • 95.6 M funding gap for South East Asia

All figures are displayed in USD

Philippines: Dengue Situation Update 504, 15 November 2016

29 November 2016 - 12:52am
Source: World Health Organization Country: Australia, Cambodia, China, French Polynesia (France), Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Malaysia, New Caledonia (France), Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Singapore, Viet Nam, World

Update on the Dengue situation in the Western Pacific Region

Northern Hemisphere

China

As of 31 October 2016, there were 1,840 cases of dengue reported in China in 2016. This number is lower than that reported during the same period in 2015 (Figure 1).

Malaysia

In week 45, the number of dengue cases was 1,373, an increase from 1,263 cases reported in the previous week(an increase by 8.7%). The cumulative number of cases in 2016 (91,879 cases) is less than that reported during the same period in 2015 (104,910 cases). As of week 45, the cumulative number of dengue deaths for 2016 was 212 cases, compared to 284 deaths during the same period in 2015 (Figure 2).

Philippines (No update)

As of 20 August 2016, there were 101,401 suspected cases of dengue reported in 2016, including 422 deaths. This is 16% higher than that reported during the same period in 2015 (n=87,411) (Figure 3).

Singapore

In week 44, there were 86 dengue cases reported in Singapore. The cumulative number of cases in 2016 (12,525) is 42.5% higher than that reported during the same period of 2015 (8,786) due to a large number of cases in early 2016 (Error! Reference source not found.). However, the number of cases is decreasing after week 36 and the number of cases in week 44 was the second lowest in the past six years.

Cambodia (No updates)

From 1 January to 17 May 2016, there have been 1,771 cases of dengue and 4 deaths reported in Cambodia. In May, there were 168 cases and no death reported. The number of cases remains low and stable at this point (Figure 5).

Lao PDR (no update)

As of 28 October, there were 4,658 cases of dengue with 10 deaths reported in Lao PDR in 2016. From 22 to 28 October, 185 new dengue cases and no death were reported. The number of cases is higher than the same time period in 2014-2015 (Figure 6).

Viet Nam (No update)

As of 31 August 2016, there were 63,504 cases of dengue including 20 deaths, reported in 44 out of 63 provinces in Viet Nam. In August 2016, there were 16,547 cases reported including four deaths. The cumulative number of cases increased by 97% with a decrease of three deaths compared to the same period in 2015. Compared to the median in 2011-2015 period, the cumulative number of dengue cases has increased by 99.7%.

Southern Hemisphere

Australia

As of 31 October 2016, there were 1,930 laboratory-confirmed dengue cases in Australia. The number of cases reported has been decreasing since March and it follows the seasonal trends (2011-2015) (Figure 8).

Pacific Islands Countries and Areas

French Polynesia (No update)

In week 42, 22 confirmed dengue cases were reported in French Polynesia (Figure 9). Four (18%) of the 22 cases were confirmed as DENV-1 infection.

Papua New Guinea

From 1 January to 6 November, 80 imported cases of dengue with travel history to Papua New Guinea were reported by Queensland Health (Weekly Report on overseas acquired dengue notifications). Among these cases, 5 were DENV-1, 57 were DENV-2, 4 were DENV-3, 3 was DENV-4 and 11 cases were of undetermined serotype.

New Caledonia

In October 2016, 19 dengue cases were reported, and the number of cases has been decreasing since June 2016 (Figure 10).

World: ‘We have a weak La Niña in progress’

28 November 2016 - 10:26pm
Source: International Federation of Red Cross And Red Crescent Societies Country: Indonesia, Philippines, World

The IFRC’s forecasting partners at the International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI) now say oceanic and atmospheric conditions in the Pacific are such that a “borderline La Niña event” is indicated.

Earlier this month US forecasters issued an official ‘advisory’ under the ENSO alert system, saying in their synopsis that “La Niña conditions are present” with around a 55 per cent chance of persisting through the northern hemisphere winter.

“We have a weak La Niña in progress,” said IRI Chief Forecaster Tony Barnston for its November climate briefing, issued last week.

“The question is how much longer will it go on?” he added. “We expect it to last not a whole lot longer; maybe one or two months.”

In terms of potential impacts, IRI’s December–February forecast shows a “moderate to strong likelihood” of drier-than-normal conditions over the southern US and northern Caribbean; and for November–January “a strong chance of above-average precipitation” in parts of Indonesia and the Philippines.

Other regions with an elevated chance of above-average precipitation in November–January include northern South America, the west of Australia, Southern Africa and the northern US, IRI says. 

Red Cross Red Crescent disaster managers can get high-resolution seasonal forecasts spanning three-month periods for their countries and regions – including possible La Niña impacts – by signing up for IRI’s notification service and following #IRIforecast on Twitter.

One of several available datasets showing weekly sea-surface temperature anomalies in the equatorial Pacific Ocean. (Source: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration via IRI)

Philippines: Philippines – Tropical Cyclone TOKAGE (GDACS, JTWC, PAGASA, NDRRMC, WMO, Local Media) (ECHO Daily Flash of 28 November 2016)

28 November 2016 - 10:17pm
Source: European Commission's Directorate-General for European Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations Country: Philippines
  • Tropical Cyclone TOKAGE continued moving north-west passing over Western Visagas and Mimaropa regions, as a Tropical Storm. It then exited in the South China Sea and continued moving north-east, weakening. On 28 November at 0.00 UTC its centre was located approx. 170 km west of Vigan city (Ilocos Sur province, Luzon) and it had max. sustained wind speed of 56 km/h (Tropical Depression).

  • Over the next 24 h it is forecast to move south-west over the South China Sea, weakening and dissipating. Moderate to locally heavy rain may affect the eastern areas of Luzon.

  • Heavy rain has already affected several parts of the country causing floods and landslides. Approx. 133 mm of rain in 24 h were recorded in Iba (Zambales province, Central Luzon) over 27-28 November. As of 28 November early morning (UTC), national authorities reported that over 14 300 people have been affected, over 12 400 evacuated and 16 homes damaged throughout the regions of Mimaropa, Eastern, Western and Central Visayas as well as Northern Mindanao.

World: Sowing seeds for stronger ‘emergency preparedness and forecast-based financing’ at WFP-organized Manila forum

28 November 2016 - 10:58am
Source: International Federation of Red Cross And Red Crescent Societies Country: Philippines, World

A inter-agency forum in the Philippine capital, Manila, on forecast-based financing (FbF) and emergency preparedness for climate risks has called on governments to promote better use of data as part of “a unified plan to respond to extreme shocks and events”.

A ‘call to action’ at the end of the one-day conference last Thursday also advocated the strengthening of risk management through science-based forecasting, prioritizing financial resources at the local level, and “more simplified protocols in line with FbF”.

The conference was organized by the World Food Programme (WFP), which is piloting FbF and emergency preparedness in Bangladesh, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Nepal and the Philippines, with support from the German Federal Foreign Office and Red Cross.

Also attending Thursday’s conference were Eliseo Rio, Undersecretary at the Philippine Department of Information and Communications Technology, and Anna Ventura from the German embassy in Manila.

‘Main partner’

Other national and local Philippine government agencies were represented, as well as the French, Spanish and US development agencies, the UN country team, the IFRC and Partners for Resilience (the Climate Centre, Cordaid, and Wetlands International), and local NGOs and scientific institutions.

The call to action also asked scientific and research bodies to pursue “research related to FbF and its institutionalization”, and to include it in input for development planning by local governments.

Humanitarians and development organizations, it suggested, should help build “FbF mainstreaming in current government initiatives [and communicate it] to donors, development partners and the private sector”.

In closing remarks, WFP’s Deputy Country Director in the Philippines, Martin Bettelley, said the forum had seen that “huge investments are lost in emergency response, and that we should make better and smarter decisions to invest in the right resources, at the right time and in the right place”.

The Philippine government, he added, remained the “main partner” in the initiative; without it “we will not be able to make headway towards institutionalizing FbF in the country”.

New ideas

The Philippine Red Cross (PRC) and PfR agencies are themselves planning to pilot flood-related FbF early next year. The PRC would “test it in a selected high-risk municipality or city,” Ana Mariquina, the National Society’s head of disaster preparedness and risk reduction, told the Manila forum. She added that the PRC could influence government agencies “to initiate discussion of FbF institutionalization in local policies and we are interested to see how it can be applied in our own organization's preparedness and response plans and policies”.

WFP says climate change disproportionately affects the most food-insecure people around the world, and new ideas like forecast-based financing and emergency preparedness are needed to ensure scarce resources are used to greater effect.

Key components of WFP’s forecast-based financing work in the Philippines are annual dialogues involving national agencies, scientific institutions, humanitarian and development actors, communities and other stakeholders, of which Thursday’s forum was the second.

Overall, WFP “works with the government and other organizations to help the Philippines strengthen its resilience to natural disasters and climate change,” according to the agency’s website.

Women plant protective mangroves in Santa Teresita, Cagayan province. WFP’s work in the Philippines helps disaster-prone communities prepare for and respond to shocks through community projects, technology and better logistics and supply-chain management.

Philippines: Sowing seeds for stronger ‘emergency preparedness and forecast-based financing’ at WFP-organized Manila forum

28 November 2016 - 10:58am
Source: International Federation of Red Cross And Red Crescent Societies Country: Philippines

A inter-agency forum in the Philippine capital, Manila, on forecast-based financing (FbF) and emergency preparedness for climate risks has called on governments to promote better use of data as part of “a unified plan to respond to extreme shocks and events”.

A ‘call to action’ at the end of the one-day conference last Thursday also advocated the strengthening of risk management through science-based forecasting, prioritizing financial resources at the local level, and “more simplified protocols in line with FbF”.

The conference was organized by the World Food Programme (WFP), which is piloting FbF and emergency preparedness in Bangladesh, the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Nepal and the Philippines, with support from the German Federal Foreign Office and Red Cross.

Also attending Thursday’s conference were Eliseo Rio, Undersecretary at the Philippine Department of Information and Communications Technology, and Anna Ventura from the German embassy in Manila.

‘Main partner’

Other national and local Philippine government agencies were represented, as well as the French, Spanish and US development agencies, the UN country team, the IFRC and Partners for Resilience (the Climate Centre, Cordaid, and Wetlands International), and local NGOs and scientific institutions.

The call to action also asked scientific and research bodies to pursue “research related to FbF and its institutionalization”, and to include it in input for development planning by local governments.

Humanitarians and development organizations, it suggested, should help build “FbF mainstreaming in current government initiatives [and communicate it] to donors, development partners and the private sector”.

In closing remarks, WFP’s Deputy Country Director in the Philippines, Martin Bettelley, said the forum had seen that “huge investments are lost in emergency response, and that we should make better and smarter decisions to invest in the right resources, at the right time and in the right place”.

The Philippine government, he added, remained the “main partner” in the initiative; without it “we will not be able to make headway towards institutionalizing FbF in the country”.

New ideas

The Philippine Red Cross (PRC) and PfR agencies are themselves planning to pilot flood-related FbF early next year. The PRC would “test it in a selected high-risk municipality or city,” Ana Mariquina, the National Society’s head of disaster preparedness and risk reduction, told the Manila forum. She added that the PRC could influence government agencies “to initiate discussion of FbF institutionalization in local policies and we are interested to see how it can be applied in our own organization's preparedness and response plans and policies”.

WFP says climate change disproportionately affects the most food-insecure people around the world, and new ideas like forecast-based financing and emergency preparedness are needed to ensure scarce resources are used to greater effect.

Key components of WFP’s forecast-based financing work in the Philippines are annual dialogues involving national agencies, scientific institutions, humanitarian and development actors, communities and other stakeholders, of which Thursday’s forum was the second.

Overall, WFP “works with the government and other organizations to help the Philippines strengthen its resilience to natural disasters and climate change,” according to the agency’s website.

Women plant protective mangroves in Santa Teresita, Cagayan province. WFP’s work in the Philippines helps disaster-prone communities prepare for and respond to shocks through community projects, technology and better logistics and supply-chain management.

Philippines: Philippines: Eco-ag network aids Lawin affected farmers in Cagayan

28 November 2016 - 6:20am
Source: Greenpeace Country: Philippines

Solana, Cagayan; 27 November 2016 – A network of organizations comes to the aid of farmers affected by Typhoon Lawin by giving out seed and fertilizer response packages to jumpstart the province’s transition to ecological agriculture.

The People’s Food Movement -- together with local organizations, such as the Green Meadows Foundation and Solana Ecological Agriculture Group; the Local Government of Solana, Cagayan; and Greenpeace Philippines -- gave out organic seeds, fertilizers, and other farm inputs to 150 farmers in the municipality.

The organic seeds and fertilizers were sourced from farmers practicing ecological agriculture in Nueva Ecija and nearby provinces. The package includes vegetable seeds, vermicast, molasses, palay seeds, bokashi and various concoctions.

“When we are hit by extreme weather events such as droughts and super typhoons, the agriculture sector always suffers the most. Impacts bury our farmers further in an endless cycle of debt, our food production and supply decrease, and food prices increase. All of us are affected. We need to empower our farmers to be able to help the whole nation,” said Yeb Saño, Executive Director for Greenpeace Southeast Asia.

Extreme weather events, exacerbated by climate change, has wrought havoc to the lives and livelihood of farmers in the Philippines. The recent super typhoon Lawin, initially classified as a Category 5 storm with maximum sustained winds of 165 miles per hour, caused Php 10.2 billion damage to agriculture, Php 3.4 billion to infrastructure, and affected 49,000 farmers in different provinces in Luzon.

Cagayan and its nearby provinces in Region 2 are the top rice and corn production areas of the country, contributing almost 30% to our rice and corn needs. The Department of Agriculture has recorded that at least 56,000 hectares of rice fields, 9,000 hectares of corn fields, and 2,000 hectares of vegetables plantations, were destroyed in Cagayan.

Prior to the seed distribution, a two-day training on Integrated and Diversified Organic Farming System was conducted by Jonjon Sarmiento of farmers group PAKISAMA, along with Lerma Matus, a typhoon Yolanda farmer survivor. The farmers were trained to practice climate-resilient agriculture, self-sufficiency by preserving the seeds, and making their own fertilizers sourced from materials that are abundant and readily available in their areas, so that the farmers will not have to resort to loans to rebuild their farms.

“Lawin brought devastation to the livelihood of small holders and producers but it also opened up opportunities to start the conversation in reliving seeds as the core of life and food,” said Mon Padilla of the People’s Food Movement. “We want to reclaim ownership and control of the food system for the small holders and household producers, in consideration with the consumers’ right to safe and healthy food.”

Through this seed response work, the People’s Food Movement hopes to help address the looming hunger among farmers affected by typhoon Lawin and ease them from the cycle of indebtedness. The activity also aimed to show the farmers that there is an alternative way of farming that will provide them, their families, and the whole nation with healthy food that are produced through safe, sustainable and climate resilient agriculture.

People’s Food Movement members CHIMES, UAAP.NET, SEARICE, and farmers of the Climate Resiliency Field Schools of the Rice Watch Action Network (R1), joined the work not only in the distribution but in sharing ecological agriculture practices so that farmers will be inspired by their experiences.

The Peoples’ Food Movement is a food campaign advanced by individuals, groups, organizations, government entities, academe and other formal and non-formal groups that act collectively and individually to promote practices, programs and policies rooted on the concept and practice of ecological agriculture.

Greenpeace is calling President Rodrigo Duterte’s administration to support a food policy that will put farmers’ need on top priority and put in place a system that can readily respond to farmers in rebuilding their farms immediately after a crisis and change the current dominant system of agriculture - from monoculture and chemical intensive farming – to diverse, integrated, sustainable and climate resilient farming system.

For more information:

Virginia Benosa Llorin, Food and Ecological Agriculture Campaigner

Greenpeace Southeast Asia

Email: vbllorin@greenpeace.org | Mobile: (+63) 917 822 8793

Angelica Carballo-Pago, Media Campaigner 
 Greenpeace Southeast Asia

Email: apago@greenpeace.org | Mobile: (+63) 949 889 1332

Philippines: DSWD distributes emergency shelter cash assistance to 27,052 households affected by Typhoon Lawin

28 November 2016 - 4:27am
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

The Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) has provided the Emergency Shelter Cash Assistance Project (ESCAP) worth P135,260,000 to 27,052 households affected by Typhoon Lawin from November 7 to 18, 2016.

ESCAP is the assistance immediately provided to victims of disasters with partially and totally damaged houses. A uniform amount of P5,000 was given to each families as an initial help in rebuilding their homes.

DSWD is now on its second week of ESCAP provision which targets to distribute the assistance to 271,164 totally damaged (42,324) and partially (228,40) with 146,104 identified households hit by ‘Lawin’. In Cordillera Administrative Region (CAR), 7,939 families received cash assistance out of the 44,433 target. In Region II, 5,304 households received ESCAP out of the 199,993 households affected by the typhoon.

Meanwhile, 13,809 families in Region I received monetary assistance to rebuild their homes out of 26,554 target.

Region III has just started to distribute ESCAP to 184 houses damaged by Typhoon Lawin.

Secretary Judy M. Taguiwalo said the DSWD targets to distribute cash assistance amounting to P730,522,090 to 146,104 target households within the next few weeks so that “the affected families can immediately repair their houses and facilitate their recovery from the damages caused by typhoon Lawin.” ###

Philippines: Flash Alert: Tropical Storm Tokage (Marce), Philippines, 28 November 2016

28 November 2016 - 4:26am
Source: Association of Southeast Asian Nations Country: Philippines

Tropical Storm TOKAGE, Philippines

Tropical Storm (TS) TOKAGE (or Marce) is now about 150 km West of Sinait, Ilocos Sur and continue to move Southwestward with wind gusts up to 75 kph. It gradually weakened as it left the Philippine area of responsibility. Storm Tokage is expected to dissipate in the next 48 hours.

As of 27 November 2016, the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRM) reported that 2,980 families/14,309 people were affected by the storm where 3,346 people were served inside evacuation centres. The government continues to provide assistance for the affected population. The government has also evacuated nearly 12,500 people prior to the landfall as a preparedness measure.