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World: Communicable Disease Threats Report, 10-16 July 2016, Week 28

16 July 2016 - 3:22pm
Source: European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control Country: American Samoa, Angola, Australia, Bangladesh, Brazil, Bulgaria, Cameroon, Chad, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, French Polynesia (France), Ghana, Guinea, India, Kenya, Netherlands, New Caledonia (France), Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Singapore, Solomon Islands, Sri Lanka, Tajikistan, Trinidad and Tobago, Uganda, World

​​The ECDC Communicable Disease Threats Report (CDTR) is a weekly bulletin for epidemiologists and health prefessionals on active public health threts. This issue covers the period 10-16 July 2016 and includes updates on Zika virus, polio, West Nile virus, MERS, and yellow fever in Angola.

Philippines: Dengue cases in Aklan on the rise

15 July 2016 - 5:49am
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

Sheila Q. Patoza

KALIBO, AKLAN, July 15 (PIA) - Dengue cases in Aklan continue to rise based on the latest data count of 525 from January 1 to July 12, 2016, with teens aged 11 to 20 years old mostly affected.

Aklan Provincial Epidemiology Surveillance and Response Unit (APESRU) records showed that dengue cases in the province increased by 130.26% compared to last year of the same period with 228 cases.

It was also noted that most of the victims belong to age bracket of 11 to 20 years old with 165 cases listed.

It was followed by those aged 1 to 10 years old recorded with 145 cases; and those aged 21 to 30 years old with 97 cases.

Found with 38 cases were age brackets 31 to 40 years old and 51 years old and above; while the 41 to 50 years old listed with 25 cases; and those less than one year old with 17 cases.

The capital town Kalibo and the most populated among the 17 municipalities in Aklan registered the highest cases of dengue with 106; followed by Malay with 48 cases; Banga 42; and Ibajay 39.

Other towns noted with dengue were: Madalag with 34 cases; Nabas with 31 cases; New Washington with 30; and the rest of the municipalities and the two non-Aklan towns had less than 30 cases.

Aklan Provincial Health Officer Dr. Cornelio Cuachon, Jr. reminded the public once again to clean their surroundings and called on parents and guardians not to take fever for granted and bring their children to nearest clinics and hospitals once they had fever for more than two days. (JCM/SQP/PIA6 Aklan).

World: Zika virus, Microcephaly and Guillain-Barré syndrome Situation Report, 14 July 2016

14 July 2016 - 1:05pm
Source: World Health Organization Country: American Samoa, Barbados, Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Brazil, Cabo Verde, Cambodia, Colombia, Cook Islands, Costa Rica, Curaçao (The Netherlands), Dominican Republic, Easter Island (Chile), Ecuador, El Salvador, Fiji, French Guiana (France), French Polynesia (France), Gabon, Guadeloupe (France), Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Indonesia, Jamaica, Maldives, Martinique (France), Mexico, New Caledonia (France), Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Philippines, Puerto Rico (The United States of America), Saint Martin (France), Samoa, Solomon Islands, Suriname, Thailand, Tonga, United States of America, United States Virgin Islands, Vanuatu, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World

Summary

WHO and partners established a definition of what constitutes an outbreak, endemic transmission, and the interruption of mosquito-borne transmission in order to better characterize the level of transmission of Zika virus infection (Table 1, Fig. 2). This classification system was put into use as of the situation report of 7 July 2016.

As of 13 July 2016, 65 countries and territories (Fig. 1, Table 1) have reported evidence of mosquito-borne Zika virus transmission since 2007 (62 of these countries and territories have reported evidence of mosquito-borne Zika virus transmission since 2015):

48 countries and territories with a first reported outbreak from 2015 onwards (Table 1).

Four countries are classified as having possible endemic transmission or have reported evidence of local vector-borne Zika infections in 2016.

13 countries and territories have reported evidence of local vector-borne Zika infections in or before 2015, but without documentation of cases in 2016, or with outbreak terminated.

No new country or territory has reported mosquito-borne Zika virus transmission in the week to 13 July 2016.

Eleven countries have reported evidence of person-to-person transmission of Zika virus, probably via a sexual route (Table 2).

As of 13 July 2016, microcephaly and other central nervous system (CNS) malformations potentially associated with Zika virus infection or suggestive of congenital infection have been reported by 13 countries or territories. Three of those countries reported microcephaly cases born from mothers with a recent travel history to Zika-affected countries in the WHO Region of the Americas (Table 3).

As of 13 July 2016, the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (US-CDC) reported seven live-born infants with birth defects and five pregnancy losses with birth defects with laboratory evidence of Zika virus infection.

In the context of Zika virus circulation, 15 countries and territories worldwide have reported an increased incidence of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and/or laboratory confirmation of a Zika virus infection among GBS cases. French Guiana recently confirmed four cases of GBS and one severe neurologic condition, all of which were confirmed positive for Zika virus.

Based on research to date, there is scientific consensus that Zika virus is a cause of microcephaly and GBS.

In Guadeloupe, there are four GBS cases confirmed with Zika virus infection, and 12 additional GBS cases under investigation. Five cases of other severe neurological syndrome were confirmed with Zika virus infection. Zika virus was probable or confirmed for 11 cases of unidentified neurological syndrome.

One neurologic condition laboratory confirmed for Zika virus infection was reported in Saint Martin.

In Guinea-Bissau, on 29 June 2016, Institute Pasteur Dakar (IPD) confirmed that three of 12 samples tested positive for Zika by PC-R. All 12 samples tested negative against IgM Zika. Four additional samples were sent to IPD on 1 July for gene sequencing and the results are still pending.

The government of Guinea-Bissau with support from the WHO Country Office (WCO) is demonstrating strong leadership in response to these findings. The WCO has availed funds to support the logistical needs of the response activities. The WHO assessment mission to Guinea-Bissau will be conducted to help identify the priority activities and to strengthen the national response capacity.

On 13 July 2016, the U.S. CDC released a risk assessment for Zika virus spread related to travel to Olympics. The assessment concluded that international spread of Zika related to the Games would not significantly alter spread, but that four countries were at special risk, because residents of those countries did not have substantial travel to Zika affected countries, outside of potential exposure at the Olympics: Eritrea, Djibouti, Chad, and Yemen.

The global Strategic Response Framework launched by WHO in February 2016 encompasses surveillance, response activities and research. An interim report describing some of the key activities being undertaken jointly by WHO and international, regional and national partners in response to this public health emergency was published on 27 May 2016. A revised strategy for the period of July 2016 to December 2017 was published on 17 June.

WHO has developed advice and information on diverse topics in the context of Zika virus. WHO’s latest information materials, news and resources to support corporate and programmatic risk communication and community engagement are available online.

World: World: 2016-2017 ENSO Overview (As of 13 July 2016)

14 July 2016 - 12:14pm
Source: World Food Programme, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Food Security Cluster Country: Angola, Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Botswana, Cambodia, Chad, Colombia, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Djibouti, Ecuador, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Indonesia, Kenya, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mongolia, Mozambique, Myanmar, Namibia, Nicaragua, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Somalia, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Timor-Leste, Viet Nam, World, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Globally, millions of vulnerable people are experiencing increased hunger and poverty due to droughts, floods, storms and extreme temperature fluctuations as a result of a climatic occurrence: El Niño. This phenomenon is not an individual weather event but a climate pattern which occurs every two to seven years and lasts 9-12 months. The 2015/2016 occurrence is one of the most severe in a half-century and the strongest El Niño since 1997/1998 which killed some 21,000 people and caused damage to infrastructure worth US$ 36 billion. The negative consequences of El Niño are foreseen to continue through 2017, particularly in Southern Africa where this event has followed multiple droughts compounding the already fragile situation. It is critical that an adequate and sustained response is implemented in order to safeguard decades of development gains. More than US$2 billion are required to support food security and agriculture programmes globally through 2017.

Philippines: Philippines: NDRRMC Update: SitRep No. 01 Preparedness Measures and Effects of Southwest Monsoon

14 July 2016 - 12:00am
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines
Situation overview

Southwest monsoon affecting the western section of Luzon. Meanwhile, at 4:00 AM, 12 July 2016, the Low Pressure Area (LPA) was estimated based on all available data at 1,050 km east of Virac radar, Bato, Catanduanes (15.4° N, 133.9°E).

Effects Served population inside and outside ECs
  • A total of 4,930 families / 20,840 persons are being served inside and outside evacuation centers in Regions III and Calabarzon.

Philippines: Philippines: Change needed to make communities resilient

13 July 2016 - 11:45pm
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

By Jaime S. Cabag, Jr.

ILOILO CITY, July 13 (PIA6) -- Office of Civil Defense Director Rosario T. Cabrera rallied the people of Concepcion to join hands with the government to achieve or work for safe, adaptive and resilient communities anchored on a change in perspective and consciousness in coping with disasters.

This change was already started with the implementation of Republic Act No. 10121 or the Philippine Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Act of 2010, according to Cabrera in her message at the Disaster Preparedness and Response Information, Education and Communication (IEC) Caravan held July 12 in Concepcion, Iloilo.

The new law veers has shifted efforts from disaster response and relief to disaster risk reduction and management and from a reactive posture to a proactive one, said Cabrera.

She also enjoined Local Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Councils and Municipal DRRM Officers to look back and devise strategies and plans in order to craft a better chemistry of resiliency among communities.

Likewise, the OCD official Disaster reiterated that preparedness is everybody’s responsibility – my responsibility, your responsibility, our responsibility.

The caravan kicked off a series of advocacy activities which will be organized in the region by the Department of the Interior and Local Government in its capacity as head of the Disaster Preparedness Committee of the Regional Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (RDRRMC). The council is chaired by OCD Director Cabrera.

DILG Iloilo Provincial Director Teodora Sumagaysay said the IEC caravan was conceived to spread the key messages of disaster preparedness and response in the light of the potential hazards resulting from the La Nina phenomenon.

According to PAGASA, the country’s weather bureau, La Nina is expected in the second half of this year, as suggested by climate models the agency has mentioned in earlier reports.

Sumagaysay also thanked the local government unit of Concepcion for hosting the initial IEC caravan, which also served as one of the highlights of this year’s National Disaster Consciousness Month in the region.

The caravan focused on the potential hazards in a La Nina episode and the preparations that should be made by communities as presented by the member-agencies of the RDRRMC disaster preparedness committee.

On hand to welcome the IEC caravan team was Concepcion Vice Mayor Rainier N. Balida in behalf of Mayor Milliard Villanueva. The caravan was attended by other local officials, barangay chairmen, local government employees, students, and other sectoral representatives. (JCM/JSC/PIA6)

World: Department for International Development - Annual Report and Accounts 2015-16

13 July 2016 - 11:06pm
Source: Department for International Development Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Cambodia, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Ghana, Guyana, Haiti, India, Indonesia, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Liberia, Malawi, Mauritania, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Rwanda, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, Turkey, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Viet Nam, World, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe
Annual Report

The Annual Report meets DFID’s obligation to report on its activities and progress under the International Development (Reporting and Transparency) Act 2006. It includes information on DFID’s results achieved, spending, performance and efficiency.

Accounts

DFID’s Accounts are prepared in accordance with the 2015-16 Government Financial Reporting Manual (FReM), issued by HM Treasury. The accounting policies contained in the FReM apply International Financial Reporting Standards as adapted or interpreted for the public sector context. DFID’s Accounts are similar in many respects to the annual accounts prepared by private sector businesses. They contain the primary financial statements recording the full costs of activities, DFID’s assets and liabilities as well as providing information on how resources have been used to meet objectives.

The format is tailored to central government accounting including, for example, financial comparisons against the Department’s resource-based estimates. Those not familiar with the format of the accounts might like to focus on the Financial Review within the Performance Report, which summarises the key areas of performance. The Financial Statements and certain sections of the Accountability Report are audited by the National Audit Office before they are presented to Parliament.

Results headlines

By 2015–16, DFID had achieved the following results towards its commitments for 2011–15. Further information on results is set out on pages 15–19.

■ Wealth creation – supported 69.5 million people, including 36.4 million women, to gain access to financial services to help them work their way out of poverty (Exceeding DFID’s commitment of 50 million)

■ Poverty, vulnerability, nutrition and hunger – reached 30 million children under 5 and pregnant women through DFID’s nutrition-relevant programmes, of whom 12.1 million were women or girls (Exceeding DFID’s commitment of 20 million)

■ Education – supported 11.3 million children in primary and lower secondary education, of whom 5.3 million were girls (Exceeding DFID’s commitment of 11 million)

■ Health – supported 5.6 million births with skilled birth attendants (Exceeding DFID’s commitment of 2 million)

■ Water, sanitation and hygiene – supported 64.5 million people, of whom 22.6 million were women, to access clean water, better sanitation or improved hygiene conditions through DFID’s WASH programmes (Exceeding DFID’s commitment of 60 million)

■ Governance and security – supported freer and fairer elections in 13 countries in which 162.1 million people voted (Meeting DFID’s commitment of 13 countries)

■ Humanitarian assistance – reached over 13.4 million people with emergency food assistance, including 5.6 million women and girls

■ Climate change – supported 17.7 million people to cope with the effects of climate change Shown below are some of the latest available results delivered through the multilateral organisations that DFID supports.

■ Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, immunised 56 million children in 2014

■ Global Partnership for Education (GPE) trained 98,000 teachers between July 2014 and June 2015

■ UNICEF helped 10.4 million children in humanitarian situations to access basic education in 2014

■ The Asian Development Bank (ADB) provided 166,000 households with a new water supply in 2015

■ The World Bank’s International Development Association (IDA) provided 339 million people with essential health, nutrition and population services between 2013 and 2015

Further information on DFID’s work with multilaterals is included on pages 37–38.

Malaysia: Dengue Situation Update 493, 12 July 2016

13 July 2016 - 7:33am
Source: World Health Organization Country: Australia, Cambodia, China, French Polynesia (France), Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Malaysia, New Caledonia (France), Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Singapore, Viet Nam

Northern Hemisphere

China (No Updates)

As of 13 June 2016, there were 154 cases of dengue reported in China in 2016. This number is higher than the number of cases reported in same period of the previous four years (2012-2015) (Figure 1).

Malaysia

In week 25, the number of dengue cases was 1,777, an increase from 1,803 cases reported in the previous week. The number of cases was less than that reported during the same period in 2015 and it turned to decrease from the previous week. And in week 25, there were four dengue-related deaths reported, bringing the total number of deaths to 122 in 2016, compared to 162 deaths during the same reporting period in 2015 (Figure 2)

Philippines

As of 11 June 2016, there were 52,177 suspected cases of dengue reported in 2016, including 207 deaths. This is 41.1% higher than that reported during the same period in 2015 (n=36,972) (Figure 3).

Singapore

From 26 June to 2 July 2016, there were 234 new dengue cases reported in Singapore. The number of cases had decreased between January to April in 2016, but the number of cases has been in upward trend in last three weeks. (Figure 4).

Cambodia (No updates)

From 1 January to 17 May 2016, there have been 1,771 cases of dengue and 4 deaths reported in Cambodia. In May, there were 168 cases and no death reported. The number of cases remains low and stable at this point (Figure 5).

Lao PDR

As of 1 July, there were 1,530 cases of dengue with 8 deaths reported in Lao PDR in 2016. From 25 June to 1 July, 190 new dengue cases and one death were reported (Figure 6).

Viet Nam (No updates)

As of 30 April 2016, there were 25,441 cases of dengue including 10 deaths, reported in 44 out of 63 provinces in Viet Nam. In April 2016, there were 3,899 cases reported including one death. Compared to the same period in 2015, the number of cases increased by 179%. Compared to the median in 2010-2014 period, the cumulative number of cases increased by 124%.

Philippines: The Philippines: Renewing prospects for peace in Mindanao

13 July 2016 - 12:39am
Source: International Crisis Group Country: Philippines

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY AND RECOMMENDATIONS

The southern Philippines is potentially closer to peace than at any time in the four decades since Muslim insurgents started fighting for independence, but the substantial progress over the past six years is also fragile. President Rodrigo Duterte, who took office on 30 June, needs to build quickly on the foundations laid by President Benigno Aquino’s administration or the process risks collapsing. Duterte has suggested a new enabling law could be drafted by an ad hoc convention that brings together members of different southern ethnic, religious and political groups. The idea has some advantages, but not at the cost of prolonged delay. The greatest danger to peace is that the restive south, sceptical after watching at least three other agreements founder, will lose faith in the process and return to guerrilla warfare or tip deeper into lawlessness. The most effective way of avoiding these dangers is for the new government to pass enabling legislation quickly that delivers at least as much autonomy as was promised by the outgoing administration.       

At the beginning of 2015, the government and the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF) seemed on the brink of an historic peace to end a conflict in which more than 120,000 people have died. After years of neglect, factionalism and talks in bad faith, Aquino’s government and MILF leaders had broadly agreed on a package that would grant the five southern provinces, collectively called Bangsamoro (Muslim Nation), a large degree of political and financial autonomy in return for the MILF disarming and dropping independence demands. The Framework Agreement on Bangsamoro in October 2012, followed by the Comprehensive Agreement on Bangsamoro (CAB) in March 2014, laid out the architecture, but finalisation was contingent on Congress approving the enabling legislation before Aquino’s term ended. That did not happen, the result of a bungled police operation and politicking ahead of the May 2016 elections.

Duterte, the mayor of the southern city of Davao who won that election, was one of the peace deal’s most vocal supporters during the campaign. Though he has said he favours autonomy for Bangsamoro, all indications are that he will not follow the same route as the previous administration to deliver it. It is unclear whether he envisages the settlement for the south as an advance model for his broader plans of national federalisation or as an integral part of them. A long delay, or an autonomy bill that delivers less than the CAB’s promises, risks alienating key sections of the Bangsamoro population. A particular danger is that young people, disillusioned by failure of political negotiations, would seek alternatives, such as joining one of the militant groups waiting in the wings or turning to anarchic criminality.

There was no contingency plan for failure to pass the bill under Aquino, and by law the new government must start the process of drafting and approving legislation over. While doing so, it needs to put in place measures to preserve the gains of the previous administration and make significant good-will gestures fast to boost damaged confidence in the deal. Both sides need to prepare for the coming autonomy. The MILF leadership has invested most of its political capital in the negotiations and to maintain its credibility has to be able to show that the new administration will continue it in good faith. A number of interlocutors within the process and outside suggest the government should boost confidence through increased development assistance to local bodies in the south.

The south is ill-prepared for autonomy. Although the delay presents a threat to the process, it is also an opportunity. It allows the MILF and other groups, such as the Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF), time to transition from guerrilla organisations to political parties; create an inclusive political platform bringing together Mindanao’s disparate population; and convince sceptics within their own communities to support social change for a lasting peace.

Mindanao’s peace process has been innovative: it includes an International Contact Group to coordinate outside support and, at least on paper, commitment to involve women, minorities, and civil society during the negotiation and implementation of agreements. International partners, in particular Malaysia and the member states of the European Union (EU), have been a vital, constructive force in the peace process, facilitating and assisting as needed, but resisting the temptation to insert themselves so far into the mechanism as to detract from its essentially home-grown nature. Foreign governments, diplomatic missions and NGOs should now help escort the process through the delay, publicly supporting measures such as development aid and education programs, while impressing upon Manila’s political elite that Congress needs to build on the achievements of the previous administration.

Failure to pass an acceptable autonomy law would risk exacerbating disenchantment with negotiated change, fuelling criminality and facilitating religious radicalisation. Global jihadist movements like Islamic State (IS) have shown a clear ability to exploit social disorder in Muslim communities elsewhere to gain new recruits and have already gained some adherents among smaller and more opportunistic rebel groups in Mindanao.

Years of negative national media coverage of Muslim aspirations have had a harmful impact on how the rest of the Philippines views southern autonomy. The new government under Duterte must remember that ignoring or derailing the existing process would lead not to a return to the status quo ante but to an unpredictable, potentially much more violent future. 

RECOMMENDATIONS

To maintain the momentum of the peace process

To the Philippines authorities:

1.  Use the 2014 Comprehensive Agreement on Bangsamoro (CAB) as the basis of any future process.

2.  Expedite the passage of enabling legislation to create a CAB-compliant autonomous region in Mindanao.

3.  Ensure strong coordination with Mindanao-based security forces to avoid confidence-shaking clashes.

4.  Use high-profile developmental and social investments, funnelled through local groups, to show goodwill, with a focus on infrastructure, education and health.

5.  Develop a public communication strategy to prepare the rest of the country for Bangsamoro autonomy.

6.  Establish a National Transitional Justice and Reconciliation Commission on Bangsamoro to deal with past injustices.

To the MILF:

7.  Continue to show flexibility in negotiations with the new government on how autonomy is going to be delivered.

8.  Reach out to non-Muslim constituencies, particularly Christian and indigenous groups, to ensure they do not feel threatened by the prospect of living in an autonomous Bangsamoro.

To the MNLF:

9.  Do not attempt to renegotiate the CAB from scratch.

To international partners and donors:

10.  Focus financial, programmatic and monitoring support on three main areas: governance and capacity building, strategic communications and peace diplomacy, and justice and rule of law.

11.  Establish in coordination with various levels of government and the MILF a multi-donor normalisation trust fund to help pay for the transition.

12.  Help facilitate inward investment in Bangsamoro to boost the local economy through jobs and commerce.

To prepare for autonomy

To the Philippines authorities:

13.  Ensure that MILF fighters who agree to demobilise get their full socio-economic assistance package, so as to encourage other fighters to follow. 

14.  Extend the offer of amnesty and a demobilisation package to fighters of other once-secessionist groups, including the MNLF.

To the MILF:

15.  Broaden the political base of its political vehicle, the United Bangsamoro Justice Party (UBJP), to give a greater voice to women, young people, Christians and members of the Lumad indigenous group.

16.  Help build capacity for governance in Bangsamoro by identifying and nurturing talent across all ethnic, social and religious groups and genders, and seeking assistance and advice as necessary.

To international partners and donors:

17.  Focus on boosting the technical capacity of the Bangsamoro bureaucracy, with specific emphasis on new areas of governance they will inherit with autonomy, including taxation and fiscal governance, investment policy, and land management. 

Manila/Brussels, 6 July 2016

Indonesia: ASEAN Weekly Disaster Update, 04 -10 July 2016

12 July 2016 - 6:55am
Source: Association of Southeast Asian Nations Country: Indonesia, Myanmar, Philippines, Viet Nam
Indonesia
  • A tornado hit the 2 districts of Kuala and Bahorok in Langkat, North Sumatra. 1 died and 48 households were affected.
  • Heavy rains brought about rivers overflowing and flashfloods in Sumber Tangkil, Tirtoyudo subdistricts in Malang, East Java. These damaged dams, river dikes, bridges, water pipes and affected 800 families. Losses were estimated to be about 3 billion.
Myanmar
  • Interminable rains caused flooding in 5 townships each in Rakhine State and Sagaing Region. Infrastructures and crops were damaged and 12,200 people affected and displaced.
Philippines
  • Enhanced monsoon rains caused flooding in the Provinces of Zambales, Bataan, Rizal and Batangas. 981 families were affected, 143 of which were brought to 19 evacuation centers.
Viiet Nam
  • Torrential rains caused flooding, landslides and mudflows in the northern province of Quang Ninh. 2 people died and 100 families were evacuated to safer areas.

Philippines: FAO Philippines Newsletter - 2016 Issue 2

12 July 2016 - 5:14am
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Country: Philippines

Featured Stories:

  • Disaster risk reduction and management and climate change adaptation at the heart of FAO's work in the Philippines

    FAO-DA formulate National La Niña Action Plan

  • Higher than average yield for rice farmers in Central Luzon

  • Telefood: Communal vegetable gardens in Mindanao promote community nutrition and sustainable livelihoods

  • Zambonaga fisherfolk rise from conflict through FAO support

  • FAO Study: Building capacities of farmer-cooperatives crucial for agribusiness venture schemes Striking the balance between livelihood and marine ecosystem preservation

China - Taiwan Province: China, Taiwan - Tropical Cyclone NEPARTAK-16 (GDACS, NMC, CMA, CWB, NDRRMC, Local Media) (ECHO Daily Flash of 11 July 2016)

11 July 2016 - 11:26pm
Source: European Commission Humanitarian Aid Office Country: China, China - Taiwan Province, Philippines
  • TC NEPARTAK-16 made landfall near Shishi city (Fujian, China) on 9 July early morning (UTC), as a Tropical Storm. It continued moving North-West over the provinces of Fujian and Jiangxi, weakening. Heavy rains affected the areas along its path, causing floods.

  • Local media reported two people dead, over eight missing, at least 240 000 people evacuated, over 1 000 houses damaged in Fujian province (China). Media also reported that the injured toll had reached at least 300 people in Taiwan. National authorities reported two people dead also in the Philippines (one in Valenzuela city and another one in the province of Rizal).

  • Over the next 24 h, heavy rain may still affect Fujian, Jiangxi, Zhejiang, Jiangsu and Guangdong (China), as well as the south-western areas of Taiwan.

China: Asia - Severe weather events situation - ECHO Daily Map | 11/07/2016

11 July 2016 - 11:15pm
Source: European Commission Humanitarian Aid Office Country: China, China - Taiwan Province, India, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines

TC NEPARTAK
• TC NEPARTAK made landfall along the coast of Fujian (China) on 9 July, as a Tropical Storm. Then it moved inland weakening. Heavy rains affected the areas along its path, causing floods.
• In Fujian and Jiangxi provinces (China): nine people died, at least 18 went missing, over 213 000 evacuated and over 11 400 houses damaged.
• In Taiwan: three people died and at least 300 were injured.
• In the Philippines: one person died, two were injured, one went missing and over 3 357 were evacuated in the regions of National Capital Region and Mimaropa, as well as in the province of Rizal.

CHINA
• Heavy rain has affecting the country over the past weeks causing more floods and landslides.
• National authorities report over 203 people dead, 28 still missing, over 200 000 evacuated and over 475 000 homes partially or fully damaged in several provinces of the country, including the ones affected by TC NEPARTAK, as of 11 July.

PAKISTAN
• Heavy rain affected several areas of the country, especially the province of Khyber Pakthnkhwa, causing floods.
• According to official reports the death toll reached 45 people, 25 injured and 41 houses fully or partially damaged, as of 11 July.

NEPAL
• Heavy rain has been affecting the country over the past few days causing floods and landslides.
• According to media reports, two people died and at least 20 were injured in Katmandu city as well as over 41 houses were damaged throughout the country.

MYANMAR/BURMA
• Heavy rain has been affecting several areas of the country over the past few days causing floods and landslides.
• According to official reports, two people have died and over 27 000 have been evacuated in Rakhine,
Sagaing, Kachin, Chin, Magway and Bago, as of 10 July.

INDIA
• Heavy rain has continued to affect the country over the past few days causing more floods and casualties.
• According to local media reports, the death toll has reached 57 people, 200 have been injured and over 7 500 have been evacuated in the states of Assam, Arunachal Pradesh, Uttarakhand, Madhya Pradesh, as of 11 July.

World: Asia - Severe weather events situation - ECHO Daily Map | 11/07/2016

11 July 2016 - 11:15pm
Source: European Commission Humanitarian Aid Office Country: China, China - Taiwan Province, India, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines, World

TC NEPARTAK
• TC NEPARTAK made landfall along the coast of Fujian (China) on 9 July, as a Tropical Storm. Then it moved inland weakening. Heavy rains affected the areas along its path, causing floods.
• In Fujian and Jiangxi provinces (China): nine people died, at least 18 went missing, over 213 000 evacuated and over 11 400 houses damaged.
• In Taiwan: three people died and at least 300 were injured.
• In the Philippines: one person died, two were injured, one went missing and over 3 357 were evacuated in the regions of National Capital Region and Mimaropa, as well as in the province of Rizal.

CHINA
• Heavy rain has affecting the country over the past weeks causing more floods and landslides.
• National authorities report over 203 people dead, 28 still missing, over 200 000 evacuated and over 475 000 homes partially or fully damaged in several provinces of the country, including the ones affected by TC NEPARTAK, as of 11 July.

PAKISTAN
• Heavy rain affected several areas of the country, especially the province of Khyber Pakthnkhwa, causing floods.
• According to official reports the death toll reached 45 people, 25 injured and 41 houses fully or partially damaged, as of 11 July.

NEPAL
• Heavy rain has been affecting the country over the past few days causing floods and landslides.
• According to media reports, two people died and at least 20 were injured in Katmandu city as well as over 41 houses were damaged throughout the country.

MYANMAR/BURMA
• Heavy rain has been affecting several areas of the country over the past few days causing floods and landslides.
• According to official reports, two people have died and over 27 000 have been evacuated in Rakhine,
Sagaing, Kachin, Chin, Magway and Bago, as of 10 July.

INDIA
• Heavy rain has continued to affect the country over the past few days causing more floods and casualties.
• According to local media reports, the death toll has reached 57 people, 200 have been injured and over 7 500 have been evacuated in the states of Assam, Arunachal Pradesh, Uttarakhand, Madhya Pradesh, as of 11 July.

Philippines: Pintakasi: A Review of Shelter/WASH Delivery Methods in Post-disaster Recovery Interventions

11 July 2016 - 9:15am
Source: Catholic Relief Services Country: Philippines

Executive Summary

Catholic Relief Services conducted an in‑depth study to assess the efficiency, effectiveness and appropriateness of the modalities for delivering shelter and WASH assistance in its Typhoon Haiyan Recovery Program. This study, Pintakasi1, hopes to contribute valuable lessons learned and share best practices from the program with the shelter/WASH recovery communities of practice in the humanitarian sector as a whole.

CRS conducted 26 focus group discussions with 115 beneficiaries and 90 staff, as well as 8 key informant interviews with senior management in the municipalities of Tacloban, Palo and Samar,
Philippines. The main objectives of the study were to:

  • Document decisions, implementation obstacles and risk‑mitigation strategies
  • Understand beneficiary preference
  • Provide a comparison between the cash‑transfer and direct‑build approaches

The study focused on the efficiency (time, cost, quantity/scale), effectiveness (quality, beneficiary satisfaction) and appropriateness (vulnerability, dignity) of a cash‑based approach to delivering shelter/WASH solutions, compared to in‑kind/direct‑build construction, in the context of recovery after Typhoon Haiyan.

Findings

The relative effectiveness of different modalities depended heavily on contextual factors such as the functioning of markets, availability of trained labor, capacity of the organization, emergency phase versus recovery phase, and availability of secure in‑country money transfer systems. Key findings of the study include:

  1. It is very important for beneficiaries to have a choice between cash transfer and direct build. The provision of options allowed for the contextual needs of each beneficiary to be met. This also assured a higher rate of beneficiary satisfaction, since they had a greater choice of the delivery method.

  2. Beneficiary preference aligned with the type of modality they received (direct build or cash transfer). In the direct‑build FGDs, all beneficiaries said they preferred direct build and responded that they would not change their decision to a cash transfer since it was the best approach for their situation. All cash transfer beneficiaries who participated in the FGDs thought cash transfer was the best approach because they were able to choose quality materials to ensure a durable, high‑quality home.

  3. Cash transfer was a more cost‑efficient approach for this response. For every $100 spent on the beneficiary, it cost $18.50 for CRS to deliver the cash‑transfer approach against $23 to deliver using the direct‑build approach. This difference was primarily due to the time it took to procure materials for thousands of beneficiaries in the direct‑build approach.

  4. Cash transfer was a more cost‑effective approach when the unit costs, completion of targets, and dropouts were compared for each approach. Per unit, CRS spent less on shelters and toilets using a cash‑transfer approach than using direct build. CRS was able to complete all 20,000 targeted shelters and toilets within 20 months over a large geographic area largely due to the scalability of the cash‑transfer approach. For every $100 spent using the cash‑transfer approach, 97 percent was used by beneficiaries to build shelters and toilets. An average of $3 (or 3 percent) of every $100 spent delivering cash transfers did not get invested into shelter and toilet construction by beneficiaries. In these cases, beneficiaries did not comply with the requirements to receive subsequent cash transfers, or “tranches”, and therefore did not complete the program. Findings suggest that the overall cost effectiveness of the completed targets would have been greater if a cash‑transfer approach had been used rather than a mixed‑methods approach.

  5. Effective social mobilization is key to the success of the cash‑transfer approach, and significant human resources should be dedicated to social mobilization when employing this approach.

  6. Environmental site assessments (collecting data on the highest seasonal flood levels, water table, and soil type) should be conducted before implementation of any cash‑transfer or direct‑build program so that guidance and training on the most resilient shelter and toilet designs can be given to engineers, foremen, carpenters and beneficiaries during pre‑construction meetings before the first cash transfer is released.

Based on the findings of this study, CRS has developed a decision‑making tool to help practitioners decide which approach will be most appropriate, effective, and efficient depending on which influencing factors are at play.

China: Asia and the Pacific: Weekly Regional Humanitarian Snapshot (5 - 11 July 2016)

11 July 2016 - 6:23am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: China, India, Indonesia, Myanmar, Philippines

CHINA

On 8 July Typhoon Nepartak made landfall near Taitung, Taiwan Province of China, as a Cat. 4 super typhoon with wind speeds of 234 km/h. Three people were reportedly killed and nearly 17,400 people were evacuated as a result of the storm, which caused storm surges and widespread damage to buildings and infrastructure.

On 9 July 2016 Typhoon Nepartak made a second landfall in eastern China's Fujian Province. As of 10 July, authorities reported six people had been killed and eight people were missing. A total of 449,000 people were affected by the typhoon including some 203,000 people in 10 cities who were temporarily evacuated.

203,000 people temporarily relocated

PHILIPPINES

Typhoon Nepartak (locally called Butchoy) caused flooding in the provinces of Bataan, Zambales,
Bulacan, Rizal and Batangas in western and central Luzon, with landslides reported in Olongapo City, Zambales, and Antipolo City, Rizal. As of 10 July, at least 7,500 families had been affected, with 132 families in 12 evacuation centres. One child is known to have died and one is still missing. 2

As of 9 July, at least 2,200 families (11,000 people) in three municipalities in Basilan province have been affected by the conflict between the Armed Forces of the Philippines and the Abu Sayyaf Group.
Some families have evacuated to designated centres while others are staying with relatives. No injuries or deaths among the civilian population have been reported. Schools remain closed in some of the affected areas.

INDIA

Continuing monsoon rains led to flash floods in Madhya Pradesh State in central India as of 9 July, with 23 districts impacted and some 200 villages cut off by flood waters. The flooding has affected more than 100,000 people and caused at least 15 deaths. Responders from the military, the National Disaster Response Force (NDRF), local police and communities are continuing rescue operations, with 20,000 people evacuated to safer areas and at least four relief camps established.

15 people killed

INDONESIA

As of 10 July 101 hotspots had been detected mostly in Sumatra and Kalimantan. Ground and air operations continued throughout the past week in Riau province, where most of the hotspots had been detected. Thus far the fires and haze have had a minimal impact on local populations, and it is unlikely that the humanitarian impacts will be as severe as last year given higher than average rainfall across the country and the increasing likelihood of a La Niña scenario.

MYANMAR

Heavy monsoon rains since 1 July caused flooding in many parts of Myanmar. As of 8 July, more than 27,000 people had been displaced in Rakhine State. Identified immediate needs include drinking water, food and basics non-food items. The State Government is leading response and humanitarian partners are working with local authorities to provide targeted support. Rainfall is expected to continue across many parts of the country in the coming days and some rivers remain above danger levels.

Philippines: NDRRMC Update: SitRep No. 06 re Preparedness Measures and Effects of Typhoon "Butchoy" (I.N. Nepartak)

11 July 2016 - 1:29am
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

Date 10 July 2016, 6:00 PM

I. Chronology of Events

02 July 2016

  • The Low Pressure Area (LPA) over the Marinas Island has developed into a Tropical Depression (TD) and was named "NEPARTAK" (International Name)

03 July 2016

  • TD "NEPARTAK" has intensified into a Tropical Storm (TS)

04 July 2016

  • At 10:00 AM, TS "NEPARTAK" was estimated at 1,855 km east of Visayas

05 July 2016

  • At 11:00 AM, TS "NEPARTAK" further intensified into a Typhoon (TY)

  • At 2:00 PM, TY "NEPARTAK" entered the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR) and was named "BUTCHOY". It has a maximum sustained winds of 120 kph near the center and gustiness of up to 150 kph, moving Northwest at 30kph

06 July 2016

  • TY "BUTCHOY" intensified further at 195 kph maximum sustained winds and gustiness of up to 230 kph as it maintained its speed while moving in a Northwest direction. Tropical Cyclone Warning Signal (TCWS) No. 1 was raised in Batanes Group of Islands

  • At 4:00 PM, TY "BUTCHOY" continues to gain strength as it moves Northwest towards Taiwan at 30 k ph

07 July 2016

  • TY "BUCHOY" slowed down to 20 kph and moved in a West Northwest towards Taiwan. TCWS No. 2 was raised in Batanes Group of Islands and TCWS No. 1 was raised to Calayan and Babuyan Group of Islands

  • At 5:00 PM, TY "BUTCHOY" further slowed down at 17 kph as it approaches Taiwan

  • TY "BUTCHOY" enhanced the Southwest Monsoon (Habagat) which brought moderate to occasionally heavy rains over the Provinces of Zambales, Bataan, Cavite, Batangas, Mindoro, and Northern Palawan.

08 July 2016

  • At 4:00 AM, TY "BUTCHOY" weakened with maximum sustained winds of 165 kph and gustiness up to 200 kph while crossing Southern Taiwan

  • TY "BUTCHOY" exited the PAR at 3:00 PM

  • At 5:00 PM, TY "BUTCHOY" crossed Southern Taiwan and continues to move away from the country. Its eye was located based on all available data at 365 km Norhtwest of Itbayat, Batanes with maximum sustained winds of 150 kph near the center and gustiness of up to 185 kph. It is forecast to move West Northwest at 12 kph

  • All Tropical Cyclone Warning Signals issued were lifted

Philippines: DSWD extends aid to families affected by Butchoy

11 July 2016 - 1:25am
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

The Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) continues its relief efforts to affected families in Region III and IV-A even as Typhoon “Butchoy” leaves the Philippine area of responsibility.

DSWD Secretary Judy Taguiwalo asked affected citizens to report their situations on the ground and for those who have not yet received assistance to coordinate with the respective DSWD field offices in their areas and indicate exactly what they need.

“Our thrust is to provide timely and responsive assistance to Filipinos during times of calamities. We can do this through coordinated efforts and communication between the Central Office and the DSWD Field Offices, and the DSWD FOs and the citizenry. We have to work together to ensure that the help people need will reach them as soon as possible,” Taguiwalo said.

As of 7 p.m. of 9 July 2016, a total of 73 families in the province of Bataan and Zambales in Region III and Batangas and Rizal in Regin IV-A are in the 11 evacuation centers while 272 families are outside evacuation centers.

In Region III, the DSWD-FO III provided a total of 200 family food packs in Bataan, 100 of these were distributed to displaced families in Hermosa, Bataan and another 100 food packs were prepositioned to the DSWD Provincial Extension Office (DPEO) in the province.

As part of DSWD’s augmentation support, 60,000 family food packs from its National Resource Operations Center (NROC) are now being delivered to DSWD Field Office III to ensure readiness to respond to any request from the affected LGUs.”

Meanwhile, the DSWD Field Office in Region IV-A has prepositioned 1, 000 family food packs in Rizal and 897 food packs in Batangas. They are also constantly coordinating with response agencies and affected local government units (LGUs) for monitoring and appropriate actions.

In Metro Manila, DSWD FO-NCR monitored flooding in the cities of Mandaluyong, Pasay, Manila, Makati and Quezon City but no affected residential areas were reported and no incidence of evacuation happened.

At present, DSWD disaster teams in all regions are still on standby for possible deployment and assistance in disaster operations.

Philippines: NDRRMC Update: SitRep No. 05 re Preparedness Measures and Effects of Typhoon "Butchoy" (I.N. Nepartak)

10 July 2016 - 1:04am
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

Date 09 July 2016, 6:00 PM

I. Chronology of Events

02 July 2016 - The Low Pressure Area (LPA) over the Marinas Island has developed into a Tropical Depression (TD) and was named "NEPARTAK" (International Name)

03 July 2016 - TD "NEPARTAK" has intensified into a Tropical Storm (TS)

04 July 2016 - At 10:00 AM, TS "NEPARTAK" was estimated at 1,855 km east of Visayas

05 July 2016 - At 11:00 AM, TS "NEPARTAK" further intensified into a Typhoon (TY) - At 2:00 PM, TY "NEPARTAK" entered the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR) and was named "BUTCHOY". It has a maximum sustained winds of 120 kph near the center and gustiness of up to 150 kph, moving Northwest at 30kph

06 July 2016 - TY "BUTCHOY" intensified further at 195 kph maximum sustained winds and gustiness of up to 230 kph as it maintained its speed while moving in a Northwest direction. Tropical Cyclone Warning Signal (TCWS) No. 1 was raised in Batanes Group of Islands
- At 4:00 PM, TY "BUTCHOY" continues to gain strength as it moves Northwest towards Taiwan at 30 k ph

07 July 2016 - TY "BUCHOY" slowed down to 20 kph and moved in a West Northwest towards Taiwan. TCWS No. 2 was raised in Batanes Group of Islands and TCWS No. 1 was raised to Calayan and Babuyan Group of Islands - At 5:00 PM, TY "BUTCHOY" further slowed down at 17 kph as it approaches Taiwan - TY "BUTCHOY" enhanced the Southwest Monsoon (Habagat) which brought moderate to occasionally heavy rains over the Provinces of Zambales, Bataan, Cavite, Batangas, Mindoro, and Northern Palawan.

08 July 2016 - At 4:00 AM, TY "BUTCHOY" weakened with maximum sustained winds of 165 kph and gustiness up to 200 kph while crossing Southern Taiwan - TY "BUTCHCOY" exited the PAR at 3:00 PM - At 5:00 PM, TY "BUTCHOY" crossed Southern Taiwan and continues to move away from the country. Its eye was located based on all available data at 365 km Norhtwest of Itbayat, Batanes with maximum sustained winds of 150 kph near the center and gustiness of up to 185 kph. It is forecast to move West Northwest at 12 kph - All Tropical Cyclone Warning Signals issued were lifted

Philippines: NDRRMC Update: SitRep No. 04 re Preparedness Measures and Effects of Typhoon "Butchoy" (I.N. Nepartak)

9 July 2016 - 1:47am
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

DATE: 08 July 2016, 6:00 PM

I. SITUATION OVERVIEW

At 3:00 PM 08 July 2016, TY "BUTCHOY" exited the Philippine Area of Responsibility.

At 5:00 PM, TY "BUTCHOY" crossed Southern Taiwan and continues to move away from the country. Its eye was located based on all available data at 365 km Northwast of Itbayat, Batanes with maximum sustained winds of 150 kph near the center and gustiness of up to 185 kph. It is forecast to move West Northwest at 12 kmh.

All Tropical Cyclone Warning Signals issued are now lifted.