Somalia - ReliefWeb News

Syndicate content
ReliefWeb - Updates
Updated: 2 hours 52 min ago

Somalia: UNICEF Somalia 2015 Annual Report [EN/SOM]

25 May 2016 - 11:23pm
Source: UN Children's Fund Country: Somalia

For UNICEF Somalia, 2015 was a year of highs and lows. We saw positive progress for children and their rights but also the devastating loss of four of our colleagues in an attack in Puntland.

In October, Somalia became the 196th country to ratify the Convention on the Rights of the Child. This is excellent news for children.The Convention provides an important framework for policy and legislation on children’s rights. UNICEF immediately started working closely with the federal government to ensure its implementation.

The report covers the following:

  • 2015 in Review

  • Health

  • Nutrition

  • WASH

  • Education

  • Child Protection

  • Social Policy

  • Emergency Response

  • Cross Sectoral

  • Donor Support

Somalia: AU Special Representative to Somalia Calls For A Step Change In Tackling Al Shabaab

25 May 2016 - 10:35pm
Source: African Union Mission in Somalia Country: Somalia

Mogadishu, 24 May, 2016 – A two-day meeting of Sector Commanders drawn from the African Union Mission in Somalia has ended in Mogadishu today.

The forum is a periodic gathering of Sector Commanders and other key security players, where matters regarding security in are discussed, especially the challenges posed by terror group Al Shabaab. It was officially opened on Monday by the AU Special Representative for Somalia Ambassador Francisco Caetano Madeira.

“The effectiveness of Al-Shabaab comes from its capacity to split into small groups which are undetectable. Secondly, it comes from it’s mobility and third, it comes from it’s capacity to surprise and speed to surprise,” said Ambassador Madeira in his opening address.

He added, “This war cannot be won only with guns. Guns are necessary, but guns alone cannot win such kind of war. Insurgency means that there is a section of population that believes in these individuals. These populations need not necessarily to be eliminated but to be harnessed and converted to our side as a method of winning the war against them. With the radicalized individuals, what we have to again is education, sensitization, mentoring so that they understand that these radical ideas, this intolerance is not acceptable because humanity is diverse, societies are diverse.”

Ambassador Madeira directed the Sector Commanders to decisively deal with Al Shabaab, while at the same time highlighting the need to employ superior techniques, which would ensure the terror group is completely subdued and pushed out of their remaining hideouts.

Acting AMISOM Force Commander Major General Mohammedesha Zeyinu emphasized the building of partnerships between AMISOM, the Somali National Army and communities in the sectors.

“This conference enables us to have common understanding; and shared information about the enemy. It is also an opportunity for us to learn from each other’s experiences in the sectors. Our main objective is to analyse our situation, our strengths, our weaknesses and come up with solutions,” said the Acting Force Commander.

The meeting ended on Tuesday with a resolve from all participants for a step change in the fight against Al Shabaab, which would see the terror group completely neutralized in all of Somalia.

“The way forward would be and would remain the need, the absolute need to capacitate and empower SNA as a gravitating point for any success that we might be able to make in Somalia. We need to see what are the challenges that our colleagues in SNA are facing and together see how we can help them overcome these challenges so that they can become an effective fighting force and capable of taking over from us,” emphasized Ambassador Madeira as he officially closed the two day forum.

Somalia: Continued Support Critical for Ongoing Somalian Political Process, Horn of Africa Region Stability, Security Council Visiting Mission Reports

25 May 2016 - 4:16pm
Source: UN Security Council Country: Libya, Somalia

SC/12374

7696th Meeting (AM)
Security Council
Meetings Coverage

During its recent visiting mission to the Horn of Africa, Council members reaffirmed the Security Council’s support for the ongoing political process in Somalia and met with top officials to address the region’s security and humanitarian challenges, co-leaders of the mission told the 15-member body in their briefing this morning.

Matthew Rycroft (United Kingdom), describing the Somalia leg of the mission, said the visit had been a chance for the Security Council to reaffirm its commitment to continue to stand with the Somali people on their journey to stability and prosperity. The visit had come at a critical time, as 2016 was halfway between 2012 — when the current political process had been launched — and 2020, when “one person one vote” general elections were slated to be held.

However, he said, when the visiting mission had arrived in Mogadishu last week the political process had been in a deadlock. The Parliament had not been able to endorse the electoral model, which was delaying the process. The Council delegation then met with Somali President Hassan Sheikh Mohamud to urge the swift adoption of the electoral model. Just days later, President Mahmud issued a presidential decree to ensure that there was no extension to the terms of Somalia’s executive and legislative bodies.

On security issues, Mr. Rycroft said that the Council delegation had met with the Somali Deputy Prime Minister, the head of the African Union Mission in Somalia (AMISOM) and other key officials, who had outlined the scale of the challenges ahead. “Security remains a very significant concern for Somalia,” he said, stressing the need to continue to work with AMISOM, the national army and the police to maintain stability. Among other things, he had been struck by the scale of what remained to be done to create a genuinely effective set of security forces.

In a broader context, he noted that the Council delegation had been able to speak with United Nations personnel and other actors in the region to examine Somalia’s humanitarian situation and its situation vis-à-vis sustainable development. Key elements of those discussions had been the long-term consequences of conflict along with its root causes.

Amr Abdellatif Aboulatta (Egypt), Council President, speaking as co-lead of the Council’s mission, said the visit had allowed the Council to achieve three main objectives: reiterate its support for national efforts to complete the political process in Somalia; provide support for more coordination in the face of the challenges relating to Somali refugees; and meet with the Arab League Council in Cairo.

Noting that the visit to Somalia had sent a “well-timed message” that the Council would not be complacent with regard to any obstructions of the peace process, he went on to describe the meeting with President Uhuru Kenyatta of Kenya. Among other things, discussions included the financing of the salary of AMISOM members and issues relating to challenges in dealing with refugees, in particular the need for more international support for receiving countries.

The Council delegation had also met with various high-level officials to review AMISOM’s logistics, including the need for more helicopters and equipment, and had discussed requests to strengthen the Mission, adjust its mandate and improve its financing. Also discussed were efforts to address Somalia’s humanitarian crisis and the challenges of increased recruitment of children by Al-Shabaab. The Council delegation had noted, among other things, the non-availability of clear information on terrorist activities inside the region’s refugee camps.

In Cairo, the Council delegation had met with the Council of Ministers of the League of Arab States, taking up issues including the Middle East peace process, Somalia and Libya. Discussions had underscored the consensus on the need to better coordinate support for Libya’s political process — which would allow the country to better fight Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIS/Da’esh) militants and achieve stability — and the need to build Libyan State institutions and to win the confidence of the Libyan people. Also raised had been the need to protect the rights of refugees and combat xenophobia and Islamophobia.

The meeting began at 10:26 a.m. and ended at 10:47 a.m.

For information media. Not an official record.

World: Conflict Trends: Issue 1, 2016 - Peacebuilding in the Great Lakes Region of Africa

25 May 2016 - 9:58am
Source: African Centre for the Constructive Resolution of Disputes Country: Burundi, Central African Republic, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Rwanda, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, World, Zambia

The Great Lakes Region highlights the interconnected nature of conflict. This is particularly true for the four focus countries of the Great Lakes Project (GLP), namely Burundi, the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Rwanda and Uganda. This interconnectedness forms the basis of the GLP’s regional approach.

Introduction

While the name ‘Great Lakes Region’ was derived from the freshwater lakes and river basins within the central and eastern part of Africa,1 for the purposes of this article the Great Lakes Region is defined within the context of the regional entity known as the International Conference on the Great Lakes Region (ICGLR). In the ICGLR context, the area of focus is therefore the countries located in the east and central Africa – namely Rwanda, Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), Uganda, Tanzania, Zambia, Republic of Congo, Central African Republic (CAR), South Sudan, Kenya and Sudan. Thus, the Great Lakes Region constitutes a complex network of political and economic interactions with significant implications for peace, security and governance. It is also a region with interlinked conflicts and common fundamental problems that emanate from postcolonial challenges to state-building and nation-building. This article analyses the main conflict dynamics in the Great Lakes Region. The causes, dynamics and effects of conflicts are summarised, but the scope of the article does not allow for the exhaustive delineation of the conflict in each country. Rather, the purpose here is to provide an overview of the root causes of conflicts in Great Lakes Region countries, their maintenance factors, their interconnectivity and their consequences on people.

World: Documenting the United States’ Commitment to Conventional Weapons Destruction: To Walk the Earth in Safety (2015/FY2014)

25 May 2016 - 6:06am
Source: Government of the United States of America Country: Afghanistan, Albania, Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Burundi, Cambodia, Colombia, Croatia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Georgia, Honduras, Iraq, Kyrgyzstan, Lao People's Democratic Republic (the), Lebanon, Marshall Islands, Mozambique, Myanmar, occupied Palestinian territory, Palau, Rwanda, Serbia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, Uganda, Ukraine, United States of America, Viet Nam, World, Yemen, Zimbabwe

A Message From Assistant Secretary Puneet Talwar

For more than two decades, the United States has been at the forefront of international efforts to reduce the worldwide threat to civilians from landmines, unexploded ordnance (UXO), and other conventional weapons of war. Just 15 years ago, landmines and other explosive remnants of war killed or injured nearly 10,000 men, women, and children every year—more than 25 every day. Thanks to the concerted efforts of the United States, partner nations, international nongovernmental organizations, and host nations, that figure has now dropped by more than 60%.

The 14th edition of To Walk the Earth in Safety documents the United States’ efforts to combat these threats, the progress we have made, and the work still to be done.

In last year’s report, I highlighted our June 2014 announcement that the United States would no longer produce or otherwise acquire anti-personnel landmines. In September 2014, President Obama took another major step forward, announcing that the United States would not use anti-personnel landmines outside the Korean Peninsula and that the United States would start to destroy anti-personnel landmine stockpiles not required for the defense of the Republic of Korea. These historic policy changes represent another step to advance the humanitarian aims of the Ottawa Convention.

Since 1993, the United States has invested nearly $2.5 billion to clear or destroy landmines, unexploded ordnance, and other dangerous conventional weapons. In Fiscal Year 2014, the Department of State allocated approximately $140 million to CWD programs in more than 40 countries, helping post-conflict communities and countries recover and rebuild. These programs touch thousands of lives all over the world, from children in Sri Lanka who can now safely walk to school, to farmers in Vietnam who can now tend to their crops without fear. Our efforts have cleared aging and unstable ammunition in Kyrgyzstan, and provided medical rehabilitation and vocational training for survivors of landmine incidents who currently reside in Syrian refugee camps.

I’d like to highlight four important milestones from FY2014:

• Comprehensive Survey and Clearance Project in Quang Tri, Vietnam: As part of our increased commitment to removing UXO from Vietnam, we launched a five-year initiative to make Quang Tri Province—home to 700,000 people—free from the impact of UXO. Our ten-fold funding increase for efforts in Quang Tri Province in FY2014 is a clear sign of this continued commitment.

• First Mine Clearance Operation in West Bank: In FY2014, The HALO Trust (HALO), funded by the U.S. government and other international donors, began the first-ever humanitarian mine clearance operation in the West Bank. They cleared and excavated 26,600 square meters and destroyed 344 mines in a single minefield. The Department of State continues to support HALO’s close collaboration with both Israeli and Palestinian mine action authorities, and we share the goal of clearing the remaining minefields that endanger the lives of Palestinian civilians.

• Gender Advancements Among Demining Teams: Reflecting our firm commitment to gender equality and advancing the rights of women and girls, in 2014 the Department of State funded an all-female demining team in Tajikistan, the first and only female demining team in Central Asia. Zimbabwe’s first all-female demining team became operational in January 2015. In Sri Lanka, female deminers are assuming greater leadership roles in integrated male and female demining teams.

• Destruction of Illicitly Proliferated or At-Risk Stockpiles: The Department of State works diligently to ensure that dangerous weapons, including MANPADS, do not fall into the wrong hands. That is why last year, in Chad, our support allowed MAG (Mines Advisory Group) to assess, refurbish, and better secure armories and ammunition stores throughout the country. In Niger, we and our partners destroyed more than 1,000 small arms and light weapons at risk for illicit proliferation. In Bosnia and Herzegovina, our support has enabled Sterling Global to send technical advisors to assist the Bosnian Armed Forces in reducing massive stockpiles of conventional munitions, including destruction oversight and capital improvements to the Bosnia and Herzegovina demilitarization facilities.

Thanks to the tremendous support of Congress and the American people, we will continue to prioritize these efforts because they are in our interests and reflect the very best of our values. As Secretary Kerry said last year, “President Kennedy set for our nation the goal of sending a man to walk on the moon. We did that. Today, we reaffirm our resolve to help all people everywhere to be able to walk safely, right here on Earth.”

Puneet Talwar Assistant Secretary Department of State Bureau of Political-Military Affairs

Greece: Operations Cell (Updated May 24, 2016 4:33 PM)

25 May 2016 - 2:37am
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Afghanistan, Austria, Comoros, Croatia, Egypt, Eritrea, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Italy, Libya, Pakistan, Serbia, Slovenia, Somalia, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, World
Arrivals and departures

In Greece, an estimated 126 people arrived over the weekend (21-22 May) in the northern Aegean (35 on Lesvos, 76 on Chios, and 15 on Samos).

Condition of People

A study carried out by Save the Children emphasized that child refugees stranded in Greece have been out of school for an average of 1.5 years. The study conducted ahead of the inaugural World Humanitarian Summit found that Syrian child refugees have been out of school for an average of 25.8 months, while Afghan child refugees spent an average of 10.7 months out of the classroom. Yesterday, 23 May, Save the Children, along with UNICEF and others, unveiled a new fund for schooling in emergencies called Education Cannot Wait to help provide schooling for displaced children. Save the Children said it has been providing non-formal lessons – including English and Greek classes – through child-friendly spaces established in several sites in Greece in partnership with UNHCR, and is currently scaling up its education activities in Greece to provide child refugees with access to basic education through temporary classrooms.

Key Developments

On 23 May, the Foreign Affairs Council discussed external aspects of migration, in particular, ways to further strengthen cooperation with countries of origin and countries of transit through a common EU approach. In its conclusions on the external aspects of migration, the Council reaffirmed its commitment to a comprehensive and geographically balanced approach, based on bilateral and multilateral cooperation, as well as building on all existing instruments. Ministers notably stressed the need to address the root causes of migration, combat smuggling and trafficking, and ensure cooperation on return and readmission. Focusing on the Eastern Mediterranean, the Council underlined the importance of further implementing the EU-Turkey Statement of 18 March. Regarding the Central Mediterranean route, the Council highlighted the need to use the broad range of tools available to manage flows, in cooperation with third countries of origin and transit, and in close collaboration with UNHCR and IOM.

The Council also discussed and adopted conclusions on EUNAVFOR Med Operation Sophia, the EU naval operation to support the fight against smuggling and trafficking in the southern central Mediterranean.

Ministers agreed to extend the Operation’s mandate by one year and add two supporting tasks: ensuring capacity building of and information sharing with the Libyan Coastguard, and contributing to the implementation of the UN arms embargo on high seas off the coast of Libya. The Operation’s mandate will be formally amended once the necessary preparatory work is conducted.

Finally, the Council discussed and adopted conclusions on the EU regional strategy for Syria and Iraq, outlining priorities in working to achieve lasting peace, stability, security in Syria, Iraq and the wider region.

Kenya: US$250,000 needed to stop cholera outbreak in Mandera

24 May 2016 - 11:20pm
Source: Amref Health Africa Country: Kenya, Somalia

Amref Health Africa can today confirm that the cholera outbreak in Mandera County has already claimed 10 lives and at least 721 people are suspected to have been infected since the first case was reported on April 13. To contain the situation and help put a stop to the spread of the epidemic, we have launched an emergency appeal for Ksh25 million (US$250,000).

The situation on the ground is dire. Cholera patients are currently being housed in a maternity shelter that was built by Amref Health Africa through the USAID-funded APHIAplus IMARISHA Project at the County Referral Hospital. The shelter has a capacity of 50 but is already crowded with 58 patients currently. Many more patients are being treated outside, with beds placed around the compound of the hospital and drips hanging from trees.

Besides, the hospital lacks standard cholera beds and these have had to be improvised.

We have established that the outbreak is mainly within Mandera town, with the original case suspected to be a man who had travelled by bus from Wajir or Nairobi.

The sanitation situation in Mandera is critical, with erratic water supply and inadequate sanitation facilities. The town has no reliable water supply and currently relies on water tankers and donkey cart transporters.

It is feared that if the infections cross over to neighbouring Bulahawa, in Somalia, the situation could turn catastrophic as the health system in that country is barely functional.

The biggest challenge now is inadequate control and management of the outbreak. Health workers are not properly skilled in proper cholera case management, which could escalate the situation.

Amref Health Africa is currently collaborating with the Mandera County Government and other partners to help manage the situation.

In particular, there is urgent need for interventions at community level, including hygiene promotion in schools and households. The County Ministry of Health has mobilised supply of water to schools, markets and other public places, but there are no water storage tanks in many of these places.

There is also an urgent need to train community health workers (C to go out into the town and surrounding villages to create awareness and to track and refer suspected cases to hospital. In addition, they will distribute water treatment products at household level.

An Amref Flying Doctors plane will tomorrow fly a team and an initial consignment of supplies to Mandera to boost the capacity of the Mandera County Hospital, including laboratory expertise and materials. Samples have so far had to be sent to Kemri for confirmation.

An ongoing outbreak of Chikungunya, a fever caused by mosquito bites, is exacerbating the cholera outbreak and affecting provision of health services in the county as some of the health workers have also been infected.

The US$250,000 will meet the cost of health promotion, purchase of supplies for prevention and treatment such as water purification tablets and medicines, as well as laboratory supplies and personnel. We appeal to our partners and supporters to help us in this effort to end the suffering of the Mandera people from the ravages of cholera.

Dr Githinji Gitahi,
Group Chief Executive Officer,
Amref Health Africa

For more information, kindly contact Betty.Muriuki@Amref.org Phone: +254726261495 or Patrick.mwaura@redhouseke.com, cell: +254722579668

World: WFP El Niño 2015-2016: Preparedness and Response, Situation Report #4, 24 May 2016

24 May 2016 - 3:38pm
Source: World Food Programme Country: Chad, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Indonesia, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Mozambique, Nicaragua, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Philippines, Somalia, Sudan, Swaziland, Timor-Leste, World, Zambia, Zimbabwe

IN NUMBERS

60 MILLION people affected globally at present.

32 MILLION people food insecure in Southern Africa.

10.2 MILLION people in Ethiopia need emergency food assistance.

50 PERCENT crop losses in Haiti due to El Niño-influenced drought.

HIGHLIGHTS

  • With its onset in early 2015, the current El Niño event is one of the strongest on record.
    At present, it has affected an estimated 60 million people globally and their food security is severely impacted.

  • Despite the weather phenomenon winding down in the second quarter of 2016, the number of people affected is expected to increase through to early 2017.

  • WFP is rapidly scaling up relief operations but resources are stretched.

SITUATION UPDATE

  • With its onset in early 2015, the current El Niño event is one of the strongest on record. At present, it has affected an estimated 60 million people globally. Despite the weather phenomenon winding down in the second quarter of 2016, the number of people affected is expected to increase through to early 2017.

  • Food security of vulnerable populations is severely impacted. Particular areas of concern include nearly all of Southern Africa which is the hardest hit region; Ethiopia and its neighbours Somalia and Sudan in East Africa; Central America’s ‘dry corridor’, nearby Haiti and the northern region of South America while floods affect the southern region; and many of Asia’s island nations including Indonesia, Papua New Guinea and Philippines.

  • Countries will continue coping with the effects on harvests and livestock through the end of 2016, with the humanitarian impact expected to increase. In some locations, the current droughts and adverse weather conditions have only added to consecutive harvest failures, in some cases for the second or third successive time.

  • El Niño is expected to aggravate the already serious chronic malnutrition situation in particular for hardhit communities and for vulnerable groups such as young children and the elderly. Reduced food access, resulting from falling food production and food price increases, will reduce dietary diversity.
    This will impact the quality of infant and young child feeding and increase the risk of acute malnutrition. Access to essential protein and iron-rich foods may also be reduced, particularly in rural areas, as a result of drought impact on livestock.

Somalia: Puntland commits to scale up efforts to address obstetric fistula

24 May 2016 - 3:10pm
Source: UN Population Fund Country: Somalia

Garowe, 23 May 2016 – The Ministry of Health of Puntland State of Somalia, with support from the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) and other stakeholders, today marked the International Day to End Obstetric under the theme “end fistula within a generation”.

The 23rd of May was designated as the International Day to End Obstetric Fistula by the United Nations General Assembly beginning in 2013, to be observed annually as a way to significantly raise awareness and intensify actions towards ending obstetric fistula. Obstetric fistula is one of the most serious and tragic injuries that can occur during childbirth. It is a hole between the birth canal and the bladder or rectum caused by prolonged, obstructed labour without treatment.

The commemorative event in Puntland was characterised by a diverse level of representation, which included government representatives, civil society constituents, professional associations, artists and students.

State Minister of Health, His Excellency Sayid Omar highlighted the importance of prevention and management of obstetric complications including fistula. H.E. Omar commended the fruitful partnership between the Ministry of Health and UNFPA in the efforts to eliminate obstetric fistula.

The State Minister of Health also made an announcement about the forthcoming Fistul Repair Campaign in Garowe, Galkaio and Bosaso and requested participants and the media to disseminate messages about the campaign to ensure that women living with obstetric fistula are registered and supported well ahead of the start of the campaign.

Director of Garowe General Hospital, Dr. Abdisamed Ahmed, who was also representing Puntland Medical Association, highlighted two main risk factors of obstetric fistula namely female genital mutilation (FGM), and prolonged/obstructed labor. He said that FGM is one of the main causes of obstructed labour, while obstructed labour in its turn is the direct cause of obstetric fistula. Dr. Ahmed urged health professionals to take up a more proactive role in educating communities about the harmful effects of FGM as well as the importance of skilled attendance at birth and emergency obstetric care.

Chairperson of Puntland Association of Midwives, Ms. Hawo Yusuf, spoke about the centrality of midwifery training in identifying, managing and referring complicated cases of pregnancy and childbirth.

A theatre performance presented at the commemorative event focused on eliminating stigma against women suffering from fistula as well as the importance of male involvement in the efforts to end obstetric fistula.

UNFPA Head of Field Office in Puntland, Dr. Bakhtior Kadirov noted in the statement he delivered during the function that eliminating obstetric fistula requires scaling up national capacities to provide access to equitable, high-quality sexual and reproductive health services, including birth spacing maternity care, especially comprehensive emergency obstetric care. Quoting a statement on the International Day to End Obstetric Fistula by Dr. Babatunde Osotimehin, United Nations Under-Secretary General and Executive Director of UNFPA, Dr. Kadirov stated that obstetric fistula is almost exclusively a condition of the poorest, most vulnerable and most marginalized women and girls and that it afflicts those who lack access to the timely, high-quality, and life-saving maternal health care that they so desperately need and deserve, and that is their basic human right.

Dr. Kadirov took note of the positive endeavours and accomplishments in the Puntland State of Somalia that more than 270 fistula repairs were performed in the region between 2013 to 2015 with the support from UNFPA and other partners and that the Puntland Taskforce on Obstetric Fistula was established in 2015, which is expected to come up with endeavours of strategic importance.

“Just in 2015, Garowe and Galkayo hospitals assisted 6,128 deliveries, managed 2,392 obstetric complications and performed 422 caesarean-sections. More than 10,000 beneficiaries received ante/postnatal care, birth counselling and services as a result of integrated community reproductive outreach campaigns supported by UNFPA,” said Dr. Kadirov. He added that in the same year, three maternity waiting homes assisted more than 1100 deliveries; 50 midwives graduated from an 18-month course and that more midwives will be graduating in 2016.

It was also noted by the UNFPA head of sub-office that in order to end fistula, Puntland and the world at large must ensure universal access to quality sexual and reproductive health services; eliminate gender-based social and economic inequities; prevent child marriage and early childbearing; promote education and broader human rights. He further noted much remains to be done to scale up the response and to put an end to obstetric fistula in Puntland. He called for a private-public sector partnership and the active involvement of men and fistula survivors as advocates. Dr. Kadirov also underlined the importance of securing a time bound and realistic national strategy on obstetric fistula with a three-pronged approach of prevention, treatment and social reintegration.

Somalia: International community welcomes presidential decree on 2016 electoral process [EN/SO]

24 May 2016 - 2:49pm
Source: United Nations Assistance Mission in Somalia Country: Somalia

Mogadishu, 22 May 2016 – The United Nations, the African Union (AU), the Inter-Governmental Authority on Development (IGAD), the European Union (EU), Ethiopia, Italy, Sweden, the United Kingdom and the United States welcome the decree issued by President Hassan Sheikh Mohamud on the modalities of the 2016 electoral process.

The international community notes that the decree will enable the technical preparation and implementation of the electoral process without further delay. It is in accordance with the repeated commitments of the Federal Government, the Federal Parliament, the National Leadership Forum and other key actors and institutions that there should be no extension of the constitutionally mandated term limits of the legislature and the executive.

“Somalia’s international partners welcome and fully support the step that President Hassan Sheikh Mohamud and the Federal Government have taken,” said the Special Representative of the UN Secretary-General (SRSG) for Somalia, Michael Keating. “We all would have preferred a different scenario for the endorsement of the model. But intense engagement among politicians, especially in the last few weeks, made it evident that the Federal Parliament would have had great difficulty in agreeing on and legalizing the model”

“The President and his government have acted to preserve timelines that will allow technical preparation and implementation of the electoral process, which were at serious risk. The challenge now is to prepare and implement the elections. We call on all Somali stakeholders to now work constructively to that end”

International partners recognize that the modalities of the electoral process are the result of negotiations over the course of nearly ten months. These began with the joint declaration by the Federal Government and the Federal Parliament on 28 July 2015 that one-person, one-vote elections would not be possible in Somalia in 2016. Inclusive and participatory consultations on an electoral model have been held across the country. They noted that Somali leaders have worked hard to achieve agreement on the modalities of the electoral model.

There are many technical and procedural issues still to be resolved, including the National Leadership Forum’s commitment to reserve 30 per cent of seats in both Houses of Parliament for women and the formation of an electoral dispute resolution body. International partners stressed their commitment to support a timely, transparent and inclusive electoral process.

“This decree is a decisive move in the right direction. Political progress is critical to the millions of Somalis who want stability and greater accountability. It is also essential for both regional and international peace and security,” SRSG Keating stressed.

Saaxiibada Soomaaliya ee caalamka oo soo dhoweeyay wareegtada madaxweyne ee hanaanka doorashada 2016

Muqdisho, 22 May 2016 – Qaramada Midoobay, Midowga Afrika (AU), Urur-Goboleedka IGAD, Midowga Yurub (EU), Ethiopia, Italy, Sweden, Dowladda Ingiriiska iyo Dowladda Maraykanka ayaa soo dhoweeyay wareegtada uu soo saaray Madaxweyne Xasan Sheekh Maxamuud ee ku saabsan qaabka loo maro hanaanka doorashada sannadka 2016.

Beesha caalamku waxay garowsatay in wareegtadu ay suurtagelin doonto diyaargarowga farsamo iyo hirgelinta hanaanka doorashada iyadoo ayna dhicin wax dib u dhac oo dheeraad ah. Wareegtadu waxay waafaqsantahay ballanqaadyadii ay marar badan ku celceliyeen Dowladda Federaalka, Baarlamaanka Federaalka, Madasha Hoggaamiyeyaasha Qaran iyo dhinacyada iyo hay’adaha kale ee muhimka ah oo ahaa inaysan dhici doonin kordhin lagu sameeyo dhammaadka xilliga dastuurku u gooyay hay’adaha sharcidejinta iyo fulinta.

“Saaxiibada Soomaaliya ee caalamka waxay soo dhoweynayaan oo si buuxdana u taageerayaan tallaabada ay qaadeen Madaxweyne Xasan Sheekh Maxamuud iyo Dowladda Federaalka,” ayuu yiri Ergeyga Gaarka ah ee Xoghayaha Guud ee Qaramada Midoobay (SRSG) u qaabilsan Soomaaliya, Michael Keating. “Dhammaanteena waxaan jeclaan lahayn xaalad sidan ka duwan oo lagu ansaxiyo hanaanka doorashada. Laakiin dood iyo muran xoog badan oo dhexmartay siyaasiyiinta, siiba toddobaadyadii la soo dhaafay, ayaa waxaa ka caddaatay in Baarlamaanka Federaalku uu dhibaato weyn kala kulmay inuu isku raaco hanaanka uuna sharciyeeyo.”

“Madaxweynaha iyo dowladdiisa waxay tallaabadan u qaadeen si ay u dhowraan waqtiga saamixi doona diyaargarowga farsamo iyo hirgelinta hanaanka doorashada, oo khatar ku sugnaa. Caqabadda hadda hartay waa in loo diyaargaroobo lana hirgeliyo doorashooyinka. Waxaan dhammaan dhinacyada Soomaaliyeed ugu baaqaynaa inay hadda si dhab ah arrintan ugu hawlgalaan.”

Saaxiibada beesha caalamku waxay aqoonsanyihiin in qaabka hanaanka doorashadu ay yihiin kuwo ka dhashay wadaxaajood socday ku dhowaad toban bilood. Wadaxaajoodkaas waxay billowdeen 28kii bishii Luulyo 2015 markii ay Dowladda Federaalka iyo Baarlamaanka Federaalku si wadajir ah ugu dhawaaqeen in doorasho qof iyo codkiisa ah ayna suurtagal ahayn iny Soomaaliya ka dhacaan sannadka 2016. Wadatashiyo loo wada dhanyahay oo laga wada qaybgalay ayaa dalkoo dhan lagu qabtay oo laga dooday nidaamka doorasho. Beesha caalamku waxay garowsatay in madaxda Soomaaliyeed ay si adag uga soo shaqeeyeen si ay u gaaraan heshiiska hanaanka doorashada.

Waxaa weli jira arrimo farsamo iyo kuwo habraac oo badan oo u baahan in xal loo helo, oo ay ka mid yihiin ballanqaadka Madasha Hoggaamiyeyaasha Qaran oo ah in boqolkiiba 30 kuraasta labada Aqal ee Baarlamaanka loo qoondeeyo haweenka iyo sameynta hay’ad qaabilsan xallinta khilaafaadka doorashada. Saaxiibada beesha caalamku waxay carrabka ku adkeeyeen inay ka go’antahay inay taageeraan hanaan doorasho oo waqtigiisa ku dhaca, daahfuran oo loo wada dhanyahay.

“Wareegtadan waa tallaabo go’aan adag ah oo loo qaaday dhanka saxda ah. Horumar siyaasadeed waa arrin aad muhim ugu ah malaayiinta Soomaalida ah ee doonaya xasillooni iyo isla xisaabtan ballaaran. Waxay sidoo kale lagama maarmaan u tahay nabadda iyo amniga gobolka iyo caalamkaba,” ayuu carrabka ku adkeeyay Ergeyga Gaarka ah Michael Keating.

Djibouti: WFP Djibouti Country Brief, April 2016

24 May 2016 - 1:20pm
Source: World Food Programme Country: Djibouti, Somalia, Yemen

Highlights

  • The protracted relief and recovery operation (PRRO) requires new contributions urgently to avert possible pipeline breaks. WFP has prioritized general distributions and nutrition interventions for the refugees, to stretch available food stocks.

  • For the school feeding programme under the development operation, new contributions are required soon for WFP to deliver food before the beginning of the new school year, which starts in September.

Somalia: WFP Somalia Country Brief, April 2016

24 May 2016 - 12:39pm
Source: World Food Programme Country: Somalia

Highlights

  • Drought conditions continue to ravage parts of Puntland and Somaliland where the 2016 Gu rains have been late and erratic.

  • 1,200 households in Adale in Middle Shabelle are facing acute food insecurity due to the delayed start of the Gu rains in the area and require immediate humanitarian assistance.

  • WFP requires USD 76.6 million in order to continue providing life-saving humanitarian and livelihood support assistance for the next six months.

Somalia: Security Council Press Statement on Somalia (23 May 2016)

24 May 2016 - 12:32pm
Source: UN Security Council Country: Somalia

SC/12369-AFR/3383

The following Security Council press statement was issued today by Council President Amr Abdellatif Aboulatta (Egypt):

The members of the Security Council welcomed the opportunity to engage in dialogue with President Hassan Sheikh Mohamud, the federal Government of Somalia, regional leaders, Somali civil society and women’s groups during their visit to Mogadishu on 19 May 2016.

The members of the Security Council welcomed the political and security progress in Somalia since “the transition” ended in 2012 and underscored the need to accelerate Somalia’s peacebuilding and State-building process. They underlined that holding a peaceful, transparent electoral process in 2016 will mark a historic step forward for all Somalis, and will be fundamental for the country’s continued progress towards democracy and stability. The members of the Security Council recalled Security Council resolution 2232 (2015), which set out their expectation that there shall be no extension of the electoral process timelines in Somalia.

In this context the members of the Security Council welcomed the electoral process set out in the decree issued by President Hassan Sheikh Mohamud on 22 May 2016, which they noted should enable necessary technical preparation and implementation without further delay. The members of the Security Council noted that Somali leaders have worked hard to achieve agreement on the modalities of the electoral model and commended President Hassan Sheikh Mohamud and the federal Government of Somalia for their actions to ensure the timelines for the electoral process are upheld.

The members of the Security Council emphasized that the challenge now is to prepare and implement the elections and renewed their call on all Somali stakeholders to work constructively to that end, without delay.

The members of the Security Council noted that this is a historic opportunity to deliver more representative governance to the people of Somalia. In this respect they commended the federal Government’s commitment to reserve 30 per cent of seats in the upper and lower houses for women. The members of the Security Council also emphasised the importance of adhering to the political road map between now and 2020, in particular in order to reach one-person, one-vote elections by 2020.

The members of the Security Council further underlined their determination to play a constructive and active role in the months ahead.

For information media. Not an official record.

Yemen: Yemen: Factsheet, April 2016 [EN/AR]

24 May 2016 - 9:29am
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Ethiopia, Somalia, Yemen

HIGHLIGHTS

  • 39,962 Persons arrived at Yemeni coasts since January 2016
  • 4,165 Refugee families provided with cash assistance since January 2016
  • 1,283 Refugee children provided with child protection services since January 2016
  • 154,811 Persons provided with NFIs since January 2016

WORKING WITH PARTNERS

  • UNHCR leads the multi-sector response for refugees and asylum-seekers in urban settings and in Kharaz refugee camp. It introduced the Refugee Coordination Model to ensure a more inclusive UNHCR-led strategic planning, operational coordination, service delivery, and resource mobilization for refugee protection and assistance in Yemen. Regular interaction is maintained with authorities at national and local level, with international and national NGOs, and with refugee community leaders.
  • UNHCR leads the Protection and the Shelter/CCCM Clusters for the IDP response throughout Yemen. UNHCR also co-leads the Task Force on Population Movements (TFPM) with IOM to collect, analyse and disseminate data, trends and characteristics of internal displacement in Yemen.

Yemen: New Arrivals in Yemen Comparison 2013 - 2016 (As of 30 April 2016) [EN/AR]

24 May 2016 - 9:27am
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Ethiopia, Somalia, Yemen

Burundi: Striving for better coordination with the UN Security Council

24 May 2016 - 7:21am
Source: Institute for Security Studies Country: Burundi, Somalia

The 10th annual Joint Consultative Meeting between the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) and the African Union (AU) Peace and Security Council (PSC) takes place from 23 to 25 May 2016. The crisis in Burundi and the mandate of the African Mission in Somalia (AMISOM), which expires at the end of May, are expected to be on the agenda.

Broader issues such as the coordination between African non-permanent members of the UNSC and relations between the two councils are also expected to be raised.

Strengthening the relationship between the PSC and the UNSC has become a top priority for both bodies because of the prevalence of African countries on the UNSC’s agenda. For the PSC, this partnership helps to legitimise its role in solving African conflicts. From the UNSC’s perspective, it means implementing Chapter VIII of the UN Charter on cooperation with regional mechanisms.

This meeting will happen with an African state, Egypt, currently chairing the UNSC. Botswana chairs the PSC this month. Burundi and Somalia are among the issues of common interest for both bodies. However, aspects of the hierarchy between these two partners remain ambiguous, as does the manner in which they can effectively coordinate to solve crises and conflicts on the continent.

Somalia: reconciling views

Somalia will be a critical item on the meeting’s agenda, as the UNSC members recently visited Egypt, Kenya and Somalia to consult on various related issues. Moreover, the UNSC is supposed to discuss the extension of AMISOM’s mandate before its expiration on 30 May.

PSC member states support a re-hatting of AMISOM, the largest African peacekeeping operation, into a UN mission. However, such a development is not supported by most members of the UNSC. A joint assessment mission by the AU and the UN has established a list of benchmarks for such an evolution. The call for a military drawdown in favour of more police in Somalia is not accepted by AMISOM troop-contributing countries in the current security context.

The PSC is expected to push for greater financial efforts regarding the funding of the enablers put at the disposal of troop-contributing countries to AMISOM such as Uganda. Coordination among national contingents, command–control issues and the support that the UN can bring in these areas are likely to be discussed during the closed session.

Burundi: avoiding duplication

Burundi is also expected to be high on the agenda of the Joint Consultative Meeting. The PSC remains deeply involved in Burundi, where 35 human rights observers and military experts have been deployed. This is expected to be increased to 200 following the visit of a High-Level Delegation of Heads of State and Government to Burundi. Meanwhile, the UNSC calls for the deployment of a police component in order to monitor human rights and protect civilians.

On 15 April, UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon sent a letter to the UNSC outlining policy options in this regard. UNSC members could opt for one of the following:

The deployment of a police component of 3 000 in order to protect civilians, monitor human rights and promote the rule of law The deployment of an unarmed police component dedicated to the monitoring of human rights violations The deployment of a police component of 20–30 staff that would mentor the Burundian national police in the areas of rule of law

The AU’s reaction to this proposition was mixed. While it welcomed the involvement of the UN, the AU Commission underlined the fact that the mandate of a UN police component would duplicate what its own human rights observers were supposed to do, except for the civilian protection element. This highlights some of the weaknesses of the AU’s approach to crises, namely the lack of a police and civilian component, and the logistical difficulties it faces in deploying its own personnel.

Coordination between the A3 and PSC

Coordination between the PSC and the African non-permanent members of the UNSC (the A3, currently Angola, Senegal and Egypt) is an important issue for the PSC.

On 28 April the PSC reaffirmed ‘the need for the A3 to respect, protect, promote in all circumstances, [the] decisions and positions of the AU on all matters of peace and security in Africa and urges them to redouble efforts, and do everything possible to strengthen the cohesion and coordination within the A3 and with the Council’.

This requirement of coordination has legal and political implications. The legal aspect concerns the ability of the PSC to oblige a sovereign state, a non-permanent member of the UNSC, to act in a certain way. In the hierarchy of norms, regional mechanisms are subordinate to the UNSC, according to Chapter VIII. This means that a regional mechanism cannot impose decisions on the UNSC through its members.

The second aspect, which is political, concerns the perception of UNSC membership. In the PSC configuration, member states are selected by their regions, and represent them rather than themselves. In the UNSC, the member states represent themselves even if they are supposed to represent the geographic balance within the UNSC. Moreover, there is an issue about the concept of an African position, and the degree to which this can be imposed on member states. While there is consensus within the AU on certain issues, serious divergences remain on many issues, such as human rights and Western Sahara.

Still a partnership among (un)equals

The search for greater coordination between the PSC and the UNSC also has an impact on the broader issue of the relationship between the two councils. While most PSC member states recognise the primacy of the UNSC in matters of international peace and security, there is growing frustration about the perceived unwillingness of the UNSC to fulfil this duty. Somalia is the best illustration of this: AMISOM troop-contributing countries feel they need greater UN support.

The call for increased coordination between the A3 is part of the efforts by the PSC to weigh in on UNSC decisions. However, most members of the UNSC are reluctant about the regionalisation of the body. Whereas the legitimacy of the PSC as a central voice on African matters is not contested, the legal primacy of the UNSC remains the norm for most of its members.

Somalia: Somalia Flood Watch - Issued: 24 May 2016

24 May 2016 - 5:52am
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization Country: Somalia

During the week that ended on 23 May 2016, there was a significant reduction of rainfall activities in most areas of Juba and Shabelle basins inside Somalia as well as the Ethiopian highlands with most stations recording little or no rainfall. The table below shows the total amounts received in some stations during the last week within the two basins.

Satellite rainfall estimates (Map‐1) also indicates minimal rainfall amounts during the same period within the Juba and Shabelle basins. The rainfall forecast for the coming week (Map – 2) indicates a further reduction of rains in two river basins both in Somalia and within the Ethiopian highlands.

For the last one week River levels at Belet Weyne remained at bank full resulting to flooding in the town and surrounding are‐ as which has caused displacements and damage of properties. This flood wave is expected to be transmitted downstream with a moderate risk of flooding along the River.

River levels along the Juba have been reducing for the last few days. Given the rainfall forecast and the reducing trend there is minimal risk of flooding along the River.

Kenya: Uhuru says Kenya to close Dadaab camp despite protests

24 May 2016 - 4:08am
Source: Kenya Daily Nation Country: Kenya, Somalia

In Summary

  • He said the refugees would be sent back to their countries of origin because they had overstayed in the country.
  • He said that although Kenya recognised Somalia as a friendly and cooperative country especially on security and business, it was time the refugees went back to their home country.
  • The government recently announced plans to close down the biggest refugee camp citing national security.
  • It is believed several terror attacks witnessed in the country have been planned at the camp.

President Uhuru Kenyatta has reaffirmed his commitment to oversee the closure of Dadaab Refugee Camp despite international pressure to rescind the decision.

He said at the weekend that the refugees would be sent back to their countries of origin because they had overstayed in the country.

Speaking at Garissa Primary School playground on Saturday in his final three-day official visit to north-eastern Region, the President said Kenyans had been generous in hosting the refugees for more than 23 years and that it was time to help them return to their homes.

He said that although Kenya recognised Somalia — where most refugees are from — as a friendly and cooperative country especially on security and business, it was time the refugees went back to their home country.

“As Kenyans we have decided that the visitors we have been hosting for more than 23 years have to be helped to return to their country where they can continue with their own lives,” said the President.

BROTHERS AND SISTERS

“We still recognise them as our brothers and sisters. We also recognise our neighbouring country and we will continue doing business with it,” he added.

The government recently announced plans to close down the biggest refugee camp citing national security.

It says it believes the April 2015 terror attack on Garissa University College in which 148 people died and the 2013 raid on Nairobi’s Westgate Mall which left 67 people dead were planned at the camps.

Political leaders from the region complained that many youths did not have identity cards and the President ordered Interior Cabinet Secretary Joseph Nkaissery to look into the matter.

“When I’m told many youths don’t have IDs, it means we have denied them the right to get jobs, to travel and to do business. It is not a favour we are doing to them. It is a right for every Kenyan who is eligible to get it,” said President Kenyatta.

The President was accompanied by his deputy William Ruto, Cabinet secretaries Joseph Nkaissery (Interior) Eugene Wamalwa (Water) Adan Mohamed (Industrialisation) and other leaders.

Somalia: Uhuru says Kenya to close Dadaab camp despite protests

24 May 2016 - 4:08am
Source: Kenya Daily Nation Country: Kenya, Somalia

In Summary

  • He said the refugees would be sent back to their countries of origin because they had overstayed in the country.
  • He said that although Kenya recognised Somalia as a friendly and cooperative country especially on security and business, it was time the refugees went back to their home country.
  • The government recently announced plans to close down the biggest refugee camp citing national security.
  • It is believed several terror attacks witnessed in the country have been planned at the camp.

President Uhuru Kenyatta has reaffirmed his commitment to oversee the closure of Dadaab Refugee Camp despite international pressure to rescind the decision.

He said at the weekend that the refugees would be sent back to their countries of origin because they had overstayed in the country.

Speaking at Garissa Primary School playground on Saturday in his final three-day official visit to north-eastern Region, the President said Kenyans had been generous in hosting the refugees for more than 23 years and that it was time to help them return to their homes.

He said that although Kenya recognised Somalia — where most refugees are from — as a friendly and cooperative country especially on security and business, it was time the refugees went back to their home country.

“As Kenyans we have decided that the visitors we have been hosting for more than 23 years have to be helped to return to their country where they can continue with their own lives,” said the President.

BROTHERS AND SISTERS

“We still recognise them as our brothers and sisters. We also recognise our neighbouring country and we will continue doing business with it,” he added.

The government recently announced plans to close down the biggest refugee camp citing national security.

It says it believes the April 2015 terror attack on Garissa University College in which 148 people died and the 2013 raid on Nairobi’s Westgate Mall which left 67 people dead were planned at the camps.

Political leaders from the region complained that many youths did not have identity cards and the President ordered Interior Cabinet Secretary Joseph Nkaissery to look into the matter.

“When I’m told many youths don’t have IDs, it means we have denied them the right to get jobs, to travel and to do business. It is not a favour we are doing to them. It is a right for every Kenyan who is eligible to get it,” said President Kenyatta.

The President was accompanied by his deputy William Ruto, Cabinet secretaries Joseph Nkaissery (Interior) Eugene Wamalwa (Water) Adan Mohamed (Industrialisation) and other leaders.

Somalia: Interview with Fatuma Kuno Muhumed, Youth and HIV Programme Analyst at UNFPA Somalia

24 May 2016 - 1:13am
Source: UN Population Fund Country: Somalia

1. What are the main causes of fistula, and what makes it prevalent in Somali?

Somalia has been through turbulent conflict since the 1990s and though it is now in the process of recovering, it remains very fragile. Women and children in particular, have been victims of the drawn out crisis, with some of the highest maternal, neonatal and child mortality rates in the world. This is influenced by conflict, emigration of health professionals, poor education systems, low levels of professional trainings, nomadic and mobile lifestyles, poor water and sanitation systems, lack of health system infrastructure and poor regulation of services and professionals. This is enhanced by the weak systems and lack of a strong central government, affecting the capacity and progress of system development. There is lack of human resource for health especially shortage of qualified midwives. Some families use traditional birth attendants (TBAs) to care for mothers during childbirth rather than qualified midwives or other skilled birth attendants and the TBAs fail to assist women when complications arise thereby increasing the incidents of fistula.

Early marriage which leads to early pregnancy result in cephalopelvic disproportion, which causes obstructed labour leading to fistula.

2. How big is the role of social norms and pressure in the prevalence of fistula?

Key cultural risk to reproductive health is FGM. Up to 98 percent of all Somali women have undergone FGM. All types of FGM affect reproductive and maternal health, including creating significant risks for childbearing.

Harmful stigma related to fistula put a lot of pressure on women, in traditional Somali society many women are divorced and sent back to her family if she develops fistula.

3. What can be done to reduce or end obstetric fistula?

Delaying the age of first pregnancy;
The cessation of harmful traditional practices.
Skilled attendance at all births.
Emergency obstetric care for those who develop complications.

4. What programs are you engaged in to end fistula?

UNFPA provides Comprehensive emergency obstetric services in 11 regional hospitals and 40 maternity waiting homes that provides Basic emergency obstetric care.

UNFPA also supports 15 midwifery schools in a bid to reduce human resource for health gap.

UNFPA runs integrated community outreach campaign in rural areas to increase access to services.

UNFPA also provide family planning advocacy and services.

Advocacy by YPEER to eliminate FGM and early marriage is ongoing in schools and at community levels.

Fistula surgeries are done in one of the CEMOC facility in Mogadishu-Dayille hospital and fistula surgery campaign in other areas.

5. What are the 2-3 main pieces of advice you can give a mother about preventing fistula for her daughter

Stop FGM.

Do not marry your daughter when she is still young.

Ensure you accept health intervention for your daughter as advised by doctors. Most times mothers refusing doctor’s advice delay interventions for obstetric complications that would have prevented obstetric fistula