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Philippines: Philippines - Tropical Cyclone TOKAGE (GDACS, PAGASA, NDRRMC, JTWC, Local media) (ECHO Daily Flash of 25 November 2016)

25 November 2016 - 7:04am
Source: European Commission's Directorate-General for European Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations Country: Philippines
  • A new Tropical Cyclone named TOKAGE (locally named "MARCE") formed close to the island of Leyte, on 24 November and then started moving west north-west passing over Central and Western Visayas Region. On 25 November at 0.00 UTC its center was located over land, approx. 23 km south-east from Banga city (Aklan province, Western Visayas Region) and it had max. sustained wind speed of km/h 65 km/h (Tropical Storm).

  • Over the next 24 h it is forecast to continue moving northwest, over Mimaropa Region and over the South China Sea, as a Tropical Storm. Heavy rain and strong winds may affect the areas along its path. As of 25 November early morning (UTC), the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) has issued Tropical Cyclone Warning Signals (TCWS) 2# for the regions of southern Luzon and western Visayas regions.

Philippines: Philippines: Annex I: Cluster Operational Delivery Plans - National Child Protection Working Group (NCPWG)

25 November 2016 - 4:45am
Source: UN Children's Fund, UN High Commissioner for Refugees, Protection Cluster Country: Philippines

Response & Operational Capacity

The Child Protection Working Group (CPWG), a sub-cluster within the Protection Cluster, provides coordination support to government offices from the national to municipal levels in ensuring prevention of and response to child protection concerns in humanitarian settings. The group brings together NGOs, UN agencies, academics and others under the shared objective of ensuring more predictable, accountable and effective child protection responses in emergencies. In the humanitarian system, we constitute ‘an area of responsibility’ within the Global Protection Cluster.The efficient management or functioning of National CPWG is the joint responsibility of the cluster lead agencies (CWC and UNICEF), and all cluster members at the national level. Sub-national CPWGs were established on the basis of Regional SubCommittee on the Welfare of Children (RSCWC)’s expanded function to include CPWG coordination.

As of August 2016 cluster resource mapping, The National Child Protection Working Group (NCPWG) has presence in the all five of the five affected regions, specifically in 10 of the 17 affected provinces. Supportive of strategic objective 5 for “Affected people quickly regain access to community and local government services, including basic education and a strengthened protective environment”, the sub-cluster is ready to provide:

  1. Facilitate the identification, documentation, family tracing and reunification (FTR) of missing, separated and unaccompanied children;

  2. Psychosocial support to affected children and families; including setting up of Child Friendly Spaces, Community Based Child Protection Networks (CBCPN), and other forms of community based interventions;

  3. Scale up advocacy, communications and awareness raising activities around prevention and response to abuse, exploitation, violence and neglect, including gender based violence (GBV) in the areas affected by the emergency; and

  4. Provide a snapshot of urgent child protection related needs among the affected population within the immediate aftermath of the emergency as a stepping-stone for a more comprehensive process of assessing the impacts of the emergency on children, as well as situation monitoring, through the use of the Child Protection Rapid Assessment (CPRA).

Philippines: Philippines: Tropical Storm Tokage (Marce) Update as of 25 November 2016

25 November 2016 - 2:35am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Philippines

Tropical Depression 29W has intensified into Tropical Storm Tokage (Marce) with 62-88 km/h wind speed range as it moves toward Calamian Group of Islands. It is expected to move in a westerly to west-northwesterly track at a speed of 22 km/hr towards the South China Sea with moderate to heavy rains within the 300 kilometer diameter of the storm.

Philippines: Flash Alert: Tropical Storm Tokage (Marce), Philippines, 25 November 2016

25 November 2016 - 12:22am
Source: Association of Southeast Asian Nations Country: Philippines

Tropical Storm (TS) TOKAGE or MARCE (local name), which developed since 23 November 2016 in east of Hinatuan, Surigao del Sur, has gained its strength and continued to move West Northwest traversing Visayas with wind speed peaking up to 102 kph. TS TOKAGE is expected to leave the Philippines area by Sunday afternoon, 27 November 2016.

As of today, Tropical Cyclone Warning Signal (TCWS) Level 2 is issued for Romblon, Calamian islands, Occidental Mondoro, Southern Oriental Mindoro, Iloilo, Capiz, Aklan and Northern Antique. Meanwhile, TCWS Level 1 is issued for Nothern Palawan, rest of Oriental Mindoro, rest of Occidental Mindoro, Biliran, Leyte, Nothern Ceby, Negros Occidental and rest of Antiques and Guimaras.

Residents of areas under TCWS and the rest of Bicol Region, Provinces of Marinduque and Quezon are alerted against possible flashflood and landslides.

Philippines: NDRRMC Update Sitrep No. 01 re Preparedness Measures for Tropical Depression Marce

24 November 2016 - 4:48pm
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

I. SITUATION OVERVIEW

23 October 2016

The LPA east of Mindanao has developed into a Tropical Depression (TD) and was named "MARCE" with maximum sustained winds of up to 45 kph near the center and gustiness of up to 55 kph. It is forecasted to move West Northwest at 17 kph. Tropical Cyclone Warning Signal (TCWS) No. 1 is hoisted over Southern Leyte, Bohol, Siquijor, Surigao del Norte, Surigao del Sur, Dinagat Island, Agusan del Norte, Agusan del Sur, Misamis Oriental and Camiguin.

24 October 2016

At around 5:00 PM, TD "MARCE" HAS MADE LANDFALL OVER SIARGAO ISLAND, SURIGAO DEL NORTE.

TCWS No. 1 is hoisted aver Romblon, Cuyo Island, Calamian Group and Oriental Mindoro, Occidental Mindoro and Masbate, Biliran, Southern part of Samar, Southern part of eastern Samar, Leyte, Southern Leyte, Bohol, Cebu including Bantayan and Camotes Islands, Siquijor, Negros Oriental, Negros Occidental, Iloilo, Capiz, Aklan, Antique, Guimaras, Surigao del Node including Siargao Island, Surigao del Sur, Dinagat Islands, Agusan del Norte, Agusan del Sur, Misamis Oriental and Camiguin.

World: Zika virus, Microcephaly and Guillain-Barré syndrome Situation Report, 24 November 2016

24 November 2016 - 11:36am
Source: World Health Organization Country: American Samoa, Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Aruba (The Netherlands), Bahamas, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belize, Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Bonaire, Saint Eustatius and Saba (The Netherlands), Brazil, British Virgin Islands, Cambodia, Cayman Islands, Chile, Colombia, Cook Islands, Costa Rica, Cuba, Curaçao (The Netherlands), Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Fiji, French Guiana (France), French Polynesia (France), Gabon, Grenada, Guadeloupe (France), Guatemala, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Indonesia, Jamaica, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Malaysia, Maldives, Marshall Islands, Martinique (France), Mexico, Micronesia (Federated States of), New Caledonia (France), Nicaragua, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Puerto Rico (The United States of America), Saint Barthélemy (France), Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Martin (France), Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Singapore, Sint Maarten (The Netherlands), Solomon Islands, Suriname, Thailand, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Turks and Caicos Islands, United States of America, United States Virgin Islands, Vanuatu, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), Viet Nam, World

KEY UPDATES

  • Countries and territories reporting mosquito-borne Zika virus infections for the first time in the past week: o None
  • Countries and territories reporting microcephaly and other central nervous system (CNS) malformations potentially associated with Zika virus infection for the first time in the past week: o None
  • Countries and territories reporting Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) cases associated with Zika virus infection for the first time in the past week: o None
  • The fifth meeting of the Emergency Committee (EC) on Zika virus, microcephaly and other neurological disorders was held on 18 November 2016.1 The Director-General accepted the recommendations of the EC and declared the end of the Public Health Emergency of International Concern (PHEIC). However, Zika virus and associated consequences remains a significant enduring public health challenge. Research has demonstrated the link between Zika virus infection and microcephaly, furthering the need for a robust technical mechanism to manage the global response and research agenda.2, 3 The coordination and response to Zika virus is being escalated into a sustained programme of work with dedicated resources to address the long-term nature of the disease and its consequences. Recommendations from previous EC meetings will remain in place for three months while WHO implements the transition plan to shift activities into a longer-term programme. Building on established mechanisms and guided by the Zika Strategic Response Plan, WHO continues to coordinate and support more than 60 partners in the areas of detection, prevention, care and support, and research to strengthen preparedness and response in countries and territories where the Aedes mosquitoes are established.

Philippines: China donates P35 million to DSWD for recovery efforts in calamity-stricken area

24 November 2016 - 7:56am
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: China, Philippines

The People’s Republic of China turned over on Tuesday an additional cash donation worth P35,000,000 to the Philippines through the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) to help fund recovery and rehabilitation efforts of the Department for calamity-affected communities. China has earlier donated P60,000,000 on November 7 to help the affected families of Typhoon Lawin which struck the northern part of Luzon last month.

In a simple turnover ceremony at the DSWD Central Office in Batasan, Quezon City, DSWD Secretary Judy M. Taguiwalo received the cash donation from Honorable He Xiangqi, Charge d’ Affaires of the Embassy of China in the Philippines.

Also present during the ceremonial turnover were DSWD Undersecretary Mateo G. Montaño, Director Felino O. Castro V, and Undersecretary Mae Fe Ancheta-Templa.

In her message, Sec. Taguiwalo stressed the importance of international solidarity. “As we continue to assess the damage brought by the typhoon, further assistance is needed for the recovery and rehabilitation of the typhoon victims. Every help we can get locally and internationally is welcome as long as no conditions are attached and based on what we need,” she said. “I would like to thank the Chinese people and its government for being responsive to the Filipino people’s needs especially in times of crisis. This solidarity reflects the type of development China pursues. I am confident that both the Philippines and China share the same ideals for humanity,” Sec. Taguiwalo added.

For her part, Hon. He Xiangqi said that the Philippines has also extended its help to China. “We can never forget that when China was hit by a great disaster, the Philippines offered support spiritually and materially. And by doing so, China also wishes to demonstrate that we are old neighbors, old brothers, and friends in need,” she added.

From March 20, 2006 to November 7, 2016, the People’s Republic of China donated a total of P67,959,000 for calamity-affected communities in the Philippines and another $105,190 to aid in the country’s disaster relief efforts.

The Philippines also received in-kind donations from China amounting to P88,660,958.45 consisting of motor vehicles, housing materials, generators and various relief items.

According to Sec. Taguiwalo, the donations will go a long way in serving the people of the Philippines. She also said that serving the people is one of the main concerns of President Rodrigo Duterte. “On behalf of the Filipino people, I would like to thank all the organizations, individuals, and institutions that have donated funds for the recovery and rehabilitation of our calamity-affected communities. Long live international solidarity!” she ended. ###

Philippines: Philippines: Caraganons prepare for TD Marce

24 November 2016 - 2:44am
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

BUTUAN CITY, Nov. 24 (PIA) – The Caraganons are taking precautionary measures as Tropical Depression (TD) Marce is expected to make landfall over Surigao del Norte this afternoon or early evening today, as per report from PAGASA Butuan chief meteorological officer Lolita Vinalay during the Regional Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (RDRRMC) meeting tthis morning.

The local government units in the provinces of Agusan del Norte, Agusan del Sur, Surigao del Norte, Surigao del Sur, Dinagat Island have declared suspension of classes today.

The Civil Aviation Authority of the Philippines (CAAP) here also reported that no cancelled flight is so far advised at the Bancasi Airport, as of 8:00 a.m today.

Agusan del Norte Provincial Disaster Risk Reduction and Management (PDRRM) Officer Erma Suyo bared that classes in kindergarten are now suspended. However, all LDRRMCs are advised to suspend elementary and high school classes if their area of responsibility (AOR) is under threat of flooding and possible landslides.

Venturing out in the sea is also strictly prohibited. Agusan del Sur PDRRMO Roberto Natividad also underlined that local residents in the different LGUs of the province especially those residing near riverbanks and prone to flash flood areas were advised to take precautionary measures as the province continues to experience light to moderate rains due to TD Marce.

Provincial Social Welfare and Development Officer PSWDO Razel Montemor of Agusan del Sur added that the LGUs of the province were already warned about TD Marce and alerted the members of the Response Cluster. She also emphasized that they have prepositioned family relief packs for possible augmentation to LGUs.

Also, since last night, November 23, 2016, the Philippine Coast Guard (PCG) in Surigao del Nofte has already cancelled all trips going to Cebu, Liloan and Benit, Southern Leyte including trips going to Dinagat Islands and Siargao Island and vice versa due to TD Marce.

It was learned that around 250 passengers and 70 rolling cargoes going to Liloan in Southern Leyte, Siargao Island and Dinagat Islands are stranded today, Nov. 24, 2016 at the Macapagal Port Terminal and Lipata Ferry Terminal in Surigao City.

In Tandag City, Surigao del Sur, administrator Roxanne Pimentel urged the fishermen not to venture out into the sea for fishing due to TD Marce. She also advised the people living along riverbanks, coastal and low-lying areas to take precautionary measures for possible flooding and landslides. (JPG/NLM/NGBT/SDR/VLG, PIA-Caraga)

Philippines: Philippines: NDRRMC monitors TD Marce

24 November 2016 - 2:40am
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

QUEZON CITY, Nov. 24 -- The National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC) continuously monitors TD MARCE since yesterday at the NDRRM Operations Center, Camp General Emilio Aguinaldo, Quezon City.

The Low Pressure Area (LPA) located East of Mindanao has developed into a Tropical Depression and was named “Marce”. At 4 pm, TD MARCE was estimated at 420km East of Hinatuan, Surigao del Sur with a maximum sustained winds of 45kph near the center and gustiness of up to 55kph. It is moving west northwest at 17kph. Moderate to heavy rains is expected within the 200km diameter of the tropical depression.

Tropical Cyclone Warning Signal (TCWS) Number 1 is raised in the Provinces of Southern Leyte, Bohol, Siquijor, Surigao del Sur, Dinagat Island, Agusan del Norte, Agusan del Sur, Misamis Oriental and Camiguin. Provinces under TCWS number 1 may experience light to medium damage to high risk structures and very light or no damage to low risk structures. Small seacrafts are not allowed to venture out in the sea while larger seacrafts are alerted against big waves.

TD Marce is expected to make landfall over Surigao Provinces this afternoon or early evening. It is likely to exit the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR) on Monday morning.

Meanwhile, gale warning is raised in the northern seaboard of Northern Luzon due to rough to very rough condition of the sea. Estimated wave height is 3.4 to 4.5 meters. Fishing boats and other small seacrafts are advised not to venture out in the sea while larger sea vessels are alerted against big waves.

All concerned Regional and Local DRRM Councils were advised to take appropriate actions related to the tropical depression. The public is advised to take precautionary measures and monitor updates through TV, radio and social media.

As of 6 pm Wednesday, the NDRRM Operations Center has raised its alert status to BLUE for continuous monitoring of the weather system. The National Council’s Pre Disaster Risk Assessment (PDRA) Core Group convenes today, 9 am at the NDRRM Operations Center in preparation for the impacts of TD MARCE. (OCD)

World: UNISDR hails The Economist Intelligence Unit's move on disaster risk analysis

23 November 2016 - 11:02pm
Source: UN International Strategy for Disaster Reduction Country: Australia, Bangladesh, China, China - Taiwan Province, Greece, Haiti, Honduras, India, Italy, Japan, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Madagascar, Niger, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Philippines, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation, Tajikistan, United States of America, World

23 November 2016, LONDON – The UN Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNISDR) welcomes a move by The Economist Intelligence Unit (EIU) to add the threats posed by natural and human-induced hazards to its widely-respected country analyses.

The EIU is the world’s leading provider of country intelligence, with its timely, reliable and impartial research offering governments, institutions and businesses the evidence base that they need to set strategy and make critical decisions.

In research commissioned through the UNISDR Private Sector Alliance for Disaster Resilient Societies, the EIU has developed new disaster risk metrics and is set to integrate them into its country risk briefings.

“Understanding disaster risk and applying that knowledge in business decisions is a critical component of resilience, not just for companies and their employees but also for the societies of which they are part. This model from the EIU will be a powerful tool for achieving this,” said Mr. Robert Glasser, Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General for Disaster Risk Reduction, who heads UNISDR.

Mr. Stefano Scuratti, Senior Consultant , Public Policy, Economics, Politics at the EIU, said: "We have been in a parallel process of revising our Operational Risk Model to respond to clients' demand to explicitly account for disaster risk in our country assessments. This is a testament to the increased market appetite for knowledge products that address the issue."

A report released today, Towards disaster-risk sensitive investments: The Disaster Risk-Integrated Operational Risk Model, presents the results of a pilot study of the EIU model conducted from January to April this year in twenty disaster-prone locations: Australia, Bangladesh, China, Greece, Haiti, Honduras, India, Italy, Japan, Laos, Madagascar, Niger, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Philippines, Russia, the Republic of Korea, Taiwan, Tajikistan, and the United States.

Only Australia, Italy, the Republic of Korea , Taiwan and the USA are judged to have a “mature” approach to economic resilience.

The EIU model, developed with UNISDR’s Risk Knowledge Services division, is built around five pillars: institutional framework; disaster risk-reduction policy, preparedness and response; economic resilience; societal resilience; and resilience of the physical environment. They are measured according to 23 separate indicators, both qualitative and quantitative.

Among the EIU’s key findings are: that there is an ongoing shift from disaster response to preparedness; that political leadership plays an important role in effective disaster-risk management; that budget allocations for disaster-risk management are rising but that dedicated budgets are not the norm; that disaster risk is highest in countries where poverty and high exposure to natural hazards coincide; and that the resilience of the physical environment dictates much of a country’s overall disaster-risk preparedness.

The in-depth EIU study warns that disaster risk is all too often considered a “tail-risk” for businesses, hard to measure and, therefore, overlooked when it comes to crafting business strategies and making decisions on how and where to invest.

Amid mounting scientific evidence that hazards, notably extreme weather events, are becoming more frequent and intense, the report finds that disaster risk needs to become a fundamental part of business planning if the world is to rein in economic losses, which according to the World Bank are now around US$500 billion annually.

Global economic losses from disasters are stoked by climate change, unbalanced urbanisation and inequalities. The growth in risk-exposed assets is often due to a lack of adequately costing disaster risk, coupled with high profit margins for investments in many areas exposed to earthquakes, tsunamis, storm surges, floods and other hazards.

“It’s smart business to manage risk rather than only managing disasters. Disasters directly affect business performance and undermine long-term competitiveness. The private sector has the power to change this because private investment largely determines disaster risk. In most economies 70%-85% of overall investment is made by the private sector,” said Mr. Glasser.

The UNISDR Private Sector Alliance for Disaster Resilient Societies, also known as ARISE, the alliance was set up in November 2015 to advocate for risk reduction in the business world and to leverage the power of companies to achieve the aims of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction, the ambitious plan to date to reduce disaster losses adopted by all UN member States in March, 2015.

Philippines: Philippines: Educating children in conflict-torn Mindanao

23 November 2016 - 5:41am
Source: European Commission's Directorate-General for European Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations Country: Philippines

By Pierre Prakash, Information Officer, EU Humanitarian Aid (ECHO)

Liling’s eyes moisten as she recalls the day she had to flee her remote village in the southern Philippines, after her small community received threats from an armed group operating in the area. “We had to leave so quickly, we didn’t have time to take our things, not even enough food," recounts the mother of three. "We were so scared to come across armed men that we didn’t take the main path, we tried to cut through the jungle. It was a very hard walk, and rain was pouring so hard, we wrapped the small children in plastic bags so they wouldn’t get sick. It took us the full day to reach the nearest town, but the elderly and some sick people couldn’t keep up, so they ended up sleeping on the side of the path, in the rain. Everyone fell sick, it was a horrible experience.”

A member the Banwaon ethnic group, Liling belongs to what is known in the Philippines as a “Lumad”, or indigenous community, settled in the remote hills of Mindanao, the southernmost region of the country. The area has been bloodied by conflict for decades, with multiple armed and paramilitary groups operating in the area - some politically motivated, others working for larger interests such as mining companies – along with a large army presence. More often than not, the fighting results in displacement of civilians: in the last four years alone, close to half a million people have been displaced across the region. Liling’s community had to wait 14 months before it was safe enough to head back to the village. During that period, they stayed in an abandoned hospital, with dire sanitary conditions and very little food on which to survive. Five children died, and many fell ill.

When asked why communities choose to stay in such an isolated place despite the hardships and the ongoing conflict, the village chief Dongkoi explains, "_life here is hard, but it is our land, and that is all that we possess._" Home to some 20 families, the village of Kihinggay is a day’s walk from the nearest market, and devoid of any government services. Surrounding villages, all from the same ethnic group, face the same fate. This means the entire community’s children do not have access to the formal education system, but thanks to a partnership with the International Organisation for Migration (IOM), the European Commission is funding a local NGO which brings informal schooling to primary school-aged children.

Funded as part of the European Union Humanitarian Aid (ECHO) worldwide effort to bring education to children who are victims of conflict, the project includes the rehabilitation of NGO school premises which have been damaged by fighting or stand dilapidated, the provision of school supplies, as well as nutritional and livelihood support to ensure the children are physically and mentally fit to attend classes. Contingency plans are also put in place to ensure continuity of education services in times of emergency – particularly in case of displacement. "_This is crucial, as apart from ensuring children’s studies are not suddenly interrupted for months, it also helps to maintain a sense of safety and normalcy for kids who are faced with very stressful situations,_" explains Michael, one of the teachers in the Kihinggay school. Last year, due to their being displaced, the children couldn’t finish the school year; they couldn’t graduate and had to repeat to the same levels, as if they had failed.

Overall, the EU funded project benefits close to 15 000 primary school-aged children across five provinces of Mindanao. Teachers from the NGO schools enrolled in the program also receive additional training on a variety of topics, including psychosocial support, and advocacy initiatives are undertaken with the government regarding the need for the formal education system to reach out to Lumad children.

Back in Kihinggay, the community is hugely supportive of the initiative. "_We are poor farmers, we live a day to day life," explains Albert Ambason, who has three children attending the school. "This education is the one and only thing I can offer to my kids, so it is very important for me." In a context where indigenous people are often looked down upon by other parts of society, many also see the school as a source of hope, the village chief Dingkoi says optimistically, "this school is the only chance for our children to be able to defend their rights in the future, and their ancestral land._"

World: From MDGs to Sustainable Development For All: Lessons from 15 Years of Practice

21 November 2016 - 7:42am
Source: World Bank, UN Development Programme Country: Albania, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brazil, Burkina Faso, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Democratic Republic of the Congo, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, India, Indonesia, Kenya, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Mali, Mexico, Morocco, Nepal, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan, Panama, Peru, Philippines, Sri Lanka, Tajikistan, Thailand, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Uruguay, World, Zambia, Zimbabwe

The quest of the last 15 years to achieve the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) taught us that Global Goals can motivate and help sustain leaps in human progress. It also taught us that the specifics matter. In some places, the MDGs became a widely-recognized, consistent and important driver of local progress; in others, the role and impact of the MDGs was more ambiguous. A lot depended on way the MDGs were implemented: if local change agents made them meaningful locally; if local leaders drew on their legitimacy and visibility; if they were employed to solve real-life problems etc.

The MDGs had greater impact where they captured the popular imagination, generating good-will and raising expectations. This happened when the Goals were brought into the popular discourse through national movements, local campaigns and political platforms; and where local leaders and change agents considered the MDGs, less as a rigid framework than as an opportunity to:

  • Build consensus around national development priorities;
  • Win international support and generate local buy-in;
  • Align fragmented initiatives;
  • Make the needs and contributions of communities and localities visible; and/or
  • Hold leaders to account for their commitments.

Change agents in communities and countries around the world, supported by UNDP and others, learned to leverage the MDGs to realize these outcomes. Improvements in data, partnerships, systems and institutions gradually made MDG practice more effective, responsive and coherent. This accelerated maternal and child survival, enrolment and gender parity in primary schools, lowered HIV prevalence, among other outcomes. The world cannot afford to start over with the SDGs – but must build on the improvements made under the MDGs. Many countries recognize this and are adapting existing strategies and repurposing the institutions that enabled MDG progress. Their challenge is to understand, prioritize and sustain what works and adjust initiatives that have stalled, while strengthening underlying capacities, mobilizing all possible resources and putting in motion the farsighted polices the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) require. This report seeks to help them by providing key lessons from the MDG era, distilled by governments and stakeholders themselves, through National MDG Progress Reports. Between 2013 and 2015, 55 countries produced National MDG Progress Reports assessing the totality of their countries’ MDG experience. Many detail lessons they now apply to implement the SDGs. Most echo lessons UNDP learned from its experience supporting over 140 countries to achieve the MDGs.

Philippines: WFP Philippines Country Brief, October 2016

21 November 2016 - 3:35am
Source: World Food Programme Country: Philippines

Highlights

  • WFP assisted 107,200 people in Mindanao with food and cash to improve their food security.

  • WFP supported the Government of the Philippines during the response to Typhoon Haima, in October.

  • Due to limited funding, nutrition and cash-based activities are in jeopardy of disruption as both are expected to have pipeline breaks in the next 12 months.

WFP Assistance

Through the PRRO, WFP assists half a million people affected by the protracted conflict in Central Mindanao as well as typhoon-affected communities in Visayas and Mindanao. The assistance is tailored to reach the most vulnerable in areas where poverty, nutrition and basic education indicators remain well below the national averages. WFP supports food-insecure populations including the internally displaced people and returnees through market-sensitive food assistance-for-assets options, school meals, and stunting prevention programmes for children under two years of age and pregnant and nursing women.

Through the Disaster Preparedness and Response Programme under this PRRO, WFP supports local government units, academic institutions, civil society and NGOs in strengthening disaster preparedness and risk reduction mechanisms through initiatives such as capacity development trainings, installation of early warning systems, and community-based risk mitigation activities.

This operation also features capacity augmentation and policy development components to optimise the disaster response structures and policy frameworks of the Government of the Philippines in support of the Philippine Development Plan (2011–2016).

This Special Operation aims to enhance the Government’s disaster response capabilities in areas of logistics and supply chain management. It also aims to ensure that WFP is ready to activate emergency response options at-scale, in a timely manner, and in alignment with government relief mechanisms. Building on the key learnings from the Typhoon Haiyan emergency in 2013/2014, the operation aims to mitigate potential operational bottlenecks and challenges as identified during the large-scale humanitarian response.

Key to this operation is the establishment of a network of disaster response facilities in Luzon, Visayas and Mindanao in support of an improved and decentralised emergency response network. WFP also provides technical assistance and trainings for government counterparts on practical, operational and strategic logistics.

Philippines: Asia and the Pacific: Weekly Regional Humanitarian Snapshot (15 - 21 November 2016)

21 November 2016 - 3:12am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Indonesia, Myanmar, Philippines

MYANMAR

As of 21 November, an estimated 30,000 people have been displaced and thousands affected by the 9 October armed attacks and subsequent security operations in Rakhine State. This includes as many as 15,000 people who may have been displaced after renewed clashes between armed groups and the military on 12 and 13 November. In Buthidaung and Maungdaw, about 350 ethnic Rakhine and Mro IDPs are also being hosted. Humanitarian services remain suspended since the initial attacks in October, leaving more than 150,000 people without life-saving food, health, cash and nutrition assistance for six weeks. Advocacy efforts continue with the Government for urgent humanitarian access to assess needs and deliver life-saving assistance.

30,000 people displaced

PHILIPPINES

On 12 November, a clash between the Moro Islamic Liberation Front and residents of the municipality of Balindong, Lanao del Sur province, affected 1,300 families (6,500 people) who fled from the armed engagement.
The Region XII Office of the Department of Social Welfare and Development delivered food packs to the affected people.

INDONESIA

From 14 to 18 November, flooding in Kerawang District, West Java province affected nearly 20,000 people and left about 5,800 houses and buildings under water. With heavy rainfall expected to increase during the next two months, the National Disaster Management Agency (BNPB) advised local authorities to enhance preparedness measures with the overflow of the Citarum and Cibeet rivers causing recurrent flooding. The local government provided immediate relief to the affected communities.

20,000 people displaced

On 16 November (22:00, UTC+7), a 6.2 magnitude earthquake struck about 127 km off the southeast coast of Malang District, East Java province at a depth of 69 km. While no casualties or major injuries were reported, 44 houses in seven sub-districts were damaged according to the provincial disaster management agency (BPBD). Although a tsunami warning was not issued, many people living in coastal areas temporarily evacuated to higher ground and have since returned home. No international support has been requested.

Philippines: DSWD lauds CSOs for compassionate service to ‘Lawin’ survivors

19 November 2016 - 10:50pm
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

QUEZON CITY, Nov. 20 -- Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) Secretary Judy M. Taguiwalo expressed her full appreciation for the collective efforts of Civil Society Organizations (CSOs) to provide compassionate service to Super Typhoon ‘Lawin’ survivors in Cagayan Valley.​

Based on the reports received by the Secretary from the DSWD-Field Office II, the Cagayan Valley Disaster Response Center (CVDRC) and Aguilang Pilipino teamed up with the DSWD to distribute Family Food Packs (FFPs) and other needed assistance to typhoon survivors in Barangays Abariongan Uneg and Calasitan, Sto. Nino, Cagayan.

Sec. Taguiwalo also noted that Abariongan Uneg and Calasitan are both located in far-flung areas in Region II and are homes to the Indigenous Peoples of Aggay who were also devastated by the typhoon. The Aggays were given FFPs in plastic bags for easier transport to their communities.

“We are grateful that CSOs and NGOs are in solidarity with the DSWD in extending compassionate service and assistance to our kababayans affected by the typhoon. This is a proof that the collective action between the government and private institutions plays a valuable role to address the fundamental issues of our country,” Sec. Taguiwalo said.

Sec. Taguiwalo also reminded the public to continue reporting to DSWD and to other concerned government agencies instances where affected communities still have not received any form of assistance from the government, a month after typhoon Lawin hit Luzon.

She added that the people are essential partners in ensuring that adequate and timely services are delivered to those in need.

Update on ‘Lawin’ relief ops

Meanwhile, the DSWD FO-II recently started the distribution of Emergency Shelter Assistance (ESA) to ‘Lawin’ victims in Isabela after finishing their assessment and validation on the total number of partially and totally damaged houses in the province.

Over the weekend, DSWD Assistant Director for Disaster Response and Management Bureau (DReAMB) Carlos Padolina and several staff from the DSWD FO-II also held a dialogue with ‘Lawin’ survivors at St. Joseph the Worker in Baggao, Cagayan to address their complaints and grievances on the response delivered by the local government and the FO, including the implementation of the ESA in the area.

Sec. Taguiwalo assured the public that the operations for ‘Lawin’ will continue since 1,031 families or 3,670 persons are still taking shelter in 18 evacuation centers in Region III.

To date, a total of P130,474,442.22 worth of relief assistance from the combined resources of the DSWD with P120,960,265.62; LGUs with P8,989,080.10, and NGOs with P525,096.50, has been provided to affected families.

Moreover, the DSWD-DReAMB will also provide assistance to field offices that are in need of augmentation and technical support. (DSWD)

Philippines: GIEWS Country Brief: Philippines 16-November-2016

19 November 2016 - 7:12pm
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Country: Philippines

FOOD SECURITY SNAPSHOT

  • Typhoons Sarika and Haima have negatively affected central and northern parts of Luzon, but overall impact on 2016 cereal crops expected to be limited

  • Cereal import requirements in 2016/17 marketing year (July/June) forecast to remain high

  • Prices of rice stable in recent months

  • Typhoons negatively impacted livelihoods and food security of affected households

Cereal production in 2016 forecast to recover from last year’s reduced level

In mid‑October, central and northern parts of Luzon Island were struck by two typhoons in close succession, Typhoon Sarika, a Category 4 event on 16 October and Typhoon Haima, a Category 5 event on 19 October. Strong winds, heavy rains and localized floods caused loss of life, damage to housing, infrastructure and agricultural sector. Although a comprehensive damage evaluation is not yet available, preliminary official estimates indicate that, as of 4 November, about 400 000 hectares of paddy, maize and high value crops (such as mango, banana, papaya, cassava and vegetables) were adversely affected by both typhoons. The overall damage to the agriculture sector was estimated to be close to USD 234 million. Hardest hit was the rice sector, followed by those of high value crops and maize. At the time of the typhoons, harvesting of the 2016 main season paddy crop, representing 55 percent of the annual production, was ongoing, while planting of the mostly irrigated 2016/17 secondary season crop was about to commence. The latest official estimates indicate that over 343 000 hectares of paddy crops were affected, mainly in Region I (Ilocos Region), Region II (Cagayan Valley), Region III (Central Luzon), Region IV‑A (Calabarzon), Region V (Bicol Region) and Cordillera Administrative Region (CAR). The affected area represents 13 percent of the estimated total area planted to the 2016 main season rice crop, out of which about 71 000 hectares, some 3 percent, were reportedly lost. Although significant localized crop losses are likely in the most affected areas, the overall impact on the 2016 main season paddy output is expected to be limited, particularly considering the otherwise favourable weather conditions during most of the season. Furthermore, the forecasted increase in the secondary season crop is anticipated to compensate for losses to the main season crop. Assuming average growing conditions during the remainder of the season, FAO’s production outlook remains positive, pointing to an aggregate paddy harvest of 18.7 million tonnes. This level would stand 7 percent above the 2015 outcome, which was affected by dry conditions associated to El Niño.

Damage to the 2016 main season maize crop is also expected to be limited as the harvest was virtually completed by mid‑September. As a result and assuming normal weather conditions for the remaining of the season, FAO forecast the 2016 maize output at 7.8 million tonnes, implying a 12 percent recovery from dry weather-reduced harvest in 2015.

The 2015/16 El Niño anomaly, which negatively affected on 2015/16 crops in the Philippines, dissipated in June. According to the World Meteorological Organization, atmospheric conditions now point to a 50‑60 percent likelihood of a weak La Niña episode during the 2016 Northern Hemisphere autumn and persisting through the 2016/17 Northern Hemisphere winter. The phenomenon is historically associated with above‑normal rainfall. This could benefit the 2016 secondary season crops, although, excessive rains could also raise the potential for flooding and negatively impacting on the yields.

Cereal import requirements in 2016/17 marketing year forecast to remain high

Wheat import requirements in the 2016/17 marketing year (July/June) are forecast at 4.9 million tonnes, 4 percent above last year’s high level, reflecting high demand for both high‑quality wheat for milling and low‑quality wheat for animal feeding. By contrast, FAO forecasts rice import requirements in calendar year 2016 to fall by 32 percent to 1.4 million tonnes, owing to ample domestic availabilities and generally stable domestic quotations.

Maize import requirements in 2016/17 are forecast to remain at last year’s level of 600 000 tonnes.

Prices of rice stable in recent months

The national average prices of regular and well‑milled rice varieties remained stable in recent months reflecting adequate domestic availabilities. Overall, rice prices were close to their year‑earlier levels.

Typhoons negatively impacted livelihoods and food security of affected households

According to the latest official estimates at least 1.5 million people have been negatively affected by the recent typhoons, mainly concentrated in Ilocos Region, Cagayan Valley, Central Luzon and CAR. Large numbers of people are still living in temporary shelters and relying on humanitarian support. Most of the population affected by the typhoons is critically dependent on agriculture for their livelihoods and many are vulnerable to food insecurity. Overall, over 170 000 farmers were negatively affected. It is critical that affected farmers receive appropriate and timely agricultural assistance, including rice and maize seeds for planting of the 2016/17 secondary season crops, irrigation tools, fertilizers for rice and maize crops, as well as, equipment for planting and harvesting, together with the provision of storage facilities.

Philippines: Philippines: Damage Assessment of Enrile Town and Surroundings (18 November 2016)

19 November 2016 - 3:51am
Source: UNOSAT, International Charter Space and Major Disasters Country: Philippines

This map illustrates satellite-detected potentially damaged buildings in Enrile town and surroundings, Cagayan Province, Philippines. The UNITAR-UNOSAT analysis used a Pleiades satellite image acquired on the 25 October 2016 as a post-image. The UNITAR-UNOSAT analysis identified 661 potentially damaged structures within the map extent of which 591 were identified inside the town of Enrile. This is a preliminary analysis and has not yet been validated in the field. Please send ground feedback to UNITAR - UNOSAT.

Satellite Data (1): Pleiades
Imagery Dates: 25 October 2016
Resolution: 50 cm
Copyright: CNES (2016), Distribution AIRBUS DS
Source: Airbus Defence and Space

Road Data : OpenStreetMap
Analysis : UNITAR - UNOSAT
Production: UNITAR - UNOSAT

Philippines: Philippines: Damage Assessment of Alibago Village and Surroundings (18 November 2016)

19 November 2016 - 3:49am
Source: UNOSAT, International Charter Space and Major Disasters Country: Philippines

This map illustrates satellite-detected potentially damaged buildings in Alibago village, Enrile Municipality, Cagayan Province, Phillippines. The UNITAR-UNOSAT analysis used a Pleiades satellite image acquired on the 25 October 2016 as a post-image. The UNITAR-UNOSAT analysis identified 303 potentially damaged structures inside the village of Alibago. The depiction and use of village locations acquired from OSM, are not warranted to be error-free nor do they imply official endorsement or acceptance by the United Nations. This is a preliminary analysis and has not yet been validated in the field. Please send ground feedback to UNITAR - UNOSAT.

Satellite Data (1): Pleiades
Imagery Dates: 25 October 2016
Resolution: 50 cm
Copyright: CNES (2016), Distribution AIRBUS DS
Source: Airbus Defence and Space

Road Data : OpenStreetMap
Analysis : UNITAR - UNOSAT
Production: UNITAR - UNOSAT

Philippines: Las Piñas City LGU creates brigade to prevent Zika spread

17 November 2016 - 9:45pm
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

QUEZON CITY, Nov. 18 (PIA) --- The local government of Las Piñas City created the Barangay Zika-Dengue Brigade to help the city government conduct a massive cleanup in barangays, and disseminate information and awareness on the prevention and control of Zika, Dengue, and Chikungunya.

The brigade is composed of barangay officials, health center staff and homeowners.

Las Piñas Mayor Imelda 'Mel' Aguilar appealed to the residents and school authorities to strengthen and maintain regular clean-up drive activities in their surroundings to stop the spread of the diseases.

Mayor Aguilar also ordered the city health office to continue its disease surveillance operations, introduction of Ovi-Larvi trap in schools and communities and immediate fogging operations and illness source reduction through active community participation.

“Prevention and control of these dreaded vector-borne disease is everybody’s concern and responsibility that we must do our share in ensuring a clean and mosquitofree surroundings,” Aguilar said.

The City Government has also purchased additional nine mini dump trucks to augment the existing 54 garbage compactor trucks used in collecting trash from all of the city’s 20 barangays with about 250 private villages and subdivisions.'

Aguilar said that the added garbage trucks were to complement the massive cleanliness and sanitation campaign not only to arrest possible spread of the dreaded vector virus but also the ensure an orderly and green environment.

"The city employs 250 garbage collectors, aids and dump truck drivers aside from the Bantay Basura volunteers that regularly pick up garbage from private, public and commercial establishments. Las Piñas has several mini green parks and vegetable gardens being maintained by various barangays, public schools and some women’s groups,' the mayir said.

According to the Department of Health, Zika virus infection is a mosquito-borne disease caused by a flavivirus.

This occurs in tropical countries with large mosquito population. It is transmitted to people through the bite of an infected mosquito from the Aedes genus, mainly Aedes aegypti in urban areas and Aedes albopictus in rural areas.

Aedes bite aggressively during the day. Zika virus can also be transmitted through sex carrying Zika virus unprotected and has been detected in blood, urine, amniotic fluids, semen, saliva as well as body fluids found in the brain and spinal cord. Moreover, this is the same mosquito that transmits Dengue and Chikungunya. (LAS PIÑAS PIO/RJB/MAPA/PIA-NCR)

World: Zika virus, Microcephaly and Guillain-Barré syndrome Situation Report, 17 November 2016

17 November 2016 - 11:02am
Source: World Health Organization Country: American Samoa, Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Aruba (The Netherlands), Bahamas, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belize, Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Bonaire, Saint Eustatius and Saba (The Netherlands), Brazil, British Virgin Islands, Cambodia, Cayman Islands, Chile, Colombia, Cook Islands, Costa Rica, Cuba, Curaçao (The Netherlands), Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Fiji, French Guiana (France), French Polynesia (France), Gabon, Grenada, Guadeloupe (France), Guatemala, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Indonesia, Jamaica, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Malaysia, Maldives, Marshall Islands, Martinique (France), Mexico, Micronesia (Federated States of), New Caledonia (France), Nicaragua, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Puerto Rico (The United States of America), Saint Barthélemy (France), Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Martin (France), Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Singapore, Sint Maarten (The Netherlands), Solomon Islands, Suriname, Thailand, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Turks and Caicos Islands, United States of America, United States Virgin Islands, Vanuatu, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), Viet Nam, World

KEY UPDATES

 Countries and territories reporting mosquito-borne Zika virus infections for the first time in the past week:

o None

 Countries and territories reporting microcephaly and other central nervous system (CNS) malformations potentially associated with Zika virus infection for the first time in the past week:

o Argentina and Guadeloupe

 Countries and territories reporting Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) cases associated with Zika virus infection for the first time in the past week:

o None

 The fifth meeting of the Emergency Committee on Zika virus, microcephaly other neurological disorders will be convened on 18 November 2016. The Emergency Committee will review the implementation and impact of earlier recommendations, provide advice on whether the current event still constitutes a Public Health Emergency of International Concern, and determine if new recommendations are needed or existing recommendations require revision.