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World: Protracted displacement following disasters worldwide in 2014/2015

23 July 2015 - 9:49am
Source: Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre Country: Armenia, Bangladesh, Colombia, Haiti, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mozambique, Nigeria, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, United States of America, World, Zimbabwe

Global Estimates 2015 - People displaced by disasters

World: Displacement related to disasters worldwide in 2014

23 July 2015 - 9:32am
Source: Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre Country: Bangladesh, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Cambodia, Chile, China, Japan, Malaysia, Pakistan, Paraguay, Philippines, Sri Lanka, Sudan, World

Global Estimates 2015 - People displaced by disasters

Philippines: DPWH ensures typhoon resilient school buildings for senior high

23 July 2015 - 5:36am
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

CATBALOGAN CITY, Samar, Jul 23 (PIA) - The Samar First District Engineering Office makes sure that soon to be constructed school buildings for Senior High Schools will be typhoon resilient.

In a statement by Nette Gomez of the DPWH Samar 1, she said that this was brought out during their regular meeting.

Project Engineers of school buildings recommended that the school sites need embankment, and soil exploration first for a better foundation to produce high quality school buildings which are typhoon resilient.

District Engineer Virgilio Eduarte said that he gives priority to school building programs for senior high school this 2015.

He instructed all assigned programming engineers to conduct site inspection on the different school sites.

There will be some 23 school buildings in Region VIII where 14 senior high school buildings will come from the Division of Calbayog, and an addition of nine senior high school buildings for the Division of Samar. The total appropriation is P 121,405,895.06 M for Calbayog and some P79, 565,979.59 M for Samar Division. (ajc/nbq/PIA 8-Samar with Donna Debuton-DPWH/Samar 1)

Philippines: Health office warns public of water contamination in Iligan

21 July 2015 - 11:58pm
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

Lorry V Gabule

ILIGAN CITY, July 21 (PIA)—City health office of Iligan has warned the public that a diarrea or loss bowel movement might occur due to water contamination.

Somehow, this would be the effect after the bursting of 24-inch blue pipe of Iligan city’s water line at Barangay Suarez, last July 16, which caused some leaks, and might be the source of bacteria contamination.

It took three days to fix and connect the pipe, and at the moment, some areas affected still experience low water supply.

Hence, Dr. Cherlina Canaveral, city health officer, reminds the consuming public to keep watch of water discoloration flowing from the faucet after the repair was done.

"Though the Iligan City Waterworks System (ICWS) gives assurance to put water disinfectant, the most we can do is to boil the water for 15 minutes, to avoid bacterial disease of the newly water supply after the repair was done," said Dr. Canaveral. (LVG/PIA-10 LDN)

Philippines: Asia - Severe weather events - ECHO Daily Map | 21/07/2015

21 July 2015 - 10:39pm
Source: European Commission Humanitarian Aid department Country: Pakistan, Philippines

1) PAKISTAN - Severe weather
• Heavy rain affected several areas of Pakistan over the last week, triggered river and lake overflow in Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa (KP) and Punjab provinces, affecting mostly the district of Chitral in northern KP.
• As of 19 July, the Provincial Disaster Management reports two people dead and widespread infrastructure damage. As a result, nearly 200,000 people are affected in Chitral, according to media, as of 21 July.
• Over the next 48h, more rainfall (locally heavy) and thunderstorms are still forecast for several areas of Pakistan, including Punjab and KP, and the risk of further flash floods remains in some low lying areas.

2) PHILIPPINES - Severe weather
• Heavy rains continued affecting the northern Philippines over the last few days causing more floods.
• As of 19 July (NDRRMC), due to the Southwest Monsoon enhanced by two Tropical Cyclones (see ECHO Daily Map of 14 July 2015), there were 17 dead, six people still missing, over 9,000 families (42,500 people) affected in Luzon and Visayas and 196 families inside 13 evacuation centers (mostly in Central Luzon region). On 21 July media reported four more dead in Luzon and thousands of people evacuated.
• Over the next 24 h moderated thunderstorms, rainfall and winds may still affect several areas of Luzon, as well as some areas of Visayas.

World: Global Emergency Overview Snapshot 15–21 July 2015

21 July 2015 - 8:00am
Source: Assessment Capacities Project Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea, Haiti, Honduras, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Liberia, Libya, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Uganda, Ukraine, World, Yemen

Snapshot 15–21 July 2015

Iraq: More than 74,440 people have been displaced from Saqlawiyah in Falluja district since 8 July, and tens of thousands reportedly remain trapped in Falluja and Ramadi districts. There are now more than 3.1 million IDPs across 3,613 locations in Iraq; 300,000 people have been displaced from and within Anbar since military operations began in April.

Yemen: The number of IDPs has increased by 24% since mid-June, to reach almost 1.27 million. The fuel crisis continues to worsen. Pro-government forces, with the support of Saudi-led airstrikes, have taken the city of Aden: 100 people were reported killed and 200 injured.

Ukraine: Security continues to deteriorate, with shelling reported in Donetsk city for the first time since the February ceasefire. Access to water is a serious problem in non-government areas, affecting over 470,000 people in Luhansk region alone. Water trucks are facing difficulties reaching the affected, and insecurity is preventing repairs to infrastructure.

Global Emergency Overview Web Interface

Philippines: ‘Habagat’ evacuees continue to receive aid

21 July 2015 - 7:06am
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

A total of ₱20,627,982.95 worth of relief assistance has been provided to ‘Habagat’ evacuees, as of today.

The amount came from the combined resources of the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) which provided ₱19,021,674.55 worth of relief augmentation to the local government units (LGUs), concerned LGUs extended ₱1,600,823.40, while a number of non-government organizations provided ₱5,485.00 worth of disaster relief assistance.

To date, 11 evacuation centers are still open and being managed by LGUs serving 374 families or 1,738 persons. These are located in Regions I, III, IV-A and the Cordillera Administrative Region (CAR).

In Central Luzon, 4,850 families or 22,939 persons in 17 municipalities in five (5) provinces were flooded as a result of the heavy downpour.

The province of Nueva Ecija, the hardest hit province, has 3,436 families or 17,079 persons affected from Cabanatuan City and Zaragoza; Zambales with 1,076 families or 4,219 persons from six municipalities; Pampanga with 311 families or 1,512 persons from seven municipalities; Bataan with 19 families or 86 persons from Dinalupihan; and Tarlac with eight (8) families or 41 persons from Paniqui.

To date, concerned LGUs in the affected municipalities in Pampanga and Zambales have already provided P236,359.00 worth of relief assistance to their affected constituents.

In Region I, the LGU of Bani in Pangasinan has declared the town under state of calamity due to incessant rains that caused massive flooding. DSWD-Field Office I has a total of 18,627 family food packs ready for distribution to affected towns in the region. DSWD disaster teams in the affected regions continue to coordinate with LGUs for further relief augmentation when necessary.

World: Asia-Pacific: Maximum Temperatures (Jul 2015)

20 July 2015 - 8:00pm
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: American Samoa, Australia, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, China, Cook Islands, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Fiji, French Polynesia (France), Guam, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kiribati, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Malaysia, Maldives, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Mongolia, Myanmar, Nauru, Nepal, New Caledonia (France), New Zealand, Niue (New Zealand), Norfolk Island (Australia), Northern Mariana Islands (The United States of America), Palau, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Pitcairn Island, Republic of Korea, Samoa, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, Viet Nam, Wallis and Futuna (France), World

Maximum Temperature

Temperatures in the Asia-Pacific region can go very high with central India reaching 50oC or more. The Tibetan plateau rarely exceeds 20oC because of its high elevation.

These temperatures are based on average highs over a period of approximately 50 years. Maximum temperatures in the region may therefore be from different months of the year and a temperature in any given location may exceed these maximums.

The WORLDCLIM dataset consists of interpolated climate surface data on monthly precipitation and mean, minimum, and maximum temperature at a spatial resolution of 30 arc seconds (approximately 1km spatial resolution).

Input data were gathered from a variety of sources and, where possible, restricted to records between 1950 and 2000.

The data are described in: Hijmans, R.J., S.E. Cameron, J.L. Parra, P.G. Jones and A. Jarvis, 2005. Very high resolution interpolated climate surfaces for global land areas. International Journal of Climatology 25: 1965-1978 which can be downloaded at http://www.worldclim.org/.

World: Asia-Pacific: Population Density (Jul 2015)

20 July 2015 - 8:00pm
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: American Samoa, Australia, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, China, Cook Islands, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Fiji, French Polynesia (France), Guam, India, Indonesia, Japan, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Malaysia, Maldives, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Mongolia, Myanmar, Nauru, Nepal, New Caledonia (France), New Zealand, Niue (New Zealand), Norfolk Island (Australia), Northern Mariana Islands (The United States of America), Palau, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Pitcairn Island, Republic of Korea, Samoa, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Tonga, Vanuatu, Viet Nam, Wallis and Futuna (France), World

Population Density

Using an innovative approach with GIS and remote sensing, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory LandScanTM is the community standard for global population distribution. At approximately 1 km resolution LandScan is the finest resolution global population distribution data available and represents an ambient population (average over 24 hours).

The LandScan algorithm uses spatial data,imagery analysis technologies and a multi-variable modeling approach to disaggregate census counts within an administrative boundary. Since no single population distribution model can account for the differences in spatial data availability, quality, scale, and accuracy as well as the differences in cultural settlement practices, LandScan population distribution models are tailored to match the data conditions and geographical nature of each individual country and region.

Oak Ridge National Laboratory: http://web.ornl.gov/sci/landscan/

World: Asia-Pacific: Annual Precipitation (Jul 2015)

20 July 2015 - 8:00pm
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: American Samoa, Australia, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, China, Cook Islands, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Fiji, French Polynesia (France), Guam, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kiribati, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Malaysia, Maldives, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Mongolia, Myanmar, Nepal, New Caledonia (France), New Zealand, Niue (New Zealand), Norfolk Island (Australia), Palau, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Pitcairn Island, Republic of Korea, Samoa, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, Viet Nam, Wallis and Futuna (France), World

Annual Precipitation

This map shows the average amount of precipitation falling in a year, based on approximately 50 years of data. The figures shown do not therefore represent the amount of precipitation that may occur in any given year.

The WORLDCLIM dataset consists of interpolated climate surface data on monthly precipitation and mean, minimum, and maximum temperature at a spatial resolution of 30 arc seconds (approximately 1km spatial resolution). Input data were gathered from a variety of sources and, where possible, restricted to records between 1950 and 2000.

The data are described in: Hijmans, R.J., S.E. Cameron, J.L. Parra, P.G. Jones and A. Jarvis, 2005. Very high resolution interpolated climate surfaces for global land areas. International Journal of Climatology 25: 1965-1978 which can be downloaded at http://www.worldclim.org/

World: Asia-Pacific: Köppen–Geiger Climate Classification (Jul 2015)

20 July 2015 - 8:00pm
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: American Samoa, Australia, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, China, Cook Islands, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Fiji, French Polynesia (France), Guam, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kiribati, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Malaysia, Maldives, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Mongolia, Myanmar, Nauru, Nepal, New Caledonia (France), New Zealand, Niue (New Zealand), Norfolk Island (Australia), Northern Mariana Islands (The United States of America), Palau, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Pitcairn Island, Republic of Korea, Samoa, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, Viet Nam, Wallis and Futuna (France), World

Köppen-Geiger Climate Classification

The highly referenced climate classification map of Wladimir Köppen was published for the first time in 1900 and updated in its latest version by Rudolf Geiger in 1961.

Climate classification is applied to a broad range of topics in climate and climate change research as well as in physical geography, hydrology, agriculture, biology and educational aspects.

Based on recent data from the Climatic Research Unit (CRU) of the University of East Anglia and the Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC) at the German Weather Service, this map presents a new digital Köppen-Geiger world map on climate classification for the second half of the 20th century.

World: Asia-Pacific: Human Footprint (Jul 2015)

20 July 2015 - 8:00pm
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: American Samoa, Australia, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, China, Cook Islands, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Fiji, French Polynesia (France), Guam, India, Indonesia, Japan, Kiribati, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Malaysia, Maldives, Marshall Islands, Micronesia (Federated States of), Mongolia, Myanmar, Nauru, Nepal, New Caledonia (France), New Zealand, Niue (New Zealand), Norfolk Island (Australia), Northern Mariana Islands (The United States of America), Palau, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Pitcairn Island, Republic of Korea, Samoa, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Tonga, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, Viet Nam, Wallis and Futuna (France), World

The Human Footprint

Human influence on the earth’s land surface is a global driver of ecological processes on the planet, en par with climatic trends, geological forces and astronomical variations. The Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS) and the Center for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN) at Columbia University joined together to systematically map and measure the human influence on the earth’s land surface today.

The analysis indicates that 83 per cent of the earth's land surface is influenced directly by human beings, whether through human land uses, human access from roads, railways or major rivers, electrical infrastructure (indicated by lights detected at night), or direct occupancy by human beings at densities above 1 person per KM². The authours refer to the human influence on the land’s surface measure as the "Human Footprint.

World: Global Estimates 2015 - People displaced by disasters

20 July 2015 - 8:14am
Source: Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Haiti, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Sudan, Tonga, World

19.3 million displaced by disasters but "mother nature not to blame"

In the last seven years, an estimated one person every second has been displaced by a disaster, with 19.3 million people forced to flee their homes in 2014 alone. Disaster displacement is on the rise, and as policy leaders worldwide advance towards the adoption of a post-2015 global agenda, the time has never been better to address it.

The Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre (IDMC) of the Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC) released today its global report, The Global Estimates: People displaced by disasters. The report reveals how, in 2014, 17.5 million people were forced to flee their homes by disasters brought on by weather-related hazards such as floods and storms, and 1.7 million by geophysical hazards such as earthquakes.

“The millions of lives devastated by disasters is more often a consequence of bad man-made structures and policies, than the forces of mother nature,” said Jan Egeland, Secretary General of NRC. “A flood is not in itself a disaster, the catastrophic consequences happen when people are neither prepared nor protected when it hits”.

The report points to the man-made factors that drive an overall increasing trend in disaster displacement, like rapid economic development, urbanisation and population growth in hazard prone areas. “These factors are a toxic mix, because when such hazards strike there are more homes and people in their path, and therefore flight becomes necessary for survival” said director of IDMC, Alfredo Zamudio. Climate change is also expected to exacerbate the situation in the future, as severe weather hazards become more frequent and intense.

The report argues that these drivers are increasing the number of people becoming displaced, and the risk that their displacement becomes a long-term problem. Today, the likelihood of being displaced by a disaster is 60% higher than it was four decades ago, and an analysis of 34 cases reveals that disaster displacement can last for up to 26 years.

People in both rich and poor countries can be caught in protracted, or long-term, displacement. In the US, over 56,000 people are still in need of housing assistance following Hurricane Sandy in 2012, and 230,000 people have been unable to establish new homes in Japan following the 2011 earthquake, tsunami and nuclear accident.

“Governments should prioritise measures to strengthen the resilience of people whose displacement risks becoming protracted, or has already become so,” said William Lacy Swing, director general of International Organization for Migration, which assisted in the data collection for the report. “If communities are strengthened and ready beforehand, with solid infrastructure, early warning systems, and other such measures, displacement can be used as a short term coping strategy, or at best be avoided altogether”.

The report comes at a crucial time this year as various past and future policy processes come together. These include the Sustainable Development Goals which are to be adopted in September, as well as ongoing preparations for the World Humanitarian Summit in 2016. What this report shows is how disaster displacement bridges all these policy processes.

“We can talk about sustainability, climate change and a reformed humanitarian architecture” said Zamudio, “but to ensure that all these policy processes turn into concrete action, we need to pay closer attention to those living on the front lines; in this case the millions of men, women and children currently on the run from disasters worldwide”.

Notes to editors: - In 2014, more than 19.3 million people became displaced by disasters in 100 countries worldwide.

  • Since 2008, an average of 26.4 million people have been displaced by disasters each year - equivalent to one person displaced every second.

  • 17.5 million people were displaced by disasters brought on by weather-related hazards in 2014. 1.7 million were displaced by geophysical hazards.

  • Since 2008, an average of 22.5 million people have been displaced by climate- or weather-related disasters each year - equivalent to 62,000 people every day.

  • Asia, home to 60% of the world’s population, and with 16.7 million people displaced, accounted for 87 per cent of the global total in 2014.

  • China, India and the Philippines experienced the highest levels of displacement in absolute terms, both in 2014 and for the 2008 to 2014 period.

  • In 2014, Europe experienced double its average level of displacement for the past seven years. 190,000 people were displaced in 2014, mostly by flood disasters in the Balkans.

  • Displacement in Africa was three times lower in 2014 than the average over the last seven years.

  • Relative to their population size, however, many African countries such as Sudan, experienced high levels of disaster displacement.

  • Contrary to common assumptions, displacement following disasters can become protracted and returning home is not always an option. A sample of 34 cases accounts for over 715,000 people in such situations. Monitoring of protracted displacement situations is scarce, resulting in an important blind spot in our current understanding of disaster displacement.

Download the full dataset

Philippines: NDRRMC Update: SitRep No. 13 re Effects of enhanced Southwest Monsoon

20 July 2015 - 3:57am
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

I.SITUATION OVERVIEW

Southwest Monsoon was enhanced by Severe Tropical Storm (STS) "Egay" which was developed inside the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR) on 02 July 2015 and exited the PAR on 07 July 2015. Subsequently, Typhoon "Falcon" entered the PAR on 07 July 2015 and exited on 10 July 2015.

The southwest monsoon brought moderate to occasionally heavy rains over Luzon and Visayas especially over the western sections and triggered the occurrence of flooding in several areas in Regions I, Ill, and NCR. Subsequently, landslide incidents was reported in Regions Ill, NCR, and CAR as the Southwest Monsoon continues to be experienced in llocos, Cordillera, Benguet, Zambales, Bataan, Pangasinan, Metro Manila, Cagayan Valley, and Central Luzon to date.

Philippines: Government continues to augment resources to areas affected by Habagat

20 July 2015 - 2:59am
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

From the Department of Social Welfare and Development

The DSWD aid families affected by prevailing Southwest Monsoon or ‘Habagat.’ Quick Response Teams also remain on alert, coordinating with LGUs to provide aid and assistance.

A total of P18.5 million worth of relief augmentation has been provided by the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) to local government units (LGUs) for distribution to families affected by the prevailing Southwest Monsoon or ‘Habagat.’

As of press time, there are still 702 families or 3,194 persons in 25 evacuation centers managed by LGUs in Regions I, III, IV-A, and in the Cordillera Administrative Region (CAR), as rains continue in these areas causing widespread flooding.

Based on the latest weather bulletin, monsoon rains which may trigger flashfloods and landslides may still be experienced by some provinces in Ilocos Region, Central Luzon, and Cordillera.

DSWD Quick Responses Teams (QRT) in affected regions remain on alert and are continuously coordinating with the LGUs for the provision of resource augmentation and technical assistance.

The Department has 402,310 available family food packs at the National Resource and Operations Center (NROC) and in all regional offices ready for augmentation to the LGUs. DSWD also has P51.7 million standby funds ready for the purchase of emergency relief supplies when necessary.

dswd.gov.ph

Philippines: Philippines: Helping seaweed-farming community stay afloat in Zamboanga

20 July 2015 - 12:15am
Source: International Committee of the Red Cross Country: Philippines

In the small coastal community of Layag-Layag in Zamboanga City, families rely on the sea for their income, growing and harvesting seaweeds. For the generations of Tausugs living there, this is the only form of livelihood that they know.

In this village, houses are built on stilts. There is no road network or dry land connecting the houses, so each family has its own boat – used both for mobility and as a means for earning a living. Mangroves separate them from the mainland, which is only 15 minutes away by motorboat.

Layag-Layag was one of the coastal villages heavily affected by the fighting that broke out in Zamboanga City in September 2013. Families fled and sought refuge in public school classrooms – later turned into evacuation centres.

When the fighting was over, half of the villagers went home to find their boats gone. Some boats were burned while others were damaged, washed out or the motors were looted. Many families were also displaced from their homes, some for more than a year.

"It was difficult because we lost our boat and didn't have a source of income at the evacuation center, so we relied on relief goods," recalls Rajam, a 42-year-old mother of six whose family depends on seaweed farming for their livelihood.

Rajam and her husband, Hussein, used a cash grant from the ICRC to buy seedlings and rebuild their seaweed farm. To date, the ICRC has provided cash incentives to more than 35,000 families to be able to rebuild their lives after the fighting in Zamboanga.

Like most of the families who lost their boats, Hussein borrowed a boat from a neighbor while saving up to buy a new one. It took him another year to finally have a boat of his own again.

Improving community livelihoods

Each house in Layag-Layag has a small area that is used for drying seaweeds, as dried products can be sold for far more than fresh seaweed. However, with a lack of drying space available, seaweed farmers are forced to sell their harvest to a local wholesaler at a lesser value.

A joint project of the United Youth of the Philippines Women and United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees to build concrete solar stilt driers was supported by the ICRC through a cash-for-work construction activity, providing an alternative source of income to 120 seaweed farmers.

Two seaweed driers were completed in February this year – one in Layag-Layag and another in the neighboring village of Leha-Leha – each with the capacity to hold and dry 4,000 kilograms of seaweeds. Cooperatives were also organized to further improve the income in these communities.

"Having a drier is a big help for seaweed farmers like me. Now we can sell our produce at a much higher price," says Hussein.

Almost two years since the fighting ended, Hussein has recovered his livelihood and spends most of his days at sea tending to his plot of seaweeds.

Philippines: Philippines: Central Visayas Earthquake - Emergency Appeal n° MDRPH013 revised final report

19 July 2015 - 11:44pm
Source: International Federation of Red Cross And Red Crescent Societies Country: Philippines

Summary

Central Visayas region of the Philippines was rocked by a 7.2 magnitude earthquake, whose epicentre was in Bohol Province, on the morning of 15 October 2013. The quake, which was described as the strongest to hit the region in more than 20 years, left more than 220 people dead and displaced some 75,000 families (370,000 people) in Bohol alone. Significant destruction to infrastructure, including roads, bridges, flood control facilities, school buildings, hospitals and other public buildings was reported to reach Philippine peso (PHP) 2.2 billion.

On 24 October 2013, the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC), at the request of the PRC, launched an emergency appeal on a preliminary basis for CHF 5.4 million to support 10,000 families (50,000 persons) affected by the earthquake. The appeal was revised on 26 December 2013, with the budget increased to CHF 7.7 million, target adjusted to 20,000 households (100,000 people) and timeframe extended from 8 to 16 months. A final revision was made on 31 October 2014, the budget adjusted to CHF 3.58 million and timeframe extended until 31 March 2015.

Philippines: Urban Climate Change Resilience Trust Fund, 15 July 2015

19 July 2015 - 11:05pm
Source: US Agency for International Development Country: Bangladesh, India, Indonesia, Pakistan, Philippines, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, United States of America, Viet Nam

The Urban Climate Change Resilience Trust Fund is a partnership among the U.S. Agency for International Development, the United Kingdom’s Department for International Development, the Asian Development Bank and the Rockefeller Foundation to help build resilience against the impacts of extreme weather events and weather-related changes that affect the urban poor in medium-sized Asian cities. The fund provides supplemental grants for investment projects, technical assistance and other support. Its total $150 million in grants is leveraging more than $1 billion in investments from public, private and municipal sources.

INCORPORATING ADAPATION MEASURES IN URBAN PLANNING

As cities in Asia grow, they become more vulnerable to the negative impacts of climate change from population density, poor infrastructure and proximity to hazard-prone coastal and river areas. Targeting 25 cities in Bangladesh, India, Indonesia, Pakistan, the Philippines and Vietnam, the fund promotes inclusion of climate change as a key element in city planning and infrastructure development. This means considering objectives such as lowering greenhouse gas emissions and incorporating adaptation measures into city-wide and sectoral planning.

SUPPORTING PROJECTS THAT BUILD RESILIENCE

According to the Asian Development Bank, roughly 55 percent of Asia’s 3.7 billion people are expected to be living in urban centers by 2030. Secondary cities, which are seeing some of the fastest population growth, are among the least prepared to tackle new climate change challenges. Projects will focus on investments in solid waste management; drainage and flood management; ecosystems strengthening and services; water management; protecting livelihoods; educating and raising awareness; enhanced surveillance, early warning systems and emergency management; health systems and services; housing and transportation systems; and low carbon, resilient development.

PROVIDING TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE FOR INVESTMENT PROJECTS

The Urban Climate Change Resilience Trust Fund helps to prepare projects and receives input from the private sector so that project proposals are investment-ready. It also helps governments and civil society better use scientific and economic data at the sub-national level to assist in decision-making and support project development.

STRENGTHENING ADAPTATION KNOWLEDGE AND NETWORKS

The fund raises awareness on adaptation and resilience and promotes learning through peer networks in the selected cities. Activities encourage sharing lessons learned and instituting monitoring and evaluation systems for adaptation projects. With this network, participating cities are able to identify urban adaptation strategies, build related institutional capacity and enable multi-stakeholder engagement to implement initiatives and assess the local impacts of climate change.

PARTNERS

The United Kingdom’s Department for International Development, the Asian Development Bank and the Rockefeller Foundation.

Philippines: Four dead, thousands flee as floods hit northern Philippines

19 July 2015 - 6:09am
Source: Agence France-Presse Country: Philippines

Manila, Philippines | AFP | Sunday 7/19/2015 - 07:25 GMT

Four people were killed and thousands forced to flee their homes as floods inundated large parts of the northern Philippines, the government said Sunday.

Heavy monsoon rains lashed the largely agricultural provinces for days, bringing floods that left roads impassable and led about 3,000 people to be evacuated, government civil defence officers said.

At least four people died as a result of the rains, including a six-month old boy who was buried by a landslide in the northern province of Pangasinan, the officers said.

Social welfare and relief agencies are delivering aid to affected areas while the public works department is preparing to repair damaged infrastructure, said President Benigno Aquino's spokesman Herminio Coloma.

Although no storm is forecast to hit, the government weather station warned that "monsoon rains which may trigger flash floods and landslides will be experienced," over large areas of the northern Philippines on Sunday.

The disaster-plagued Philippines is hit by about 20 typhoons and storms each year, many of them deadly.

Earlier this month, Tropical Storm Linfa inundated whole towns in the north, although no fatalities were reported.

str-mm/erf