Somalia - ReliefWeb News

Syndicate content
ReliefWeb - Updates
Updated: 1 hour 11 min ago

Somalia: AU Delegation Visits Somalia to Assess the State of AMISOM

2 hours 52 min ago
Source: African Union Country: Somalia

Mogadishu, 12 February, 2016 – A delegation from the African Union Commission has carried out an assessment on the state of the Somalia-based peacekeeping mission to identify areas that need urgent support from the African Union headquarters in Ethiopia.

The delegation from the AU Commission’s Peace Support Operations Division also wanted to find out how AMISOM planned to implement the revised Concept of Operations (CONOPS) that was endorsed by the African Union Peace and Security Council at its 544th meeting in September last year. The revised CONOPS for AMISOM aims to create and preserve an enabling environment for the unfolding political, peace and reconciliation processes in Somalia.

The delegation also looked at ways of assisting Somali security institutions alongside AMISOM troops, execute their mandate of keeping the country safe and warding off threats posed by Al Shabaab and other armed militant groups. The visit further evaluated the Mission’s readiness for the upcoming presidential and parliamentary elections, scheduled later this year.

Maj. Gen. Francis Okello, who led the delegation from the Peace Support Operations Division said; “Our visit here is to find out the preparedness of troops to support this political process. The second key aspect of the visit is: as you are aware last year in August, AMISOM and the African Union Headquarters produced a new CONOPs and this visit is to find out how that Concept of Operations, in support with the political process in Somalia is unfolding.”

The delegation also visited AMISOM troops stationed in the port city of Marka and held meetings with elders, local residents and Commanders, to clearly understand the security and administrative issues in the region. This was in view of recent allegations in the media that AMISOM had withdrawn from Marka.

However the allegations were denied by the top AMISOM leadership led by the Special Representative of the African Union Commission chairperson for Somalia, Ambassador Francisco Madeira. Recently Ambassador Madeira issued a statement, assuring both local and international community that the port city of Marka was firmly under the control of AMISOM troops and Somali National Army (SNA).

Col. Peter Omola, the Commander of the Ugandan AMISOM contingent stationed in Marka, explained to the AU delegates that he made a recent decision to readjust troop’s positions. This, Col. Omola said, was intended to avoid civilian casualties in the event of any combat engagements, and to consolidate AMISOM positions in the outskirts of the town.

“We are firmly in control of Marka town itself. We are patrolling the area day and night. We also have a detachment of SNA in this location. At the same time, the population is very positive. We are cooperating with the population. The population is supporting AMISOM operations. They are giving us information despite threats and intimidation from Al-Shabaab,” said Col. explained.

Lt. Col. Paul Njuguna, the AMISOM Force Spokesperson, dispelled recent media reports that the African Union troops had withdrawn from the strategic port city.

“We have visited this area so that we can come out with the facts as they are on the ground. We do remember a few days ago, there were a myriad of reports in the media on Marka. We are in Marka to certify that Marka is a peaceful town. The people in Marka are going on with their lives as normal and they are going to achieve peace in their lives.”

The Assistant Commissioner of Police (ACP) Crowd Chirenje, a member of the visiting African Union delegation said, “At the end of this visit, we are going to give a feedback to people who make the decisions and actions that we need to take at our level as managers of the Mission, to support the Mission, to support the Federal Government of Somalia to help realise lasting peace and stability in Somalia.”

Somalia: Somalia: Humanitarian Snapshot (as of 12 February 2016)

12 February 2016 - 8:37am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Somalia

The food security and malnutrition situation in Somalia remains alarming, especially in parts of Puntland and Somaliland, which have been hard hit by drought exacerbated by El Niño. This is according to the latest assessment by the FAO-managed Food Security and Nutrition Analysis Unit (FSNAU). More than 4.7 million people are in need of humanitarian assistance, of these about 950,000 are severely food insecure and are unable to meet their daily food needs. Nearly 305,000 children under age 5 are acutely malnourished, with 58,300 of them severely malnourished.

Drought and water shortages

While El Niño conditions led to above average rains in many parts of Somalia during the Deyr rainy season from October to December, parts of Puntland and Somaliland are currently affected by drought and water shortages.

World: Mixed Migration Flows in the Mediterranean and Beyond: Compilation of available data and information - Reporting period 2015

12 February 2016 - 5:01am
Source: International Organization for Migration Country: Afghanistan, Algeria, Bangladesh, Benin, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Croatia, Cyprus, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Greece, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Hungary, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Italy, Liberia, Libya, Mali, Malta, Morocco, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Senegal, Serbia, Sierra Leone, Slovenia, Somalia, Spain, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Togo, Tunisia, Turkey, World

About this report: DTM in the Mediterranean and beyond

While populations from the Middle East, South East Asia, and Africa have been crossing the Mediterranean to reach Europe in growing numbers since 2011, 2015 marked the sharpest increase arrivals to Europe and deaths in the Mediterranean. International organizations and EU policy makers recognized the urgent need to identify effective measures to tackle the resulting humanitarian issues, but at the start of the crisis, relatively little was known about migrants arriving to Europe beyond their nationality, sex, and age. Thus, IOM rolled out its Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) across the affected region. DTM is a suite of tools and methodologies designed to track and analyse human mobility in different displacement contexts, in a continuous manner. Through DTM’s flow monitoring system, over the course of 2015 IOM identified key locations along the migratory route to collect data through direct observation, consultations with relevant national authorities, and surveys with migrants. The transit point assessments provide information on numbers of migrants, countries of origin, demographics, routes, and transport, using data provided by ministries of interior, coast guards, police forces, and other relevant national authorities. The flow monitoring surveys provide more in-depth information on specific vulnerabilities, socioeconomic circumstances, routes, reasons for movement, and country of intended destination. IOM field staff started conducting these interviews in October, starting in Croatia and also covering Greece, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia (fYROM), and Slovenia. As of 31 December 2015 IOM had interviewed over 1,673 migrants and asylum seekers.

These activities allow IOM to systematically gather detailed information about migrants’ backgrounds, motivations, and the migratory routes, and to share ongoing analyses of migratory trends and patterns with humanitarian actors and policy makers. Such information is key to devising appropriate and effective measures to manage migration, including protection for those who are entitled to it, possible integration for those who can stay in the EU and more sustainable return and reintegration to the countries of origin. This report is an overview of the year, based on IOM’s weekly flows compilations.

World: Mixed Migration Flows in the Mediterranean and Beyond: Compilation of available data and information (4 - 10 Feb 2016)

12 February 2016 - 4:54am
Source: International Organization for Migration Country: Afghanistan, Algeria, Austria, Bangladesh, Bulgaria, Croatia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Eritrea, Finland, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Italy, Lebanon, Liechtenstein, Malta, Morocco, Nigeria, Norway, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Serbia, Slovenia, Somalia, Spain, Sudan, Sweden, Switzerland, Syrian Arab Republic, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, World

1. Highlights

  • Flow Monitoring: As of 10 February 2016 IOM field staff in Greece, fYROM, Croatia, and Slovenia had amassed interviews with over 4,681 migrants and asylum seekers, of which 406 people were interviewed over the week from 4 February – 10 February. Individuals of Syrian, Afghan, Iraqi, Iranian and Pakistani nationalities comprised 94% of all respondents.

  • See sections on Greece and Italy for an update on the EU’s Relocations Plan.

  • For numbers of fatalities and missing persons in the Mediterranean and Aegan seas, go to page 35.

  • See the Northern Route section for developments in the news about the route to Finland and Norway from Russia.

  • See the sections for Greece, fYROM, Serbia, Croatia, and Slovenia for maps showing the transport and logistics used between entry, transit, and exit points.

  • For information on this report, including details on the sources of this report’s data and tallying methodologies used, please see page 37. On 06 January 2016 Germany’s Ministry of Interior announced that it had begun using a new system to count arrivals in 2015, rather than the asylum application system. The new numbers indicate that there may have been a larger overall number of arrivals to Europe in 2015 than has to date been detected in countries of transit. For a fuller explanation of this difference, please see page 37.

  • For a snapshot of first time asylum applications in the EU28 and Iceland, Liechtenstein, Norway and Switzerland compiled by Eurostat and analysed by IOM, please see page 48.

Kenya: Kenya Country Office Monthly Humanitarian Situation Report September-December 2015

12 February 2016 - 3:28am
Source: UN Children's Fund Country: Kenya, Somalia, South Sudan

Highlights:

  • A total of 11,332 and 19,592 under-five children in the Dadaab and Kakuma refugee camps respectively, from January to December 2015, received Integrated Management of Acute Malnutrition (IMAM) services for severe and moderate acute malnutrition.

  • UNICEF provided medical supplies (Ringers Lactate, Oral Rehydration Solution and antibiotics), which were used in the treatment of 211,283 children in cholera-affected counties from January to December 2015.

  • Through the Kenya Red Cross Society partnership for El Nino emergency interventions, 30,000 households across Garissa, Homa bay, Kisumu, Migori, Tana River and Wajir counties were provided with one-and-a-half months of WASH supplies for household water treatment.

  • In the last quarter of 2015, Best Interest Assessments were undertaken and case plans developed and implemented for 174 children (90 girls and 84 boys) in the Kakuma Refugee Camp, while 407 children (194 girls and 213 boys) had Best Interest Determination cases successfully processed. Medical and psychosocial assistance through an enhanced service referral process was provided to 150 children (83 girls and 67 boys) affected by Sexual and Gender-based Violence (SGBV).

  • Over 7,300 children have received education supplies in six arid and semi-arid lands (ASAL) counties through partnerships with the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology, Rural Organization for Advocacy and Development (ROAD) and World Vision. Under the Peace-building Education and Advocacy programme in the Dadaab Refugee Camp, 565 teachers were trained in methodologies supporting alternative education and peace-building, benefitting 64,075 children (40 per cent female).

  • A total of 12,186 adolescents and young people in ASAL counties and urban informal settlements utilized the UNICEF-supported toll-free Call Centre to receive counselling and information on Sexual and Reproductive Health (SRH) and HIV and a total of 128 Adolescent Peer Educators and 65 adolescent advocates were trained. A network of 1500 adolescents living with HIV continued to receive HIV information through the Sauti Sikika initiative while 263 (112 Male and 151 female) adolescents living with HIV benefitted from peer support groups.

Situation Overview and Humanitarian Needs:

  • The continuing cholera outbreak in 22 counties, including in the Dadaab Refugee Camp and El Nino-related flooding presented the greatest challenges in the last quarter of 2015. Kenya is experiencing localized flooding associated with the El Niño weather phenomenon. The Kenya Red Cross Society reports indicate that starting from November up to end December 2015, floods and landslides/mudslides had affected 40,121 households (approximately 240,726 people) and 17,254 households (approximately 103,524 people) had been displaced across the country, while 130 lives were lost and 73 injuries reported. In Tana River County, a total of 44 internally-displaced (IDP) camps have been established, hosting 3,881 households. According to the Kenya Red Cross and the Kenya Initial Rapid Assessments (KIRA) in Garissa and Tana River, displaced populations lack safe water, shelter, sanitation, food and non-food items, exposing them to the risk of waterborne diseases such as acute watery diarrhoea, malaria and Rift Valley Fever. By 28 December 2015, 10,221 cases and 174 deaths (CFR=1.7 per cent) had been reported nationally in 22 counties, including 1,216 cases with 11 deaths in the Dadaab Refugee Camp.1

  • The cholera outbreak was brought under control in 16 counties due to an intensified response by the Government and partners. By the end of the year, only seven counties were reporting active outbreaks. Of these, two are in the 1st wave (Marsabit and Wajir) while three are in the 2nd wave (Garissa, Mombasa and Nakuru), one in the 3rd wave (Siaya) and the 4th wave (Nairobi). Additional targeted interventions are therefore required to successfully stop the outbreak.

  • The Famine and Early Warning System Network (FEWSNET) food security update for December 2015 projects improved food security in the pastoral areas due to above-average short rains. Increased milk consumption and income from the sale of livestock is expected to result in a decline of malnutrition cases among children. However, households in parts of Garissa, Isiolo, Kwale, Makueni and Wajir will remain stressed (minimally adequate food consumption but unable to afford some essential non-food expenditures) through March 2016 due to the below average rainfall received in these areas.

  • As per the Long Rains Assessment 2015, the total number of children under-five years of age requiring treatment for acute malnutrition (total caseloads) in the ASAL areas has dropped to 239,446 compared to 261,120 reported in the 2015 Short Rains Assessment (SRA). However, the number of children in the ASAL areas admitted to programmes responding to severe acute malnutrition remains high at an average of 3,000 per month.

  • Since the December 2013 influx2, the influx of refugees into the Kakuma Refugee Camp continues due to the prolonged conflict in South Sudan. As of 30 December 20153, 48,522 new arrivals have been recorded/registered (67 per cent children). Of these, 748 (151 female,597 male) are unaccompanied minors (UAMs) and 5,138 (1,851 female, 3,287 male) are separated children. Not all unaccompanied and separated children are in family care due to shortage of foster families, inadequate shelter and resource constraints, thus exposing them to protection risks. UNHCR estimates that 9,000 additional South Sudanese refugees will be received in Kakuma in 2016.

  • Inter-communal conflicts, terrorism, food insecurity, El Nino flooding and the cholera outbreak have continued to disrupt learning in disaster-prone counties especially in Baringo, Mandera, Pokot, Turkana and Wajir where teacher absenteeism remains high. This was further exacerbated by the lack of implementing partners on the ground as well as the teachers’ strike that lasted for five weeks between September and October 2015.

  • A needs assessment conducted by the International Rescue Committee in December 2015 focusing on HIV services provided to children and adolescents within the Kakuma Refugee Camp revealed gaps in paediatric HIV services, specifically, the integration of early diagnosis of paediatric HIV in MCH/Immunization clinics, decentralization of PMTCT services as well as weaknesses in the early infant diagnosis processes. There were also gaps noted in providing adolescent-friendly services that ranged from infrastructural deficiencies to weak participation of adolescents and community members in the provision of adolescent-related health services. Weaknesses were also found in the quality assurance of HIV services and in the M&E system, which is not fully responsive to the needs of adolescents.

Yemen: Yemen Crisis - Humanitarian overview - ECHO Daily Map | 11/02/2016

11 February 2016 - 9:36pm
Source: European Commission Humanitarian Aid Office Country: Djibouti, Somalia, Yemen

Somalia: Somalia Food Security Alert, February 11, 2016

11 February 2016 - 8:54pm
Source: Famine Early Warning System Network Country: Somalia

Northern regions of Somalia face deteriorating access to food and water, increasing food insecurity

After below-average 2015 rainfall, much of northern Somalia is facing very poor pasture conditions, limited water availability, high livestock out-migration, and elevated livestock death rates. As a result, incomes are significantly below average and poor households are having difficulty meeting their basic food needs.

An estimated 146,200 people in northern Somalia are in Crisis (IPC Phase 3) in Guban Pastoral,
Northwestern Agropastoral, and Northern Inland Pastoral livelihood zones. The scaling up of humanitarian assistance is necessary to avert a food security Crisis in northern Somalia.
In northwestern areas, below average rainfall and higher than normal temperatures throughout 2015 reduced pasture and water availability. In northeastern areas, atypical dry conditions from July to August were followed by below-average October to December rainfall that led to significant livestock outmigration and unusually high livestock deaths. Rain station data recorded by FAO SWALIM shows that rainfall over this time period in northeastern areas was approximately 30 percent of the long-term mean (Figure 1). As a result, pasture throughout northern Somalia remains extremely limited and water for both livestock and human use is scarce. Most communal dams and private reservoirs (berkads) are dry and distances traveled to livestock watering boreholes have increased. Of particular concern are Guban Pastoral livelihood zone in Awdal and Woqooyi Galbeed Regions, Northwestern Agropastoral livelihood zone in Awdal and Woqooyi Galbeed Regions, and Northern Inland Pastoral in Bari, Sanaag and Nugaal Regions.

In Guban Pastoral livelihood zone, pasture resources and water availability increased slightly after the region received atypical, moderate rainfall in October and November. Livestock that migrated out of Guban in early 2015 began returning in December. However, improved pasture has also encouraged the inward migration of livestock from Northwestern Agropastoral livelihood zone and other neighboring regions, putting pressure on the limited, replenished pasture and water.

Despite slight improvements, herd sizes remain below average as a result of the high livestock deaths in this area in early 2015. Livestock productivity is very low, limiting household access to milk, and households have few saleable animals, reducing income. An estimated 13,300 people in Guban Pastoral are in Crisis (IPC Phase 3).

In Northwestern Agropastoral livelihood zone, as a result of the poor 2015 rainfall, November/December crop production was below average and pasture conditions remain very poor. With few stocks and below-average livestock productivity, households are restricting food consumption. An estimated 62,900 people in this livelihood zone are currently in Crisis (IPC Phase 3). It is expected that the sale and consumption of fruits and vegetables from January to March 2016 are likely to increase food security slightly, but not enough to move this area out of Crisis (IPC Phase 3).

In Northern Inland Pastoral livelihood zone, pasture and water are both very scarce. Many households are now purchasing expensive, trucked-in water. The January 2016 price of a 20-liter jerry can of water in this area was approximately 7,000 Somali Shillings, 60 and 20 percent above the last-year and the five-year average, respectively. Recent FEWS NET field assessments found that nearly 70 percent of livestock from this zone have been migrated towards neighboring regions where moderate rains have slightly improved pasture and water availability. This has put pressure on the resources of recipient regions. Livestock have lost weight due to the lack of forage, long trekking distances, and overall poor health. Low conception Figure 1. Deyr (October - December) 2015 Station Rainfall Performance Compared to Average Source: Data from FAO SWALIM2060100 120 Gebilley, Woqooyi Galbeed,
Northwestern Somalia Aburin, Woqooyi Galbeed, Northwestern Somalia Xudun, Sool, Northeastern Somalia Dangoroyo, Bari, FFNortheastern Somalia Rainfall in mm 2015 Deyr Rainfall Long-term average Deyr Rainfall Somalia Food Security Alert February 11, 2016 rates were reported in November and a further reduction in goat kidding and camel calving is expected in April/May, reducing herd sizes. By mid-December, as a result of a significant decrease in livestock prices, the goat-to-rice terms of trade in this area declined by 31 and 38 percent compared to the 2014 and five-year average, respectively. With reduced household purchasing capacity, poor households are no longer consuming milk and meat, as is typical at this time of year, and have diets limited to cereals, sugar, and vegetable oil. Many households are increasingly relying on credit to purchase food: reported debt levels for poor households atypically increased 42 percent from July to December 2015. An estimated 70,000 people in Northern Inland Pastoral are currently in Crisis (IPC Phase 3).

With the poor 2015 rainfall performance in northern Somalia, 146,200 people in people in Northern Inland Pastoral, Guban Pastoral, and Northwestern Agropastoral livelihood zones are in Crisis (IPC Phase 3). Conditions are likely to improve slightly in April as average Gu rains are expected to improve pasture and water availability. However, given the depletion of assets and increasing debt levels, poor households are expected to remain in Crisis (IPC Phase 3) even after the February-March lean season. It is likely poor households in these areas will continue to face significant difficulty meeting their basic food needs, have limited access to water for personal and livestock consumption, and experience the unsustainable depletion of assets given elevated livestock death rates. The scaling up of humanitarian assistance is necessary to avert this food security Crisis in northern Somalia.

Somalia: Update on drought situation in Somalia - Issued: 11th February, 2016

11 February 2016 - 9:02am
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization Country: Somalia

The Deyr 2015 rainy season experienced El Nino conditions that resulted into good rains in many parts of the country. Despite this, the northern parts of the country are facing drought conditions. Two appeals for assistance have been sent by both the Somaliland and Puntland authorities. The drought conditions are as a result of failed consecutive rainy seasons especially in the western part of Somaliland. The situation is expected to worsen during the coming months owing to the continued depletion of available water resources in the areas. The next rainy season is expected to start in late March.

Water resources and pasture conditions have deteriorated triggering livestock migration and increasing competition among pastoralists on the already scarce pasture and water resources. This is especially seen in southern part of Awdal and Woqooyi Galbeed Regions (in Northwest Agro-pastoral livelihood zone) and in parts of Sanag, Sool, Nugaal, and Bari Regions (Northern Inland Pastoral Livelihood Zone). In general, pasture conditions are very poor throughout northern Somalia with the exception of southern parts of Togdheer, and Sool regions (Guban pastoral) areas that recorded good rains towards end of the previous Dyer season.

In the north western coastal areas of of Awdal Region in Somaliland (Guban Pastoral livelihood zone), unseasonal moderate rains in November followed by near normal Hays rains in December contributed to moderate improvement in terms of pasture and water availability. However due to the high pressure on limited available resources, the situation is expected to worsen triggering conflict among pastoralists.

The continued depletion of ground water resources as the only reliable water sources may lead to conflict of resources between the communities and livestock in these drought affected areas. The overuse of the rare commodity may also lead to deterioration of groundwater quality triggering water borne diseases.

The situation in terms of drought severity and magnitude was analysed using observed rainfall data and applying the Standard Precipitation Index (SPI) which is a measure excess or deficits in terms of rainfall.

Somalia: Narratives of Famine - Somalia 2011

11 February 2016 - 6:59am
Source: Tufts University Country: Kenya, Somalia

This paper is important reading for anyone working in or on Somalia because it presents the famine of 2011 from the perspective of those who lived through it in their own words. The Somali voices bring critical (but often neglected) insight to the study of the crisis, particularly in todays’ context where the distance between local populations and humanitarian actors is increasing as remote management becomes the new norm.

Through the stories you will understand the Somali perspective on the evolution of the famine and, in particular who survived, who did not, and why. The narratives show that one of the main internal factors that influenced people’s ability to manage the crisis was their socio-political identify and social networks.

This report also serves as background to (and effectively the database for) our 2015 report, “Facing Famine: Somali Experiences of the Famine of 2011.”

Somalia: Drought spells disaster for Somali herders

11 February 2016 - 6:44am
Source: IRIN Country: Somalia

By Mohamed Amin Jibril and Mohamed Omar Mulla

HARGEISA/GAROWE, 11 February 2016 (IRIN) - Two consecutive seasons of drought across northern Somalia are driving tens of thousands of pastoralists into hunger and debt.

Read the full report

Somalia: East Africa Seasonal Monitor - February 10, 2016

11 February 2016 - 4:13am
Source: Famine Early Warning System Network Country: Burundi, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya, Rwanda, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania

Key Messages

January rainfall has remained above average for much of Rwanda, Burundi, Tanzania, and neighbouring districts in southern Kenya, due to the on-going moderate to heavy rains (Figure 1), which can be attributed in part to the ongoing strong El Niño event. Above-average rainfall is expected to continue in the coming one to two weeks.

In northeastern Amhara and Tigray in Ethiopia, sporadic and unseasonal light to moderate rains since December triggered early planting of short-cycle crops and helped to replenish water points and pasture for livestock.

Rainfall remained poorly distributed in January following a delayed onset in October over parts of marginal agricultural areas of southeastern lowlands of Kenya, southern coastal areas of Somalia, and northeastern Tanzania, resulting in significant crop moisture stress which is expected to result in reduced yields in these areas.

Seasonal Progress

January rainfall has remained above average for much of Rwanda, Burundi, Tanzania, and neighbouring districts in southern Kenya, due to the on-going moderate to heavy rains (Figure 1), which can be attributed in part to the ongoing strong El Niño event. However, the rest of the region has remained dry and hot, as is normal in January, which is expected to be favorable for harvesting maize in key producing areas of western and central Kenya, Uganda, Rwanda, and Burundi.

In parts of northeastern Amhara and Tigray, unseasonal light to moderate rains continued in January, which encouraged early planting of short-cycle crops coupled with improved pasture, browse, and surface water conditions in these areas. However, pastoral areas of northern Ethiopia, Djibouti, and northern Somalia have remained generally dry, with deteriorating rangeland resources due to the ongoing El Niño-induced severe drought, exacerbated by hotter-than-average land surface temperatures.

Meanwhile, rangeland resources (both pasture and water resources) have above average for this time of year in central Somalia, Kenya, Uganda, parts of southern Ethiopia, and parts of northern and southern Tanzania, with above-average vegetation depicted in Figure 2.

Meanwhile, pastoral areas in Sudan, South Sudan, Djibouti, and northern Somalia, are seasonally dry. However, they are expansive areas of drier-than-average vegetation condition in northeastern Ethiopia and parts of the Rift Valley, southern Somalia, northeastern and southeastern Kenya, and northeastern and central Tanzania, in response to below-average rains in the recent past months. The dry and hot season is expected to continue for much of these areas, until the onset of the Belg and Long-rains seasons in the next one to two months.

Rapid assessments reports in Kenya by FEWS NET and partners are suggesting slightly above-average maize production in Kenya, with expected below-average maize yields prospects in marginal southeastern lowlands and parts of the coastal regions, due to shortened length of growing period, coupled with poor rainfall distribution and amounts. Similarly, for the coastal strip of southern Somalia and parts of extreme northeastern Tanzania, where the current crop conditions are in stressed levels and are expected to result in reduced yield.

Somalia: Somalia: Shelter Cluster Strategic Operating Framework 2016-2018

11 February 2016 - 3:48am
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees, REACH Initiative, Shelter Cluster Country: Somalia

Executive Summary

This SOF serves as a key document for Shelter Cluster (SC) partners and other shelter stakeholders to understand how the cluster operates and the key points for which the cluster advocates and mandates. The document outlines the operational structure and the strategic objectives of the cluster. The SOF aims to harmonize the overall strategy and the approaches related to Shelter activities. Standards are incorporated within the document, but provide a lot of flexibility due to the vast area of shelter programme coverage, geographic and climatic variations, variable access conditions, capacity of the partners, different target populations and variable support of the local authorities.

The Somalia Shelter Cluster (SC) has historically provided emergency assistance to newly displaced people affected by natural and human-caused disasters (e.g., flood, fire, drought, conflict and evictions). However, with the overall security situation having improved since the beginning of 2013, the cluster is placing more of an emphasis on sustainable shelter solutions for protractedly displaced persons and is moving away from lifesaving activities.

In an effort to provide more sustainable forms of assistance, the SC has taken a leadership role in inter-cluster coordination. Through initiatives such as conducting inter-cluster assessments across a number of key settlements over the past three years as well as being a key facilitator of the Somalia Inter-Cluster Rapid Needs Assessment (SIRNA) process, the SC has advocated for coordinated cluster response and information collection. The strength of the cluster lies in its service delivery focus. Drawing on an assessment and mapping process refined over the previous three years, the cluster is able to use highly reliable data to provide a targeted response to individuals most in need. This reliance on coordination and responses based on accurate information has allowed the cluster to build upon its emergency provision core competencies and move into more sustainable forms of assistance.

The cluster acts as a coordination, advocacy, and technical support body to ensure that member agencies have the resources and capacity needed to provide the highest quality shelter assistance possible. The cluster does this by offering a number of services, including: (1) providing guidance through the Strategic Operating Framework (SOF) to enhance accountability and effectiveness of shelter interventions in Somalia; (2) maintaining coordination mechanisms through a platform of information sharing, both at the national and regional levels, in close collaboration with government counterparts; (3) representing the interests of SC members in discussions with the Humanitarian Coordinator (HC) at inter-cluster meetings and with other stakeholders on the prioritization of shelter issues for humanitarian action and resource mobilization; (4) identifying advocacy concerns, including resource requirements, and contributing to broader advocacy initiatives; (5) ensuring that adequate monitoring mechanisms are in place to review the impact of cluster member activities and the progress against implementation plans; and, (6) providing leadership in emergency and crisis preparedness by putting in place contingency plans in areas and situations where there is a high risk of recurring disasters and where sufficient capacity exists within the cluster.

With its core focus being service delivery, the SC has created a number of training modules, technical reference documents, and coordination systems intended to improve and complement the activities of its member agencies. Furthermore specific training modules have been developed for capacity building of agency staff: monitoring and evaluation, building back safer, local building culture, and linking relief-rehabilitation-development.

Somalia: Shelter Cluster Strategic Operating Framework 2016-2018

11 February 2016 - 3:48am
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees, REACH Initiative, Shelter Cluster Country: Somalia

Executive Summary

This SOF serves as a key document for Shelter Cluster (SC) partners and other shelter stakeholders to understand how the cluster operates and the key points for which the cluster advocates and mandates. The document outlines the operational structure and the strategic objectives of the cluster. The SOF aims to harmonize the overall strategy and the approaches related to Shelter activities. Standards are incorporated within the document, but provide a lot of flexibility due to the vast area of shelter programme coverage, geographic and climatic variations, variable access conditions, capacity of the partners, different target populations and variable support of the local authorities.

The Somalia Shelter Cluster (SC) has historically provided emergency assistance to newly displaced people affected by natural and human-caused disasters (e.g., flood, fire, drought, conflict and evictions). However, with the overall security situation having improved since the beginning of 2013, the cluster is placing more of an emphasis on sustainable shelter solutions for protractedly displaced persons and is moving away from lifesaving activities.

In an effort to provide more sustainable forms of assistance, the SC has taken a leadership role in inter-cluster coordination. Through initiatives such as conducting inter-cluster assessments across a number of key settlements over the past three years as well as being a key facilitator of the Somalia Inter-Cluster Rapid Needs Assessment (SIRNA) process, the SC has advocated for coordinated cluster response and information collection. The strength of the cluster lies in its service delivery focus. Drawing on an assessment and mapping process refined over the previous three years, the cluster is able to use highly reliable data to provide a targeted response to individuals most in need. This reliance on coordination and responses based on accurate information has allowed the cluster to build upon its emergency provision core competencies and move into more sustainable forms of assistance.

The cluster acts as a coordination, advocacy, and technical support body to ensure that member agencies have the resources and capacity needed to provide the highest quality shelter assistance possible. The cluster does this by offering a number of services, including: (1) providing guidance through the Strategic Operating Framework (SOF) to enhance accountability and effectiveness of shelter interventions in Somalia; (2) maintaining coordination mechanisms through a platform of information sharing, both at the national and regional levels, in close collaboration with government counterparts; (3) representing the interests of SC members in discussions with the Humanitarian Coordinator (HC) at inter-cluster meetings and with other stakeholders on the prioritization of shelter issues for humanitarian action and resource mobilization; (4) identifying advocacy concerns, including resource requirements, and contributing to broader advocacy initiatives; (5) ensuring that adequate monitoring mechanisms are in place to review the impact of cluster member activities and the progress against implementation plans; and, (6) providing leadership in emergency and crisis preparedness by putting in place contingency plans in areas and situations where there is a high risk of recurring disasters and where sufficient capacity exists within the cluster.

With its core focus being service delivery, the SC has created a number of training modules, technical reference documents, and coordination systems intended to improve and complement the activities of its member agencies. Furthermore specific training modules have been developed for capacity building of agency staff: monitoring and evaluation, building back safer, local building culture, and linking relief-rehabilitation-development.

Ethiopia: UNHCR Ethiopia Factsheet - January 2016

10 February 2016 - 10:48pm
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Eritrea, Ethiopia, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Yemen

HIGHLIGHTS

  • 731,071 Total number of refugees

  • 38,858 Number of Unaccompanied Minors and Separated Children

  • 49.7% Percentage of women and girls

  • 56.6% Percentage of Children

Population of concern-updated

A total of 733,071 of concern (As of 31 January 2015)

Funding

USD 280.0 million requested

UNHCR Presence

Staff: 319 national staff 101 international staff 89 individual contractors 32 deployees 7 IUNVs

Total: 586

Offices: 24 offices, including the UNHCR Representation in Ethiopia, as well as Sub and Field-Offices located in five Regional States: Afar (Semera) Benishangul-Gumuz (Assosa, Bambasi, Sherkole, Tongo), Gambella (Gambella, Dimma, Itang, Jewi, Pugnido), Somali (Jijiga,
Melkadida, Aw-barre, Sheder, Kebribeyah, Dollo Ado, Bokolmanyo, Kobe, Hilaweyn, Buramino) and Tigray (Shire, Mekele, Embamadre, Shimelba).

*81,078 Eritrean refugees previously registered as living in the camps are believed to have spontaneously settled in Ethiopia. This figure will be subjected to Verification

WORKING WITH PARTNERS

  • UNHCR is fully engaged in the Humanitarian Country Team in Ethiopia consisting of UN Agencies, NGOs and donor representatives, where the refugee programmes are discussed strategically to ensure that the needs of refugees are adequately presented and addressed. The Representation Office is also building on well-established coordination fora such as the Refugee Task Force, donor and NGO and inter-agency meetings at the field and camp
  • UNHCR's main Government counterpart and implementing partner in Ethiopia is the Administration for Refugee and Returnee Affairs (ARRA) and the Office works well with it in ensuring continued protection of the refugees.
  • Some 40 partners, including government agencies, national and international non-governmental organizations and UN agencies work closely with UNHCR to support the refugees in the country.
  • The effective coordination environment that was established in response to the Level 3 emergency with refugees arriving from South Sudan is working well; a Regional Refugee Response Plan was developed with participation of all partners.

Ethiopia: Refugees and Asylum-seekers in Ethiopia, 31 January 2016

10 February 2016 - 10:14pm
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Eritrea, Ethiopia, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Yemen

Ethiopia: Australian response to Horn of Africa drought

10 February 2016 - 6:07pm
Source: Government of Australia Country: Australia, Ethiopia, Somalia

Joint media release

  • The Hon Julie Bishop MP, Minister for Foreign Affairs
  • The Hon Steven Ciobo MP, Minister for International Development and the Pacific

The Australian Government is providing further humanitarian assistance to Ethiopia and Somalia to support those affected by drought conditions, and those affected by the ongoing conflict in Somalia.

Two seasons of poor or non-existent rainfall in Ethiopia, exacerbated by the current El Niño event, has left more than 10 million Ethiopians in need of assistance. An estimated 2.1 million people are suffering acute malnutrition and over 100,000 have been displaced.

The Australian Government will provide an additional $10 million to Ethiopia to help provide food and nutrition support, and services such as health and sanitation. In addition, the United Nations World Food Programme has channelled $6.4 million of Australia’s core funding towards its operations in Ethiopia bringing Australia’s total funding for the Ethiopian drought to $16.4 million.

The Australian Government is also providing a further $5 million in humanitarian assistance to Somalia, bringing Australia’s contribution to the Somalia crisis to $9 million since the beginning of 2015.

Over 4 million Somalis are in need of humanitarian assistance due to ongoing conflict and the deepening impacts of El Niño conditions. Delivered through the United Nations, funding will support life-saving interventions such as emergency food, water, shelter and healthcare.

Australia’s contribution will help vaccinate around 12,000 women and children, provide approximately 29,000 people with access to food and 59,000 people with sustainable access to safe water.

Media enquiries

Minister's office: (02) 6277 7500
DFAT Media Liaison: (02) 6261 1555

World: The Aid Security Monthly News Brief January 2016

10 February 2016 - 3:35am
Source: Insecurity Insight Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Burkina Faso, Burundi, China, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, France, Greece, Iraq, Kenya, Mali, Myanmar, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, World, Yemen

This monthly digest documents threats and incidents of violence affecting the delivery of humanitarian assistance. It is prepared by Insecurity Insight from information available in open sources. It complements resources that already exist, such as the Aid Worker Security Database, which provides statistics and analysis about attacks against aid workers.

World: The Aid Security Monthly News Brief December 2015

10 February 2016 - 3:29am
Source: Insecurity Insight Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, India, Kazakhstan, Lebanon, Nepal, Somalia, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Uganda, World, Yemen

This monthly digest documents threats and incidents of violence affecting the delivery of humanitarian assistance. It is prepared by Insecurity Insight from information available in open sources. It complements resources that already exist, such as the Aid Worker Security Database, which provides statistics and analysis about attacks against aid workers.

Somalia: UNICEF Somalia Humanitarian Situation Report 12, December 2015

9 February 2016 - 4:13pm
Source: UN Children's Fund Country: Somalia

Highlights

• UNICEF and partners continue to respond to flooding and AWD/cholera outbreaks.

• The round five of the Polio National Immunization Day conducted in Central and Southern Somalia, as well as in Puntland. A measles campaign also took place in Somaliland during the reporting period.

Situation Overview and Humanitarian Needs

The primary outlook from the Food Security and Nutrition Analysis Unit (FSNAU) indicated that acute food insecurity is expected to persist in most parts of Somalia, especially in urban areas affected by trade disruptions, as well as across most of the main IDP settlements. Slight improvements are however expected in some pastoral, agropastoral and riverine livelihoods of southern regions. Based on the Integrated Phase Classification (IPC) food insecurity severity scale, the overall number of people in Crisis (IPC 3) and Emergency (IPC 4) is expected to remain stable or increase slightly in the first half of 2016, particularly in drought affected areas, while most rural livelihoods are likely to be classified as Minimal or Stresses (IPC 2). Since the onset of the Deyr rainy season in October, seasonal flooding exacerbated by El Niňo conditions has affected over 145,000 people and displaced nearly 60,000. Response to Acute Watery Diarrhoea (AWD)/cholera cases is ongoing. Mediation efforts by various actors led to a peace agreement being signed on 2 December, ending the armed violence in Gaalkacyo and internally displaced populations are returning to their homes and previous settlements. Somalia continues to respond to the influx, albeit much reduced, of returnees and refugees fleeing the conflict in Yemen; at end December, the number stands at 30,180.