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Philippines: SitRep No.1 re Preparedness Measures and Effects of Tropical Storm "MARIO" (Fung-Wong)

18 September 2014 - 1:50pm
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines preview

1. SITUATION OVERVIEW

Tropical Storm "MARIO" has maintained its strength as it moved toward Northern Luzon.

World: DEC Annual Report & Accounts 2013-2014

18 September 2014 - 1:32pm
Source: Disasters Emergency Committee Country: Philippines, Syrian Arab Republic, World preview

Saleh Saeed, DEC CEO, writes a special letter to all our supporters announcing the new DEC Annual Report.

Dear DEC supporter,

Last year was an extraordinary one for the Disasters Emergency Committee and we want to thank you for being part of it.

We marked our 50th anniversary with our supporters, partners and members - remembering some of the 65 appeals we have run together, which in total have raised £1.2 billion and helped tens of millions of people around the world. That list includes two new appeals for the Syria Crisis (pp9-12 of the Annual Report), which launched in March 2013, and the Philippines Typhoon which launched in October.

We launched the Syria Crisis Appeal following a dramatic escalation in the displacement of people caused by a brutal civil war. Increased support from our partners and improvements to how we fundraise, have helped us reach the current appeal total of £25m.

Humanitarian disasters caused by wars almost always raise less than those caused by natural disasters and this total is a credit to the generosity of the UK public. In the Philippines, a devastating super-Typhoon ripped apart the lives of 14 million people – cutting a path 100 miles wide across a nation made up of thousands of islands. Our Philippines Typhoon Appeal raised an extraordinary £95m.

Each appeal presented serious challenges for our members and we are collectively committed to learning from these and being open about them. In Syria our members and their partners faced serious risks in seeking to deliver aid. In keeping with our commitment to openness the report explores some these challenges of working in Syria.

We also make a point of sharing not only details of the kinds of aid that DEC funds have helped deliver but also explaining how money has been spent on essential systems and processes to allow our members to effectively deliver aid to 1.7m people last year.

As this report went to print we had raised £15m for our Gaza Crisis Appeal which launched after 2013-14 year end and on which we will report in full in next year’s annual report.

Saleh Saeed
Chief Executive
Disasters Emergency Committee

Syrian Arab Republic: DEC Annual Report & Accounts 2013-2014

18 September 2014 - 1:32pm
Source: Disasters Emergency Committee Country: Philippines, Syrian Arab Republic preview

Saleh Saeed, DEC CEO, writes a special letter to all our supporters announcing the new DEC Annual Report.

Dear DEC supporter,

Last year was an extraordinary one for the Disasters Emergency Committee and we want to thank you for being part of it.

We marked our 50th anniversary with our supporters, partners and members - remembering some of the 65 appeals we have run together, which in total have raised £1.2 billion and helped tens of millions of people around the world. That list includes two new appeals for the Syria Crisis (pp9-12 of the Annual Report), which launched in March 2013, and the Philippines Typhoon which launched in October.

We launched the Syria Crisis Appeal following a dramatic escalation in the displacement of people caused by a brutal civil war. Increased support from our partners and improvements to how we fundraise, have helped us reach the current appeal total of £25m.

Humanitarian disasters caused by wars almost always raise less than those caused by natural disasters and this total is a credit to the generosity of the UK public. In the Philippines, a devastating super-Typhoon ripped apart the lives of 14 million people – cutting a path 100 miles wide across a nation made up of thousands of islands. Our Philippines Typhoon Appeal raised an extraordinary £95m.

Each appeal presented serious challenges for our members and we are collectively committed to learning from these and being open about them. In Syria our members and their partners faced serious risks in seeking to deliver aid. In keeping with our commitment to openness the report explores some these challenges of working in Syria.

We also make a point of sharing not only details of the kinds of aid that DEC funds have helped deliver but also explaining how money has been spent on essential systems and processes to allow our members to effectively deliver aid to 1.7m people last year.

As this report went to print we had raised £15m for our Gaza Crisis Appeal which launched after 2013-14 year end and on which we will report in full in next year’s annual report.

Saleh Saeed
Chief Executive
Disasters Emergency Committee

Philippines: 18 September 2014: Mexico, Philippines, China, Vietnam - Tropical Cyclones

18 September 2014 - 10:57am
Source: European Commission Humanitarian Aid department Country: China, Mexico, Philippines, Viet Nam preview

MEXICO

• On 17 September, ODILE moved over the northern Gulf of California and north-western mainland Mexico, weakening into a Tropical Depression, then towards south-western U.S.A. About 26 000 foreign tourists took refuge in 165 temporary shelters (including 31 hotels). An aerial bridge was established in Baja California in order to evacuate them. Preliminary reports indicate that ODILE has caused 135 minor injuries. No casualties have been reported so far. 240 000 households were left without electricity and damage assessment is ongoing.

• In the meantime, POLO strengthened into a Category 1 Hurricane, off the Pacific coast of Mexico. In the next 24 h it is forecast to move north-west over water, parallel to the south- western coast of Mexico, strengthening. Strong winds and heavy rains may affect parts of the coastal areas of the states of Guerrero, Michoacan, Colima and Jalisco over 18-20 September .

PHILIPPINES, CHINA, VIETNAM

• KALMAEGI weakened into a Tropical Depression on 17 September, moving over northern Vietnam. Heavy rainfall affected several areas of northern Vietnam and southern China, causing floods and landslides. In northern Vietnam, media reported six dead and five injured, 5 000 ha of crops destroyed and 147 houses damaged. In the northern Philippines, 366 075 people were affected, as of 18 September, according to the NDRRMC.

• In the meantime, a new Tropical Cyclone, FUNG-WONG (called “MARIO” in the Philippines) formed over the Philippine Sea and started moving towards the north-eastern Philippines. It is forecast to reach the north- eastern tip of Luzon on 19 September, possibly as a Tropical Storm. A Public Storm Warning Signal #2 is in effect for the provinces of Cagayan and Northern Isabela, as of 18 September, according to PAGASA.

Viet Nam: Philippines, China, Vietnam - Tropical Cyclones KALMAEGI and FUNG-WONG (ECHO Daily Flash, 18 September 2014)

18 September 2014 - 10:01am
Source: European Commission Humanitarian Aid department Country: China, Philippines, Viet Nam

KALMAEGI weakened into a Tropical Depression on 17 September, moving over northern Vietnam. Heavy rainfall affected several areas of northern Vietnam and southern China, causing floods and landslides. In northern Vietnam, media reported at least six people killed and another five injured in a landslide in Cao Loc district (Long Son Province), 5 000 ha of crops destroyed and 147 houses damaged.
In northern Philippines, due to the passage of KALMAEGI (LUIS), 366 075 people were affected (as of 18 September, NDRRMC).

In the meantime a new Tropical Cyclone FUNG-WONG (MARIO) formed over the Philippine Sea and started moving towards north-eastern Philippines. On 18 September at 00.00 UTC it was a Tropical Storm (max. sustained winds of 64 km/h) and its center was located over water approx. 420 km east of Catanduanes province. In the next 24 h it is forecast to move northwest towards north-eastern Philippines, strengthening. It may reach the north-eastern tip of Luzon on 19-20 September. A Public Storm Warning Signal #1 is in effect for the provinces of Catanduanes, Isabela, Aurora and Cagayan (Luzon), as of early 18 September (PAGASA).

Philippines: 'Luis' aftermath: 5 Pangasinan towns under calamity state

18 September 2014 - 2:37am
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines

By: Venus H. Sarmiento

DAGUPAN CITY, Sept. 18 (PIA) – Five Pangasinan towns were declared under calamity state days after Typhoon Luis dumped from heavy to intense rains submerging communities and agricultural lands in northern Luzon provinces.

The towns of Calasiao, Sta. Barbara, Umingan, Laoac and San Manuel were declared under state of calamity due to high flood waters. Classes remain suspended in seven public schools and seven private schools until Thursday.

The Provincial Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (PDRRMC) said three people died of drowning while damages to agriculture and infrastructure were estimated at P290 million.

The victims were identified as Rogelio Marquez Sayan whose body was found along the Camangaan river in Binalonan town; Edmund Rubio Dimatulak from Tarlac City whose body was found in Burgos town and Magie Rosario of Sta. Barbara town.

“The damages to agriculture and infrastructure are only partial estimates as flood waters have not yet subsided in low-lying areas,” said Avenix Arenas, PDRRRMC spokesperson.

In Dagupan City, 26 barangays experienced flooding while affected families were at 56,554 or 236,175 individuals.

Roads going to and from Pangasinan are now passable except the Marunong bridge in Sta. Barbara town. (MCA/VHS/PIA-1/Pangasinan)

Philippines: NDDRMC Update Sitrep No. 2 re Monitoring Activities on the Alert Status of Mayon Volcano

18 September 2014 - 2:25am
Source: Government of the Philippines Country: Philippines preview

Alert Level 3 remains in effect as of 8:00 AM, 18 September 2014, which means that magma is at the crater and that hazardous eruption is possible within weeks.

Pakistan: The 2014 Rainfall Season: South and East Asia

17 September 2014 - 12:14pm
Source: World Food Programme Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines, Thailand, Viet Nam preview

Highlights

• The dominant feature of the 2014 season across East Asia so far has been widespread rainfall deficits that led to delayed starts of the growing season across vast areas of the continent.

• Conditions were worst around mid July, followed by a general improvement, which still left moderate rainfall deficits as the predominant pattern. SE Pakistan has been the worst affected area, in particular for livelihoods dependent on rainfed agriculture and pastoral resources.

• In early September, extreme rainfall events, the heaviest in at least 30 years, led to flooding and loss of life in Kashmir. In contrast, heavy rainfall relieved dry conditions in Gujarat, India.

• Seasonal forecasts indicate a continuation of broadly drier than average conditions across the continent. Weakening El Nino conditions may change these perspectives.

World: The 2014 Rainfall Season: South and East Asia

17 September 2014 - 12:14pm
Source: World Food Programme Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, China, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines, Thailand, Viet Nam, World preview

Highlights

• The dominant feature of the 2014 season across East Asia so far has been widespread rainfall deficits that led to delayed starts of the growing season across vast areas of the continent.

• Conditions were worst around mid July, followed by a general improvement, which still left moderate rainfall deficits as the predominant pattern. SE Pakistan has been the worst affected area, in particular for livelihoods dependent on rainfed agriculture and pastoral resources.

• In early September, extreme rainfall events, the heaviest in at least 30 years, led to flooding and loss of life in Kashmir. In contrast, heavy rainfall relieved dry conditions in Gujarat, India.

• Seasonal forecasts indicate a continuation of broadly drier than average conditions across the continent. Weakening El Nino conditions may change these perspectives.

Philippines: Philippines: Municipality of Salcedo - Zero Open Defecation Certified Barangays (as of 10 Sep 2014)

17 September 2014 - 7:54am
Source: Government of the Philippines, UN Children's Fund Country: Philippines preview

Philippines: Philippines: Municipality of Quinapondan - Zero Open Defecation Certified Barangays (as of 10 Sep 2014)

17 September 2014 - 7:53am
Source: Government of the Philippines, UN Children's Fund Country: Philippines preview

Philippines: Philippines: Municipality of Mercedes - Zero Open Defecation Certified Barangays (as of 10 Sep 2014)

17 September 2014 - 7:50am
Source: Government of the Philippines, UN Children's Fund Country: Philippines preview

Philippines: Philippines: Municipality of Lawaan - Zero Open Defecation Certified Barangays (as of 10 Sep 2014)

17 September 2014 - 7:47am
Source: Government of the Philippines, UN Children's Fund Country: Philippines preview

Philippines: Philippines: Municipality of Guian - Zero Open Defecation Certified Barangays (as of 10 Sep 2014)

17 September 2014 - 7:42am
Source: Government of the Philippines, UN Children's Fund Country: Philippines preview

Philippines: Philippines: Municipality of General McArthur- Zero Open Defecation Certified Barangays (as of 10 Sep 2014)

17 September 2014 - 7:40am
Source: Government of the Philippines, UN Children's Fund Country: Philippines preview

Philippines: Philippines: Municipality of Balangiga - Zero Open Defecation Certified Barangays (as of 10 Sep 2014)

17 September 2014 - 7:37am
Source: Government of the Philippines, UN Children's Fund Country: Philippines preview

Philippines: Philippines: Eastern Samar - Zero Open Defecation Certified Barangays (as of 10 Sep 2014)

17 September 2014 - 7:32am
Source: Government of the Philippines, UN Children's Fund Country: Philippines preview

Philippines: Rushed evacuations as Philippine volcano spews lava

17 September 2014 - 2:49am
Source: Agence France-Presse Country: Philippines

09/17/2014 05:52 GMT

LEGAZPI, September 17, 2014 (AFP) - Lava cascaded down the Philippines' most active volcano on Wednesday as authorities rushed to evacuate thousands ahead of a possible deadly eruption.

Mostly women, children and the elderly carrying bags of clothes were hauled out of farming villages near Mayon volcano's slopes on board army trucks and minibuses.

Soldiers went from house to house asking residents to evacuate, after authorities on Monday raised the third highest alert in a five-step scale, meaning a full-scale eruption is possible "within weeks".

Before dawn Wednesday, Mayon's crater glowed red as molten rocks flowed as far as halfway down its slopes.

The volcano's world-renowned perfect cone appeared to have been deformed, swollen with lava that had risen from the Earth's core.

At least 8,000 of the target 50,000 people had been moved to temporary shelters, with the operation expected to run for three days, regional civil defence director Bernardo Alejandro told AFP.

However he said the evacuation operation was sapping precious disaster-relief funds and manpower in Albay province, which is regularly battered by typhoons at this time of year.

"The province can sustain them (in evacuation centres) for not more than a month... we cannot exhaust all our disaster funds on Mayon," Alejandro said.

The deadliest and most powerful of the roughly 20 typhoons that batter the Philippines every year happen towards the end of the year, bringing floods, landslides and storm surges to eastern provinces such as Albay that face the Pacific Ocean.

State volcanology agency director Renato Solidum said more magma was moving up the crater each day, although for the time being the alert level would remain at three. Level five means an eruption is occurring.

The 2,640-metre (8,070-foot) Mayon, located about 330 kilometres (200 miles) southwest of Manila, is a draw for local and foreign tourists but an enduring danger for anyone getting too close.

Four foreign tourists and their local tour guide were killed when Mayon last erupted, in May 2013.

In December 2006, 1,000 people died as a strong typhoon hit near Mayon, unleashing an avalanche of volcanic mud from an eruption four months earlier.

In 1814, more than 1,200 people were killed when lava flows buried the town of Cagsawa.

str-jfg-mm/kma/jah

© 1994-2014 Agence France-Presse

World: Cómo desarrollar programas eficaces de recuperación tras desastres: Lecciones de países vulnerables

17 September 2014 - 2:16am
Source: World Bank Country: Bangladesh, Haiti, Indonesia, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Mozambique, Pakistan, Philippines, Senegal, World, Yemen

TITULARES DE ARTÍCULOS

  • Una mejor reconstrucción después de un desastre natural tiene relación con la calidad de las nuevas estructuras y también con la participación de las comunidades, especialmente los pobres y vulnerables.

  • Formular planes de restauración antes de que ocurra una catástrofe puede ayudar a las personas y las comunidades a recuperarse más rápido y proteger los avances en materia de desarrollo.

  • Los países se pueden beneficiar del intercambio de conocimientos sobre qué medidas han dado resultados y cuáles no han sido efectivas durante desastres sucedidos previamente.

En octubre de 2008, una gran tormenta tropical se transformó en uno de los peores desastres naturales que ha afectado a Yemen en más de una década. Miles de familias huyeron de sus hogares, y casi 7000 personas fallecieron. La tormenta destruyó infraestructura esencial y detuvo la actividad económica. Los daños fueron estimados en US$1600 millones, o 6 % del producto interno bruto (PIB) del país. El tumultuoso ambiente político complicó más la situación, y la puesta en práctica de programas de recuperación y reconstrucción acordes a la magnitud del desastre constituyó un gran desafío.

Los momentos después de una catástrofe son críticos, ya que las políticas y las decisiones del Gobierno pueden determinar la rapidez de la recuperación de un país y sus habitantes.

Para ayudar a naciones como Yemen a crear capacidad para diseñar e implementar programas integrales de recuperación y reconstrucción, el Fondo Mundial para la Reducción de los Desastres y la Recuperación (GFDRR, por sus siglas en inglés) del Banco Mundial y el Programa de las Naciones Unidas para el Desarrollo (PNUD), junto con los Gobiernos de los países, han desarrollado una serie de nueve estudios de caso. Estos ofrecen lecciones concretas y buenas prácticas respecto de la implementación de programas de recuperación posterior a desastres en Bangladesh, Haití, Indonesia, la República Democrática Popular Lao, Mozambique, Pakistán, Filipinas, Senegal y Yemen.

Tras la tormenta tropical en Yemen, el Gobierno estableció un Fondo de Reconstrucción y Recuperación para financiar y coordinar los esfuerzos en estas materias en las regiones de Hadramaut y al-Mahra, afectadas por dicho desastre. Para evitar demoras innecesarias durante el delicado proceso de recuperación y reconstrucción es importante clarificar las responsabilidades y la rendición de cuentas.

“La experiencia de Yemen después de las inundaciones de 2008 destaca la importancia de aprender de las mejores prácticas relativas a los programas de recuperación y reconstrucción”, dijo el primer viceministro del Ministerio de Obras Públicas y Carreteras de Yemen, Abdulmalek Al-Jolahy. “En Yemen, planeamos institucionalizar estas lecciones estableciendo una unidad central que coordine de manera permanente la gestión del riesgo de desastres y que promueva la capacidad de adaptación a estos fenómenos y, a su vez, el desarrollo sostenible a nivel nacional”.

![Open Quotes] Los desastres naturales de gran magnitud, especialmente en los países frágiles y en desarrollo, pueden significar un retroceso en los logros obtenidos en materia de desarrollo durante años. Aunque no podemos eliminar totalmente las catástrofes en el futuro, podemos aprender de cada evento de modo que cuando reconstruyamos, reduzcamos las vulnerabilidades ya identificadas [Close Quotes]!

Francis Ghesquiere director de la Secretaría del GFDRR

Los estudios de caso (i) complementan las evaluaciones sobre los daños, pérdidas y necesidades para la recuperación y reconstrucción posterior a un desastre y las orientaciones para la recuperación después de una catástrofe, que están siendo lanzadas esta semana por el GFDRR y el PNUD durante la Segunda Conferencia Mundial sobre Reconstrucción (WRC 2). (i) Estos documentos contienen recomendaciones sobre cómo determinar los daños tras un desastre y ayudar a los países a planificar, diseñar e implementar mejor los programas de recuperación y reconstrucción.

“Los desastres naturales de gran magnitud, especialmente en los países frágiles y en desarrollo, pueden significar un retroceso en los logros obtenidos en materia de desarrollo durante años. Aunque no podemos eliminar totalmente las catástrofes en el futuro, podemos aprender de cada evento de modo que cuando reconstruyamos, reduzcamos las vulnerabilidades ya identificadas”, dijo Francis Ghesquiere, director de la Secretaría del GFDRR.

Pero la resiliencia no tiene que ver solamente con el resultado final —los nuevos edificios y la infraestructura—, sino que también con cómo se lleva cabo el proceso. Si se involucra a los gobiernos locales y a las comunidades afectadas, la reconstrucción puede fortalecer el capital social y las capacidades comunitarias, así como dar lugar a la innovación y mejorar las prestaciones y la eficacia del sector público.

Esto quedó claro después del terremoto de 2005 en Cachemira. El Gobierno de Pakistán lanzó un programa de subsidios públicos para la reconstrucción de viviendas que permitió entregar apoyo técnico y financiero a los hogares. Al participar directamente en la rehabilitación o reconstrucción de sus casas, las familias afectadas se aseguraron de que las nuevas viviendas fueran a prueba de terremotos. Más de 400 000 casas fueron reconstruidas y el 90 % de ellas cumplió con los nuevos códigos antisísmicos, lo cual ayudó a preparar mejor a la región para futuros eventos de este tipo.

El fortalecimiento de la resiliencia y de los programas de recuperación y reconstrucción debe también considerar las vulnerabilidades específicas de los segmentos más pobres de la sociedad, es decir los hogares e individuos que no tienen acceso a ahorros o no son propietarios y que, por tanto, están en enorme riesgo de sumirse aún más en la pobreza.

En Bangladesh, por ejemplo, el ciclón tropical Sidr dañó más de 1 millón de hogares en 2007, desencadenando el mayor programa de reconstrucción de viviendas en la historia del país. Sin embargo, durante la fase de recuperación y reconstrucción, el Gobierno enfrentó un gran desafío: más de la mitad de los hogares no tenía derechos legales sobre sus tierras.

Para los hogares pobres, las soluciones específicas que tienen como objetivo abordar vulnerabilidades determinadas pueden inclinar la balanza hacia un futuro más resiliente y próspero. Mediante la recopilación de los mejores conocimientos y experiencias en todo el mundo, se puede ayudar a que los países propensos a los desastres aprendan de otros que enfrentaron retos similares en el pasado.

Además de buenas prácticas, los estudios de caso también presentan ideas sobre lo que los países podrían haber hecho mejor.

“Los desastres ocurren porque el desarrollo no funcionó. Cuando sucede una catástrofe, tenemos una oportunidad de adoptar medidas diferentes que en última instancia conducirán a mejores resultados en materia de desarrollo sostenible y reducción de la pobreza", dijo Jo Scheuer, coordinador del equipo de reducción del riesgo de desastres y recuperación del PNUD. “Hemos recorrido un camino muy largo. Cada proceso de recuperación es diferente y tenemos que continuar aprendiendo, haciendo ajustes y colaborando con las asociaciones internacionales que hemos establecido”.

Los nueve estudios de caso serán presentados durante la Segunda Conferencia Mundial sobre Reconstrucción con el fin de fomentar el aprendizaje y el intercambio de conocimientos entre las regiones, los países y los sectores del desarrollo. Estos se pueden descargar en: www.gfdrr.org. (i)

World: Global Estimates 2014 - People displaced by disasters

17 September 2014 - 1:08am
Source: Norwegian Refugee Council, Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre Country: Chad, Niger, Philippines, Sudan, World, South Sudan preview

22 million people displaced by disasters in 2013, global trends on the rise

Latest report from IDMC shows that 22 million people were displaced in 2013 by disasters brought on by natural hazard events – almost three times more than by conflict in the same year.

NEW YORK, 17 September 2014: Four decades of data show that twice as many people are being displaced today than in the 1970s. A new report by the Norwegian Refugee Council’s Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre, launched today at the UN in New York, reveals this is largely due to the growth and concentration of urban populations, particularly in vulnerable countries.

“This increasing trend will continue as more and more people live and work in hazard-prone areas. It is expected to be aggravated in the future by the impacts of climate change”, said Jan Egeland, the Secretary General of the Norwegian Refugee Council.

Displacement caused by disasters is a global phenomenon that is growing in scale, frequency and complexity. “More people today are exposed and vulnerable. Our report shows that much more can be done to prepare for and prevent displacement caused by disasters”, said Jan Egeland.

According to the report, no region of the world is immune to disasters, but as in previous years the worst affected was Asia, where 19 million people, or 87.1 per cent of the global total, were displaced. Both wealthy and poorer countries are affected, although developing countries bear the brunt, accounting for more than 85 per cent of displacement.

Major disasters drive the global trend. In the Philippines, typhoon Haiyan alone displaced 4.1 million people, a million more than in Africa, the Americas, Europe and Oceania combined.

Viewed relative to population size, seasonal floods also caused significant displacement in sub-Saharan Africa, most notably in Niger, Chad, Sudan and South Sudan – countries with highly vulnerable populations who are also affected by conflict and drought. Given that Africa’s population is predicted to double by 2050, displacement risk is expected to increase faster than in any other region in coming decades.

The extent to which populations in the most developed countries are exposed to hazards also led to some of the world’s largest displacements. Typhoon

Man-yi in Japan displaced 260,000 people and tornadoes in the US state of Oklahoma 218,500.

“Most disasters are as much man-made as they are natural,” said IDMC’s director, Alfredo Zamudio. “Better urban planning, flood defences and building standards could mitigate much of their impact”.

As world leaders prepare to gather for the UN Secretary General Ban Ki- moon's Global Climate Change Summit, this evidence calls for action to be taken to reduce disaster risk and to help communities adapt to changing and more unpredictable weather patterns, without which much more displacement will occur in the future.

END

The full report, highlights document, and graphics are available to download here

Notes to the editor:

IDMC considers that ‘natural’ hazards are events or conditions originating in the natural environment that may affect people and critical assets located in exposed areas. They include climate- and weather-related events as well as geo-physical events such as earthquakes. The impact of these hazards is often strongly influenced by human actions that contribute to disaster risk and long-term changes in the global climate; therefore, the causes of these hazards and disasters related to them are often less than ‘natural’.

It is widely agreed that the vast majority of people displaced by disasters are internally displaced (defined by the 1998 Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement), which is the focus of displacement situations highlighted by the Global Estimates report. A smaller number are displaced across borders, but this has not been quantified globally.

The global figures relate to cases of new displacement each year. They do not include people who have remained displaced for prolonged periods of time following disasters in preceding years. This is a global information blind spot that should be of concern to governments, given that the risks faced by displaced people tend to increase the longer that they are displaced.

For more information, please contact:

Tuva Bogsnes, Norwegian Refugee Council E-Mail: Tuva.Bogsnes@nrc.no Mobile: +(47) 932 31 883

Ane Høyem, Norwegian Refugee Council E-mail: Ane.hoyem@nrc.no Mobile phone: +(47) 975 65 108

Erik Abild , Norwegian Refugee Council E-mail: erik.abild@nrc.no Mobile phone: +(47) 474 19 946