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Philippines: NDDRMC Update Sitrep No. 66 re Monitoring Activities on the Alert Status of Mayon Volcano

20 November 2014 - 7:00pm
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

I. ALERT STATUS OF MAYON VOLCANO

A. Alert Level 3 is still in effect as of 8:00 AM, 21 November 2014. At this present stage, potentially eruptible magma has already been intruded and continues to be intruded beneath the edifice. At any given time in the following weeks to months, this magma can eventually be erupted quietly as lava flows or explosively as vertical eruption columns and pyroclastic flows or both. Mayon Volcano's seismic network detected six (6) volcanic earthquakes during the past 24 hour observation period, consistent with overall slow magma intrusion at depth that has characterized this year's activity

B. Emission of white steam plumes was of moderate volume that crept downslope and drifted west-southwest. Crater glow was observed at Intensity I last night, while sulfur dioxide (SO2) emitted at the crater averaged 106 tonnes/day on 09 November 2014, which is below the baseline level during normal periods. The visual and gas parameters may denote either poor magma degassing or the generally low gas content of intruding subsurface magma. Seismicity, visual and gas parameters, however, may suddenly change within a few hours or days should magma breach the surface in an eventual eruption. Mayon Volcano's current condition remains unstable due to slow but sustained ground deformation of the edifice by subsurface magma since the start of unrest this year. Data from the latest ground deformation survey on November 9 - 13 indicated a deflation of the edifice relative to the October 21 — 28 survey, although the edifice remains inflated relative to the baseline measurements beginning 2010. The deflation may have been caused by short-term depressurization of intruded magma at depth or by magma having risen to shallower depths. Continuous observation will be conducted to determine if this episode of deflation persists without the emergence of other precursors, since past eruptions have occurred during the deflationary trend in ground deformation. Short-term deflation was also reflected by electronic tilt data from the continuous network on the northwest flank, although continuous inflation of the edifice has been detected since August 2014, succeeding a previous inflation event in June to July 2014, The inflation events correspond to batches of magma (approximately 107 cubic meters) that have been slowly intruded at depth but that have yet to be erupted at the crater, and therefore posing threat of eventual hazardous eruption at an unknown time in the near future

Philippines: P23-B supplemental budget to scale up Yolanda aid, APEC preps

19 November 2014 - 11:26pm
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

MANILA, Nov 20 -- In its bid to develop a more responsive budget plan for the next fiscal year, the Department of Budget and Management (DBM) is pushing for a P23-billion supplemental budget to ensure sufficient funding support for crucial development initiatives, including various infrastructure projects for post-Yolanda rehabilitation and government preparations for the 2015 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Summit.

Budget Secretary Florencio “Butch” Abad explained, “The National Treasury has already certified the availability of funds to support these projects, but these appropriations must likewise be supported by proper legislation. With the proposed 2015 National Budget already subject to Senate deliberations, we need the support of the House of Representatives to pass a supplemental appropriations bill to fund these projects.”

A total of P16.4 billion—comprising the bulk of allocations under the supplemental budget—has been earmarked for new priority initiatives. Of this amount, the Administration’s Yolanda reconstruction and rehabilitation program will get P9.5 billion. Another P1.44 billion will support key projects in preparation for the APEC Summit, which the Philippines will be hosting next year.

The Budget chief also said that the supplemental budget will cover liabilities arising from obligated infrastructure projects worth P1.85 billion under the Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH). Lastly, a total of P5.08 billion will be coursed to a number of priority projects under various government agencies. The funds will account for the budgetary requirements of priority projects that were partially implemented or previously approved for implementation this year.

Abad said, “Most of these projects have already been completed, are on-going, or are urgently needed to sustain our socio-economic development. The passage of the proposed supplemental budget will allow us to allocate funds accordingly so we can complete these projects right away.“

If approved by Congress, the 2014 Supplemental Appropriations will fund a number of priority projects, ranging from the rehabilitation of the LRT lines 1 and 2 to the construction of permanent housing for the victims of super typhoon Yolanda. (DBM)

Philippines: NDDRMC Update Sitrep No. 64 re Monitoring Activities on the Alert Status of Mayon Volcano

19 November 2014 - 10:47pm
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

I. ALERT STATUS OF MAYON VOLCANO

A. Alert Level 3 is still in effect as of 8:00 AM, 19 November 2014. At this present stage potentially eruptible magma has already been intruded and continues to be intruded beneath the edifice. At any given time in the following weeks to months, this magma can eventually be erupted quietly as lava flows or explosively as vertical eruption columns and pyroclastic flows or both. Mayon Volcano's seismic network detected three (3) volcanic earthquakes and one (1) rock fall event during the past 24 hour observation period, consistent with overall slow, magma intrusion at depth that has characterized this year's activity.

Philippines: One Year Later—the Road to Resilience After Typhoon Haiyan

19 November 2014 - 10:38pm
Source: US Agency for International Development Country: Philippines

Posted by Nancy Lindborg on Tuesday, November 18th 2014

This week a year ago, I was in the Philippines, flying with the USAID Disaster Assistance Response Team in a C-130 to Tacloban in the wake of Typhoon Haiyan (known locally as Yolanda). The strongest storm in recorded history, Haiyan hit on Nov. 8, killing more than 6,000 people, displacing 4.1 million, and affecting 16 million in total—about 14 percent of the country’s total population. Flying into Tacloban, I saw a flattened landscape littered with what looked like matchsticks—the splintered remains of homes, businesses and millions of coconut trees. The damage was immense.

The Philippine Government estimates the typhoon caused $12.7 billion in losses. More than a million homes were damaged or destroyed, and 33 million coconut trees, a source of income for many Filipinos, were wiped out. As the average growth span of a coconut tree is 12 years, the storm essentially wiped out a decade of livelihoods for many Filipino families.

While we have seen enormous progress by the Philippines to build back better, including plans to move 1 million people away from the coast, many of the 4 million people displaced by the storm are still living in temporary shelters. The Philippines continues to lose up to $5 billion, or 2 percent of its gross domestic product, each year to recurring natural disasters.

The Philippines’ steady but tough recovery one year after Haiyan underscores the importance of investing in resilience—of helping people, communities, countries and systems survive and recover from acute shocks and stresses.

Far from being an isolated incident, Haiyan is part of a litany of natural disasters that are coming faster and harder each year thanks to climate change. Research suggests that, as our oceans become warmer, the severity of storms will inevitably increase. The number of reported disasters has already nearly tripled since 1980, and the cost of those disasters is up 300 percent, to $200 billion every year.

As Haiyan illustrates, when disaster strikes, the most vulnerable populations are the hardest hit, often without a chance to recover before the next shock hits them. Many of the communities affected by Haiyan already had poor infrastructure, which was devastated by the storm.

We know that droughts, typhoons and other disasters will continue to happen. By investing in resilience, USAID has pledged to help the world’s most vulnerable get ahead of these recurring shocks. We have changed the way we do business to help communities adapt, mitigate and manage the risks that will inevitably come. These efforts include bringing our humanitarian and development teams together to integrate, layer and sequence our relief and development resources around the shared aim of reducing persistent emergencies by addressing underlying vulnerabilities.

Climate change adaptation is critical to mitigating the impact of disasters like Haiyan, and USAID is investing in these efforts. We are part of the Urban Climate Change Resilience Trust Fund, a $140 million partnership with the Department for International Development and the Rockefeller Foundation targeting infrastructure projects in Asian cities. We also launched the Pacific American Climate Fund, a $24 million program that provides grants to help communities adapt to the impacts of climate change.

In the aftermath of Haiyan, our humanitarian assistance of over $90 million helped the Philippines not only bounce back, but rebuild livelihoods and build up stronger systems to weather future shocks. Our Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance deployed people before the storm hit so we were prepared to provide immediate assistance to help save lives. We quickly turned our cash assistance programs into cash-for-work and cash-for-training activities, including emergency employment programs that engaged 118,000 people in essential reconstruction efforts to clear debris, repair more than 1,500 kilometers of roads, and restore services in 560 schools, 220 rural health care centers and more than 30 hospitals.

We also provided skills training and micro-enterprise and small business support to the most vulnerable populations, particularly small-scale coconut farmers.USAID joined together with Procter & Gamble and Coca-Cola to help revive economic activity and livelihoods in Leyte, the province worst hit by the typhoon. These efforts helped restore damaged or destroyed sari-sari stores (small community stores) in public markets, and jump-start business by providing store owners access to micro-financing loans.

And we continue to seek the best ideas for building resilience in advance of a crisis. USAID joined forces with the Rockefeller Foundation and Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency earlier this fall to launch the Global Resilience Partnership, which aims to catalyze innovation and scale what is already working in resilience efforts by bringing in new actors, including the private sector and academia. With an initial investment of $150 million from the three partners, the Partnership will help to drive evidence-based investments that enable cities, communities and households to better manage and adapt to inevitable shocks.

The Partnership’s first activity is the Global Resilience Challenge, a call for the creation of teams from all sectors to come together to produce locally driven, high-impact solutions to resilience challenges (application deadline: Nov. 30). Our focus will be in the Sahel, the Horn of Africa, and South and Southeast Asia—areas with high resilience needs.

Through the Partnership, we seek to create a community of practice to strengthen resilience globally. In the face of shocks and stresses caused by epidemics, fragility and our planet’s changing climate, we need all-in ideas and solutions. The Partnership is an important effort to learn from disasters like Haiyan, build preparedness for the future, and help the world’s most vulnerable get on a solid path toward development.

Philippines: NDDRMC Update Sitrep No. 65 re Monitoring Activities on the Alert Status of Mayon Volcano

19 November 2014 - 7:00pm
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

Philippines: P23-B supplemental budget to scale up Yolanda aid, APEC preps

19 November 2014 - 3:21pm
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

MANILA, Nov 20 -- In its bid to develop a more responsive budget plan for the next fiscal year, the Department of Budget and Management (DBM) is pushing for a P23-billion supplemental budget to ensure sufficient funding support for crucial development initiatives, including various infrastructure projects for post-Yolanda rehabilitation and government preparations for the 2015 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Summit.

Budget Secretary Florencio “Butch” Abad explained, “The National Treasury has already certified the availability of funds to support these projects, but these appropriations must likewise be supported by proper legislation. With the proposed 2015 National Budget already subject to Senate deliberations, we need the support of the House of Representatives to pass a supplemental appropriations bill to fund these projects.”

A total of P16.4 billion—comprising the bulk of allocations under the supplemental budget—has been earmarked for new priority initiatives. Of this amount, the Administration’s Yolanda reconstruction and rehabilitation program will get P9.5 billion. Another P1.44 billion will support key projects in preparation for the APEC Summit, which the Philippines will be hosting next year.

The Budget chief also said that the supplemental budget will cover liabilities arising from obligated infrastructure projects worth P1.85 billion under the Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH). Lastly, a total of P5.08 billion will be coursed to a number of priority projects under various government agencies. The funds will account for the budgetary requirements of priority projects that were partially implemented or previously approved for implementation this year.

Abad said, “Most of these projects have already been completed, are on-going, or are urgently needed to sustain our socio-economic development. The passage of the proposed supplemental budget will allow us to allocate funds accordingly so we can complete these projects right away.“

If approved by Congress, the 2014 Supplemental Appropriations will fund a number of priority projects, ranging from the rehabilitation of the LRT lines 1 and 2 to the construction of permanent housing for the victims of super typhoon Yolanda. (DBM)

World: Unflooding Asia: The Green Cities Way

19 November 2014 - 11:54am
Source: Asian Development Bank Country: China, Philippines, Thailand, World

Floods in the past decade have been more frequent and more intense. They have become the result of greater interaction between human society and the natural environment, exacerbated by urbanization and climate change.

This publication illustrates the more recent and unprecedented flood devastations in Bangkok, Beijing, and Manila, and some of the international best practices in urban floodwater management. Following the pillars of “Green Cities Development,” it proposes a holistic approach, combining structural and nonstructural measures and seeking multifunctional solutions, in managing today’s urban floods.

Philippines: Philippines: Typhoon Haiyan Humanitarian Dashboard (as of 22 October 2014)

19 November 2014 - 6:13am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Philippines

SITUATION OVERVIEW

After nine months of response in close partnership with national authorities, significant progress has been made in meeting the needs of vulnerable people affected by last November’s Typhoon Haiyan (locally-known as Yolanda). Of the 45 indicators tracked in the third and final Periodic Monitoring Report (PMR), 30 show achievements of greater than 50 per cent, and 15 of these indicators have reached or surpassed the targets established in the Haiyan Strategic Response Plan (SRP).

Only 15 indicators show progress of below 50 per cent. These are due largely to reporting issues, funding constraints within the sector, and activities taking place later in the programme cycle that are more recovery-oriented. Due to the early closure of the SRP, some projects within the plan are ongoing, and activities in pursuit of targets are still underway in many sectors.

Philippines: Ilocos Sur disaster response group adopts command system in emergency plan

18 November 2014 - 9:27pm
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

By Ma. Nila O. Argel

Cabugao, Ilocos Sur, Nov. 19 (PIA) – The Disaster Risk Reduction Management Council (DRRMC) here has integrated the Incident Command System (ICS) in the all-hazard incident management of events.

The council uses its own emergency response teams composed of search and rescue, Rapid Damage and Needs Assessment and Incident Management Teams including material resources based on the following criteria: continues even with out a natural calamity through the communication network of the ICS.

The ICS could effectively address some persistent issues and problems arising at on-scene level such as who's in-charge on-site especially when the incident involves multi-agency participation and multi-jurisdictional; too many responders; too many people reporting to one supervisor; and unclear lines of authority.

The council's partner agencies include Department of Local Governement-Bureau of Fire Protection (DILG-BFP), Department of Health (DOH),Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD), Philippine National Police (PNP), Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP), Philippine Red Cross (PRC).

According to municipal disaster council officer Engr. Nestor B. Somera of Cabugao town, the ICS assisted in the emergency activities in time for the 2014 Unit Athletic Meet which was participated in by delegates coming from the towns of Sinait, Magsingal, San Juan and Cabugao on November 5-7.

They are also expected to render assistance during the 2014 Provincial Sports Competition to be held in this town in December. (MCA/MNOA /PIA1 Ilocos Sur)

World: Global Emergency Overview Snapshot 12–18 November

18 November 2014 - 2:15pm
Source: Assessment Capacities Project Country: Afghanistan, Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea, Haiti, Honduras, India, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, World, Yemen

Snapshot 12–18 November

Ethiopia: Waters have begun to recede from Leitchuor refugee camp in Gambella, but few refugees have returned to the camps so far, where alarming rates of severe malnutrition persist: 5.7% in Leitchuor, 7.8% in Kule, and 10% in Tierkidi. In SNNPR, flooding was reported, while in Oromia, water trucking has begun for populations affected by drought.

South Sudan: Bombing was reported in Maban, Upper Nile state, where over 125,000 Sudanese refugees are living. In Jonglei, heavy fighting has displaced about 35,000, while illegal checkpoints have been set up in Malakal Protection of Civilians site.

Nigeria: The Government is expected to extend the state of emergency for another six months, until May 2015, as a series of attacks and battles have taken place in the northeastern states. Mubi and Chibok, both taken by Boko Haram, have been retaken by government forces with the support of militias. Thousands have fled the fighting.

Updated: 18/11/2014. Next update: 25/11/2014

Philippines: One Year after Typhoon Haiyan Salesian Missionaries Have Aided Close to 3,000 Families in Rebuilding Homes While Beginning Construction on 11 New Schools

18 November 2014 - 12:09pm
Source: Salesian Missions Country: Philippines

(MissionNewswire) One year after Typhoon Haiyan (also known as Typhoon Yolanda) devastated portions of Southeast Asia, particularly the Philippines, Salesian missionaries working in the region have successfully completed community rehabilitation and rebuilding projects allowing survivors to return to their normal lives.

The super typhoon which struck on Nov. 8, 2013, was one of the strongest tropical cyclones ever recorded and the deadliest typhoon on record in the Philippines killing more than 6,200 people in that country alone. According to the United Nations, the super typhoon affected more than 13 million people overall. An estimated one million homes were destroyed and 4 million people were left homeless with close to 2.5 million of those displaced needing food assistance. More than 5 million of those affected were children, leaving 1.5 million children at risk of acute malnutrition, according to the UN World Food Program.

Salesian missionaries in the Philippines who have been working with vulnerable children and their families at Salesian schools, youth centers and community programs for many years, were positioned to be on the front lines of the relief efforts. Salesian buildings in Cebu were named Official Help Centers and students, teachers, staff and volunteers worked alongside missionaries to collect, prepare and pack relief goods.

In cooperation with the National Crisis Management Unit in the Philippines, 25,000 emergency kits were distributed in the days immediately following the storm. In addition, Salesian missionaries provided food, clothing, water and medical care to 40,000 families in Leyte, Cebu, Samar and Aklan. A year later, thousands of families are surviving with the help of volunteers and organizations linked to the Salesians. “Because we have been working in the Philippines since 1950 and already have an established network in the affected areas, we are able to provide vital coordination and infrastructure support,” says Father Mark Hyde, executive director of Salesian Missions, the U.S. development arm of the Salesians of Don Bosco. “Our work did not stop in the immediate aftermath of the storm. Salesian relief efforts continue for those in need and reconstruction efforts are underway to rebuild communities.”

Initiated in the wake of the storm, the Don Bosco Adopt and Rebuild a Community Project (Don Bosco ARC) began replacing destroyed homes and buildings that were poorly constructed before the storm with ones that can withstand future weather events. To date, close to 150 homes have been completed. Ultimately, the Don Bosco ARC project will benefit 2,600 families on four separate islands.

Reconstruction of homes, schools and shelters has also continued with many projects close to completion. More than 2,700 families have received materials to repair roofs and walls and have been able to return to their homes. Salesian missionaries are also focusing their efforts on building shelters for the disaster prone country. Of the nearly 500 temporary shelters in East Samar, Aklan and on the island of Bantayan, 417 have already been completed and others are under construction. Salesian Missionaries have also focused their rebuilding efforts on schools with 11 new schools under construction, eight of which are in Leyte, two in Cebu and one on the island of Bantayan.

As many Filipinos lost their livelihoods in the wake of the storm, Salesian missionaries are also working on employment initiatives primarily in the farming, livestock management and manufacturing sectors designed to jump-start the local economy. By integrating research, technological advancement and vocational training in these areas, Salesian programs aim to create sustainable, long-term entrepreneurship and employment opportunities which, in turn, will provide typhoon victims and vulnerable youth with financial security and hope for a better future.

“Salesian missionaries have made great progress in the year since the typhoon but there is still much work to be done, particularly helping those whose livelihoods were affected find meaningful employment in order for them to support their families,” adds Fr. Hyde.

Salesian Missions, the U.S. development arm of the Salesians of Don Bosco, launched a “Philippines Typhoon Emergency” fund in response to the need. To give to that fund, go to SalesianMissions.org/typhoon.

Philippines: NDDRMC Update Sitrep No. 63 re Monitoring Activities on the Alert Status of Mayon Volcano

18 November 2014 - 7:57am
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

I. ALERT STATUS OF MAYON VOLCANO

A. Alert Level 3 is still in effect as of 8:00 AM, 18 November 2014. At this present stage potentially eruptible magma has already been intruded and continues to be intruded beneath the edifice. At any given time in the following weeks to months, this magma can eventually be erupted quietly as lava flows or explosively as vertical eruption columns and pyroclastic flows or both. Mayon Volcano's seismic network detected two (2) volcanic earthquakes during the past 24 hour observation period, consistent with overall slow, magma intrusion at depth that has characterized this year's activity.

Philippines: NDDRMC Update Progress Report re Flooding in Midsayap, Cotabato Province, 11 November 2014

18 November 2014 - 4:06am
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

A. SITUATION OVERVIEW

On 28 October 2014, local flooding incident occurred affecting twelve (12) barangays in Midsayap, Cotabato Province due to heavy rains.

Philippines: Yolanda victims assured of continued help

18 November 2014 - 12:43am
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

ILOILO CITY, Nov. 17(PIA)—The Department of Social Welfare and Development here has assured Typhoon Yolanda affected residents in Ajuy, Iloilo that government does not stop finding ways to help them.

Evelyn Macapobre, DSWD regional director, recently led the giving of financial assistance to homeless typhoon victims in that town, which she commended for being prompt in the submission of the required documents.

“This is the reason the municipality is the first to receive the emergency shelter assistance (ESA),” Macapobre said, adding that more beneficiaries are going to receive the same assistance in the coming weeks.

Recipient Lolita Panday, 58 and mother of 11 children, said she was so nervous thinking that she was to receive P30,000 as ESA for the first time in her life.

“I am so nervous, my knees are shaking and if it were not for my damaged house, I really wouldn’t know what to do with that,” Lolita said in the local dialect, in an interview.

She was also a recipient of 25 kilos of rice from the DSWD and the local government of Ajuy.

Lolita’s house lost its walls and roofing at the height of Typhoon Yolanda last year, and a number of them have not yet been able to rebuild.

Her husband is a fisherman and she augments by laundering clothes, always hoping they will have the means to rebuild their house, until the DSWD assistance came.

“Our things will no longer be wet when it rains,” said Lolita beaming with her P30,000.

Ajuy was the first LGU affected by Typhoon Yolanda in the region to receive the ESA and the 25 kilos of rice from the government.

Wenna Bendol, DSWD Information Officer for the project, said that the Municipal Social Welfare and Development Office is still processing the papers of others so that more will be given the same assistance soon.

Meanwhile, Ajuy Mayor Juancho Alvarez said they had 1,000 beneficiaries for the Cash-for-Work program with a budget of P4,305,000, P819,000 for livelihood projects on-going in the barangays, and the shelter component program.

“All of these are from the DSWD,” Alvarez said.

On the other hand, Macapobre told the first batch recipients to help explain to others who are still waiting that they will receive theirs also. (DSWD/ESS/PIA-Iloilo)

Philippines: Typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan): ADB's Response

17 November 2014 - 11:53pm
Source: Asian Development Bank Country: Japan, Philippines

On 8 November 2013, Typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan), one of the most powerful storms ever recorded to hit land, devastated a huge area of the Central Philippines. In response, ADB immediately designed and approved more than $900 million in assistance for relief, recovery, and reconstruction of Yolanda-hit areas. In addition to grants and loans, ongoing ADB projects for transport, conditional cash transfers, and agrarian reform were re-designed to help affected communities.

Philippines: A safer home for Maricel and her family

17 November 2014 - 2:24pm
Source: Agency for Technical Cooperation and Development Country: Philippines

A safer home for Maricel and her family

Typhoon Haiyan one of the deadliest and most powerful storms made landfall in the Philippines on 8th November 2013. Huge numbers of houses were either completely destroyed or heavily damaged.

Moving forward in the early recovery and rehabilitation stage, ACTED teams supported by ShelterBox are facilitating the construction of 300 houses in Northern Leyte in the Municipalities of Alangalang and Barugo. Newly constructed houses incorporate Build Back Safer Techniques to make sure that people’s homes resist disaster better in the future.

Big Change for Maricel

Maricel lives in the community of San Diego in the Municipality of Alangalang. She is 32 years old and has two young children and another baby on the way. The family’s primary income is based on the farming Maricel’s husband does. Maricel tells of the difference between her new and old house “we couldn’t sleep before because our bed was too narrow”. Since the typhoon Maricel and her family have lived in a makeshift house made from salvaged GI sheeting and coconut leaves. She is very happy that she now has a bigger and more secure house for her and her children.

Participating in the building process

Maricel attended all construction related meetings and workshops conducted by ACTED in her community and she understands well the importance of building back safe:

During construction of her house, Maricel tells that attending trainings and workshops allowed her to supervise construction activities to ensure that her new house met build back safer standards. Maricel is making her house a home and has already added brightly coloured curtains and potted plants.

Philippines: A year after Haiyan, MCC continues rebuilding in Philippines

17 November 2014 - 11:59am
Source: Mennonite Central Committee Country: Philippines

By Laurie Robinson

Nov. 17, 2014

AKRON, Pa. -- One year after Typhoon Haiyan destroyed the house of Dominga Arias in the Philippines, the 50-year-old widow and mother of three has a new home with a more spacious bedroom than she did before.

The simple wood structure with a tin roof was built by combining wood from her old house with a shelter kit of new wood, tin roofing, rebar and building supplies, provided by Mennonite Central Committee (MCC) through Church World Service (CWS) and its partners.

The new building in Leyte Province was critical to Arias’ recovery because her income from washing other people’s clothes does not cover her expenses.

“I like my new house better because it’s stronger and the materials are of good quality,” Arias told Kriz Cruzado, who oversees MCC’s typhoon response. “But, my favorite part of the house is our bedroom because this is where we snuggle as a family.”

By the end of September, Arias was one of 5,076 families that had received new shelter kits through the $4.3 million in donations given to MCC after the Nov. 8, 2013, typhoon devastated large swaths of central Philippines. In addition, Filipinos trained in disaster-resistant construction were paid in cash and food to build 4,146 homes so far.

The donations also will support reconstruction of 72 classrooms in 12 schools, where students are currently meeting in temporary spaces.

Peacebuilders Community, Inc., a Philippines-based ministry of Mennonite Church Canada Witness, has provided training in emergency response and conflict resolution for pastors. Ecoweb, another local partner, completed construction of 40 homes, distributed construction materials to an additional 118 families and provided training in disaster risk reduction.

Many laborers, including carpenter Agustin Abilar of Leyte Province, lost their sources of income in the typhoon. Abilar’s carpentry tools and rice were washed away. However, through MCC’s cash-for-work program, he was able to purchase some carpentry tools to start working as a carpenter again.

“I also learned new techniques in building houses, especially ways of making them typhoon resistant. Certainly, I could use this new knowledge whenever I get carpentry jobs,” Abilar said.

In a food-for-work project, laborers worked together to dig out a tilapia fish pond on Ronaldo Elcarte’s property in Leyte Province, creating a new way for him to earn money. Recognizing the larger need of the community, Elcarte formed a cooperative with 15 people, who helped to purchased fingerlings for the pond, so that the project benefits all of them.

The food package that Cantina Velarde picked up as payment for her husband’s work on community projects included turkey canned by MCC’s canning volunteers and crew. MCC sent 40,320 cans of meat last January that are being used in the food-for-work program.

“It’s the first time that I received a food bag like this,” said Velarde. “I couldn’t buy the contents of this bag because they are expensive. We don’t have enough income, so eating good food is almost a luxury. We will consume these foods slowly, so we could stretch it for weeks.”

MCC is a faith-based, nongovernmental organization that works in more than 60 countries responding to disasters, encouraging sustainable development and strengthening local peace and justice initiatives.

Mennonite Central Committee: Relief, development and peace in the name of Christ

—END—

Philippines: NDDRMC Update Sitrep No. 62 re Monitoring Activities on the Alert Status of Mayon Volcano

17 November 2014 - 7:37am
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

I. ALERT STATUS OF MAYON VOLCANO

A. Alert Level 3 is still in effect as of 8:00 AM, 17 November 2014. At this present stage potentially eruptible magma has already been intruded and continues to be intruded beneath the edifice. At any given time in the following weeks to months, this magma can eventually be erupted quietly as lava flows or explosively as vertical eruption columns and pyroclastic flows or both. Mayon Volcano's seismic network detected one (1) rock fall event during the past 24 hour observation period, consistent with overall slow, magma intrusion at depth that has characterized this year's activity.

Philippines: NDDRMC Update Sitrep No. 58 re Monitoring Activities on the Alert Status of Mayon Volcano

17 November 2014 - 6:56am
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

I. ALERT STATUS OF MAYON VOLCANO

A. Alert Level 3 is still in effect as of 8:00 AM, 13 November 2014. At this present stage potentially eruptible magma has already been intruded and continues to be intruded beneath the edifice. At any given time in the following weeks to months, this magma can eventually be erupted quietly as lava flows or explosively as vertical eruption columns and pyroclastic flows or both. Mayon Volcano's seismic network detected one (1) volcanic earthquake during the past 24 hour observation period, consistent with overall slow, magma intrusion at depth that has characterized this year's activity.

Indonesia: Asia Pacific Region: Weekly Regional Humanitarian Snapshot (11 - 17 November 2014)

17 November 2014 - 5:10am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, Philippines, Sri Lanka

INDONESIA

Continued heavy rains caused more flooding and landslides across Indonesia. Flooding has killed one person and damaged 30 houses in West Sumatra Province and inundated 372 houses in Riau Province. In West Java Province, a landslide injured three people and flash floods from the Cisangli River inundated approximately 220 houses, affecting 1,200 people.

Flooding affected over 53,000 people in Aceh Barat Daya and Aceh Jaya Districts.

In early Nov, flooding also damaged over 10,330 houses in Aceh Selatan and Nagan Raya Districts. Local authorities are responding to these events, deploying teams and relief items. International assistance was not requested or expected.

1 person dead 54,200 people affected

A 7.3 magnitude earthquake struck off the coast of Indonesia on 15 Nov at 09:31. The epicentre was located approximately 158 kms off Bitung District, North Maluku Province. The earthquake was felt in Ternate and Sitaro of North Maluku Province, and Manado of North Sulawesi Province. The Indonesia Agency for Meteorology (BMKG) confirmed a 0.9 meter tsunami wave hit Jailolo (20 kms from Ternate, North Maluku) at 09:43 Jakarta time and 0.01 metre tsunami in Tobelo at 10:24 Jakarta time. Latest reports from the National Disaster Management Authority (BNPB) indicate the earthquake caused light damage in North Sulawesi Province and there were no casualties.

SRI LANKA

Humanitarian agencies have conducted a desk review of secondary data and compiled a draft report on the landslide that occurred in Meeriyabadda Estate, Haldummulla division, Badulla district on 29 Oct. The secondary data was provided by the Disaster Management Centre, Sri Lanka Red Cross Society, and international humanitarian partners to ascertain the needs, response to date and remaining gaps. Initial findings indicate 37 people died and 22 remain missing. Over 4,460 people are displaced and seeking support from 28 welfare centres in Badulla district.

22 people missing 4,460 people displaced

MALAYSIA

The Malaysian Government will launch a three-year programme to plant one million trees in the Cameron Highlands and halt construction of new hotels or condominiums in the area after five people died and five were injured when flash floods struck on 5 Nov. Massive illegal clearing in the Cameron Highlands was blamed for the flash floods which resulted in the landslides and mud floods.

More than 203 residents from 47 families in Kampung Baru and Bertam Valley were evacuated in the incident, which caused widespread damage. The Environment Minister handed out a contribution of RM1,000 (US$ 300) to each of the 33 families hit by the disaster and establish a new housing scheme.

5 people dead