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Updated: 5 hours 49 min ago

Philippines: Philippines: UP to continue Project NOAH

26 February 2017 - 11:24pm
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

QUEZON CITY, Feb. 27 - At its 1325th meeting on February 23, 2017, the University of the Philippines Board of Regents approved the adoption of Project NOAH (Nationwide Operational Assessment of Hazards) by UP upon the termination of its administration by the Department of Science and Technology (DOST) on February 28.

“In a sense, Project NOAH is coming home,” said UP President Danilo L. Concepcion after the BOR meeting, noting that the project was conceived by the DOST with the help of UP professors, led by its executive director Dr. Alfredo Mahar Lagmay from the National Institute of Geological Sciences (NIGS), and that most of the project’s staff have come from UP.

Project NOAH began as a research program under the DOST in 2012 following the Typhoon Sendong tragedy in 2011. Having delivered its research results and after two extensions, the project was scheduled to end when UP stepped in to continue it.

“The project’s benefits go far beyond its research value,” said Concepcion. “It has literally been a lifesaver for millions of Filipinos threatened by natural disasters like floods, landslides, and storm surges. It deserves a new lease on life, and UP is happy to welcome it into its fold.”

Project NOAH was designed to harness technologies and management services for disaster risk-reduction activities offered by the DOST through PAGASA, PHIVOLCS, and the DOST’s Advanced Science and Technology Institute (ASTI), in partnership with the UP National Institute of Geological Sciences (NIGS) and the UP College of Engineering.

For the past four years, the media and the general public have come to depend on Project NOAH’s assessments for guidance in disaster situations. “We have offered open access to our findings and services, empowering the people—local governments and communities—to make decisions for themselves,” Lagmay explained.

The program will now fall under the Office of the President in UP. “We were a program in need of a home,” added Lagmay. “Disaster management should involve more than science and technology. We also need artists and educators to communicate messages more effectively. UP is an interdisciplinary community and will make the perfect home for us, given that our disaster problem will grow even bigger in the future. We remain deeply grateful to the DOST for having hosted us, and we look forward to complementing the work of its agencies toward our common goal of mitigating the effects of disasters on our people.” (UP)

Philippines: MGB6 to assess towns most vulnerable to risks

26 February 2017 - 2:42am
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

Elsa S. Subong

ILOILO CITY, 24 Feb (PIA)—Fourteen towns in the region are set to undergo vulnerability and risk assessment, according to the DENR-Mines and Geosciences Bureau-6.

These municipalities are Cabatuan, Guimbal, Tigbauan, Miagao, New Lucena and Mina in Iloilo; Banga, Batan and New Washington in Aklan; Belison in Antique; Panit-an, Dao and Roxas City in Capiz.

MGB Regional Director Engr. Leo Van Juguan, said that the VRA is a continuing program of the MGB in line with the geohazard assessment and mapping program of the government.

“The MGB has been in the forefront of conducting field surveys and assessments to generate information on geological hazards,” Juguan said.

“Added to this are the risks and vulnerabilities of localities and the recommendation on measures to mitigate the impacts of natural hazards,” Juguan further said.

Mae Magarzo, chief of the Geosciences Division said the VRA looks at the degree of vulnerability and potential risks of an area given the exposures of three elements: population, built-up areas and roads, to rain-induced landslides and floods.

She said that the 1:10,000 geohazard mapping of the MGB was completed and has given information on the extent of vulnerability of barangays and sitios to natural hazards.

“Taking this information further, the VRA will produce data on the number of population, the extent of built-up areas and the roads that will be affected given the extent of exposures to hazards,” Magarzo said.

The final output of the VRA are risk exposure maps, which serve as decision-making tool that the local governments can use before and after disaster planning.

Last year, the MGB has conducted VRA for Oton, Leganes, Zarraga, Pavia and Barotac Nuevo in Iloilo; Laua-an, Patnongon, San Jose and Barbaza in Antique; Numancia in Aklan; Sigma in Capiz. (JCM/ESS/PIA-Iloilo)

Philippines: NDRRMC SitRep No. 14 re Effects of Magnitude 6.7 Earthquake in Surigao City, Surigao del Norte

24 February 2017 - 1:46am
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

Date: 24 February 2017, 8:00 AM

I. SITUATION OVERVIEW

At 10:03 PM on 10 February 2017, Friday, a strong earthquake of magnitude 6.7 shook the island of Mindanao. The epicenter is located 16 km offshore northwest of Surigao City, Surigao Strait with a depth of 10 km. The earthquake was generated by the movement of Surigao segment of the Philippine Fault. Small-magnitude earthquakes followed afterwards, and as of 6:00 AM of 21 February 2017, 227 aftershocks have been recorded by the PHIVOLCS seismic monitoring network.

Based on preliminary intensity reports, the strongest ground shaking was felt at PHIVOLCS Earthquake Intensity Scale (PEIS) VII (Destructive) in Surigao City. Furthermore, the municipalities of Pintuyan in Southern Leyte, and San Francisco and Malimono in Surigao del Norte experienced the ground shaking at PEIS VI (Very Strong), while the municipalities of Mainit and Placer in Surigao Del Norte, Libjo and Sari Jose in Dinagat Island, San Ricardo, Limasawa and San Francisco in Southern Leyte and Manduae City felt the shaking at PEIS V (Strong). This earthquake was felt PEIS IV to I as far as 250 km away (Butuan City, Ormoc City, Tacloban City, Catbalogan City, Bislig City, Cebu City, Cagayan De Oro City, Dumaguete City and Tagbilaran City) from the epicentral area. The strong ground shaking near the epicentral area resulted to damages to some buildings, roads and bridges.

II. EFFECTS

A. AFFECTED POPULATION

  1. A total of 6,472 families / 32,360 persons were affected in 82 barangays in the province of Surigao del Norte and a total of 1,567 families / 7,835 persons are served outside evacuation centers.

Philippines: Philippines: NDRRMC SitRep No. 14 re Effects of Magnitude 6.7 Earthquake in Surigao City, Surigao del Norte

24 February 2017 - 1:46am
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

Date: 24 February 2017, 8:00 AM

I. SITUATION OVERVIEW

At 10:03 PM on 10 February 2017, Friday, a strong earthquake of magnitude 6.7 shook the island of Mindanao. The epicenter is located 16 km offshore northwest of Surigao City, Surigao Strait with a depth of 10 km. The earthquake was generated by the movement of Surigao segment of the Philippine Fault. Small-magnitude earthquakes followed afterwards, and as of 6:00 AM of 21 February 2017, 227 aftershocks have been recorded by the PHIVOLCS seismic monitoring network.

Based on preliminary intensity reports, the strongest ground shaking was felt at PHIVOLCS Earthquake Intensity Scale (PEIS) VII (Destructive) in Surigao City. Furthermore, the municipalities of Pintuyan in Southern Leyte, and San Francisco and Malimono in Surigao del Norte experienced the ground shaking at PEIS VI (Very Strong), while the municipalities of Mainit and Placer in Surigao Del Norte, Libjo and Sari Jose in Dinagat Island, San Ricardo, Limasawa and San Francisco in Southern Leyte and Manduae City felt the shaking at PEIS V (Strong). This earthquake was felt PEIS IV to I as far as 250 km away (Butuan City, Ormoc City, Tacloban City, Catbalogan City, Bislig City, Cebu City, Cagayan De Oro City, Dumaguete City and Tagbilaran City) from the epicentral area. The strong ground shaking near the epicentral area resulted to damages to some buildings, roads and bridges.

II. EFFECTS

A. AFFECTED POPULATION

  1. A total of 6,472 families / 32,360 persons were affected in 82 barangays in the province of Surigao del Norte and a total of 1,567 families / 7,835 persons are served outside evacuation centers.

Philippines: Philippines: NDRRMC scales up preps for magnitude 7.2 earthquake

24 February 2017 - 1:41am
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

QUEZON CITY, Feb. 24 - National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC) members convene to discuss plans and preparations for a magnitude 7.2 earthquake on Thursdays at the NDRRMC Conference Room, Camp General Emilio Aguinaldo, Quezon City.

NDRRMC Vice Chairperson for Preparedness and Secretary of the Interior and Local Government Ismael D Sueno chaired the meeting attended by Vice Chairperson for Response and Social Welfare Secretary Judy M Taguiwalo and NDRRMC Executive Director and Civil Defense Administrator Usec Ricardo B Jalad. Directors of member agencies namely; DILG, DSWD, OCD, DOST-PHIVOLCS, DPWH, DOH, DepEd, DFA, MMDA, PNP, AFP, PCG, BFP, PDRF, ADMU were present during the meeting as well as Regional Directors of OCD and DILG from Luzon.

Mr. Ishmael C Narag of PHIVOLCS presented on the Metro Manila West Valley Fault System including the possible effects of a magnitude 7.2 earthquake in Metro Manila and nearby provinces. In his presentation, he focused on the massive impacts of a strong earthquake in Metro Manila including a huge economic loss. Mr. Narag emphasized that the “Big One” is not only for Metro Manila but also in other regions of the country thus the need for a whole of society preparation.

BGen Manuel S Gonzales of MMDA gave an overview of the Oplan Metro Yakal Plus which outlines the contingency plan for an earthquake based on the Metro Manila Earthquake Impact Reduction Study (MMEIRS). This stipulates the twinning system or the regions identified to assist the quadrants in Metro Manila during a response.

Further, Director Felino O Castro V of DSWD explained the National Disaster Response Plan (NDRP) for Earthquake and Tsunami. The plan was approved by the National Council during the recent council meeting on 17 January 2017 and is being cascaded through the DSWD.

During the discussion, members of the National Council emphasized on the full utilization of the NDRP and recommended that Local Government Units (LGUs) align its plans with the NDRP on assisting Metro Manila in the event of an earthquake. The interoperability of all the plans of government agencies and LGUs was discussed during the meeting.

Secretary Judy M Taguiwalo expressed the need to firm up local plans and identify the details of assistance needed from the LGUs.

“We should spell out the assistance we need from the LGUs to harmonize emergency response in the event of an earthquake,” said Secretary Taguiwalo.

The National Council is set to create a Technical Working Group to draft the guidelines for the creation of local plans for assisting Regions likely to be affected. A team composed of experts was proposed to be organized to monitor the progress of preparations for the implementation of the NDRP for Earthquake and Tsunami. (NDRRMC)

World: Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific: Humanitarian Civil-Military Coordination (as of 23 Feb 2017)

23 February 2017 - 10:50pm
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Bangladesh, Fiji, Indonesia, Malaysia, Nepal, Philippines, Thailand, Vanuatu, World

Overview

Humanitarian Civil-Military Coordination facilitates the essential dialogue and interaction between civilian and military actors in humanitarian emergencies necessary to protect and promote humanitarian principles, avoid competition, minimize inconsistency, and when appropriate, pursue common goals. The Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific (ROAP) civil-military coordination strategy focuses on building a predictable civil-military coordination engagement tailored to the regional context. An important element is establishing and maintaining strategic and operational partnerships with military and police during the response preparedness phase.

Philippines: After Nock-ten: Responding to dire needs with the START Network

23 February 2017 - 2:52pm
Source: Agency for Technical Cooperation and Development Country: Philippines

Raising an alert to the START Network about the crisis sparked by typhoon Nock-ten, which struck the Philippines on 25th December 2016, ACTED and other INGOs enabled the quick release of a START Fund* to respond to the emergency within 45 days. ACTED joined the START Network in May 2016: the emergency response to typhoon Nock-ten is the first operation implemented with funding from the START Network.

Providing Shelter kits to address urgent needs of vulnerable families

With this funding, ACTED provided shelter and water, hygiene and sanitation (WASH) assistance from the beginning of January until the end of February, in consortium with Action Against Hunger and Handicap International in the island province of Catanduanes, heavily struck by typhoon Nock-ten on Christmas 2016. In total, ACTED and its consortium partners distributed 1,400 shelter kits in the Bato, San Andres and San Miguel municipalities (Catanduanes province).

ACTED also raised awareness on build back safer techniques and hired cash-for-workers to help the most vulnerable families rebuild their home, reaching some 430 households. In parallel, the consortium partners distributed hygiene kits and provided hygiene promotion sessions in the same areas to the most vulnerable households, notably households with a person with disability or a pregnant/lactating women, and households headed by a single woman.

A lot of needs remain unmet

In spite of the shelter and hygiene interventions carried out by the consortium, needs remain important. Nock-ten first made landfall in the Catanduanes province, and about 90% of its population was affected by the typhoon, according to the Provincial Government, particularly in southern municipalities.

With 24,300 shelters partially damaged and 9,500 shelters completely destroyed, many families still need shelter assistance, particularly transitional shelters, but also additional kits. Similarly, as abaca plants, which constitute the main source of livelihoods, were destroyed, families will soon face a food security crisis: priority is now to address urgent food needs of these populations.

Advocating for a greater visibility of disaster-affected communities

Since Haiyan, the government of the Philippines has improved its preparedness and is now able to significantly reduce the number of casualties when natural hazards hit the country, which allowed to strengthen the resilience of populations affected by natural disasters.

Concerns now focus on the amount of assistance provided in the affected areas: only a small part of the food needs have been covered so far. NGOs strive to respond to the major issues and still important dire needs, but are facing difficulties in finding funds.

  • The Start Fund was created to fill a gap in humanitarian funding. It enables NGOs to make collective decisions on the basis of need alone and respond quickly to ‘under the radar’ emergencies around the world.