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Updated: 5 hours 28 min ago

Philippines: Government prepared to take on effects of Typhoon Dodong

13 May 2015 - 7:28am
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

In anticipation of possible calamities in 2015, such as Typhoon Dodong, the National Government allotted P6.71 billion worth of Quick Response Funds (QRFs) under various departments and agencies in the 2015 General Appropriations Act (GAA).

“The Administration’s disaster management strategy is already in place to address Typhoon Dodong, with funds allocated to different frontline agencies under their respective budgets. These funds will enable us to quickly respond—with the appropriate resources and manpower—to the damage caused by the recent typhoon,” Budget Secretary Florencio “Butch” Abad said.

The departments and agencies that have QRFs are the departments of Agriculture, Education, Health, National Defense (including the Office of Civil Defense), Social Welfare and Development, and Transportation and Communications, as well as the National Irrigation Authority (NIA).

These QRFs range from P352.5 million (DND) to P1.325 billion (DSWD). The breakdown is as follows:

World: Getting Textbooks to Every Child in Sub-Saharan Africa: Strategies for Addressing the High Cost and Low Availability Problem

13 May 2015 - 2:20am
Source: World Bank Country: Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cabo Verde, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, India, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Nigeria, Philippines, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, South Africa, Swaziland, Togo, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Viet Nam, World, Zambia

Birger Fredriksen and Sukhdeep Brar
with Michael Trucano

This book offers policy options that can help reduce textbook costs and increase their supply. The book explores, in depth, the cost and financial barriers that restrict textbook availability in schools across much of the region, as well as policies successfully adapted in other countries. The book also provides a thorough assessment of the pros and cons of digital teaching and learning materials and cautions against the assumption that they can immediately replace printed textbooks.

World: Global Emergency Overview Snapshot 6–12 May 2015

12 May 2015 - 11:02am
Source: Assessment Capacities Project Country: Afghanistan, Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guatemala, Guinea, Haiti, Honduras, India, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Kiribati, Lebanon, Liberia, Libya, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Uganda, Ukraine, Vanuatu, World, Yemen

Snapshot 6–12 May 2015

Iraq: Conflict has escalated in a number of locations. In Anbar, fighting has displaced more than 47,000 in Karmah district, and more than 133,000 around Ramadi. Clashes between Islamic State and government forces have intensified around Baiji oil refinery, in Salah al Din.

Nepal: A second earthquake of magnitude 7.3 struck on 12 May. As of 1800 local time, 37 people have been reported killed and 1,129 injured. The earthquake was followed by aftershocks with magnitudes up to 6.3. Major landslides have been reported, further hampering relief efforts.

Niger: 3,300 suspected cases of meningitis recorded as an epidemic is declared in eight districts. Vaccines are reported to be out of stock. 39,700 people have reportedly been displaced from islands on Lake Chad, due to planned military operations against Boko Haram.

South Sudan: Since the beginning of May, up to 100,000 people have been displaced by fighting south of Bentiu, Unity state. Bentiu’s Protection of Civilians (PoC) site, housing 52,900 IDPs, is so close to the fighting that the displaced are seeking safety elsewhere. Fighting in Upper Nile saw 1,500 IDPs arrive at the Malakal PoC site over 22–23 April.

Updated: 12/05/2015. Next update: 19/05/2015

Global Emergency Overview Web Interface

Philippines: Tropical Cyclones NOUL and DOLPHIN - ECHO Daily Map | 12/05/2015

12 May 2015 - 10:51am
Source: European Commission Humanitarian Aid department Country: Guam, Japan, Micronesia (Federated States of), Philippines

Philippines, Japan - Tropical Cyclone NOUL

NOUL (known in the Philippines as DODONG), after having reached the north-eastern tip of Luzon on 10 May, as an intense Typhoon, turned north-east and started weakening. It passed over the Batanes islands (Philippines) and the Japanese islands of Yaeyama and Miyako on 10-11 May, still as a Typhoon, and it reached Okinawa islands late on 11 May, weakened into a Tropical Storm. On 12 May at 00.00 UTC it had max. sustained winds of 110 km/h and its centre was located near Tokunoshima island (Amamai Islands, Japan). Over the next 24 h it is forecast to continue moving north-east, weakening, and it may reach Tokyo on 12 May, as a Tropical Storm. In Japan, as of early 12 May, media reported one home damaged and two people injured in the Amami islands. In the Philippines, according to the latest NDRRMC report, due to the passage of NOUL, two people were killed and 4 500 people were affected in the provinces of Cagayan and Isabela (Cagayan Valley Region).

Federated States of Micronesia, Guam - Tropical Cyclone DOLPHIN

DOLPHIN (previously SEVEN), formed over the northern Pacific Ocean on 6 May and started moving through Pohnpei and Kosrae States (Federated States of Micronesia, FSM). Heavy rainfall and winds affected several islands of these states during its passage with some floods, damaged crops and power outages in Pohnpei island reported by media.

On 12 May, at 0.00 UTC, DOLPHIN was a Tropical Storm, with max. sustained winds of 84 km/h. Over the next 48 h it is forecast to move west towards Guam, intensifying. It is forecast to reach Guam on 15 May, strengthened into a Typhoon. As of 12 May, 3.00 UTC (NOAA), a Tropical Storm Watch is in effect for Fananu in Chuuk State (FSM).

World: Annual Report 2014

12 May 2015 - 9:18am
Source: International Committee of the Red Cross Country: Afghanistan, Algeria, Bangladesh, Burundi, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Guinea, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Liberia, Libya, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Nepal, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Rwanda, Somalia, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Uganda, Ukraine, World

The 2014 Annual report of the ICRC is an account of field activities conducted worldwide. Activities are part of the organization's mandate to protect the lives and dignity of victims of war, and to promote respect for international humanitarian law.

Facts and figures

26.2 million people had access to water and sanitation improved.
Read more on water and shelter.

9.12 million people were provided with basic aid such as food.
Read more on aid distribution.

6.2 million people received health care.
Read more on health. 800,900 detainees were visited.
Read more on visiting detainees.

470,000 calls were made between detainees and families.
Read more on restoring family links.

Japan: Typhoon Noul in Japan after deadly Philippines hit

12 May 2015 - 6:53am
Source: Agence France-Presse Country: Japan, Philippines

Japan | 03:07 GMT

Powerful Typhoon Noul crashed into the southern Japanese island chain of Okinawa Tuesday, after killing two people in the Philippines, bringing surging waves and howling winds as it headed towards the mainland.

Heavy rain and gale-force gusts were lashing a wide swathe of the archipelago, television footage showed, as pedestrians struggled with their umbrellas and scurried for shelter.

Some crops were damaged and a number of buildings affected by the wind.

The Japan Meteorological Agency said Noul, the first typhoon of the season to hit Japan, would work its way northwest towards the main island of Honshu later in the day.

Forecasters warned of gusts up to 180 kilometres (110 miles) per hour and said there was a danger of high waves, thunderstorms, flood and gales in much of the country.

It was expected to be near Tokyo overnight.

The storm killed two people as it scraped over the Philippines' northeastern tip, according to authorities, who said Monday that the evacuation of coastal villages and volcanic slopes averted a higher toll.

It later skirted the coast of Taiwan, after 1,000 tourists were evacuated from the scenic Green island in the southeast in anticipation of the storm.

kh/hg/jom

World: Disaster and Crisis Management – Annual report 2014 MAA00040

12 May 2015 - 6:46am
Source: International Federation of Red Cross And Red Crescent Societies Country: Guinea, Iraq, Liberia, Niger, Philippines, Sierra Leone, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, World

Period covered: January-December 2014

Overview -- DCM mission and core functions

The Disaster and Crisis Management (DCM) department’s mission is to ensure that a well functioning, relevant global disaster management system is in place to address the needs of communities who are vulnerable to or affected by disasters and crises. DCM is part of a global disaster management team guided by the following key strategic priorities:

  • Providing leadership for the development of global disaster and crises management policies, strategies and programming approaches to reflect the changing humanitarian environment and the growing capacities of National Societies to coordinate and deliver humanitarian assistance.

  • Developing and disseminating global disaster response guidance and procedures that clarify roles and responsibilities, set standards and help the IFRC to measure efficiency, effectiveness and the impact of operations.

  • Strengthening IFRC-wide response tools and capacities for disaster and crises including in the areas of response preparedness and contingency planning, disaster needs assessment, relief to recovery planning, the scaled-up use of cash in emergencies; global surge capacity systems and tools development and improving the timeliness and quality of Emergency Appeal and Disaster Relief Emergency Fund (DREF)-supported1 operations.

Within these key priorities, DCM delivers the following core functions:
- Conceptual leadership and remote and field-based technical support for response preparedness, relief and recovery programming globally.
- Quality assurance and approval of all DREF proposals and Emergency Appeals.
- Real time evaluations (RTE’s) of all major operations.
- Immediate mobilization of global surge capacity / disaster response tool upon request.
- Reliable disaster management information systems and maps.
- Facilitating global coordination and representation on disaster and crises management with Movement and non-Movement partners.

As part of an effective global disaster management team, DCM strives to continuously improve communications and collaboration between the department and DM colleagues at Zone, regional and country levels; regularly deploys to operations to provide surge capacity where needed, to ensure that disaster and crises operations are appropriately led and strategized and that humanitarian standards are adhered to.

Syrian Arab Republic: Disaster and Crisis Management – Annual report 2014 MAA00040

12 May 2015 - 6:46am
Source: International Federation of Red Cross And Red Crescent Societies Country: Guinea, Iraq, Liberia, Niger, Philippines, Sierra Leone, Syrian Arab Republic

Period covered: January-December 2014

Overview -- DCM mission and core functions

The Disaster and Crisis Management (DCM) department’s mission is to ensure that a well functioning, relevant global disaster management system is in place to address the needs of communities who are vulnerable to or affected by disasters and crises. DCM is part of a global disaster management team guided by the following key strategic priorities:

  • Providing leadership for the development of global disaster and crises management policies, strategies and programming approaches to reflect the changing humanitarian environment and the growing capacities of National Societies to coordinate and deliver humanitarian assistance.

  • Developing and disseminating global disaster response guidance and procedures that clarify roles and responsibilities, set standards and help the IFRC to measure efficiency, effectiveness and the impact of operations.

  • Strengthening IFRC-wide response tools and capacities for disaster and crises including in the areas of response preparedness and contingency planning, disaster needs assessment, relief to recovery planning, the scaled-up use of cash in emergencies; global surge capacity systems and tools development and improving the timeliness and quality of Emergency Appeal and Disaster Relief Emergency Fund (DREF)-supported1 operations.

Within these key priorities, DCM delivers the following core functions:
- Conceptual leadership and remote and field-based technical support for response preparedness, relief and recovery programming globally.
- Quality assurance and approval of all DREF proposals and Emergency Appeals.
- Real time evaluations (RTE’s) of all major operations.
- Immediate mobilization of global surge capacity / disaster response tool upon request.
- Reliable disaster management information systems and maps.
- Facilitating global coordination and representation on disaster and crises management with Movement and non-Movement partners.

As part of an effective global disaster management team, DCM strives to continuously improve communications and collaboration between the department and DM colleagues at Zone, regional and country levels; regularly deploys to operations to provide surge capacity where needed, to ensure that disaster and crises operations are appropriately led and strategized and that humanitarian standards are adhered to.

World: Bringing drones down to earth

12 May 2015 - 5:38am
Source: IRIN Country: Nepal, Philippines, Vanuatu, World

By Caterina Pino and Obinna Anyadike

KATHMANDU, 12 May 2015 (IRIN) - Disaster coverage now seems incomplete without amazing drone footage of the damage, accompanied by effusive media reports on the technological wizardry of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and their humanitarian application. But is that really the story? Here’s a look at how far their use has evolved and what is still needed for them to fulfill their potential.

Right tool for the job?

The advantage of UAVs is that they are a fraction of the cost of manned aircraft and the smallest can fit into the hand luggage of a humanitarian response team. They provide very high resolution imagery and can carry an array of sensors. “They provide extra information in the phase where you need a quick overview,” explained Arjan Stam, overall leader of international Urban Search-and-Rescue units in Nepal.

But misconceptions remain, including within the humanitarian community, over what UAVs can achieve. “People who have not seen UAVs often think of the military versions that can fly a long way and carry heavy payloads,” said Andrej Verity of the UN’s Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA).

Commonly used micro-UAVs, like the quadcopter DJI Phantom, has a flight time of under 25 minutes and doesn’t fly in high winds and bad weather. There are larger, more capable UAVs, but drones are far from always the answer. In many circumstances old-fashioned helicopters, manned aircraft and people doing assessments on foot are better options.

“If we prioritise using the cool new toys instead of choosing the collection platform that meets needs and constraints, we risk being less useful than we could be and probably slower,” said John Crowley of UN Global Pulse. “[UAVs] can be amazing assets when they fit into a larger system that makes it safe, secure and legal to use them – [that requires] trained people, clear policies, and established protocols.”

UAVs in disaster response are largely privately operated. There are currently 10 UAV teams in Nepal, from Canada’s Global Medic to California-based Team Rubicon, whose philanthropic partner is US intelligence-linked data mining firm Palantir. Encouraging adherence to standard operating procedures and maximising the humanitarian value of these diverse teams has historically proven a challenge.

Coordination conundrum

“Disaster responders in an emergency are generally too overwhelmed to lead on innovative methods,” Crowley told IRIN. “A disaster is rarely the time to introduce unfamiliar tools with lots of elements that require coordinated action between several organisations.”

Keeping on the right side of the law can be the first challenge. While some countries have UAV legislation in place to cover safety, privacy, national security and insurance liability, many do not. Where no regulations exists, UAV flights are either cleared with national authorities on an ad-hoc emergency basis, or are flown without permission – a reality that has a host of implications.

Then there is the glaring gap in the humanitarian response structure to facilitate UAV use. OCHA serves as the secretariat for critical coordination mechanisms like the Inter-Agency Standing Committee and the UN’s rapid-response Disaster Assessment and Coordination system and International Search and Rescue Advisory Group. But it has no formal oversight role as far as UAV operations are concerned, and has been cautious in claiming a mandate.

Who can we talk to?

In the Philippines, during Cyclone Haiyan in 2013, there was little coordination or clarity over how UAVs were to be used. OCHA then worked with the authorities on recognizing the value of UAVs and including them in national disaster response plans. But in 2014, when Cyclone Hagupit arrived, there was only an ad-hoc link between UAV operators, the humanitarian community and the government.

In the wake of Cyclone Pam that tore through the Pacific islands of Vanuatu earlier this year, a World Bank project used the volunteer Humanitarian UAV Network (UAViators) to provide damage assessment imagery. There was better engagement with the government and military on basics like flight path clearance and notification to local communities, but the arrangement was still informal.

In Nepal, UAViators has taken the lead in engaging with the civil aviation authorities and the police, but it lacks institutional clout. For drones to be better established, the founder of UAViators, Patrick Meier, argues what is required is “strong backing or leadership from an established humanitarian organisation that is able and willing to mediate with appropriate ministries.”

In a Skype conversation with IRIN, he added: “The UN has not designated a formal focal point for UAV flights who can serve as liaison with [government]…. This is a big problem, as UAV teams need formal letters confirming that they are part of the humanitarian response. Also, we need this focal point to serve as initial liaison with ATC [air traffic control] and the military. In sum: [it is a] major institutional gap here.”

But in a disaster, where aid agencies and government officials are scrambling to respond and capacity is stretched so thin, should the appointment of a focal person to work with UAV operators always be a priority?

Sharing is caring

The purpose of UAV imagery is to help better shape the humanitarian response.

To get proper value out of UAVs “we need to make sure that we’re as clear as possible on where imagery needs are greatest, where the gaps in coverage may be, and how those imagery needs are going to be connected directly with practical relief efforts,” Andrew Schroeder, director of research and analysis at Direct Relief, a medical aid charity, told IRIN.

“We need an easy way for people and organisations to express where and why they need imagery so that priorities can be established quickly and those with skills and access to the technology can be appropriately tasked. We need to make sure that we’re sharing data effectively and adhering to open standards,” said Schroeder, also chair of the UAV working group at Nethope, an NGO consortium. But the reality is that people can be averse to sharing. This can be due to legal and political considerations, with some humanitarian organisations leery of associating too closely with private UAV teams, or data hoarding by the drone operators.

Data is power

“Some UAV teams have not (yet) expressed an interest in sharing their imagery. Some have not provided information about where they’re flying,” Skyped Meier. “Of course, they are incredibly busy. And besides, they are not required to share.… [W]ithout strong public backing from established humanitarian groups, there is little the network can do.”

“Data is power, and people perceive it that way,” said Nama Budhathoki, the head of Kathmandu Living Labs. His team of volunteers is working with OpenStreetMap, a crowd-sourced geographic information system (GIS), to map the impact of the Nepal quake.

A significant impediment to working with UAV imagery is the size of the data files, which in the case of a country like Nepal, with low internet bandwidth, impacts on the speed with which data can be analysed.

“Aerial imagery typically constitute large files, which means they take longer to upload, and with unreliable or low bandwidth it can take multiple repeat attempts to upload just one mosaic [GIS maps are composed of a multitude of data mosaics],” said Meier.

“Figuring out file transfers from the field… this is a huge problem… and getting it out of disaster zones is really not easy. We need to treat the logistics for this as seriously as the damage assessment,” Robert Banick, a GIS expert at the Assessment Capacities Project, told IRIN.

Build local capacity

“I think we’re so excited about the possibilities of UAVs and so challenged by making it work that we’re not giving full attention to the data analysis,” he added.

Kathmandu Living Labs is trying to reduce the dependence on external analysis by using local mappers, who have the additional advantage of a “better sense of location and geography,” said Budhathoki.

His goal is not only to build sustainability in GIS, but also to develop a local “UAV capacity with Nepal.” It’s a project that Meier and UAViators are collaborating on.

Reducing the need for external assistance by assisting national authorities and local NGOs build their capacity in high disaster risk countries like Nepal would be a step forward.

cp-oa/bp/ag

Philippines: Philippines: Typhoon Noul – Information Bulletin n° 2

12 May 2015 - 5:07am
Source: International Federation of Red Cross And Red Crescent Societies Country: Philippines

This bulletin is being issued for information only, and reflects the current situation and details available at this time. The Philippine Red Cross (PRC) is not seeking funding or other assistance from donors at this time.

The situation

Typhoon Noul (locally named Dodong) has exited the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR) on 12 May 2015 and is currently heading towards Japan having weakened significantly to a Category 1 cyclone. The typhoon had brushed the north-eastern tip of Luzon after making landfall over Pananapan Point, Sta. Ana Municipality, Cagayan province in the late afternoon of 10 May 2015 as a Category 4 cyclone. From there, it tracked north-northwest, passing through the Batanes group of islands before heading outside of PAR. Consequently, all public storm warning signals have been lifted.

The National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC) reports that humanitarian impact of the typhoon has been minimal. The number of confirmed casualties is two; family members who were electrocuted while repairing the roof of their house in the Aparri municipality of Cagayan Province. Pre-emptive evacuation efforts of the authorities helped get 1,029 families (3,803 people) out of harm’s way in the provinces of Cagayan and Isabela where 20 evacuation centres were operational. The evacuees have all returned home following the lifting of all public storm warning signals.
Overall, damage to houses, infrastructure and livelihoods has been minimal. Although some 350 houses are reported to have sustained partial damage in Sta. Ana Municipality, Cagayan Province – which was directly hit by the typhoon – there were no people in the houses at the time of impact. With regard to livelihoods, some minor losses of ready-to-harvest paddy, corn and watermelon have been reported in the municipality.

At the moment, clearing of roads, debris and toppled power or communication lines is underway alongside assessments to ascertain the exact extent of impact. By large, however, residents are glad that the rains brought by the typhoon have provided relief from a prolonged dry spell.

Philippines: NDRRMC Update: SitRep No. 08 re Preparedness Measures and Effects for Typhoon "DODONG" (NOUL)

12 May 2015 - 2:58am
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

I. SITUATION OVERVIEW

Typhoon "DODONG" has further weakened as it moves Northeastward.

At 4:00 PM, the center of Typhoon "Dodong" was located based on Basco doppler radar and all available data at 220 km Northeast of Basco, Batanes (22.3°N, 122.7°E) with maximum sustained winds of 140 kph near the center and gustiness of up to 170 kph. It is forecasted to move Northeast at 30 kph.

Philippines: NDRRMC Update: SitRep No. 07 re Preparedness Measures for Mt. Bulusan

12 May 2015 - 2:50am
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

I. SITUATION OVERVIEW

Alert Level Status

a) Alert Level 1 (Abnormal) remains in effect over Bulusan Volcano. This indicates that hydrothermal processes may be underway beneath the volcano that may lead to more steam-driven eruptions.

Philippines: Nueva Vizcaya PLGU to fund flood control, dredging, bridge repair projects

11 May 2015 - 10:35pm
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

BAYOMBONG, Nueva Vizcaya, May 10 (PIA) - - The provincial government here is expected to pour in funds for the implementation of various flood control projects, waterways dredging and construction and improvement of bridges in the province.

A total of P14.5 million fund has been recommended by the provincial government’s Local Finance Committee (LFC) for governor Ruth Padilla’s approval.

Evaliza Agamata, provincial disaster risk reduction and management coordinator, said this will be included in the budget of the Provincial Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Office (PDRRMO) under the Local Expenditure Program (LEP) for 2015. The funding will be sourced out from the Special Trust Fund (STF).

“This will further improve our disaster preparedness and mitigation programs against flashfloods and landslides,” she said.

The P14.5 million fund will cover the implementation of flood control projects along the Bambang town-barangay Salinas-barangay Pingkian Road in Kayapa town; Salinas-Tabla section in Bambang town; barangay Barat-barangay San Leonardo section in Bambang town and the barangay Comon-barangay Sta. Clara-barangay Canabuan road in Aritao town.

It will also fund the dredging of waterways along the Sta. Cruz river in Bambang town through the Barat-San Leonardo and Salinas sections’ Bintawan creek in Villaverde town through the Calaoagan-Capiddigan section and the construction and improvement of bridges such as the Wangwang bridge in Ambaguio and the San Antonio bridge in Bambang town. (ALM/BME/PIA 2-Nueva Vizcaya)

Philippines: Measles cases in WV up

11 May 2015 - 10:27pm
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

NEGROS OCCIDENTAL, May 8 (PIA6) – A total of 399 laboratory confirmed measles cases were recorded in 2014, one hundred forty-one cases more compared to the previous year, data from the Department of Health (DOH6) showed.

Dr. Renilyn Reyes, Medical Specialist II, said there were measles outbreaks in the provinces of Iloilo, Capiz and Negros Occidental in 2014, which contributed to the sudden increase of measles cases from 2013.

Out of the 399 laboratory confirmed cases, Iloilo had the most number of cases with 145, followed by Capiz with 81 cases and Negros Occidental with 64 cases.

Rounding out the figure are Antique and Guimaras with 29 cases each, Iloilo City with 23, Aklan with 18 and Bacolod City with 9.

In Negros Occidental, the number of measles cases ballooned to 64 from a measly 9 cases in 2013.

Only 1 fatality was recorded in 2014 based on the DOH’s data. A 2 year-old child from Antique died because of complications due to measles.

“People in Western Visayas are susceptible to measles because the immunization coverage is low,” Reyes said.

The main reason why people are infected with measles is because they were not vaccinated, she added.

Reyes urged the public to be vaccinated against measles because the vaccines are free.

“These vaccines are free and they can combat measles safely and effectively,” she said.

The DOH is aiming to immunize 95% of the children in public schools to lower the chances of measles outbreaks.

Meanwhile, the DOH is set to conduct a school-based immunization in August in all government schools and select private schools.

Some of the vaccines that will be given are pneumococcal conjugate vaccines, inactivated polio vaccines, tetanus diphtheria vaccines and human papilloma virus vaccines.

Around two million school children in Western Visayas will be given free vaccines. (JCM/CBA-PIA Negros Occ.)

Philippines: NDRRMC Update: SitRep No. 08 re Preparedness Measures and Effects for Typhoon "DODONG" (NOUL)

11 May 2015 - 1:39pm
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

I. SITUATION OVERVIEW

Typhoon "DODONG" has further weakened and accelarated as it moves Northeastward.

Philippines: 14 evacuation centers still open for ‘Dodong’ evacuees

11 May 2015 - 7:26am
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

A total of 1,025 families or 3,744 persons from 36 barangays in Cagayan Valley and Isabela have been affected by Typhoon Dodong and sought temporary shelter in 27 evacuation centers set up in the two provinces.

As of 2 am today, only 14 evacuation centers remain open in the two hardest hit provinces and continue providing temporary shelter to 607 families or 2,159 persons. The families who have evacuated at the height of the typhoon have been allowed to return to their homes after their communities have been declared safe.

The evacuation centers which remain open are located in the towns of Aparri, Calayan, Gonzaga, and Sta. Ana in Cagayan; and in Benito Soliven and Divilacan in Isabela.

Social workers from DSWD-Field Office II are assisting local government units (LGUs) in managing the evacuation centers. Aside from the provision of food packs and hot meals at the evacuation centers, there are also available facilities for the evacuees such as family tents, multi-purpose tents, portalets, water containers, water treatment plants, and transformers.

At the same time, some 95 families or 425 persons who opted to stay in their relatives’ or friends’ houses are also being provided with family food packs.

Disaster teams from DSWD-Field Office II continue to coordinate with concerned LGUs to further assess the extent of the typhoon and to provide resource and personnel augmentation, when needed.

Nepal: PH Crisis Management Teams distribute relief goods to Filipinos in Nepal

11 May 2015 - 7:20am
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Nepal, Philippines

Two Crisis Management Teams (CMT) of the Philippine Embassy in New Delhi distributed relief goods to 90 Filipino families at the compound of the Philippine Honorary Consulate General in Kathmandu today.

CMT-2, composed of Chargé d’Affaires Maria Agnes Cervantes and Attaché Ms. Jeanette Ramos arrived early this morning with additional items, which included water purification tablets, to support the relief effort. CMT-1 On-scene commander, Consul Fernando V. Beup, Jr, supervised the distribution.

The items included rice, noodles, cheese and much needed bottled water. Blankets, medicines and several tarpaulins were also handed out. Another Nepali NGO also contributed bottled water and medicine.

Kababayans in the Philippines who have not heard from their relatives in Nepal are invited to leave the name, address and contact details of the missing individuals on the Facebook Information Page of the Embassy. The Embassy will do its utmost to contact them.

Families in the Philippines may also contact the Office of the Undersecretary for Migrant Workers’ Affairs (OUMWA) through 0917-5693073 or (02) 871-4503 to inquire about their relatives in Nepal or to provide information as to their relatives’ status and whereabouts.

The Embassy will continue to publish updates as developments arise.

Nepal: Asia and the Pacific: Weekly Regional Humanitarian Snapshot (5 - 11 May 2015)

11 May 2015 - 7:00am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Bangladesh, Indonesia, Micronesia (Federated States of), Myanmar, Nepal, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Thailand, Vanuatu

NEPAL

Emergency shelter remains the top response priority, especially with the imminent monsoon rains. Other priority needs include sanitation and hygiene support, household items, medical kits and supplies, food and protection.
To date, 70,000 tarpaulins and nearly 6,000 tents were distributed; nearly 370,000 people received food; more than 345,000 people were provided with safe drinking water and more than 250,000 people with hygiene support.

70,000 tarpaulins delivered

370,000 people received food

The topography challenge is being resolved by enhancing aid delivery methods. Teams of responders were dispatched to cover the affected areas on foot and relief goods are being dropped off at strategic locations.

THAILAND

Authorities and media reported that more than 30 bodies had been found in smugglers’ camps in the southern province of Songkhla, close to the border with Malaysia. The dead were said to be people originating from Myanmar and Bangladesh. Thai police are investigating.

MYANMAR AND BANGLADESH

A UNHCR periodic report released on 8 May estimates that some 25,000 Rohingya and Bangladeshis boarded smugglers’ boats between January and March in 2015 – almost double the number over the same period in 2014.

PAPUA NEW GUINEA

A 7.4 magnitude earthquake struck on 5 May off Kokopo, New Britain province. This caused the collapse of electricity distribution lines, cracks in some walls and the partial collapse of a bridge. A surge wave of less than one meter was observed. On 7 May, a 7.1 magnitude earthquake stuck 144 km off Paguna,
Bougainville. No damage or injuries were reported. Over 33 earthquakes were recorded in past weeks.

PHILIPPINES

Typhoon Noul made landfall on10 May at Santa Ana, Caguyan Province, Northern Luzon with wind speeds of 185 kph and gusts up to 220 kph according to the Philippines Atmospheric,
Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration. The Department of Social Welfare and Development reports over 1,850 people affected in Region II, with over 1,580 people inside 19 evacuation centres and the remainder with host communities. As of 11 May two casualties and minimal damage was reported. The typhoon is expected to leave the Philippines Area of Responsibility late on 11 May and head towards Taiwan and Japan.

1,850 people affected

INDONESIA

Heavy rainfall caused two landslides in West Java and East Java on 6 May. In West Java the landslide resulted in five deaths and eight injuries.
Four people are still missing and search and rescue operations are ongoing. Eight houses were damaged and a natural gas pipeline was damaged. The local disaster authorities, police and community volunteers are supporting recovery operations and searching for missing people. Local disaster management authorities are leading the response.

5 people killed

WEST PACIFIC

On 10 May, Tropical Storm Dolphin passed 230 km east of Pohnpei island, Federated States of Micronesia (FSM), travelling at a speed of around 70 kmh. Initial reports indicate the storm caused some flooding and damage to crops. The FSM National Disaster Management Office commenced assessments on 11 May. Dolphin is forecast to move west-northwest towards Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands and is likely to intensify as it moves west.

Philippines: NDRRMC Update: SitRep No. 06 re Preparedness Measures for Mt. Bulusan

11 May 2015 - 6:40am
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

I. SITUATION OVERVIEW

Alert Level Status

a) Alert Level 1 (Abnormal) remains in effect over Bulusan Volcano. This indicates that hydrothermal processes may be underway beneath the volcano that may lead to more steam-driven eruptions.

Philippines: Philippines: Flash Update No 2 - Typhoon Noul (Dodong) - Final, 11 May 2015

11 May 2015 - 6:30am
Source: Association of Southeast Asian Nations Country: Philippines

PHILIPPINES. Tropical Cyclone NOUL (Typhoon 'Dodong') has made its landfall yesterday 10th of May 2015 at 5:00 pm (local time) in Isabela - Cagayan Province. Dodong is gradually weaken with 140 km/h wind speed and moving forward to Taiwan and Japan. It is estimated to exit the Philippines area by Tuesday morning, May 12th.

Initial impact report:

Based on NDRRMC, no significant impact has been reported so far (SitRep No.07). The Province of Isabela also reported no damage and casualties within its area. Pre-emptive evacuation, which moved 3,800 people in Cagayan and Isabella, has significantly contributed to the low casualty number. In terms of lifeline and infrastructure, all road and bridges are passable to all types of vehicle. Nevertheless, electricity was disrupted and several flights cancelled due to the typhoon. 2 people reported died due to electrocution.

Based on the information from the Armed Forces of Philippines in Sta. Ana, Gonzaga and Appari (Cagayan Province), evacuees have started to return to their homes and several houses were destroyed in Sta. Ana. Casualties were reported in Aparri.