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Philippines: PRC's Operation Typhoon Hayan builds 2,298 houses

14 August 2016 - 12:43am
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

August 12, 2016 Alex A. Lumaque

ROXAS CITY, Capiz, Aug. 12 (PIA6) – Two thousand two hundred ninety – eight houses out of the 2,500 target are already built by the ongoing Typhoon Haiyan Operation of the Philippine Red Cross in the province.

“The remaining houses are under construction and up for completion in time for the termination of German and Swiss Red Cross core shelter support by September,” said Typhoon Haiyan Operation in Capiz Shelter Sector Officer Paul Arcenas.

He added that some of the houses were funded by the International Federation of Red Cross, HSBC, Taiwan and Hong Kong Red Cross in identified housing project sites. The PRC’s core shelter assistance is implemented in the identified barangays of Panay, Panit-an, Ivisan, Dao, Dumalag, Dumarao and Tapaz towns.

“These houses were designed to withstand strong typhoons,” he noted, adding that the core shelter units are either full wooden or half concrete structures.

Each of the full wooden house costs P80,000.00 to P100,00.00 while a half concrete house ranges from P100,000.00 to P120,000.00.

The Red Cross is among the many international humanitarian organizations which immediately responded to help Capiceños after the onslaught of supertyphoon Yolanda in 2013. (JCM/AAL/PIA6 Capiz)

Philippines: NDRRMC Update: SitRep No.4 re Preparedness Measures and Effects of Southwest Monsoon (HABAGAT)

14 August 2016 - 12:38am
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

I. SITUATION OVERVIEW

Since 08 August 2016, Southwest Monsoon is affecting Lu zon and Western Visayas. On 09 August 2016, the Low Pressure Area (LPA) located at Aparri, Cagayan enhanced the Southwest Monsoon which brought moderate to heavy rains over Metro Manila, (locos Region, CALABARZON, and the Provinces of Zambales, Bataan, Mindoro, and Northern Palawan.

At 10:00 AM, 10 August 2016, the LPA continued to enhance the Southwest Monsoon. Moderate to heavy rains was experienced over CALABARZON and !locos Region, and in the Provinces of Benguet, Zambales, Bataan, Mindoro, Marinduque, Romblon, and Northern Palawan.

The LPA at Itbayat, Batanes exited the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR) on 11 August 2016 but continued to enhance the Southwest Monsoon.

Meanwhile at 5:00 AM, 14 August 2016, monsoon rains which may trigger flashfloods and landslides will be experienced over Metro Manila, Central Luzon, CALABARZON and MIMAROPA. Occasional rains will prevail over !locos Region, Cordillera Administrative Region (CAR) and Western Visayas. Cloudy skies with light to moderate rains and thunderstorms will be experienced over the rest of Luzon and Visayas while partly cloudy to cloudy skies with isolated rainshowers or thunderstorms is expected over Mindanao.

Philippines: DSWD provides financial aid to informal settlers

12 August 2016 - 1:34pm
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

The Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) is now distributing a total of P8.7M financial assistance to 485 informal settler families (ISFs) from Cavite; Laguna; Pandi, Bulacan; and, Pasay City and Tondo, Manila.

This is in line with the implementation of the Oplan LIKAS (Lumikas para Iwas Kalamidad at Sakit) program of DSWD in collaboration with the Department of Interior and Local Government (DILG) to relocate ISFs residing on top of or along waterways and other dangerous and high risk areas to safe and decent settlements.

As one of the implementing agencies of the program, DSWD is tasked to validate and assess the beneficiaries of the program, and to disburse the Interim Shelter Fund worth P18,000 to each of the family-beneficiaries which they can use to find safe residency and livelihood to support their families.

The DILG appropriated a total of P509,606,000 for the Interim Shelter Fund and downloaded the fund to DSWD for the disbursement of the financial assistance to beneficiaries and for administrative operations.

Starting Over It is the first time for Marisa Abiso, a pregnant street vendor from Pasay City, to be a beneficiary of a cash assistance program from the government.

When asked on how she will use the money, she answered, “Aba, malaki po, malaki po ang maitutulong nito sa amin para sa panganganak ko ngayong buwan (It will help us a lot in paying for my delivery this month).”

“Kung magagawan po ng paraan na hindi magalaw lahat, gagamitin namin sa pagtitinda para makapagsimula kami sa bago naming titirhan (If possible that there will be money left, we plan to use it for our livelihood in our new residence),” Abiso added.

Another beneficiary, Rogelyn Fuerto, a 26-year-old beneficiary from Pasay City, plans to use the cash assistance to set up a mini sari-sari store for her mother and to apply for a job in a security agency.

When asked about the area where they will be relocated, Fuerto said, “Wala pa pong masyadong mga tao pero maayos yung titirhan namin. (There are only a few people in the neighborhood, but the place is decent).”

Abiso and Fuerto are among the beneficiaries who are set to be relocated in Lallana, Trece Martires City.

A long way to go “We still have a very long way to go to ensure that all poor Filipinos have access to decent shelter and housing, as well as to the services that are necessary to ensure that they are able to raise their families well. We are encouraging Filipinos to be more proactive in seeking out the programs of the national government’s agencies that aim to provide these. By themselves, residents of urban poor communities can organize neighborhood and community associations and together press for improved and safer public services that are well within their means. From our end, we will also work harder to assist these community actions and efforts,” said DSWD Secretary Judy M. Taguiwalo.

The Department is set to finalize its budget proposal for 2017 to prioritize programs and initiatives that will help Filipinos from the vulnerable and marginalized sector to stand on their own feet.

“Bagamat prioridad ng gobyernong ito ang mabigyan ng sapat na tulong ang ating mga kababayan upang magkaroon sila ng ligtas at maayos na kabahayan, nais pa rin po naming ipaalala na kailangan pa rin natin ng sama-samang pagkilos para matulungan ang ating mga maralitang kababayan na tumayo sa sarili nilang mga paa at maging produktibong miyembro ng kani-kanilang komunidad (While it is the priority of the government to provide enough assistance to our people so they can have decent and safe houses, we remind everyone that collective action is still needed to help the marginalized sector to stand on their own feet and to become productive members of their communities),” ended Sec. Taguiwalo.

World: Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator Positions (as of 09 August 2016)

12 August 2016 - 3:34am
Source: Inter-Agency Standing Committee Country: Afghanistan, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ecuador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Fiji, Haiti, Indonesia, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, Libya, Mali, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Philippines, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Ukraine, World, Yemen

Philippines: NDRRMC Update: SitRep No.3 re Preparedness Measures and Effects of Southwest Monsoon (HABAGAT)

11 August 2016 - 8:00pm
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

I. SITUATION OVERVIEW

Since 08 August 2016, Southwest Monsoon is affecting Luzon and Western Visayas. On 09 August 2016, the Low Pressure Area (LPA) located at Aparri, Cagayan enhanced the Southwest Monsoon which brought moderate to heavy rains over Metro Manila, Ilocos Region, CALABARZON, and the Provinces of Zambales, Bataan, Mindoro, and Northern Palawan

At 10:00 AM, 10 August 2016, the LPA continued to enhance the Southwest Monsoon. Moderate to heavy rains was experienced over CALABARZON and 'locos Region, and in the Provinces of Benguet, Zambales, Bataan, Mindoro, Marinduque, Romblon, and Northern Palawan.

The LPA at Itbayat, Batanes exited the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR) on 11 August 2016 but continued to enhance the Southwest Monsoon. Meanwhile at 11:00 AM, 12 August 2016, the aforementioned LPA and another LPA East of Luzon (Outside PAR) are continuously enhancing the Southwest Monsoon which will bring moderate to occasionally heavy rains over the Provinces of Pangasinan, Zambales, Bataan, Cavite, Batangas, Occidental Mindoro, and Northern Palawan.

II. EFFECTS

A. Incidents Monitored

Overflowed Spillway

  • The Spillway in Barangays Lumangbayan and Barahan in Municipality of Sta. Cruz, Occidental Mindoro overflowed on 09 August 2016, 9:30 AM, due to heavy rains.

  • On 11 August 2016, 9:00 AM, the Pola Spillway in Barangay Barahan Sta. Cruz, Occidental Mindoro overflowed due to heavy rains.

Flooding

  • On 09 August 2016, flooding (2ft) occurred in Barangay Poblacion Crossing, Morong, Bataan, due to continuous rains. A total of four (4) families/20 persons were evacuated.

  • Flooding occurred in the Municipalities of Pontevedra, Valladolid, and Pulupandan in the Province of Negros Occidental due to intermittent moderate to heavy rains. A total of 1,035 families/6,122 persons were affected, of which, 50 families/250 persons were evacuated.

  • At 06:00 AM, 10 August 2016, upto knee deep flooding was experienced in low lying areas in Iloilo City. The flood waters had subsided on the same day.

  • On 10 August 2016, a flashflood occurred in the Municipalities of San Remegio and Sibalom in the Province of Antique. A total of four (4) families/17 persons were evacuated due to the flashflood and returned home on the same day as weather improved.

Landslide

  • At about 9.30 PM, 09 August 2016, a landslide incident transpired along the National Highway in the vicinity of Barangay Naparing, Dinalupigan, Bataan. DPWH and Barangay Naparing conducted clearing operations and barricaded the area.

Missing Fishermen

  • At 07:00 AM, 08 August 2016, Ruben Pahilagmo, 57 y/o resident of Barangay Bognuya, Marinduque, went fishing onboard a motorized banca. At 3:30 PM on the same day, his motorized banca was found between the vicinity of Marinduque and the Oriental Mindoro and Mr. Pahilagmo has been missing since then. Search and Rescue (SAR) Operations was conducted, however, the fisherman is still missing up to this date.

Washed-out Foot Bridge

  • On 10 August 2016, at about 1:00 AM, a 12 meter footbridge connecting Sitio Putik and Sitio delos Reyes in Barangay San Jose, Tuy, Batangas was washed-out due to flooding brought about by heavy rains. The footbridge is temporarily impassable and closed for repairs.

World: Global Food Security Update Issue 22, July 2016

11 August 2016 - 2:33pm
Source: World Food Programme Country: Angola, Bangladesh, Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Cameroon, Chad, Colombia, Cuba, Ecuador, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Iraq, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Niger, Nigeria, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Philippines, South Sudan, Swaziland, Syrian Arab Republic, Viet Nam, World, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

IN FOCUS & FOOD INSECURITY HOTSPOTS

  • Drought has left 23 million requiring food assistance in Southern Africa.

  • An outbreak of fighting in South Sudan has caused new displacements and food price increases in the capital Juba. The South Sudan IPC update for April 2016 estimated that 4.8 million people (40 percent of the population) would face severe food insecurity in the May–July 2016 lean season.

  • Conflict in Nigeria’s north-eastern states of Adamawa, Borno and Yobe has made 3 million people food insecure. UNICEF has warned that an estimated 49,000 children in Borno State are likely to die if they do not urgently receive adequate assistance.

  • In Yemen, the June IPC has found that over 14 million people are in Crisis or Emergency. Food prices have risen due to currency devaluation and insecurity, while incomes have been disrupted by displacement and power cuts.

  • Since January 2014, 4 million people have been displaced in Iraq. WFP monitoring indicates that food security deteriorated from February to May. As of May, 31 percent of IDPs and returnees have poor or borderline food consumption.

  • The number of people in need of assistance in Syria has risen from 8.7 million in September 2015 to 9.4 million in June 2016. A high proportion of households in Aleppo city report being food insecure.

World: Surgical Care Required for Populations Affected by Climate-related Natural Disasters: A Global Estimation

11 August 2016 - 11:00am
Source: Public Library of Science Country: China, India, Philippines, Saint Lucia, World

AUTHORS
Eugenia E. Lee
Barclay Stewart
Yuanting A. Zha
Thomas A. Groen
Frederick M. Burkle Jr.
Adam L. Kushner

ABSTRACT
Background: Climate extremes will increase the frequency and severity of natural disasters worldwide. Climate-related natural disasters were anticipated to affect 375 million people in 2015, more than 50% greater than the yearly average in the previous decade. To inform surgical assistance preparedness, we estimated the number of surgical procedures needed.

Methods: The numbers of people affected by climate-related disasters from 2004 to 2014 were obtained from the Centre for Research of the Epidemiology of Disasters database. Using 5,000 procedures per 100,000 persons as the minimum, baseline estimates were calculated. A linear regression of the number of surgical procedures performed annually and the estimated number of surgical procedures required for climate-related natural disasters was performed.

Results: Approximately 140 million people were affected by climate-related natural disasters annually requiring 7.0 million surgical procedures. The greatest need for surgical care was in the People’s Republic of China, India, and the Philippines. Linear regression demonstrated a poor relationship between national surgical capacity and estimated need for surgical care resulting from natural disaster, but countries with the least surgical capacity will have the greatest need for surgical care for persons affected by climate-related natural disasters.

Conclusion: As climate extremes increase the frequency and severity of natural disasters, millions will need surgical care beyond baseline needs. Countries with insufficient surgical capacity will have the most need for surgical care for persons affected by climate-related natural disasters. Estimates of surgical are particularly important for countries least equipped to meet surgical care demands given critical human and physical resource deficiencies.

World: INTERVIEW: Asia must invest more in disaster risk reduction - Red Cross

11 August 2016 - 12:06am
Source: AlertNet Country: Philippines, World
"It is not enough just to respond when the shock arrives. What is most important is how can we work together in the spirit of risk reduction"

By Beh Lih Yi

JAKARTA, Aug 10 (Thomson Reuters Foundation) - From typhoons and earthquakes to floods, Asian nations must step up investment in disaster risk reduction before it is "too late for too many" in a region regularly battered by disasters, the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) said.

Read the full story here.

Fiji: Cyclone Winston: A reminder the poor pay the price for climate-change inaction

10 August 2016 - 11:45pm
Source: CARE Country: Fiji, Philippines, Vanuatu

By CARE Australia

As we mark six months since Cyclone Winston devastated Fiji, CARE Australia’s Emergency Response Manager Adam Poulter reflects on the pattern of severe storms that is becoming the new normal.

We have crossed the threshold. Gone are the days when catastrophic cyclones were a once in a lifetime event.

A couple of years ago it would have been inconceivable to have multiple category-five mega-storms hitting Australia’s neighbours in so short a time. But that is today’s reality.

In just the last three years we’ve seen three of the biggest storms ever recorded – all in the Pacific.

When Typhoon Haiyan struck the Philippines in 2013, it was unprecedented. We had never seen 300km/h winds and the damage they could inflict. Homes were destroyed, whole communities devastated.

The recovery effort was huge. CARE helped people mend their homes and we provided advice on how people could build safer homes that were better able to stand up to storms.

Afterwards, we all breathed a sigh of relief. Well, we thought, we won’t see one of these again for another five-to-ten years. Then, just over a year later, Cyclone Pam struck Vanuatu. It was the biggest storm the country had ever seen.

As the recovery process got underway, again we breathed a sigh of relief. That’s a one-in-twenty-year event. We won’t see another one like that in a while, we said, not in the Pacific anyway.

Then Cyclone Winston ripped across Fiji. It was the biggest storm ever recorded in the Southern Hemisphere.

Fiji is a robust country with a centralised, well-organised government. People were evacuated and, thanks to an investment in disaster preparation, the number of casualties was relatively low. But the long-term impact is more complex.

The trouble is these disasters are smashing people’s homes and their livelihoods – the way they make a living. And the storms are destroying the vital infrastructure of countries. If you take the case of one island alone in Vanuatu – Tanna – Cyclone Pam cut gross domestic product by 50 per cent.

While the ‘debate’ around climate change continues, it is the world’s poor who are paying the price.

But there is some positive news: the number of people being killed by disasters is falling. And there is a clear reason for this: preparation.

In places like Vanuatu and Fiji where we work with partners Live and Learn, we are helping remote communities gain better access to cyclone warning systems. We have been working with telecom providers to disseminate warning messages to the ever-expanding mobile phone network, and working with communities to build safe community structures which are more robust in the face of storms. Crucially, we have been training men and women to lead disaster preparedness teams, called Community Disaster Committees (CDC).

In Vanuatu, once the CDC knew Cyclone Pam was near, they started the evacuation procedure, using the megaphone provided by CARE, to announce the imminent arrival of the cyclone. Using CARE’s cyclone map and listening to warnings via radio, the team advised everyone to prepare their houses and to be ready to move to an evacuation centre. Immediately people started preparing: cutting down branches near their homes, fastening roofs, pulling fishing boats out of the water, and gathering essential supplies.

The CDCs were successful: there were no deaths reported in the many villages where CARE has been working.

In today’s reality, preparedness is more important than ever.

Philippines: SitRep No.2 re Preparedness Measures and Effects of Southwest Monsoon (HABAGAT)

10 August 2016 - 8:00pm
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

I. Situation Overview

Since 08 August 2016, Southwest Monsoon is affecting Luzon and Western Visayas.

On 09 August 2016, the Low Pressure Area (LPA) located at Aparri, Cagayan enhanced the Southwest Monsoon which brought moderate to heavy rains over Metro Manila, Illocos Region, CALABARZON, and the Provinces of Zambales, Bataan, Mindoro, and Northern Palawan.

At 10:00 Am, 10 August 2016, the LPA continued to enhance the Southwest Monsoon. Moderate to heavy rains was experienced over CALBARZON and Ilocos Region, and in the Provinces of Benguet, Zambales, Bataan, Mindoro, Marinduque, Romblon, and Northern Palawan.

Meanwhile at 10:00 Am, 11 August 2016, the LPA at Itbayat, Batanes is expected to exit the Philippine Area of Responsibility (PAR) within the day but will continue to enhance the Southwest Monsoon

II. Effects

A. Incidents Monitored

Overflowed Spillway

  • The Spillway in Barangays Lumangbayan and Barahan in Municipality of Sta. Cruz, Occidental Mindoro overflowed on 09 August 2016, 9:30 AM due to heavy rains.

Flooding

  • On 09 August 2016, flooding (2ft) occurred in Barangay Poblacion Crossing, Morong, Bataan, due to continuous rains. A total of four (4) families/20 persons were evacuated.

  • Flooding occurred in the Municipalities of Pontevedra, Valladolid, and Pulupandan in the Province of Negros Occidental due to intermittent moderate to heavy rains. A total of 1,035 families/6,122 persons were affected, of which, 50 families/250 persons were evacuated.

  • At 06:00 AM, 10 August 2016, upto knee deep flooding was experienced in low lying areas in Iloilo City. The flood waters had subsided on the same day.

  • On 10 August 2016, a flashflood occurred in the Municipalities of San Remegio and Sibalom in the Province of Antique. A total of four (4) families/17 persons were evacuated due to the flashflood and returned home on the same day as weather improved.

    Landslide

  • At about 9.30 PM, 09 August 2016, a landslide incident transpired along the National Highway in the vicinity of Barangay Naparing, Dinalupigan, Bataan. DPWH and Barangay Naparing conducted clearing operations and barricaded the area.

Missing Fishermen

  • At 07:00 AM, 08 August 2016, Ruben Pahilagmo, 57 y/o resident of Barangay Bognuya, Marinduque, went fishing onboard a motorized banca. At 3:30 PM on the same day, his motorized banca was found between the vicinity of Marinduque and the Oriental Mindoro and Mr. Pahilagmo has been missing since then. Search and Rescue (SAR) Operations was conducted, however, the fisherman is still missing up to this date.

World: Lutte contre la traite et l’exploitation d’êtres humains en temps de crise - Faits et recommandations en vue de mesures à prendre pour protéger les populations vulnérables et mobiles juillet 2015 conclusions et recommandations

10 August 2016 - 5:16am
Source: International Organization for Migration Country: Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Haiti, Indonesia, Iraq, Libya, Philippines, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Thailand, World
INTRODUCTION

Alors que des soldats de la paix, des fonctionnaires de police, des entrepreneurs du secteur privé et d’autres membres de la communauté internationale étaient déployés en Bosnie-Herzégovine et au Kosovo sous administration des Nations Unies (résolution 1244 du Conseil de sécurité) pendant les guerres qui ont sévi dans les Balkans occidentaux de 1992 à 1999, la prostitution, qui était un commerce local à petite échelle entre les mains de réseaux criminels organisés, est devenue une industrie florissante. A cette époque, la communauté humanitaire avait commencé à reconnaître la gravité du problème de la traite des personnes, et l’avait donc fait figurer au rang des préoccupations internationales.

Bien que plusieurs organisations internationales aient élaboré des stratégies de lutte contre ce phénomène, la traite des personnes s’est développée et demeure un crime grave donnant lieu à d’importantes violations des droits de l’homme, et reste dans une large mesure ignoré des acteurs gouvernementaux et non gouvernementaux dans les situations de crise. L’identification des cas de traite est entravée par des difficultés sur le plan des définitions, par un manque de connaissances et par l’existence de zones grises entre la traite et d’autres formes d’exploitation. En outre, la traite n’est généralement pas considérée comme une conséquence directe d’une crise, ce qui, sur le terrain, pèse souvent sur les interventions menées en réponse aux cas, non seulement sur le plan de l’identification et de la documentation, de l’établissement de rapports, de l’aide aux victimes, mais aussi au stade ultérieur de l’enquête pénale. Les mesures de lutte contre la traite ne sont pas nécessairement perçues comme permettant de sauver immédiatement des vies dans une situation d’urgence. Or, elles constituent une question de survie et de moyens de subsistance pour les victimes, et devraient donc être considérées avec la même priorité que toutes les autres activités de réponse en situation de crise.

Dans un souci de ne pas exagérer le problème et les conséquences de la traite dans les situations de crise, le rapport plus détaillé dont s’inspire la présente note formule des recommandations fondées sur des faits à l’intention de la communauté humanitaire et, notamment, des professionnels qui travaillent dans le domaine de la lutte contre la traite et l’exploitation dans les interventions d’urgence. Le rapport en question passe en revue les risques, la prévention des cas et la manière d’améliorer la réponse à la traite d’êtres humains aux diverses phases d’une crise (avant, pendant et après), en s’intéressant plus particulièrement aux conflits armés, aux catastrophes naturelles et aux crises prolongées. Le présent document contient un résumé des principales conclusions et recommandations formulées dans le rapport.

Certaines recommandations figurent déjà dans la stratégie de l’Organisation visant à lutter contre la traite en temps de crise, actuellement en cours de finalisation.

Bernd Hemingway Directeur, Département de la gestion des migrations Siège de l’OIM

Mohammed Abdiker Directeur, Département des opérations et des situations d’urgence Siège de l’OIM

World: IOM Contributions to Progressively Resolve Displacement Situations: Compendium of activities and good practice

10 August 2016 - 4:41am
Source: International Organization for Migration Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Bangladesh, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Burundi, Cambodia, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ecuador, Ethiopia, Georgia, Haiti, Indonesia, Iraq, Kenya, Lebanon, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Pakistan, Philippines, Rwanda, Serbia, Somalia, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Thailand, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, World, Zimbabwe

Description:

The number and scale of crises are forcing record numbers of people to flee their homes seeking relative safety within or across international borders. However, the growing complexity and unpredictability of these crises is resulting in increasingly protracted displacement situations which challenge the versatility of the three traditional durable solutions – voluntary return and sustainable reintegration, sustainable settlement elsewhere and sustainable local integration. More inclusive approaches that recognize the needs and rights of all those affected by crises and development and recognition of existing, and exploration of new, mobility strategies may offer new avenues towards the progressive resolution of displacement situations.

Compendiums are central to IOM’s own processes of collecting and learning from good practices globally. Externally, they demonstrate IOM’s experience on a given topic. This compendium is primarily designed to support IOM staff, aiming to facilitate exchange of good practices and promote innovative, high-quality programming while cognisant of the need to assess feasibility and adaptability to local contexts. This compendium is based on IOM’s extensive achievements in the field: some 550 projects in 35 countries implemented between January 2010 and December 2014, which contributed towards building resilience and progressively resolving displacement situations.

The Global Review section of this publication provides an analysis of global trends based on contributions from IOM offices, contributing to a better understanding of types of migration crises and the populations affected by crises and displacement. Using available information, a mobility perspective is applied to each of the eight criteria outlined in the Inter-Agency Standing Committee Framework on Durable Solutions for Internally Displaced Persons. Good practices shared by IOM offices are summarized.

The Country Pages section provides an overview of key migration crises occurring in 35 countries between 2010 and 2014. IOM’s efforts to contribute to the progressive resolution of those displacement situations – including the identification of key partnerships and critical enablers and disablers, a good practice and IOM’s future objectives – are outlined.

The process of developing this compendium has directly contributed to the development of a new IOM framework – the Progressive Resolution of Displacement Situations (PRDS) Framework – which aims to guide IOM and inform its partners to frame and navigate the complexity of forced migration dynamics and support efforts to progressively resolve displacement situations. The PRDS Framework promotes an inclusive, resilience-based approach and embraces mobility strategies that support progression towards resolving displacement while ensuring safety nets are in place to avoid potentially harmful mobility strategies.

This compendium is part of an evolving process to contribute to a growing knowledge base and to learn from experience and good practices of how resilience and mobility can be better integrated across IOM’s response to migration crises.

World: Climate impacts on food security and livelihoods in Asia - A review of existing knowledge

10 August 2016 - 2:36am
Source: Government of the United Kingdom, Consortium of International Agricultural Research Centers, World Food Programme Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bhutan, Brunei Darussalam, Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Malaysia, Maldives, Mongolia, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines, Republic of Korea, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Viet Nam, World

Introduction

There is agreement in the scientific community that the global food system will experience unprecedented pressure in the coming decades – demographic changes, urban growth, environmental degradation, increasing disaster risk, food price volatility, and climate change will all affect food security patterns.

Climate change can act as a hunger risk multiplier, exacerbating drivers of food insecurity. Climate change disproportionately affects the poorest and most food insecure through a combination of decreasing crop production, and changes in the frequency and intensity of climate-related hazards, all of which can result in more humanitarian and food security crises.

Climate change affects the different dimensions of food security in complex ways. The availability of food can be affected through variations in yields – especially in key producing areas – due to increasing temperatures as well as changes in the quantity of arable land and water available for agriculture. Changes in production, in turn, can affect the ability of households to access food and as such impact on dietary diversity. Moreover, changes in rainfall and temperature patterns directly impact livelihoods that depend on climate-sensitive activities, such as rain-fed agriculture and livestock rearing. Changes in the timing and availability of water may create sanitation problems and impact quality of available drinking water, leading to increased health concerns, including diarrheal diseases. Together with other vector-borne infections, it has the potential to increase malnutrition, and affect food utilization.

Extreme weather effects disrupt the stability of food supply as well as people’s livelihoods.

Understanding the specific impacts of climate change on food security is challenging because vulnerabilities are highly contextual and are unevenly spread across the world. Ultimately, these vulnerabilities also depend on the ability of households, communities, and countries to manage risks. Under climate change, some regions of the world may experience gains in terms of food security outcomes, but the poorest and more isolated parts of the world tend to be more adversely affected in the absence of adaptation efforts.

The Asian continent is particularly vulnerable to climate change due to a combination of: high reliance on climate-sensitive livelihoods, high incidence of poverty and food insecurity, and high population densities in vulnerable and areas highly exposed to climate-related hazards such as floods, cyclones and droughts, and long-term climate change such as gradual changes in monsoon patterns, glacier melt and sea-level rise.

The purpose of this primer is to review the current state of knowledge on the relationship between climate change and food security, focusing specifically on the Asian context, to provide an evidence base for discussion and further analysis.

Philippines: SitRep No.1 re Preparedness Measures and Effects of Southwest Monsoon (HABAGAT)

9 August 2016 - 8:00pm
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

I. SITUATION OVERVIEW

Since 08 August 2016, Southwest Monsoon is affecting Luzon and Western Visayas.

At 4:00 PM, 10 August 2016, the Low Pressure Area (LPA) was estimated based on all available data at 635 km east of Basco, Batanes (21.0 N, 128.0 E).

II. EFFECTS

A. AFFECTED POPULATION

  1. A total of 1,039 families / 6,142 persons were affected in the Provinces of Negros Occidental (NIR) and Bataan (Region III) due to flooding. Of which, 54 families / 270 persons were evacuated.

Philippines: Philippines: Armed fighting in Basilan displaces 17,000 people

9 August 2016 - 9:02am
Source: International Committee of the Red Cross Country: Philippines

Armed fighting between government security forces and non-state armed groups since the first week of July has caused the displacement of around 3,400 families in Basilan Province, southern Philippines.

The affected families in Tipo-Tipo, Al-Barka and Ungkaya Pukan municipalities have sought refuge with their relatives after shelling and air strikes occurred on an almost daily basis over the past three weeks. Casualties and injured fighters were reported on both sides, while a few civilians were also wounded as a consequence of the clashes.

"The security situation in Basilan is precarious. We are concerned for the civilians as we expect clashes to continue in the coming weeks," said Yann Fridez, head of the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) sub-delegation in Mindanao.

"We urge all parties to the fighting to exercise utmost precaution to minimize the impact or damage to civilian communities. We also ask them to spare civilian structures such as hospitals, schools and houses, and facilities that are essential for their daily lives," he stressed.

To complement the assistance provided by the authorities, the ICRC, with the Philippine Red Cross (PRC), distributed essential household items to more than 17,000 displaced people in the three municipalities. The items distributed by the PRC Basilan chapter on July 27-28 included hygiene kits, blankets, towels, jerry cans, mosquito nets and sleeping mats.

The ICRC also distributed dressing kits and medical supplies including drugs and anti-tetanus vaccines to enhance the capacity of rural health units in these three municipalities to treat sick and wounded people. Already in April, the ICRC and the Department of Health-Health Emergency Management Bureau had conducted Basic Life Support training for 168 health staff in Basilan and Sulu provinces.

For further information, please contact:
Allison Lopez, ICRC Manila, tel: 0908 868 6884
Wolde-Gabriel Saugeron, ICRC Manila, tel: 0918 907 2125

World: Extrêmes climatiques et réduction de la pauvreté par la résilience - le développement conçu dans l’incertitude

9 August 2016 - 7:13am
Source: Building Resilience and Adaptation to Climate Extremes and Disasters Country: India, Mali, Philippines, World

Résumé

En renforçant la résilience face aux extrêmes climatiques et aux catastrophes, nous contribuerons au succès des efforts déployés mondialement pour éliminer l’extrême pauvreté.
Pour atteindre et maintenir un niveau zéro d’extrême pauvreté, le premier des Objectifs de développement durable (ODD), un effort collectif est requis afin de gérer les risques liés aux extrêmes climatiques actuels et aux projections concernant le changement climatique.

1.Joindre les efforts pour combattre le changement climatique et la pauvreté Notre planète voit son climat se réchauffer, et nous disposons aujourd’hui de plus en plus de preuves que la variabilité du climat augmente dans beaucoup de régions, les extrêmes devenant, en effet, plus fréquents et plus intenses dans certaines régions du monde. L’augmentation de la variabilité saisonnière et des changements au niveau de la prévalence et de l’intensité des extrêmes climatiques rend la réduction de la pauvreté très difficile à l’avenir, tant au niveau de l’impact que de l’incertitude accrue qui accompagne l’intensification du risque climatique.

Trois grands cadres de travail internationaux orienteront l’action de l’après-2015 sur le changement climatique, les catastrophes et le développement, à savoir : la 21ème session de la Conférence des parties à la Convention-cadre des Nations unies sur les changements climatiques (COP21) à Paris, le Cadre de Sendai pour la réduction des risques de catastrophes et les Objectifs de développement durable (ODD). Avec le Sommet humanitaire mondial 2016, ils offrent une occasion de coordonner les efforts et d’aborder les défis du développement et du changement climatique.
Pour sécuriser l’efficacité de ces cadres de travail, les pays doivent s’assurer que leurs parcours de développement ne maintiennent ni n’exacerbent les risques liés au climat.

2.Examiner les extrêmes climatiques et la réduction de la pauvreté par la résilience Dans le présent rapport, nous étudions les relations entre changement climatique et pauvreté en nous concentrant sur les extrêmes climatiques, selon la conviction que ces derniers affecteront le plus nos efforts pour combattre la pauvreté au cours des 15 à 25 prochaines années.

S’inscrivant dans le cadre d’une analyse plus large, trois études détaillées (sur le risque de sécheresse au Mali, les canicules en Inde et les typhons aux Philippines) illustrent la relation entre changement climatique, extrêmes climatiques, catastrophes et impacts sur la pauvreté.

Ces trois études montrent tous les effets disproportionnés des extrêmes climatiques sur les populations qui vivent en dessous du seuil de pauvreté et sur celles qui souffrent de la pauvreté dans ses dimensions non monétaires. Parmi ces impacts immédiats sur les ménages pauvres, on compte la perte de vie humaine (et la perte de revenus du ménage correspondante), la maladie et les perte de récoltes ou d’autres biens. Les effets à plus long terme comprennent la hausse des prix des aliments de base, une sécurité alimentaire réduite, la dénutrition, la malnutrition et le retard de croissance chez l’enfant, ainsi qu’un niveau plus faible d’assiduité scolaire.

Les effets indirects ne sont pas seulement ressentis par les ménages pauvres qui vivent dans les zones affectées, mais aussi par ceux des autres régions du pays en raison des baisses de productivité et de croissance économique, de la perte d’actifs publics, de la perturbation des services et de la réallocation des dépenses publiques vers les activités d’intervention. Cela confirme la constatation selon laquelle il n’existe pas de co-localisation géographique simple des extrêmes climatiques et des impacts sur la pauvreté.

Certes, il existe des points névralgiques, telles les zones urbaines vulnérables aux inondations ou aux tempêtes, sur lesquelles doivent être ciblées les interventions.

Toutefois, on relève aussi d’importantes répercussions sur les populations démunies des autres zones.

3.Implications pour la politique et la planification Le présent rapport appelle à une amélioration de la résilience aux extrêmes climatiques comme condition nécessaire pour atteindre les objectifs de lutte contre la pauvreté.

Pour y parvenir, planificateurs et responsables politiques devront soutenir le renforcement des capacités d’absorption, d’anticipation et d’adaptation des communautés et des sociétés. Des méthodes de travail inédites s’imposent : d’une part, pour lier entre elles des institutions auparavant mal connectées, et, d’autres part dans l’utilisation de nouveaux critères de prise de décision, y compris, pour la sélection de solutions basée sur les scénarii climatiques. L’ampleur de l’enjeu laisse penser que davantage d’actions transformatrices pourraient être requises, notamment le recours à des mécanismes innovants de financement du risque.

Renforcer les capacités d’adaptation, d’anticipation et d’absorption Pour relever le double défi de l’éradication de la pauvreté et du changement climatique, des mesures s’imposent pour accroitre la résilience des communautés et des sociétés les plus vulnérables face à l’augmentation des risques climatiques. La capacité à l’échelle locale informe la façon dont les effets des extrêmes évoluent et affectent les schémas de pauvreté. En renforçant les capacités d’anticipation, d’absorption et d’adaptation des communautés et des sociétés les plus exposées à l’augmentation des risques climatiques, nous pouvons minimiser l’impact des extrêmes climatiques sur les niveaux de pauvreté et sur les pauvres.

Consolider les institutions à toutes les échelles Des investissements soutenus sont requis dans les capacités et les institutions locales de gestion du risque de catastrophe, ainsi que des efforts pour renforcer la coordination entre les différents niveaux de gouvernance. La décentralisation peut contribuer à autonomiser les institutions locales.

Lorsqu’elle est accompagnée d’efforts d’intégration des unités locales au sein de systèmes de planification national et régional, elle peut aussi offrir des solutions locales plus efficaces aux risques posés par les extrêmes climatiques.

Penser mondial, mais évaluer le risque localement Bien que les évaluations régionales et mondiales soient essentielles pour comprendre la portée de l’enjeu climatique, un diagnostic local est nécessaire pour nous permettre de comprendre plus précisément comment le risque est réparti.
Une analyse, reliant les niveaux macro et micro et reposant sur les forces comparatives offertes à chaque niveau d’analyse, présentera un tableau plus nuancé et plus précis du lien changement climatique, catastrophes et pauvreté.

Relier institutions et solutions Les solutions qui visent à renforcer la résilience et réduire la pauvreté devront relier entre elles des institutions auparavant mal connectées. L’analyse du lien entre changement climatique, catastrophes et pauvreté révèle d’importants manques de connectivité et de coordination entre les différents domaines du politique et du pratique.

Il pourrait s’avérer nécessaire d’adopter des méthodes de travail moins cloisonnées entre les différents secteurs et échelles, utilisant autant les informations au lieu de renseignements climatiques et météorologiques que les scénarii visant à informer la planification.

Rôle de l’action transformatrice Un renforcement progressif des capacités de résilience risque d’être insuffisant pour parvenir à la réduction de la pauvreté face au changement climatique. L’ampleur et la portée des risques climatiques futurs nécessiteront une évolution transformatrice dans la manière dont le risque est géré. Les changements transformateurs peuvent être de nature catalyseurs, ayant un effet de levier sur le changement au-delà des activités directes initialement menées. Ils permettent d’opérer des changements à grande échelle et de produire des résultats d’un ordre de grandeur très élevé par rapport aux ressources investies. Ils peuvent également s’avérer durables dans le temps, et survivre bien au-delà du soutien politique et/ou financier initialement apporté.

Le financement, moteur de transformation Les instruments de financement du risque peuvent engendrer des changements transformateurs en agissant comme catalyseurs d’autres investissements dans la gestion du risque de catastrophe et l’adaptation. Les mécanismes financiers régionaux peuvent eux aussi aider les pays à intensifier ces investissements là où ils sont les plus nécessaires. Certes, le financement n’est pas une panacée et, dans certains contextes de développement, il a ses limites. Toutefois, il peut offrir et offre bel et bien des possibilités de méthodes innovantes de gestion du risque qui méritent davantage d’attention dans le cadre d’un portefeuille de solutions.

World: Regional Consultative Group on Humanitarian Civil Military Coordination for Asia and the Pacific - Newsletter Issue 2 | August 2016

9 August 2016 - 5:34am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Bangladesh, Indonesia, Myanmar, Nepal, Philippines, World

Welcome to the Second Edition of the Regional Consultative Group (RCG) on Humanitarian Civil-Military Coordination for Asia and the Pacific Newsletter.

We are glad to share the latest updates in relation to the RCG as well as other UN-CMCoord projects in the Asia-Pacific region:

  1. Second Session of the Regional Consultative Group (RCG) on Humanitarian Civil-Military Coordination for Asia and the Pacific;

  2. UN-CMCoord Course for the Pacific;

  3. Updates on the development of Common Humanitarian Civil-Military Coordination Standards.

REGIONAL CONSULTATIVE GROUP (RCG)

The Regional Consultative Group on Humanitarian Civil-Military Coordination (RCG) for Asia and the Pacific was formed to act as a regional forum that brings together humanitarian, civilian and military actors involved in disaster response preparedness planning and disaster response, including aspects related to the field of humanitarian civil-military coordination and the use of foreign military assets.

The First Session of the RCG (December 2015) resulted in a number of key outcomes, summarized in the report available on Humanitarian Response.info. As RCG chair for 2016, the Government of the Philippines, with the support of the RCG Secretariat, is organizing the Second Session of the RCG that will take place on 11-12 October 2016 at the UN Building in Bangkok, Thailand. The event will have the following objectives:

a) To provide an update on the work plans that were agreed during the First Session of the RCG to strengthen the coordination of operational planning between civilian and military actors in each of the RCG focus countries (Bangladesh, Indonesia, Nepal, Myanmar and the Philippines).

b) To outline the relevance for the Asia-Pacific region of flagship UN-CMCoord events (Annual Meeting of the UN-CMCoord Global Consultative Group - Geneva, February 2016; UNCMCoord side event at the World Humanitarian Summit - Istanbul, May 2016).

c) To discuss new UN-CMCoord projects such as the development of Common Humanitarian Civil-Military Coordination Standards, the Key Immediate Needs (KIN) methodology, the RCG publications.

Malaysia: Dengue Situation Update 497, 9 August 2016

9 August 2016 - 5:11am
Source: World Health Organization Country: Australia, Cambodia, China, French Polynesia (France), Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Malaysia, New Caledonia (France), Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Singapore, Viet Nam
Northern Hemisphere China (No update)

As of 12 July 2016, there were 180 cases of dengue reported in China in 2016. This number is higher than the number of cases reported in the same period of the previous four years (2012-2015) (Figure 1).

Malaysia

In week 29, the number of dengue cases was 2,188, a decrease from 2,240 cases (a decline by 2.3%) reported in the previous week. The cumulative number of cases in 2016 (63,722 cases) was less than that reported during the same period in 2015 (67,944 cases). In week 29, the cumulative number of dengue deaths was 142 cases, compared to 185 deaths during the same reporting period in 2015 (Figure 2).

Philippines (No update)

As of 2 July 2016, there were 59,585 suspected cases of dengue reported in 2016, including 248 deaths. This is 31.4% higher than that reported during the same period in 2015 (n=45,338) (Figure 3).

Singapore

In week 30, there were 222 dengue cases reported in Singapore. While the cumulative number of cases in 2016 (10,095) was almost double compared to that reported in the same period of 2015 (5,447), the number of reported cases follow the same seasonal trend as was in 2015 (Figure 4).

Cambodia (No updates)

From 1 January to 17 May 2016, there have been 1,771 cases of dengue and 4 deaths reported in Cambodia. In May, there were 168 cases and no death reported. The number of cases remains low and stable at this point (Figure 5).

Lao PDR

As of 29 July, there were 2.365 cases of dengue with 9 deaths reported in Lao PDR in 2016. From 23 July to 29 July, 219 new dengue cases and no death were reported. The number of cases is increasing, following the trend of 2012 (Figure 6).

Viet Nam

During week 30, there were 1,983 cases reported with no death. As of 24 July 2016, the cumulative number of cases was 48,798 cases including 14 deaths, reported in 48 out of 63 provinces in Viet Nam. Compared to the same period in 2015 (18,432 cases including 12 deaths), the number of cases was 2.5 times higher. It shows upward trend since week 22, following the trend of 2015.

Southern Hemisphere Australia

As of 7 August 2016, there were 1,496 laboratory-confirmed dengue cases in Australia. The number of cases reported has been decreasing since March and it follows the seasonal trend (2011-2015) (Figure 8).

Pacific Islands Countries and Areas French Polynesia

In week 29, 41 confirmed dengue cases were reported in French Polynesia (Figure 9). Seven of the 41 cases (17%) were confirmed as DENV-1 infection.

Papua New Guinea (No updates)

From 1 January to 5 June, 67 imported cases of dengue with travel history to Papua New Guinea were reported by Queensland Health (notifiable conditions data). Among these cases, 5 were DENV-1, 48 were DENV-2, 3 were DENV-3, 1 was DENV-4 and 10 cases were of undetermined serotype.

New Caledonia

Since 1 September 2015 to 5 August 2016, 483 dengue cases were reported. In July 2016, 89 dengue cases were reported (Figure 10).

Philippines: Comval inaugurates Emergency Operation Center

9 August 2016 - 1:44am
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

NABUNTURAN, Compostela Valley Province----In line with the celebration of the National Disaster Consciousness Month, the Province of Compostela Valley conducted Provincial Emergency Operation Center (OpCen) Inauguration Ceremony on July 28, 2016 located at the Capitol Ground, Cabidianan, Nabunturan, Comval.

The total cost of the OpCen building is Php3.5Million with the Php2.5M coming from the Provincial Government and Php1M from the World Food Program (WFP) as their counterpart.

Juan Blen Huelgas of the WFP and Governor Jayvee Tyron L. Uy lead the ribbon cutting and the official turnover of the building to the Province. The WFP is an international non-government organization, and is the sole partner that has funded the construction of the Provincial Emergency Operation Center as part of their three (3) phase project in making the province more disaster prepared and resilient Local Government Unit.

The ceremony was attended by Provincial Department Heads, MDRRMOs, their respective rescue teams, PNP and BFP and blessed by Father Rey Amora. A Rescue Exhibit and Responders Forum Program followed after the ceremony which was headed by Mr. Raul P. Villocino at the Capitol Lobby.

In addition, Earthquake Drill and Rescue Simulation Exercise was conducted in the afternoon with Mr. Michael S. Capuyan as the overall event facilitator of the one day activity as well as the conduct of the motorcade as part of the observance. (Rey Antibo, IDS Comval)

Myanmar: Asia and the Pacific: Weekly Regional Humanitarian Snapshot (2 - 8 August 2016)

8 August 2016 - 5:33am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Bangladesh, Indonesia, Myanmar, Philippines

MYANMAR

As of 8 August, nearly 360,000 people have been displaced by seasonal monsoon flooding in Magway, Mandalay, Sagaing, Kachin, Ayeyarwady, Mon, Yangon and Bago. Of the total displaced population, 200,000 people are in Magway. State and regional authorities are providing food, water, NFIs, cash and construction materials. Humanitarian organizations are also supporting the government’s response with additional food support. Flood waters are gradually moving south towards the Ayeyarwady Delta as monsoon rains continue to affect various parts of the country.

360,000 people displaced

PHILIPPINES

Following Tropical Strom Nida, 8,300 people were displaced when it struck northern Cagayan province; by 3 August all evacuation centres had closed, with the Department of Social Welfare and Development providing relief assistance to the displaced people. Twelve people were injured in incidents attributed to the storm, while strong winds partially damaged seven houses in the provinces of Ilocos Norte and Ilocos Sur. Six roads and five bridges in northern and southern Luzon remain impassable due to landslides and swollen rivers.

8,300 people displaced

BANGLADESH

Flooding due to heavy rains has continued to affect 16 districts across Bangladesh. To support the local response, NGOs, the IFRC and UN agencies have started to provide targeted shelter, water and sanitation and health support using in-country resources. Based on Humanitarian Coordination Task Team analysis, at least 3 million people may end up being affected by floods by the time the monsoon season peaks around mid-August to September.

16 districts affected

INDONESIA

From 3 to 6 August, Mount Gamalama on Ternate Island, North Maluku province, spewed volcanic ash up to 600 metres towards the southeast areas of the island. As a result Sultan Babullah Airport in Ternate was closed until 6 August. The national volcanology agency maintained the volcano alert status at level two. No casualties or evacuations were reported from the recent eruption. Local government and the Red Cross distributed thousands of anti-dust masks.