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Philippines: DSWD ready to provide more support for drought-hit LGUs

12 April 2016 - 8:12am
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

The different Field Offices of the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) nationwide are currently conducting assessment activities at the provincial and municipal levels to determine further additional requirements for food assistance and implementation of Cash-for-Work (CFW) in drought-stricken areas.

DSWD Secretary Corazon Juliano-Soliman reiterated that the Department has adequate funds to augment the resources of local government units (LGUs) in responding to the needs of affected families.

To date, DSWD has provided a total of P1,270,615,194.13 worth of assistance to 1,172,260 affected families nationwide. The amount includes the cost of food assistance and the implementation of CFW funded under the Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation and Quick Response Funds of the Department for 2015-2016.

Currently, the highest number of beneficiaries came from Region XII and the Autonomous Region for Muslim Mindanao (ARMM) with 330,060 and 338,314 families, respectively.

World: Regional Consultative Group on Humanitarian Civil Military Coordination for Asia and the Pacific - Newsletter Issue 1, April 2016

12 April 2016 - 5:21am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Bangladesh, Indonesia, Nepal, Philippines, World

Welcome to the First Edition of the Regional Consultative Group (RCG) on Humanitarian CivilMilitary Coordination for Asia and the Pacific Newsletter. This Newsletter will be published every two months to provide an update on the RCG work as well as to inform the UN-CMCoord community about upcoming UN-CMCoord events in the Asia-Pacific region.

For this edition, as chair of the RCG for 2016, the Government of the Philippines would like to share with RCG members the following updates:

  1. Consultative Group on Humanitarian Civil-Military Coordination Annual Meeting outcomes;

  2. Updates on the implementation of the RCG 2016 Work Plan;

  3. Invitation to RCG members to join the Advisory Group on common humanitarian civil-military coordination standards.

World: Prevention and Treatment of Severe Acute Malnutrition in East Asia and the Pacific - Report of a Regional Consultation - Bangkok, Thailand, June 24-26, 2015

11 April 2016 - 11:43pm
Source: UN Children's Fund Country: Cambodia, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Indonesia, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Mongolia, Myanmar, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Timor-Leste, Viet Nam, World
Executive Summary

Rationale and objectives of the meeting

In the East Asia and the Pacific Region (EAPR), despite economic growth and achievements in health and nutrition indicators, maternal and child undernutrition rates and burden remain extremely high. The annual estimated number of cases of severe wasting in EAPR countries is over six million, but the indirect coverage of the treatment of Severe Acute Malnutrition (SAM) is less than 2%. Prevention and management of acute malnutrition is therefore a large unfinished agenda in this region.

As part of a broader effort by UNICEF and partners to raise awareness and promote commitment to the issue, the “Regional Consultation on Prevention and Treatment of Severe Acute Malnutrition in East Asia and the Pacific” was held in Bangkok, Thailand, on June 24-26, 2015. The meeting was organised by the UNICEF East Asia and Pacific Regional Office (EAPRO). Participants included government representatives, UNICEF staff from headquarters, regional offices and EAPRO country offices, staff from other United Nations (UN) agencies such as the World Food Programme (WFP) and the World Health Organization (WHO), Non Governmental Organisations (NGOs), such as Save the Children, Action Against Hunger (ACF-UK) and Alive & Thrive (Vietnam), Institute de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD), academia (University of Louvain) and donors.

The objectives of the consultation were to:

(1) discuss the latest evidence on nutrition-specific and nutrition-sensitive delivery platforms and models for the prevention and treatment of acute malnutrition, with a special focus on SAM;

(2) examine the strengths and challenges of the currently implemented approaches in the region, with a focus on SAM management;

(3) identify the importance of acute malnutrition within the larger nutrition operating environment, and the integration into national systems and existing coordination mechanisms at country level.

Philippines: El Niño survivors in the Philippines: rice not bullets

11 April 2016 - 2:48pm
Source: Peace Direct Country: Philippines

April 11 2016: The El Niño drought has left thousands hungry in the Philippines. There have been violent scenes around food distribution but starving people need bullets not rice, says Rey Ty.

North Cotabato in Mindanao, southern Philippines, has been experiencing a devastating drought for six months now, due to the effects of El Niño. This weather phenomenon is affecting 36,000 people and the local government has declared a state of calamity in seven towns and one city in North Cotabato.

On 30 March, 2016, 6,000 peasants and indigenous people, as well as members of cause-oriented groups, first gathered in front of the National Food Authority (NFA) warehouse blocking the Davao-Cotabato highway in Kidapawan City in Cotabato, Mindanao. They organised protest action, asking the government to provide emergency support for the hunger experienced due to effects of El Niño on their agricultural production.

The local government, to which the national government has devolved budget and resource allocation, promised three kilos of rice to each family every four months. The protesters refused the measly offer and were angry at the delayed release of food relief and calamity funds. They demanded a subsidy of 15,000 sacks of rice from the National Food Authority, free distribution of seedlings, an increase in crop prices, and the removal of military forces from their communities.

On the morning of Friday 2 April, 2016, a police officer gave an ultimatum to the protesters, the latter expressing they would rather talk to the governor who was supposed to hold a second round of talks with them.

Pedro Arnado, chairman of the Kilusang Magbubukid ng Pilipinas (Philippine Peasant Movement), Cotabato chapter said: “All we wanted was relief from the drought, especially the rice, and we would peacefully leave but the chief of police insisted that they would disperse us by force if we did not leave.”

The protests: what happened

A few videos online showed the violent dispersal of the protesters. With truncheons and shields, policemen pushed back the protesters who stood firm. By around 11 AM, the barricade was brutally dispersed, shots fired, and protesters scampered for safety.

When the protest line was broken and mayhem ensued, protesters fought back with whatever they could grab, such as stones and sticks. Police fired M1 rifles at them. At least two protesters were killed by the state forces, 116 were injured and 87 protesters were missing. Two police officers with head trauma are in a critical condition and the security forces detained about 78 protesters.

Fearing for their safety and lives, many protesters sought refuge at the local Spottswood Methodist Mission Center, which was surrounded by the state forces. Reporters were barred from entering the church grounds. The church provided sanctuary to the fleeing protesters and served as an evacuation center, to which the state forces laid siege.

As the permit to demonstrate expired Friday morning, the police and the provincial governor justified the violent dispersal in the name of public interest. Provincial Governor Emmylou Mendoza defended the attack on unarmed, hungry people as a “clearing operation” as the permit to assemble expired.

On the morning of Saturday 2 April, 2016, a search warrant was served to church leaders by the police. No weapons were found in the church. Governor Mendoza threatened to sue United Methodist Church Bishop Ciriaco Francisco, writing that harbouring protesters “is punishable by law.” As the majority of the Filipinos are Christian, when the Church sides with the poor and the oppressed, this sends a clear signal that the protesters stand on high moral ground and that the government must favourably respond to their demands.

The local response: civil society condemns the violence

Many civil society organisations, church groups and politicians were shocked at the violence of the dispersal and government defence of the brutal dispersal. For example, in the aftermath of the bloodbath, the Department of Interior and Local Government bestowed medals upon policemen who were involved which many in civil society slammed.

The National Union of Journalists of the Philippines (NUJP) also condemned “police intimidation and attempts to suppress information” by preventing media practitioners from covering the violent dispersal in Kidapawan, during which many journalists were harassed physically.

Similarly, religious institutions came out in support of the protesters. Iglesia Filipina Independiente (IFI) Bishop Rhee Timbang of Surigao Diocese said: “This is too much an abuse and oppression against our farmers who toil for our foods.” President of the Catholic Bishops Conference of the Philippines, Archbishop Socrates Villegas, said: “May the police and military return to their mandate to preserve peace, protect the weak and serve justice.”

The General Board of Church and Society of the The United Methodist Church (GBCS-TUMC) extended its support for Bishop Ciriaco Francisco of the Davao Episcopal Area and the farmers. A number of other religious institutions called for donations to support those suffering, condemned the violence and stood in solidarity with those protesting.

Perhaps most prominently, New York based Human Rights Watch said: “The government needs to urgently investigate the incident, particularly the conduct of law enforcement personnel that may have led to the bloodshed, and hold accountable anyone found responsible regardless of rank or affiliation.”

The political response: a violation of rights

Whilst the Philippine government came under fire for the violent dispersal, those speaking on behalf of the Malacañang Presidential Palace were defensive, calling for people not to “rush into judgment,” and claiming that the issue is highlighted to affect the results of the presidential elections. If the government admits culpability, the Aquino administration and Liberal Party’s bet for the Presidential race, Mar Roxas, will continue to drop in ratings.

In response to this, Presidential candidate Senator Grace Poe said the protesters were making a rightful demand for government assistance in times of drought. She called for an immediate investigation of the bloody dispersal. Other candidates upheld the Filipino right to free assembly, condemned the use of bullets to disperse protesters and called for a thorough investigation into the security forces who fired at the crowd.

Similarly, Vice Presidential candidate Senator Ferdinand Marcos, Jr. stood against the use of bullets to disperse protesters. Marcos said: “I deplore the use of bullets to answer legitimate demands of our farmers and their families in North Cotabato. They are hungry and they are just asking for food so they can feed their families. The violent dispersal was completely unnecessary.”

The legal response has so far focused on the violation of the rights of the protesters. The regional director of the Commission on Human Rights said that the police who fired shots at farmers who were on their knees had clearly violated human rights. Correspondingly, the National Union of Peoples’ Lawyers and its affiliate, the Union of Peoples’ Lawyers in Mindanao will file charges against GovernorEmmylou Taliño-Mendoza, police Supt. Alex Tagum and others responsible for the violence and killing.

The aftermath: what effects for local peace?

The Commission on Human Rights, the Senate, the Philippine National Police, and many civil society organisations are conducting separate probes into the violent dispersal.

And in Metro Manila, social movements staged a mass demonstration in from of the Department of Agriculture to protest. Many other rallies ensued in front of the headquarters of the Philippine National Police and elsewhere.

The violent dispersal of the peasants and indigenous peoples is a step backwards in the peacebuilding process. Mindanao is beset with many problems which led to the formation, development and rise of several Mindanao-based rebel groups, including the Moro National Liberation Front (MNLF), the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF), and their splinter groups. In addition, the nationwide underground revolutionary groups, such as the National Democratic Front and the Communist Party of the Philippines have a strong presence in Mindanao. The national government and local government must own up to the violent dispersal, hurting of protesters and killings in order for the peacebuilding efforts to move one step forward again.

In Mindanao, the hungry and suffering people cry for rice, not bullets.

Philippines: Is There an HIV Law in the Philippines?

11 April 2016 - 12:13pm
Source: Pulitzer Center Country: Philippines

ANA P. SANTOS

MANILA, Philippines – When the Philippines passed the HIV/AIDS Prevention and Control Act in 1998, it was celebrated as a pioneering law that primarily aimed to protect the rights of people living with HIV (PLHIV) and prevent the escalation of new HIV infections.

Read the full article

Philippines: DSWD, LGUs intensify aid for families affected by drought

10 April 2016 - 5:01am
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

QUEZON CITY, April 10 - The Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) and local government units (LGUs) in Region XII which are experiencing drought due to the El Niño phenomenon have strengthened their collaborative efforts to speed up delivery of assistance to affected families.

DSWD-Field Office XII Regional Director Bai Zorahayda Taha met on Tuesday with North Cotabato Govenor Emmylou Taliño-Mendoza and Kidapawan City Mayor Joseph Evangelista to identify areas of collaboration. They agreed that DSWD-Field Office XII will extend food assistance for 150,000 families in the province with an estimated requirement of 15,000 bags of NFA rice at five kilos per family for April.

The distribution of food assistance shall be coursed through the Provincial/City/Municipal Social Welfare Development Office (P/C/MSWDO) of each area.

Field Office XII remains in close coordination with the P/C/MSWDO of North Cotabato for the immediate release of rice allocation per LGU.

In addition, the Field Office will also provide burial assistance amounting to P5,000 each for the two bereaved families of the farmers who died, and P3,000 each for families with injured family member during the incident in Kidapawan City.

DSWD is also providing psycho-social support to emotionally disturbed rallyists. The DSWD, through its Field Office in SOCCSKSARGEN, will also extend P1,000 each as “balik-barrio” assistance.

On the other hand, the provincial LGU of North Cotabato will extend food assistance for the month of May.

In other drought-hit LGUs, validation and assessment of affected famers in Siayan, Zamboanga del Norte and Zamboanga City is ongoing.

DSWD Field Office- IX is also coordinating with the PSWDO in Basilan in the Autonomous Region in Mindanao (ARMM) for the list of names in the affected municipalities.

In Davao Region, DSWD-Field Office XI provided an initial 2,000 family food packs amounting to P774,000 to Davao del Sur; 1,000 packs amounting to P387,000 to Compostela Valley; and, 1,000 packs worth P387,000 to Davao del Norte.

In CARAGA, the DSWD-Field Office here is continuously coordinating with the Regional Disaster Response Committee and Inter-Agency Monitoring of the Roadmap to Address the Impact of El Niño (RAIN) on the updates regarding the calamity.

The Field Office has prepositioned a total of 5,000 family food packs in LGUs located in strategic areas.

Another 6,859 FFPs are available at the DSWD Regional Bodega located at DPWH Equipment Service in Tiniwisan, Butuan City, and 1,000 packs at the PSWDO in Tandag, Surigao del Sur. These can be delivered to requesting LGUs anytime.

To date, the DSWD has released a total of P1,270,645,194.13 worth of assistance to LGUs for families affected by the prolonged period of low rainfall in Regions NCR, I, II, III, IV-A, IV-B, VI, VII, X, XI XII and ARMM. The amount includes the cost of family food packs, hygiene kits, and the implementation of Cash-for-Work funded under the Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation (CCAM) and Quick Response Funds of the Department.

Todate, a total of 139,996 families or 695,345 persons from Regions VI, X, XII, and ARMM have been affected by El Niño. (DSWD)

World: A Transparent and Accountable Judiciary to Deliver Justice for All

9 April 2016 - 2:33pm
Source: UN Development Programme Country: Afghanistan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Colombia, Indonesia, Kenya, Nepal, Nigeria, Paraguay, Philippines, Serbia, Somalia, World

Executive summary

Corruption is hampering the delivery of justice globally. People perceive the judiciary as the second most corrupt sector, just after the police. In the last decade governments and development partners’ efforts to reform judiciaries have been undermined by corruption, and few have taken concrete steps to address it.

Although there are several international standards on judicial integrity and independence, implementation is the challenge. But it doesn’t have to be this way, UNDP experience in the field shows that change is possible in judicial systems.

This report finds that opening up judicial systems fosters integrity and increases public trust without impeding independence of the judiciary. The report advocates for judiciaries to open up to peer learning by engaging representatives from judiciaries of other countries in capacity assessments to improve judicial integrity. It also encourages judiciaries to consult end-users, associations of judges and use new technologies to foster transparency and accountability.

There are few wide-ranging success stories but lessons can be learned from piecemeal solutions that have worked in individual countries. The report highlights stories from countries in various contexts - Afghanistan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Colombia, Indonesia, Kenya, Kosovo, Nepal,
Nigeria, Paraguay, Philippines, and Somalia. It draws on international expert discussions held during the 16th session of Transparency International’s IACC.

The report discusses internal oversight within the judiciary such as judicial councils, and the related challenge of finding an appropriate model that balances judicial independence and accountability. It also looks at how stakeholders such as associations of judges and court users can become allies in reforming judicial systems. For example, the report cites the use of surveys and consultations with court users that have led to more responsive services and reduced demands for bribes. Another potential transformative tool is the use of new technologies and court automation. For example, digitising court documents and statistics has helped increase transparency for people who can access judgements on-line, reduce bureaucracy, and achieve efficiency. Even in post-conflict environments where change is difficult, NGOs working with citizens to monitor trials in selected provinces have contributed to improving the administration of justice.

The recently approved 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development provides renewed impetus to deliver justice for all. Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 16 includes key targets for providing access to justice, and tackling corruption. The aim of the report is to help transform judicial systems across the world by illustrating inspirational experiences for delivering justice for all.

This report has six parts. Section 1 discusses the importance of promoting a transparent and accountable judiciary to deliver justice for all as part of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. With the monitoring of SDG 16, it will become increasingly important to collect evidence on judicial systems to measure progress over time.

In Section 2, the report reviews the main international surveys and indexes on corruption perception, as well as diagnostic tools available for assessing judicial integrity.
The Nigerian experience distils lessons from a multi-year judicial reform programme, where the broader community was instrumental in developing a baseline for reform and monitoring progress over time.

Section 3 focuses on internal judicial oversight mechanisms for strengthening integrity and accountability, while reflecting on their appropriateness in different contexts, including in post-conflict countries, such as Bosnia and Herzegovina and Kosovo, as well as in Nepal and Somalia.

Section 4 argues that, although technology is not a panacea, automation of court services and proceedings can expedite procedures, avoid human interaction to minimize corruption risks, and give citizens access to court information and statistics. Indonesia and the Philippines provide case studies on how technical solutions can open up judicial verdicts to public scrutiny. Reference is also made to UNDP’s “Strengthening Management Capacities for Governance” approach in Latin America and the Caribbean.
Section 5 presents innovative approaches from Afghanistan and Kenya for involving the community and civil society in trial monitoring and as part of court user committees to increase judicial integrity and accountability.

In Section 6, the report concludes with a call to judiciaries around the world to open up their institutions to peer learning by involving representatives from judiciaries of other countries in assessments of judicial integrity. It highlights some principles to guide these assessments in a way that promotes ownership and effectiveness:

  • Making the assessment part of a capacity development exercise, not a mere ad-hoc evaluation;
    Executive Summary Ensuring that the capacity assessments are owned and driven by the judiciary itself while the role of external experts is limited to facilitating the self-assessment;

  • Involving judges and legal practitioners from other countries who have faced similar challenges to foster peer-to-peer exchange;

  • Having a participatory and inclusive capacity assessment that consults all levels of the organisation being assessed as well as other key actors such as associations of judges or court users;

  • Undertaking a capacity assessment that directly feeds into a reform process with the development of an integrity action plan by the organisation itself;

  • Grounding the integrity action plan developed as a result of the capacity assessments in normative and policy frameworks.

Finally, the report encourages development partners and researchers to work together in mapping out corruption risks in the overall justice system to develop more integrated programming on anti-corruption and rule of law.

Philippines: Linking Preparedness Response and Resilience in Emergency Contexts (LPRR): Philippines Case Study Policy Recommendations

8 April 2016 - 3:53pm
Source: King's College London, Christian Aid Country: Philippines

Authors: Rebecca Murphy, Mark Pelling, Emma Visman and Simone Di Vicenz

This policy brief outlines the core messages and recommendations coming out from the study that explored Christian Aid Typhoon Ketsana and Help Age International Typhoon Haiyan interventions. The authors asked community members, field staff, government officials and other key stakeholders what the biggest challenges were in implementing resilience informed humanitarian response and what they would recommend for improved practice. The brief aims to analyse past humanitarian interventions to understand and map out how emergency response can be better informed by communities’ understanding of what builds their resilience and links to longer term development.

This research was part of "Linking Preparedness Response and Resilience in Emergency Contexts (LPRR)" which is a START DEPP DfID funded 3 year, consortium led project aimed at strengthening humanitarian programming for more resilient communities. The consortium is led by Christian Aid and includes Action Aid, Concern Worldwide, Help Age International, Kings College London, Muslim Aid, Oxfam, Saferworld and World Vision.

World: World Bank Group Climate Change Action Plan

7 April 2016 - 7:14pm
Source: World Bank Country: Benin, Ethiopia, India, Mozambique, Philippines, Senegal, Tajikistan, Viet Nam, World

World Bank Group Unveils New Climate Action Plan

Plan to Help Countries Meet Paris COP21 Pledges

WASHINGTON, April 7, 2016—The World Bank Group today announced plans to help developing countries add 30 gigawatts of renewable energy – enough to power 150 million homes – to the world’s energy capacity, bring early warning systems to 100 million people and develop climate-smart agriculture investment plans for at least 40 countries – all by 2020.

These are among a number of ambitious targets laid out in the World Bank Group’s new Climate Change Action Plan, approved today, which aims to accelerate efforts to tackle climate change over the next five years and help developing countries deliver on their national climate plans submitted for the historic climate agreement reached at COP21 in Paris in December last year.

The release of the Climate Change Action Plan comes just two weeks before world leaders officially sign the Paris Agreement in New York. As part of the Paris process, 140 countries working with the Bank Group lodged national climate plans, known as Nationally Determined Contributions, or NDCs.

“Following the Paris climate agreement, we must now take bold action to protect our planet for future generations,” said World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim. “We are moving urgently to help countries make major transitions to increase sources of renewable energy, decrease high-carbon energy sources, develop green transport systems, and build sustainable, livable cities for growing urban populations. Developing countries want our help to implement their national climate plans, and we’ll do all we can to help them.”

To maximize impact, the Action Plan is focused on helping countries shape national policies and leverage private sector investment. IFC, a member of the World Bank Group, aims to expand its climate investments from the current $2.2 billion a year to a goal of $3.5 billion a year, and lead on leveraging an additional $13 billion a year in private sector financing by 2020. As well its own financing, the World Bank also intends to mobilize $25 billion in commercial financing for clean energy over the next five years. The Bank Group will also continue to deepen its work to help countries to put a price on carbon pollution to create incentives for public and private sector decision makers to make the right climate choices.

The Action Plan recognizes that climate change is a threat to efforts to end poverty, and that there is an increasing urgency to protect poor people and poor countries. As part of its response, the Bank Group plans to bring early warning systems to 100 million people across 15 developing countries, and help bring adaptive social protection – social safety nets that can quickly support people affected by a disaster or an economic shock – to an additional 50 million poor people by 2020. At the same time, the Bank Group will pilot a new approach in 15 cities that aims to boost urban resilience by integrating infrastructure, land use planning and disaster risk management.

“If we don’t act, climate change threatens to drive 100 million more people into poverty in the next 15 years,” said John Roome, Senior Director for Climate Change at the World Bank Group. “The Action Plan will allow us to help developing countries more quickly, and in the areas where support is most needed, such as disaster preparedness, social protection, and coastal protection.”

The Action Plan also lays out plans to quadruple funding over five years to make transport systems more resilient to climate change, as well as invest at least US$1 billion to promote energy efficiency and resilient building by 2020. IFC sees a large opportunity for promoting climate-smart urban infrastructure, and its EDGE Green Building Program aims to have a presence in 20 markets over the next 7 years. The World Bank Group will develop climate smart agricultural investment plans for at least 40 countries, design sustainable forest strategies for 50 countries by 2020 and promote climate-informed fisheries management.

The Bank Group will also help “green” the financial sector through a coordinated approach across banking, pensions and capital markets to implement changes needed nationally and globally. It will also create special teams to work with countries to generate a robust pipeline of bankable projects, with a focus on areas like rooftop solar and boosting the growth of distributed solar in Sub-Saharan Africa

The Action Plan aims to deliver on the Bank Group’s commitment – announced in October 2015 – to increase climate financing to potentially $29 billion annually by 2020, with the support of its members.

It also sets out a new approach to take the growing threat of climate change into account across the Bank Group’s operations. Climate risk screening – which is already applied to projects supported by IDA, the World Bank’s fund for the poorest countries – will be extended across other World Bank operations in early 2017.

Media Contacts

In Washington:
Nicholas Keyes
Tel : +1 (202) 473-9135
nkeyes@worldbankgroup.org

Mehreen Sheikh
Tel : +1 (202) 458-7336
msheikh1@worldbankgroup.org

For Broadcast Requests:
Huma Imtiaz
Tel : +1 (202) 473-2409
himtiaz@worldbankgroup.org

World: WHO Zika Virus, Microcephaly and Guillain-Barré Syndrome Situation Report, 7 April 2016

7 April 2016 - 11:18am
Source: World Health Organization Country: American Samoa, Argentina, Aruba (The Netherlands), Barbados, Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Bonaire, Saint Eustatius and Saba (The Netherlands), Brazil, Cabo Verde, Cambodia, Chile, Colombia, Cook Islands, Costa Rica, Cuba, Curaçao (The Netherlands), Dominica, Dominican Republic, Easter Island (Chile), Ecuador, El Salvador, Fiji, France, French Guiana (France), French Polynesia (France), Gabon, Guadeloupe (France), Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Indonesia, Italy, Jamaica, Malaysia, Maldives, Martinique (France), Mexico, Micronesia (Federated States of), New Caledonia (France), New Zealand, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Philippines, Puerto Rico (The United States of America), Saint Martin (France), Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, Sint Maarten (The Netherlands), Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Suriname, Thailand, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, United States of America, United States Virgin Islands, Vanuatu, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World

SUMMARY

  • From 1 January 2007 to 6 April 2016, Zika virus transmission was documented in a total of 62 countries and territories. Five of these (Cook Islands, French Polynesia, ISLA DE PASCUA – Chile, YAP (Federated States of Micronesia) and New Caledonia) reported a Zika virus outbreak that has terminated. Six countries have now reported locally acquired infection through sexual transmission (Argentina, Chile, France, Italy, New Zealand and the United States of America). Viet Nam is the country to most recently report mosquitoborne Zika virus transmission.

  • In the Region of the Americas, the geographical distribution of Zika virus has steadily widened since the presence of the virus was confirmed in 2015. Mosquito-borne Zika virus transmission has been reported in 33 countries and territories of this region.

  • From 2007, mosquito-borne Zika virus cases have been reported in 17 countries and areas of the Western Pacific Region.

  • Microcephaly and other fetal malformations potentially associated with Zika virus infection or suggestive of congenital infection have been reported in Brazil (1046 cases), Cabo Verde (two cases), Colombia (seven cases), French Polynesia (eight cases), Martinique (three cases) and Panama (one case). Two additional cases, each linked to a stay in Brazil, were detected in the United States of America and Slovenia.

  • In the context of Zika virus circulation, 13 countries or territories worldwide have reported an increased incidence of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and/or laboratory confirmation of a Zika virus infection among GBS cases.

  • Based on a growing body of preliminary research, there is scientific consensus that Zika virus is a cause of microcephaly and Guillain-Barré syndrome.

  • The global prevention and control strategy launched by the World Health Organization (WHO) as a Strategic Response Framework encompasses surveillance, response activities and research. This situation report is organized under those headings.

Philippines: DSWD, LGUs intensify aid for families affected by drought

7 April 2016 - 1:42am
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

The Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) and local government units (LGUs) in Region XII which are experiencing drought due to the El Niño phenomenon have strengthened their collaborative efforts to speed up delivery of assistance to affected families.

DSWD-Field Office XII Regional Director Bai Zorahayda Taha met on Tuesday with North Cotabato Govenor Emmylou Taliño-Mendoza and Kidapawan City Mayor Joseph Evangelista to identify areas of collaboration. They agreed that DSWD-Field Office XII will extend food assistance for 150,000 families in the province with an estimated requirement of 15,000 bags of NFA rice at five kilos per family for April.

The distribution of food assistance shall be coursed through the Provincial/City/Municipal Social Welfare Development Office (P/C/MSWDO) of each area.

Field Office XII remains in close coordination with the P/C/MSWDO of North Cotabato for the immediate release of rice allocation per LGU.

In addition, the Field Office will also provide burial assistance amounting to P5,000 each for the two bereaved families of the farmers who died, and P3,000 each for families with injured family member during the incident in Kidapawan City.

DSWD is also providing psycho-social support to emotionally disturbed rallyists. The DSWD, through its Field Office in SOCCSKSARGEN, will also extend P1,000 each as “balik-barrio” assistance.
On the other hand, the provincial LGU of North Cotabato will extend food assistance for the month of May.

Interventions in other areas In other drought-hit LGUs, validation and assessment of affected famers in Siayan, Zamboanga del Norte and Zamboanga City is ongoing.

DSWD Field Office- IX is also coordinating with the PSWDO in Basilan in the Autonomous Region in Mindanao (ARMM) for the list of names in the affected municipalities.

In Davao Region, DSWD-Field Office XI provided an initial 2,000 family food packs amounting to P774,000 to Davao del Sur; 1,000 packs amounting to P387,000 to Compostela Valley; and, 1,000 packs worth P387,000 to Davao del Norte.

In CARAGA, the DSWD-Field Office here is continuously coordinating with the Regional Disaster Response Committee and Inter-Agency Monitoring of the Roadmap to Address the Impact of El Niño (RAIN) on the updates regarding the calamity.

The Field Office has prepositioned a total of 5,000 family food packs in LGUs located in strategic areas.

Another 6,859 FFPs are available at the DSWD Regional Bodega located at DPWH Equipment Service in Tiniwisan, Butuan City, and 1,000 packs at the PSWDO in Tandag, Surigao del Sur. These can be delivered to requesting LGUs anytime.

Total aid To date, the DSWD has released a total of P1,270,645,194.13 worth of assistance to LGUs for families affected by the prolonged period of low rainfall in Regions NCR, I, II, III, IV-A, IV-B, VI, VII, X, XI XII and ARMM. The amount includes the cost of family food packs, hygiene kits, and the implementation of Cash-for-Work funded under the Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation (CCAM) and Quick Response Funds of the Department.

As of today, a total of 139,996 families or 695,345 persons from Regions VI, X, XII, and ARMM have been affected by El Niño.

Philippines: Government fairly successful in mitigating El Niño impact, but needs to accelerate RAIN implementation to address remaining gaps, NEDA says

7 April 2016 - 1:38am
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

PASIG CITY, April 7 –The Government has been fairly successful in mitigating the impact of El Niño particularly in ensuring sufficiency in supply of food and keeping food prices stable.

“We would like to assure the public that government is doing its best to address the needs of affected areas and families, considering that they are among the poorest and most vulnerable sectors. As mentioned, we have been fairly successful in mitigating the overall impact of El Nino, but we need to accelerate implementation of RAIN to address remaining gaps.”

This was the statement made by Socioeconomic Planning Secretary Emmanuel F. Esguerra as he reported on Tuesday on the status of the Roadmap to Address the Impact of El Niño (RAIN).

The NEDA chief said that the Technical Working Group on the Roadmap to Address the Impact of El Niño or RAIN has just had its 5th meeting morning and they wanted to share with you highlights of the agencies’ reports on the implementation status of the action plan of the government’s El Niño Task Force.

In retrospect, President Benigno S. Aquino III designated NEDA as head of the El Niño Task Force in mid-2015. This move was prompted by forecasts from the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA that El Niño will intensify from moderate to strong in late 2015 until May 2016. With this, NEDA has convened the Task Force in a series of inter-agency meetings to discuss and finalize the RAIN, which was subsequently approved by the President. RAIN is aimed at mitigating the impact of the El Niño phenomenon on four areas: 1.) Food security, 2.) Energy security, 3.) Health, and 4.) Safety. This action plan focuses on 67 El Niño-affected provinces throughout the country, including Metro Manila.

Esguerra said the success in mitigating the impact of El Niño was largely due to production support like irrigation and distribution of seeds in non-vulnerable and mildly-affected provinces; timely importation; and price freeze in areas that declared state of calamity.

He added that while drought usually entails low production leading to high agricultural product prices, inflation data show that prices of food, particularly rice, have been low and stable in the past months. In fact for March, despite the El Niño phenomenon, rice prices remain lower than in the previous year (-1.7% in March from -2.0% in February) and have been declining consistently since October 2015. Likewise, the price of vegetables, while remaining elevated since November 2015, has trended down after peaking in January 2016, declining by 2.9 percent in March 2016 from the previous month, for a total decline of 7.8 percent since the beginning of the year. Supply and buffer stock management is being done well with timely purchases. Moreover, despite the lack of water, there were no reported breakout of diseases and epidemic, though we do not discount that there could still be health issues in some places.

Also, according to the Social Weather Stations or SWS survey, conducted from December 5-8, 2015, the 2015 average hunger rate of 13.4 percent is the lowest annual average hunger rate since 2004. Moreover, hunger in Mindanao fell by 8.7 points from 21.7 percent to 13.0 percent. This brought the 2015 average Mindanao hunger rate to 15.8 percent, the lowest since the 13.3 percent annual average in 2005.

However, despite these encouraging numbers, Esguerra said the El Niño Task Force recognizes that there could be areas that are feeling the brunt of El Niño and for this, the role of LGUs is very crucial.

”We are certainly bothered by the fact that there are people who still go hungry. There could be areas that are not yet being reached by government interventions,” Esguerra said.

“While the supply of food and production and other types of support such as distribution of food packs seems enough, the challenge is in making the distribution system much more efficient so that these actually reach the affected families in a timely fashion. We need to consider that some of the services are devolved to LGUs and so we need to strengthen coordination with LGUs,” the NEDA chief added.

There is a need to increase support for farmers to augment their incomes. For this, there is a need to accelerate programs like cash-for-work and emergency employment.

The NEDA chief noted that there is a need to improve coordination within government from national to local levels and also communication with affected families. It is also very important that affected families know about the situation and know how to access government programs that are already in place. For this, hotlines have been established through 0920-8790924for Smart and 09950383-2393 for Globe. (PIA)

Malaysia: Dengue Situation Update 488, 5 April 2016

6 April 2016 - 9:06am
Source: World Health Organization Country: Australia, Cambodia, China, French Polynesia (France), Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Malaysia, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Singapore, Viet Nam

Northern Hemisphere

China (no updates)

There were 3,884 cases of dengue reported in China in 2015, with the majority of cases being reported during September and October. In December, there were 62 dengue cases (with no associated deaths) reported, which was a decrease from 470 cases reported in November, and lower than the number of cases reported in December 2014 (n=180) (Figure 1).

Malaysia

For the week from 27 March to 2 April, the number of dengue cases decreased to 2,130 from 2,135 cases reported in the week prior. The number of cases was higher than that reported the same period in 2015, and far exceeded the median for this week between 2011 and 2015. Within the same period there were 2 denguerelated deaths reported, bringing the total number of deaths for 2016 to 87, compared to a total of 108 deaths during the same reporting period in 2015.

Philippines (no updates)

As of 20 February 2016, there were 18,790 suspected cases of dengue reported in 2016, including 65 deaths. This is higher than that reported during the same period in 2015 (n=16,606) (Figure 3).

Singapore

From 20 to 26 March 2016, 308 dengue cases were reported, a decrease from the previous week (n=374) and higher than the number reported for the same period in each of the last five years (2011-2015) (Figure 4).

Cambodia (no updates)

As of 20 February 2016, there were 663 cases of dengue (with no deaths) reported in Cambodia. The number of cases remains stable and in line with case numbers observed between 2012 and 2015. In week 8, there were 15 cases reported, compared to 75 cases reported in the week prior (Figure 5).

Lao PDR

As of 25 March, there were 237 cases of dengue with 1 death reported in Lao PDR in 2016. From 12 to 25 March 2016, 30 new dengue cases were reported, which followed the seasonal trend (2011-2015) (Figure 6).

Viet Nam (no updates)

As of 31 January 2016, there were 13,086 cases of dengue, including 2 deaths, reported in 38 of 63 provinces in Viet Nam. The cumulative number of cases reported in 2016 is higher than that reported during the same period in 2015 and higher than the median for the same reporting period between 2010 and 2014 (Figure 7). The number of cases reported in January 2016 was 23% lower than that reported in December 2015 (17,033 cases and 8 deaths).

Philippines: Philippine elections trigger disasters debate

5 April 2016 - 8:00pm
Source: UN International Strategy for Disaster Reduction Country: Philippines

By Denis McClean

GENEVA, April 6, 2016 - Disaster risk management has emerged as an issue in the May local and national elections in the Philippines, a country which regularly features in the top five most disaster prone countries in the world. Officials from leading national organisations are calling for politicians to demonstrate greater awareness and knowledge of the issue as the May 9 polling day approaches.

UNISDR Champion, Senator Loren Legarda, said that “Disaster risk management and climate change adaptation should be part of the agenda of our presidential candidates and all other candidates whether running for local or national positions. Our media forums have been discussing these issues but still not as extensively as they should be.”

The Senator said that presidential candidates must incorporate in their plans of action the measurable targets under the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction, the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), and the Paris Agreement on Climate Change.

It is a point of view supported by Mr. Alexander Pama who took over as head of the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC) after the devastation of Typhoon Haiyan (aka Yolanda) in November 2013 which claimed over 6,000 lives, affected 25 million people and caused $10 billion in economic losses.

Mr. Pama said: “Voters should include in their criteria in selecting candidates those who they believe are well-informed relative to disaster risk reduction management. It will directly affect their lives and livelihood.” In a recent interview, he added: “Disaster risk reduction involves saving lives and protecting lives and livelihood. It is a critical aspect of sustainable development.”

This is a neat summary of key aims of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction which the Philippines adopted in March 2015 along with all other UN Member States as a global blueprint for reducing disaster risk and disaster losses. Mr. Pama believes that disaster risk management and climate change should be at the forefront of the coming elections.

Last year 3.8 million people were affected by disasters in the Philippines and economic damage was estimated by the Centre for Research on the Epidemiology of Disasters (CRED) at US$ 1.9 billion. The former Vice Admiral took over as Executive Director of the NDRRMC in May 2014 after a critical period during which many lives were lost in a succession of deadly typhoons, earthquakes and floods.

Under his leadership, the NDRRMC and PAGASA have been praised for keeping the general public risk informed and ensuring early dissemination of warnings and efficient evacuations to minimise casualties in the face of major storms such as Typhoon Hagupit in December 2014 and Typhoon Koppu in October, 2015. Mr. Pama said there should be a system that would reward local executives who performed well in disaster risk reduction and punish those who are remiss in their duties.

Philippine Atmospheric Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration weather specialist, Ms. Sharon Arruejo, said it would be good to have a law that would require local officials to attend disaster risk reduction seminars. She lamented that some local officials are not that interested in attending such seminars. “If that happens, life in the Philippines will be better,” she told journalists recently. Ms. Arruejo said adequate knowledge of disaster risk management should be a requirement for those seeking electoral posts.

In a statement, climate group Disaster Risk Reduction Network Philippines (DRRNetPhils) is urging voters to select candidates who will boost climate and disaster resilience in the country. “We need lawmakers who can craft and support policies that address the all-too-often neglected rights of elderly people, women, children, persons with disabilities, indigenous peoples, urban poor, fisherfolk, agricultural laborers, and factory workers before, during, and after disasters because they are the ones disproportionately affected and have the least capacity to recover from disasters,” DRRNetPhils stressed.

DRRNetPhils comprises over 300 Philippine Civil Society Organizations (CSOs), communities, practitioners and advocates for Community-Based Disaster Risk Management (CBDRM).

Philippines: Socioeconomic Planning Secretary Esguerra on the status of the Roadmap to Address the Impact of El Niño

5 April 2016 - 11:03am
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

Statement of Socioeconomic Planning Secretary Emmanuel F. Esguerra On the status of the Roadmap to Address the Impact of El Niño (RAIN)

[Delivered on April 5, 2016]

The Technical Working Group on the Roadmap to Address the Impact of El Nino or RAIN has just had its 5th meeting this morning and we would like to share with you highlights of the agencies’ reports on the implementation status of the action plan of the government’s El Niño Task Force.

In retrospect, the President Benigno S. Aquino III designated NEDA as head of the El Niño Task Force in mid-2015. This move was prompted by forecasts from the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration or PAGASA that El Niño will intensify from moderate to strong in late 2015 until May 2016. With this, NEDA has convened the Task Force in a series of inter-agency meetings to discuss and finalize the RAIN, which was subsequently approved by the President. RAIN is aimed at mitigating the impact of the El Niño phenomenon on four areas: 1.) Food security, 2.) Energy security, 3.) Health, and 4.) Safety. This action plan focuses on 67 El Niño-affected provinces throughout the country, including Metro Manila.

With this, let me provide you a summary of progress of RAIN based on the reports and discussions of the TWG this morning.

Government has been fairly successful in mitigating the impact of El Nino, particularly in ensuring sufficiency in supply of food and keeping food prices stable. This is through a) production support like irrigation and distribution of seeds in non-vulnerable and mildly-affected provinces, b) timely importation, and c) price freeze in areas that declared state of calamity.

While drought usually entails low production leading to high agricultural product prices, inflation data show that prices of food, particularly rice, have been low and stable in the past months. In fact for March, despite the El Niño phenomenon, rice prices remain lower than in the previous year (-1.7% in March from -2.0% in February) and have been declining consistently since October 2015. Likewise, the price of vegetables, while remaining elevated since November 2015, has trended down after peaking in January 2016, declining by 2.9 percent in March 2016 from the previous month, for a total decline of 7.8 percent since the beginning of the year. Supply and buffer stock management is being done well with timely purchases. Moreover, despite the lack of water, there were no reported breakout of diseases and epidemic, though we do not discount that there could still be health issues in some places.

Also, according to the Social Weather Stations or SWS survey, conducted from December 5-8, 2015, the 2015 average hunger rate of 13.4 percent is the lowest annual average hunger rate since 2004. Moreover, hunger in Mindanao fell by 8.7 points from 21.7 percent to 13.0 percent. This brought the 2015 average Mindanao hunger rate to 15.8 percent, the lowest since the 13.3 percent annual average in 2005.

However, despite these encouraging numbers, we recognize that there could be areas that are feeling the brunt of El Niño and for this, the role of LGUs is very crucial. We are certainly bothered by the fact that there are people who still go hungry. There could be areas that are not yet being reached by government interventions.

1.While the supply of food and production and other types of support such as distribution of food packs seems enough, the challenge is in making the distribution system much more efficient so that these actually reach the affected families in a timely fashion. We need to consider that some of the services are devolved to LGUs and so we need to strengthen coordination with LGUs.

2.We need to increase support for farmers to augment their incomes. For this, we need to accelerate programs like cash-for-work and emergency employment.

3.We need to improve coordination within government from national to local levels and also communication with affected families. It is also very important that affected families know about the situation and know how to access government programs that are already in place. For this, hotlines have been established through 0920-8790924for Smart and 09950383-2393 for Globe.

Finally, we would like to assure the public that government is doing its best to address the needs of affected areas and families, considering that they are among the poorest and most vulnerable sectors. As mentioned, we have been fairly successful in mitigating the overall impact of El Nino, but we need to accelerate implementation of RAIN to address remaining gaps.

Philippines: Government intensifies efforts to combat El Niño

5 April 2016 - 10:59am
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

While the Department of Agriculture has been continuously trying to mitigate the weather phenomenon’s impact, it will utilize its quick response fund (QTF) to fast-track the delivery of appropriate services or interventions that are critical for the rehabilitation of affected areas.

From April to July, the department (DA) targets a total of 1,750 bags of rice registered seeds, 43,635 bags of certified seeds, 42,362 bags of hybrid rice/HYTA, 1,513 bags of green super rice, 80,000 kilograms of soil ameliorant/zinc sulphate, and 5,000 bags of organic fertilizer for distribution to affected farmers.

Other seed supply will serve as bufferstock for delivery to DA warehouses.

For corn, a total of 28,900 bags of open pollinated variety corn and 12,500 bags of organic fertilizer will be provided, while for high value crops, 600 kilograms and 5,500 packs of assorted vegetable seeds, 25,000 kilograms of mungbean, and 28,000 kg of mungbean will be distributed.

For livestock 4,633 bottles of biologics, 65,000 doses of medicines, 30,000 packs of surveillance for pests and diseases, 400 bags of feed concentrates, and 180 heads of goat will be provided.

Under the water augmentation initiatives, 332 units of pump and engine sets, nine units of diversion dams, 1,816 unit of pump irrigation for open source, and four units of drilling rig will be given away.

The regional field units has extended the distribution of shallow tube wells to rainfed and upland areas closer to water tributaries.

Meanwhile, the DA’s Bureau of Soils and Water Management has deployed contracted aircrafts to seed clouds for rain in identified vulnerable agricultural areas and watersheds to minimize the impact of El Niño to crop production.

World: L'UE fournira une aide à l'éducation dans les situations d'urgence à plus de 2 300 000 enfants dans 42 pays

5 April 2016 - 10:30am
Source: European Commission Humanitarian Aid Office Country: Afghanistan, Armenia, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Georgia, Guatemala, Honduras, India, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Kenya, Lebanon, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Rwanda, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, World, Yemen

La Commission européenne a annoncé aujourd’hui un train de mesures d’aide humanitaire d’un montant de 52 millions d’euros, visant spécifiquement la réalisation, en 2016, de projets éducatifs en faveur d’enfants en situation d’urgence.

La Commission européenne a annoncé aujourd’hui un train de mesures d’aide humanitaire d’un montant de 52 millions d’euros, visant spécifiquement la réalisation, en 2016, de projets éducatifs en faveur d’enfants en situation d’urgence. Ce train de mesures traduit l’engagement pris précédemment par la Commission de consacrer 4 % de son budget d’aide humanitaire à l’éducation.

Ce financement bénéficiera à plus de 2 300 000 enfants dans 42 pays dans le monde et ciblera les régions où les enfants sont davantage exposés au risque de déscolarisation ou d’interruption scolaire, à savoir le Moyen-Orient (en particulier la Syrie et l’Iraq), l’Afrique orientale, centrale et occidentale, l’Asie, l’Ukraine, l’Amérique centrale et la Colombie.

«Aujourd’hui, nous avons atteint et même dépassé l'objectif que nous nous étions fixé, à savoir quadrupler notre soutien à l’éducation dans les situations d’urgence en faisant passer de 1 à 4 % sa part dans notre budget d’aide humanitaire, puisque ce soutien était de 11 millions d’euros en 2015 et qu'il atteint 52 millions d’euros en 2016.Investir dès maintenant dans l’éducation des enfants pris dans des zones de conflit ou connaissant d’autres situations d’urgence revient à prévenir le risque d’une génération perdue et à miser sur l’avenir. Je suis fier que l’Union européenne soit en passe de devenir une référence en la matière. Je félicite aussi le Parlement européen pour les efforts qu’il a déployés avec succès afin de dégager un financement européen supplémentaire en faveur de cette action, et pour le soutien qu’il n’a cessé d’apporter. J’invite à présent tous les pourvoyeurs d’aide humanitaire à suivre notre exemple» a déclaré M. Christos Stylianides, commissaire européen chargé de l’aide humanitaire et de la gestion des crises.

Le financement alloué aujourd’hui favorisera l’accès à l’éducation dans les situations d’urgence, une éducation qui inclut la sensibilisation aux risques posés par les mines, l’apprentissage des compétences indispensables dans la vie courante et la formation professionnelle, ainsi que des activités de loisirs et un soutien psychosocial. Les enfants bénéficieront également de fournitures scolaires et de la mise en place de nouvelles installations scolaires. Les enseignants, les parents et les autres personnes s’occupant des enfants bénéficieront eux aussi d’une formation.

L’aide sera acheminée par l’intermédiaire d’organisations non gouvernementales (ONG), d’agences des Nations unies et d’organisations internationales. À titre d’exemple, l’UNICEF améliorera la qualité de l’environnement pédagogique des enfants à Alep, en Syrie, en fournissant des panneaux solaires aux écoles sujettes à de fréquentes pannes de courant. Les élèves syriens auront accès aux ressources numériques grâce aux ordinateurs et aux tablettes numériques à prix modique mis à leur disposition dans les écoles. En Éthiopie, l’organisation «Save the Children» améliorera l’accès des enfants hébergés dans les camps de réfugiés à un environnement pédagogique de qualité en proposant des formations aux enseignants et en rénovant ou en érigeant des lieux de scolarisation sûrs.

Contexte

Depuis 2012, la Commission a accru le soutien financier accordé aux projets éducatifs en faveur des enfants vivant dans des zones de conflit. En 2015, le commissaire européen Christos Stylianides s’est engagé à porter la part du financement en faveur de l’éducation dans les situations d’urgence à 4 % de l’aide humanitaire de l’UE avant la fin du mandat de la Commission Juncker. Grâce au soutien du Parlement européen et des États membres de l’UE, cette proportion a pu être atteinte dès 2016, avant l'échéance fixée.

À ce jour, plus de 23 millions d’euros ont été alloués à l’éducation dans les situations d’urgence, dont les contributions de 500 000 euros et 250 000 euros versées respectivement par le Luxembourg et par l’Autriche en 2014. Plus de 1 519 000 enfants de 26 pays en ont bénéficié jusqu’à présent. Avec les 52 millions d’euros supplémentaires débloqués cette année, plus de 3 800 000 enfants dans 46 pays auront bénéficié d’une aide d’ici à la fin 2016.

Pays concernés

Afghanistan, Arménie, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroun, Colombie, Djibouti, Équateur, Égypte, El Salvador, Éthiopie, Géorgie, Guatemala, Honduras, Inde, Iran, Iraq, Kenya, Liban, Libye, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritanie, Myanmar/Birmanie, Niger, Nigeria, Ouganda, Pakistan, Territoire palestinien occupé, Philippines, République centrafricaine, République démocratique du Congo, Somalie, Soudan, République du Soudan du Sud, République arabe syrienne, Tanzanie, Tchad, Rwanda, Ukraine et Yémen.

Organisations humanitaires partenaires chargées de la mise en œuvre des projets

ACTED, Adra, Comité international de secours (IRC), Concern Worldwide, COOPI Cooperazione Internazionale, Croix Rouge, DanChurchAid, Danish Refugee Council (DRC), Fédération luthérienne mondiale, Finn Church Aid (FCA), Fonds des Nations unies pour l’enfance (UNICEF), Handicap International, Haut-Commissariat des Nations unies pour les réfugiés (HCR), HOPE’87, International Medical Corps, Organisation internationale pour les migrations (OIM), Norwegian Refugee Council, Plan International, Plan Spain, SOS Kinderdorf, Save the Children, Terre des hommes, Triangle et War Child.

Pour en savoir plus

Questions-réponses: l’UE soutient l’éducation des enfants dans les situations d’urgence

Fiche d’information sur l’éducation dans les situations d’urgence

Service de l'aide humanitaire et de la protection civile de la Commission européenne

IP/16/1224

Personnes de contact pour la presse:

Alexandre POLACK (+32 2 299 06 77)
Daniel PUGLISI (+32 2 296 91 40)
Renseignements au public: Europe Direct par téléphone au 00 800 67 89 10 11 ou par courriel

World: EU to support over 2,300,000 children in 42 countries with education in emergency situations

5 April 2016 - 8:08am
Source: European Commission Humanitarian Aid Office Country: Afghanistan, Armenia, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Georgia, Guatemala, Honduras, India, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Kenya, Lebanon, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Rwanda, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, World, Yemen

European Commission - Press release

Brussels, 5 April 2016

EU quadruples its humanitarian financing to education in emergencies worldwide.

Today the European Commission has announced a €52 million humanitarian aid package aimed specifically at educational projects for children in emergency situations in 2016. The package reflects the Commission's prior commitment to allocate 4% of its humanitarian aid budget to education. The funding will support over 2,300,000 children in 42 countries around the world and will be targeted at regions where children are at higher risk of being left out of school or having their education disrupted: the Middle East (especially Syria and Iraq), East, Central and West Africa, Asia, Ukraine, Central America and Colombia.

"Today we fulfil and surpass our commitment to quadruple our support to education in emergencies from 1% to 4% of our humanitarian aid budget from €11 million in 2015 to €52 million in 2016. Investing in education now for children caught up in conflict zones and other emergencies is an investment against the risk of a lost generation and an investment for the future. I’m proud that the European Union is becoming a leader in this field. I also commend the European Parliament for its successful efforts to secure additional EU funds for this action and for its continuous support. I now call on all humanitarian donors to follow our example" EU Commissioner for Humanitarian Aid and Crisis Management Christos Stylianides said.

Today’s funding will support access to education in emergency situations, including mine risk education, life skills and vocational training, recreational activities and psychosocial support. Children will also benefit from the provision of school material and the setting up of new education facilities. Teachers, parents and caregivers will also benefit from training.

The aid will be channelled through non-governmental organisations (NGOs), United Nations agencies and international organisations.As an example, UNICEF will improve the quality of children's learning environment in Aleppo, Syria, by providing solar panels to schools often affected by power cuts. Syrian children will be enabled to access digital resources in schools through low-cost computers and tablets. In Ethiopia, Save the Children will improve access to quality learning for children in refugee camps by providing training to teachers and by renovating or creating new safe learning spaces.

Background

Since 2012, the Commission has increased the financial support to education projects for children living in conflict areas. In 2015, EU Commissioner Christos Stylianides committed to increasing the EU's humanitarian funding for education in emergency situations to 4% by the end of the mandate of the Juncker Commission. Thanks to support from the European Parliament and EU Member States, this increase has been made possible earlier, as of 2016.

To date, more than €23 million has been allocated for education in emergencies projects, including the contributions of €500 000 from Luxembourg and €250 000 from Austria in 2014. Over 1,519,000 children in 26 countries have benefited so far. With the additional €52 million released this year, more than 3,800,000 children in 46 countries will have been helped by the end of 2016.

Target countries

Afghanistan, Armenia, Georgia, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Chad, Niger, Nigeria, Central African Republic, Colombia, Democratic Republic of Congo, Djibouti, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Honduras, India, Iran, Iraq, Kenya, Lebanon, Libya, Madagascar, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Pakistan, Occupied Palestinian Territory, Philippines, Somalia, the Republic of South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Tanzania, Burundi, Rwanda, Uganda, Ukraine and Yemen.

Humanitarian partner organisations that will implement the projects

ACTED, Adra, Concern Worldwide, COOPI Cooperazione Internazionale, Croix Rouge, DanChurchAid, Danish Refugee Council (DRC), Finn Church Aid (FCA), Handicap International, HOPE'87, International Medical Corps, the International Organization for Migration (IOM), International Rescue Committee (IRC), the Lutheran World Federation, Norwegian Refugee Council, Plan International, Plan Spain, SOS Kinderdorf, Save the Children, Terre des hommes, Triangle, the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) and War Child.

For more information Q&A - EU supports education for children in emergencies Factsheet on Education in Emergencies The European Commission's humanitarian aid and civil protection

Philippines: Philippines Humanitarian Bulletin Issue 3 | 1 to 31 March 2016

4 April 2016 - 6:37pm
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Philippines

HIGHLIGHTS

• 31,500 people remain displaced by continuous armed clashes in Maguindanao province since 5 February.

• CERF-funded emergency health project helps 212,000 most vulnerable people among those hit by Typhoon Koppu in October 2015.

• Inter-agency Cash Working Group applies lessons of cash-transfer programming in Typhoon Haiyan response to disaster preparedness.

Displacement – a way of life in Maguindanao

31,500 people remain displaced by clashes in Maguindanao

Continuous clashes between Government forces and armed groups since 5 February displaced over 41,800 people in six municipalities of Maguindanao province. While some have returned to their homes, about 31,500 people remain displaced as of 28 March, according to the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) in the Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM). The majority of the internally displaced people (IDPs) – about 28,100 – are staying at 13 evacuation centres, while the remaining 3,400 people are “home-based” IDPs hosted by the neighboring communities.

Many of the displaced families and their hosts are the same people affected by the Government’s military operations against the Bangsamoro Islamic Freedom Fighters (BIFF) – a break way of the Moro Islamic Liberation Front seeking independence for Bangsamoro – in early 2015, which displaced over 148,000 people in Maguindanao province.

Host communities burdened by frequent and long-term displacement

Recurrent displacement has become a way of life for most communities in Maguindanao and the adjacent provinces of central Mindanao.

A large number of people displaced by recent conflict (some dating back to over a year) involving the military, the BIFF and other Moro groups have moved to urban centres to seek protection and support from their relatives and friends and larger host communities. Besides disrupting family life and livelihoods of the IDPs themselves, frequent and often long-term displacement has eroded the coping capacity of their already-poor host communities. They continue to share often-inadequate food and water as well as crowded shelter, sanitation and education facilities. Meanwhile, insecurity is constraining farmers from cultivating land, straining food security of the displaced and host households alike.

Erosion of the coping capacity of these displaced people and the impact this has on their hosts pose a challenge to local authorities and aid agencies trying to address the humanitarian situation in central Mindanao. Government assistance to displaced people has been limited to small food rations (e.g. two to three kilograms of rice and three tins of sardines per family to consume for several weeks), with an aim to prevent the relief goods from being accessed by armed groups. However, frequent violence has hampered regular access of the Government and aid agencies to the affected communities, making it difficult for the IDPs to meet their daily food needs without support from their host communities. Ironically, these host communities who are often the first responders to displacement are largely left out from organised humanitarian assistance, and this has created tensions and sometimes conflict between them and the IDPs.

Long term assistance to vulnerable communities key to lasting peace in Maguindanao

IDPs from areas where the BIFF is operational, mainly in the municipalities of Datu Salibo and Datu Piang close to Ligwasan Marsh, are suspected of supporting the BIFF. Restrictions on humanitarian access and limited relief efforts to these IDPs and their host communities may further alienate and frustrate them. This is feared to radicalise the communities and especially the youth amid political uncertainties following the recent setback in the peace process due to the delayed passage of the draft Bangsamoro Basic Law. Meanwhile, the BIFF may be gaining support from these communities as they become more vulnerable with fewer options. To prevent escalation of inter-group tensions and further suffering of the communities caught in the middle of recurrent fighting, there is an urgent need to strategically reach out to them with sustained humanitarian and development assistance.

World: MasterCard and World Vision to Address Key Issues Facing Humanitarian Sector

4 April 2016 - 9:22am
Source: World Vision Country: Nepal, Philippines, World

Multi-layered Partnership Focuses on Aid Delivery, Industry Research, Fundraising and Advocacy to Reach More People in Need

Purchase, NY and Monrovia, CA – April 4, 2016 – MasterCard and World Vision today signed a multi-layered partnership agreement in which MasterCard will apply its expertise, products and services in support of World Vision’s efforts to tackle key challenges impacting the humanitarian sector.

International humanitarian aid assistance continues to grow, reaching an all-time high last year. Yet, at a time of unprecedented humanitarian crises, it is insufficient in meeting the needs of the millions of people affected by poverty, political turmoil and natural disasters every year.

“Effectiveness and sustainability are two of the most pressing issues facing humanitarian organizations,” said Ann Cairns, president, International Markets, MasterCard. “We’re increasingly using our core expertise to create innovative solutions with NGOs like World Vision that address these pain points and better support those affected by poverty and emergencies around the world. We believe this partnership can serve as a blueprint for private and non-profit organizations working together to create mutually beneficial and sustainable solutions for some of the world’s most challenging issues.”

“Responding to disasters and meeting humanitarian needs is a shared responsibility,” says Kevin Jenkins, president, World Vision International. “World Vision values partnerships like this that aim to move the relationship between NGOs and private enterprises from transactional to transformational. We want to harness each other’s experience, skills and technology to reach more people in more effective innovative and efficient ways.”

Through the partnership, MasterCard and World Vision are improving humanitarian aid delivery via digital identity and electronic payment technology, including World Vision’s Last Mile Mobile Solutions (LMMS) and the MasterCard Aid Network. MasterCard partnered with World Vision to test both systems in the Philippines to help micro-entrepreneurs rebuild businesses after Typhoon Haiyan. World Vision also began using LMMS and MasterCard Aid Network in Nepal, following last year’s earthquake, to deliver a wide range of services, food assistance and equipment.

Going forward, MasterCard and World Vision also plan to partner on fundraising and advocacy opportunities, as well as joint industry research and consulting on topics ranging from digital identity to financial education for beneficiaries to data management and protection.

About MasterCard
MasterCard (NYSE: MA), is a technology company in the global payments industry. We operate the world’s fastest payments processing network, connecting consumers, financial institutions, merchants, governments and businesses in more than 210 countries and territories. MasterCard products and solutions make everyday commerce activities – such as shopping, traveling, running a business and managing finances – easier, more secure and more efficient for everyone. Follow us on Twitter @MasterCardNews, join the discussion on the Beyond the Transaction Blog and subscribe for the latest news on the Engagement Bureau.

About World Vision
World Vision International, wvi.org/disaster-management, is a Christian relief, advocacy and development organisation dedicated to working with children, families and communities worldwide to reach their full potential by tackling the causes of poverty and injustice. World Vision International is dedicated to working with the world’s most vulnerable people. World Vision International serves all people regardless of religion, race, ethnicity or gender. World Vision is currently responding to more than 20 humanitarian crises, in over 35 countries, assisting more than nine million people. Follow us on Twitter @wv_humanitarian.

For further enquires and interview requests please contact:

Marisa Grimes
MasterCard
Email: marisa.grimes@mastercard.com
Mobile: +1 914 325 8367 (New York)

Tanya Penny
World Vision International
Email: tanya_penny@wvi.org
Mobile: +971 50 550 5803 (Dubai)