Sudan - ReliefWeb News

Syndicate content
ReliefWeb - Updates
Updated: 39 min 38 sec ago

South Sudan: South Sudan: Emergency Dashboard, March 2017

5 hours 53 min ago
Source: World Food Programme Country: Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Kenya, South Sudan, Sudan, Uganda

World: Strengthening the Rule of Law in Crisis-affected and Fragile Situations - United Nations Development Programme 2015 Country Profile Pamphlet

13 hours 51 min ago
Source: UN Development Programme Country: Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Burundi, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, El Salvador, Guatemala, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Honduras, Iraq, Jordan, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Liberia, Libya, Mali, Myanmar, Nepal, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Timor-Leste, Tunisia, World, Yemen

UNDP provides support to nearly 170 countries, about 40 of which are affected by crisis and have received rule of law support through the Global Programme for Strengthening the Rule of Law in Crisis-Affected and Fragile Situations.

UNDP’s rule of law assistance is carried out with the generous support of Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, France, Germany, Ireland, Japan, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, Qatar, the United Kingdom, and the United States of America. Please reference the “Financial Information” included in the 2015 Global Programme Annual Report, Eight Years On, for a complete picture of the contributions received over the last eight years. UNDP also recognizes that our work would be meaningless without the dedication and commitment of our national partners.

We look forward to continuing this joint endeavor in the years to come.

This Country Profile Pamphlet accompanies the 2015 Global Programme Annual Report, Eight Years On, presenting detailed country-by-country assistance provided, programmes implemented, and results achieved in 2015 in the following countries: Afghanistan, Bahrain, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Burundi, Central African Republic, Chad, Colombia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, El Salvador,
Guatemala, Guinea (Conakry), Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, Honduras, Iraq, Jordan, Kosovo(UN Administered Territory), Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Liberia, Libya, Mali, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, State of Palestine, Sudan, Timor-Leste,
Tunisia, Yemen. Additionally, Financial Snapshots depicting the 2015 budget for each country programme are provided in the back of this pamphlet.

Chad: WFP Chad Country Brief, February 2017

27 March 2017 - 11:47am
Source: World Food Programme Country: Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Niger, Nigeria, Sudan

Highlights

  • A campaign for mass distribution of mosquito nets has been launched. WFP will ensure the distribution of 7 million mosquito nets to 10 million people in 13 regions of Chad in the framework of UNDP’s programme to prevent malaria, the first cause of death in the country. WFP leverages its field presence and logistical expertise to dispatch the nets to 4,000 sites through 900 health centres.

  • Cash-based assistance is suspended for 62,000 returnees from Central African Republic and will only resume during the lean season to prioritize the use of limited resources during that critical time of the year. WFP urgently requires USD 10 million to enable prepositioning of food and nutritious products in Eastern Chad before the rainy season, which cuts off access routes – otherwise, half rations will not be ensured for 330,00 Sudanese refugees from June to October.

Operational Updates

Country-wide:

Preliminary results of a national market assessment by the Government, WFP and other partners show that the current food prices are relatively low. This situation is driven by the low demand from households due to their insufficient purchasing power and to the fact that households are currently consuming their own production during this postharvest season. However, a deterioration is expected during the lean season when demand increases thus putting pressure on prices, particularly in the regions of the Sahel belt with low agricultural production. The current economic crisis affects traders' resources and this situation, combined with the structurally poor road infrastructure making it unlikely for inter-regional transfers from surplus regions towards deficit regions to be sufficient. Border closures with Nigeria and C.A.R. continue to disrupt livestock trade and to negatively affect the purchasing power of pastoral and agropastoral households. Finally, the border closure with Libya in January 2017 led to an increase of food prices in Kanem, a region through which trade flows used to transit.
A Standardized Monitoring and Assessment of Relief and Transitions (SMART) survey conducted in January indicates that in Sudanese refugee camps, the global acute malnutrition prevalence has overall increased between 2015 and 2016, from 7.4 percent to 9.2 percent. This increase comes after several consecutive years of steady improvement. Partners need to be on alert, analyse the determinants of these changes and monitor admissions in nutrition centres. In camps hosting refugees from C.A.R., no significant changes were noted and prevalence is at 6.3 percent on average, under the 10 percent threshold alert.

Sudan: Sudan: 2017 Humanitarian Needs Overview, Dec 2016

27 March 2017 - 5:29am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Central African Republic, Chad, Eritrea, Ethiopia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Yemen

Humanitarian Needs & Key Figures

This document identifies the needs of people based on their vulnerabilities. Rather than assuming that all Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) are in need because they are displaced, only vulnerable IDPs have been considered. The main humanitarian needs in Sudan result from several factors. New and protracted displacement due to conflict affects access to basic services and disrupts the livelihoods and food security of many people. Acute malnutrition in children under the age of 5 is above emergency thresholds in different areas across the country. Refugees and asylum seekers continue to arrive in Sudan seeking protection and humanitarian assistance. Returnees (both refugee and IDP returnees) are also vulnerable. Natural hazards in Sudan (in particular floods and droughts) impact food security and livelihoods of vulnerable people. The total number of people estimated to be in need of humanitarian assistance in 2017 is 4.8 million, a reduction of 1 million compared to 2016. This is attributed to food security being severely affected by El Niño and other factors in 2015, but in 2016 agricultural performance was better due to improved rainfall, reducing the number of people in need of food and livelihoods assistance to 3.6 million.

Humanitarian Impact

Sudan faces two major overlapping humanitarian challenges: one triggered by conflict leading to wide-scale population displacement and another due to climatic and socio-cultural conditions leading to crisis levels of food insecurity and malnutrition. The scale and long-term nature of displacement, especially in Darfur, which has not been matched by economic opportunities, has exposed displaced people to hardship and uncertainty about their future. This is putting an additional strain on the 3.6 million people currently suffering from food insecurity, and the 2.2 million children suffering from acute malnutrition. Refugees and asylum seekers living in both emergency and protracted situations remain largely dependent on humanitarian assistance, with very limited access to livelihood opportunities.

Large scale and protracted internal displacement

In 2016, considerable new displacement occurred and a large number of those who have fled their homes since 2004 remain displaced.

In Darfur some 1.6 million displaced people are registered as living in camps. For unregistered IDPs i.e. displaced people living in rural settlements and urban areas, estimates vary considerably, especially as there is no systematic registration of displacement outside camps. The official government estimate is that an additional 0.5 million internally displaced persons live outside camps in Darfur and a further 0.2 million internally displaced people live in South Kordofan and Blue Nile. According to the government, the overall total number of IDPs across Sudan is 2.3 million in government-controlled conflict-affected areas.

The UN and partners estimate that a further half a million displaced people live in host communities and settlements in Darfur.

In many parts of Darfur, inter-communal conflict is another main cause of insecurity and recurrently causes substantial civilian displacement. Such localised armed violence takes place most frequently between sedentary-farming and nomadic-pastoral communities, as well as between nomadic communities, clashing over access to, use of and management of resources, especially land.

Armed movements in South Kordofan and Blue Nile estimate that an additional 545,000 people are displaced in areas under their control.

Nearly every community in conflict-affected areas, whether sedentary rural farmers, nomadic pastoralists, public sector workers or urban dwellers, has been impacted, further undermining their capacity to host displaced people.

Protracted displacement has disrupted traditional livelihood activities and eroded community resilience to withstand shocks. Displaced people are more vulnerable due to their reduced access to natural resources such as land and water, and a chronic shortage of basic services. Conflict impacts pastoralists’ traditional migration routes and farmers’ capacity to transport their crops. Newly displaced people lose their livelihood opportunities. As a result they seek safety, food, water, shelter, healthcare, education for their children and new livelihoods.

Sudan: Sudan Humanitarian Fund (SHF) - Basic facts and figures, 22 February 2017 [EN/AR]

27 March 2017 - 4:54am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Australia, Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Netherlands, Spain, Sudan, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

The Sudan Humanitarian Fund (SHF) is a cost-effective way to support humanitarian action in Sudan. Under the direction of the Humanitarian Coordinator (HC), the SHF aims to support the timely allocation and disbursement of donor resources to the most critical humanitarian needs as defined by the Humanitarian Response Plan (HRP) or any agreed upon strategy by the HC. The SHF provides funding to international and national non–governmental organizations and UN agencies. The SHF receives voluntary donor contributions and supports humanitarian response year–round.

South Sudan: Statement attributable to the UN Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator in Sudan, Ms. Marta Ruedas, on Sudan opening a new humanitarian corridor for food aid into famine-struck South Sudan [EN/AR]

26 March 2017 - 9:25am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs, UN Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator for the Sudan Country: South Sudan, Sudan

Khartoum, 26 Mar 2017. The United Nations Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator in Sudan, Ms. Marta Ruedas, today welcomed the decision by the Government of Sudan to open a new humanitarian corridor for food aid to be delivered by the UN World Food Programme (WFP) from El Obeid in central Sudan to Bentiu, a town in Unity State, South Sudan, where 100,000 people are enduring famine amid a deepening humanitarian crisis across the country.

“By opening this cross-border corridor, the Government of Sudan is showing its commitment to the people of South Sudan and further strengthening cooperation with the international community to pull South Sudan back from a widening famine that could affect another 1 million people,” said Ms. Ruedas. “This decision also comes at a critical time just before South Sudan’s rainy season, which starts in May and usually renders these roads impassable.”

This week, WFP will be moving an initial delivery of 11,000 metric tons of sorghum – including 1,000 metric tons donated by the Government of Sudan - in seven convoys of 30 to 40 trucks, which is enough to feed 300,000 people for three months. The convoys will take up to four days to complete the 500km journey. The humanitarian corridor will not only allow for the timely delivery of the food aid, but will also help reduce reliance on air operations, which cost six to seven times as much as moving food by river and road.

At least 7.5 million people across South Sudan – almost two thirds of the population – need humanitarian assistance. Sudan is also currently hosting over 350,000 South Sudanese refugees, who have arrived since the conflict erupted in December 2013.

For further information, please contact Samantha Newport, Chief, Communication & Information Section, UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs in Sudan (newports@un.org / +249 912 174 454).

Sudan: Statement attributable to the UN Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator in Sudan, Ms. Marta Ruedas, on Sudan opening a new humanitarian corridor for food aid into famine-struck South Sudan [EN/AR]

26 March 2017 - 9:25am
Source: UN Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator for the Sudan Country: South Sudan, Sudan

Khartoum, 26 Mar 2017. The United Nations Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator in Sudan, Ms. Marta Ruedas, today welcomed the decision by the Government of Sudan to open a new humanitarian corridor for food aid to be delivered by the UN World Food Programme (WFP) from El Obeid in central Sudan to Bentiu, a town in Unity State, South Sudan, where 100,000 people are enduring famine amid a deepening humanitarian crisis across the country.

“By opening this cross-border corridor, the Government of Sudan is showing its commitment to the people of South Sudan and further strengthening cooperation with the international community to pull South Sudan back from a widening famine that could affect another 1 million people,” said Ms. Ruedas. “This decision also comes at a critical time just before South Sudan’s rainy season, which starts in May and usually renders these roads impassable.”

This week, WFP will be moving an initial delivery of 11,000 metric tons of sorghum – including 1,000 metric tons donated by the Government of Sudan - in seven convoys of 30 to 40 trucks, which is enough to feed 300,000 people for three months. The convoys will take up to four days to complete the 500km journey. The humanitarian corridor will not only allow for the timely delivery of the food aid, but will also help reduce reliance on air operations, which cost six to seven times as much as moving food by river and road.

At least 7.5 million people across South Sudan – almost two thirds of the population – need humanitarian assistance. Sudan is also currently hosting over 350,000 South Sudanese refugees, who have arrived since the conflict erupted in December 2013.

For further information, please contact Samantha Newport, Chief, Communication & Information Section, UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs in Sudan (newports@un.org / +249 912 174 454).

United Republic of Tanzania: Refugee Situation in Northwest Tanzania - Statistical Report (Friday 24-Mar-2017)

26 March 2017 - 4:26am
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Rwanda, Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania

Sudan: Jordan: Bar Entry or Arrest Sudan’s Bashir

26 March 2017 - 12:24am
Source: Human Rights Watch Country: Sudan

ICC Members Should Not Allow Fugitives on Their Territories

(Amman, March 26, 2017) – Jordan should deny entry to Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir or arrest him if he enters the country, Human Rights Watch said today. Al-Bashir has been invited to visit Jordan on March 29, 2017, to attend the 28th summit of the Arab League, news reports say.

Al-Bashir has been a fugitive from the International Criminal Court (ICC) since 2009. He is the subject of two ICC arrest warrants, issued in 2009 and 2010, related to his alleged role in Sudan's abusive counterinsurgency campaign in Darfur. The charges are for genocide, crimes against humanity, and war crimes.

“Jordan would be defying its international obligations as an ICC member if it allows al-Bashir to visit without arresting him,” said Elise Keppler, associate international justice director at Human Rights Watch. “Welcoming an ICC fugitive would undermine the Jordanian government’s recent efforts to strengthen the country’s rule of law.”

A visit by al-Bashir would be the first time Jordan had welcomed an ICC fugitive. Human Rights Watch wrote to Jordanian authorities about the potential visit but have yet to receive a response.

Jordan’s King Abdullah II in February accepted sweeping recommendations by a royal committee to reform the country’s criminal justice system. If carried out, these measures would be a major step for human rights in Jordan. But a failure by Jordan to uphold its international obligations as a party to the Rome Statue of the ICC would be at odds with these efforts, Human Rights Watch said.

Allowing al-Bashir’s visit would also be a reversal of Jordan’s historical support for the ICC. In 2015, Ahmed al-Mufleh, Jordan’s ambassador to The Hague, said that Jordan “will continue to confirm its support of the International Criminal Court because of its firm conviction over the essential role of the court in achieving international justice and halting impunity from punishment.”

“Jordan is not the first country to face a possible al-Bashir visit,” said Keppler. “But most ICC members have avoided letting him in.”

Since 2009, some ICC members, such as Botswana and Denmark, have affirmatively signaled that al-Bashir risked arrest if he entered their territory, and he has not traveled there. Others have relocated or rescheduled meetings or asked Sudan to send other representatives.

In 2012, Malawi opted to relocate an African Union summit in light of the AU’s insistence that al-Bashir should be allowed to attend the meeting if it took place in Malawi as scheduled. In October 2010, an international development meeting scheduled for Kenya was relocated to Ethiopia to avoid a visit by al-Bashir. In other instances, al-Bashir cancelled anticipated visits – to Central African Republic and Zambia – amid calls for his arrest.

As an ICC suspect, the Sudanese president should appear before the ICC, where he would receive the full range of protections under international law for people accused of crimes.

“Jordan’s government has a chance to demonstrate its credibility on accountability and support for justice for victims of mass atrocities by avoiding an al-Bashir visit,” Keppler said. “Al-Bashir belongs in The Hague appearing before the ICC.”

For more Human Rights Watch reporting on al-Bashir and the ICC, please visit: https://www.hrw.org/topic/international-justice/international-criminal-court

Chad: GIEWS Country Brief: Chad 23-March-2017

25 March 2017 - 11:41pm
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Country: Central African Republic, Chad, Libya, Nigeria, Sudan

FOOD SECURITY SNAPSHOT

  • Above-average crop production in 2016 due to adequate rainfall throughout the season

  • Prices of millet and sorghum stable in January but remain above their year-earlier levels

  • Continued assistance required to improve access to food and protect livelihoods of food insecure and vulnerable people, including refugees and returnees

Cereal production recovered in 2016

Harvesting of the 2016 cereal crops was completed last November. In most agricultural regions, the 2016/17 cropping season was characterized by favourable rains in terms of amounts and distribution in time and space. Despite some attacks by pests reported in some areas, the 2016 aggregate cereal production is estimated at about 2.8 million tonnes, about 15 percent above the previous year’s output and about 11 percent above the last five-year average.

Coarse grain prices stable in January, but remained above last year’s levels

Millet prices began to stabilize in January 2017 following the steep decline of the previous months. However, they remain well below their year-earlier values as a result of good supplies from the above-average 2016 harvest.

The steep depreciation of the local currency in neighbouring Nigeria also supported increased cereal imports to Chad.

Food security continues to be affected by civil insecurity in neighbouring countries

The country hosts a large number of refugees due to the continuing civil conflict in neighbouring countries: the Central African Republic, Libya, Nigeria and the Sudan. The ongoing civil insecurity due to Boko Haram led to large population displacement, compromising the food security amongst refugees, returnees and host communities in the whole Lake Chad region. According to OCHA, as of March 2017, about 104 000 people have been internally displaced due to insecurity in the Lake Chad Region. In addition, over 394 000 refugees are estimated to be currently living in Chad, while about 117 000 Chadians have returned to the country. As a result of these various factors, according to the latest “Cadre Harmonisé” analysis, about 456 000 people are currently estimated to be in Phase 3: “Crisis” and above and are in need of urgent assistance across the country.

Sudan: Sudan: New Report Details Deep Impact of Armed Conflict on Children

24 March 2017 - 5:39pm
Source: UN Office of the SRSG for Children and Armed Conflict Country: Sudan

New York – A new report by the UN Secretary-General details the deep impact of armed conflict on children in the Sudan states of Darfur, South Kordofan, Blue Nile and Abyei.

“Child recruitment and use declined during the period covered by the report,” declared Leila Zerrougui, Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict. “However, boys and girls continued to be victims of grave violations committed by all parties to the conflict, including killing and maiming, sexual violence and attacks on schools and hospitals.”

The report, covering the period from March 2011 to December 2016, is the fifth by the Secretary-General on children and armed conflict in Sudan. It is also the first report on children and armed conflict published since the independence of South Sudan and the beginning of conflict in South Kordofan and Blue Nile States.

Throughout the reporting period, access by the UN to conflict-affected areas across Darfur, South Kordofan and Blue Nile was a constant challenge and the information presented in the report might provide only a partial assessment of the actual situation of children affected by armed conflict in Sudan.

Killing and maiming

The UN verified the killing and maiming of close to 1,300 children, with a majority of child casualties (971) documented in Darfur. In all regions, the majority of child deaths and injuries were the result of hostilities between the Government and armed groups, including aerial bombardments. Unexploded ordnance of war causing child casualties was another concern.

Recruitment and use of children

Over two thirds of the 230 cases presented in the report in South Kordofan, Blue Nile and Abyei were documented in the early stages of the conflict in the “Two Areas”, with the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement/ North (SPLM/N) responsible for the majority of verified cases. Beginning in 2014, the trends illustrate a decrease in the number of cases, albeit with the new concern of cross-border recruitment and use of children by Sudanese and South Sudanese groups, notably the SPLM/N, Sudan People’s Liberation Army-in Opposition and Justice (SPLA-iO) and Equality Movement (JEM).

In Darfur, a total of 105 cases of recruitment and use of children were documented. Attributing responsibility for these cases was not always possible, but approximately half of the cases were attributed to Government forces. There was a constant decrease in the number of children recruited and used during the reporting period, with only one case verified in 2016.

Sexual violence against children

Rape and sexual violence were a major concern in Darfur, with 372 child victims affected throughout the reporting period. In most cases, children were raped during attacks on their villages or while getting wood or water in the vicinity of camps for displaced people.

Progress, engagement with parties to conflict and Action Plans

The Government of Sudan strengthened the national framework for the protection of children and promoted accountability by enacting laws to raise the age of recruitment into the national forces to 18. Provisions were also added to the criminal code to sanction child recruitment and use and to ensure that children associated with armed forces and groups are treated primarily as victims, in line with the Paris Principles, endorsed by Sudan. Offenses related to sexual violence have also been criminalized and a number of perpetrators of rape against children have been prosecuted and sentenced.

Three Action Plans were signed with the United Nations during the reporting period. In March 2016, the Government signed an Action Plan to protect children from violations by which it committed to end and prevent child recruitment and use. Implementation has been going apace. The SPLM/N signed an Action Plan in November 2016, as well as JEM in September 2012. Engagement with other parties to conflict is ongoing.

“I encourage the Government to continue to work swiftly to fully implement this Action Plan, and to consider the strengthening of birth registration in conflict-affected areas as a priority to establish efficient age verification mechanisms as a prevention measure,” said Leila Zerrougui. “I also urge all other parties to conflict to take concrete measures to fully implement or to develop new commitments with the United Nations to protect children.”

The Special Representative concluded by calling for unrestricted access to all conflict-areas for the UN to ensure adequate monitoring and reporting, monitor compliance in the implementation of Action Plans and to facilitate the delivery of lifesaving humanitarian assistance to thousands of children.

For more information please contact:

Stephanie Tremblay – Communications Officer Office of the Special Representative for Children and Armed Conflict Tel: +1 212 963-8285 Mobile: +1 917 288-5791 tremblay@un.org

Follow us on Twitter and Facebook: www.twitter.com/childreninwar www.facebook.com/childrenandarmedconflict Use the hashtag: #ChildrenNotSoldiers

Read the Report of the Secretary-General on children and armed conflict in Sudan

Click here to save this press release as a PDF.

Sudan: Report of the Secretary-General on children and armed conflict in the Sudan (S/2017/191)

24 March 2017 - 5:32pm
Source: UN Security Council Country: Sudan

Summary

The present report, submitted pursuant to Security Council resolution 1612 (2005) and subsequent resolutions on children and armed conflict, is the fifth report of the Secretary-General on children and armed conflict in the Sudan to be submitted to the Security Council and its Working Group on Children and Armed Conflict and the first such report since the secession of South Sudan in July 2011. Covering the period from 1 March 2011 to 31 December 2016, the report is focused on the trends and patterns of the six categories of grave violations committed against children and contains information on the perpetrators and the context in which such violations took place. The progress made by all parties to the conflict in terms of dialogue, action plans and other child protection commitments is also reviewed.
The report contains a series of recommendations aimed at ending and preventing grave violations against children and strengthening child protection in the Sudan.

I. Introduction

  1. The present report, submitted pursuant to Security Council resolution 1612 (2005) and subsequent resolutions, covers the period from 1 March 2011 to 31 December 2016. It is the fifth report on children and armed conflict in the Sudan to be submitted to the Security Council and its Working Group on Children and Armed Conflict and the first such report since the secession of South Sudan on 9 July 2011. The report is focused on grave violations perpetrated against children and the progress made in ending such violations, in follow-up to the recommendations contained in the previous report (S/2011/413) and to the conclusions of the Working Group (S/AC.51/2012/1). In the annexes to my annual report on children and armed conflict (S/2016/360), government security forces, pro-government militias, the Justice and Equality Movement (JEM), the Sudan Liberation Army/Minni Minawi (SLA/MM), the Sudan Liberation Army/Abdul Wahid (SLA/AW) and the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement-North (SPLM-N) were listed as parties that recruit or use children. Armed groups that were no longer active had been removed from the annexes. The SLA/Free Will, JEM/Peace Wing and SLA-Peace Wing were removed in 2013 and the SLA-Historical Leadership, SLA-Mother Wing (Abu Gasim) and SLA-Unity were removed in 2014.

  2. During the reporting period, the United Nations country task force on monitoring and reporting continued to document grave violations against children perpetrated by all parties to the conflict, including government security forces, namely, the Sudan Armed Forces, the police, the Central Reserve Police, the Popular Defence Forces, the Border Guards, the Rapid Support Forces and governmentaffiliated militias. At the beginning of the reporting period, the majority of the documented violations were attributed to the Central Reserve Police and the Popular Defence Forces. From 2014 onwards, the Sudan Armed Forces and the Rapid Support Forces became the perpetrators with the most documented violations. Violations by the armed groups that remained active, namely, JEM, SLA/AW,
    SLA/MM and SPLM-N, were also documented. It should be noted that, from the second half of 2015, JEM and SLA/MM were no longer militarily active in Darfur.

  3. During the reporting period, the country task force faced significant constraints in effectively monitoring and reporting grave violations against children owing to the lack of access to conflict-affected areas due to insecurity, ongoing hostilities and restrictions imposed by the Government and some of the armed groups.

Sudan: Sudan - Complex Emergency Fact Sheet #3, Fiscal Year 2017

24 March 2017 - 2:55pm
Source: US Agency for International Development Country: South Sudan, Sudan, United States of America

HIGHLIGHTS

• Above-average harvest reduces food insecurity levels across Sudan

• GoS implements revised humanitarian directives to facilitate relief operations

• Humanitarian actors report improved access in Jebel Marra region

• Relief agencies coordinate to support influx of South Sudanese refugees

KEY DEVELOPMENTS

• An above-average 2016/2017 harvest and regular access to seasonal agricultural labor have reduced food insecurity across Sudan, according to the USAID-funded Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET). However, parts of South Kordofan State and Jebel Marra continue to experience elevated levels of acute food insecurity due to disrupted agricultural production, ongoing insecurity, and population displacement.

• In mid-January, the Government of Sudan (GoS) Humanitarian Aid Commission (HAC) convened a workshop in the capital city of Khartoum to communicate key elements of the revised Directives and Procedures for Humanitarian Action in Sudan.

• More than 46,000 South Sudanese refugees have arrived in Sudan since January 1, according to the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), prompting the UN agency and other humanitarian actors to scale up response activities to meet the needs of refugees and affected host community members.

South Sudan: HSBA Issue Brief for Sudan and South Sudan, #26 - March 2017

24 March 2017 - 12:31pm
Source: Small Arms Survey Country: South Sudan, Sudan

Policing in South Sudan

Transformation Challenges and Priorities

Over the past three years, ongoing conflict in South Sudan has fundamentally reshaped donor engagement with the security sector. In the wake of the conflict that began in December 2013, major bilateral donor support was suspended to the security services, including the police. More recent efforts to support transitional security arrangements under the terms laid out in the Agreement on the Resolution of the Conflict in South Sudan (ARCSS), signed in August 2015, have been met with criticism in the face of persistent conflict and human rights abuses.

Download Issue Brief 26: Policing in South Sudan

Italy: Mediterranean Update, Migration Flows Europe: Arrivals and Fatalities: 24 March 2017

24 March 2017 - 9:15am
Source: International Organization for Migration Country: Afghanistan, Côte d'Ivoire, Eritrea, Gambia, Greece, Guinea, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Italy, Mali, Nigeria, Pakistan, Senegal, Spain, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, World

25,170 arrivals by sea in 2017 559 dead/missing published 09:00 CET 24 March 363,401 arrivals in 2016

Sudan: Unite to End TB: 21 GeneXpert machines had been installed all over Sudan to enhance the rapid detection of Multi Drug Resistant Tuberculosis

24 March 2017 - 12:52am
Source: UN Development Programme Country: Sudan

Khartoum, 24. March 2017- Today, marks the world TB Day 2017 under the theme ‘’Unite to End TB’’. On this day, The United Nations Development Programme in Sudan and through the support of The Global Fund to fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria and in collaboration with Federal Ministry of Health, have succeeded to invest 121,000 USD to enhance the rapid detection of the Multi Drug Resistant Tuberculosis. This included procurement and installation of 21 GeneXpert machines, training of 60 lab technician and rehabilitation of 8 laboratories.

GeneXpert is a new technology that diagnoses Multi-Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis. It shortens the diagnosis period to few hours instead of many weeks. Such a short diagnosis period allows the health worker to start the treatment immediately after the diagnosis as well as halt the spread of this disease. The installation of the GeneXpert machine had been launched in Sudan for the first time in 2015. The launch started by installing two GeneXpert machines in the National Tuberculosis Reference Laboratory in Khartoum State and then installed in all the other states Sudan. The installation process was accompanied by comprehensive training for the lab technicians as well as rehabilitation of the TB laboratories per each state to ensure suitable place as well as appropriate utilization of the machine.

Since 2005, UNDP in Sudan, through the Global Fund support, the Federal Ministry of Health and other stakeholders are working to reduce the mortality rate associated with TB in Sudan in Holistic approach through; expanding the integration of TB/HIV services, increasing the detection and treatment of multi-drug resistance tuberculosis, supporting community-based interventions, increase the awareness of vulnerable groups and capacity building for health care providers.

Chad: Flash Info: COP 2018/2019, PPG Soudanais, Abéché, les 14/15 mars 2017

23 March 2017 - 3:24pm
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Chad, Sudan

C’est l’Université Adam Barka d’Abéché qui, cette année encore, a offert sa salle multimédia comme cadre pour la restitution des travaux du COP 2018-2019 qui ont eu lieu dans les 3 sous délégations de l’est du Tchad et qui ont ensuite été compilés à Abéché par les différentes sections.

Ouvert le mardi 14 mars 2017 par le Secrétaire Général de la Région du Ouaddaï représentant le Gouverneur qui avait à ses côtés le représentant par intérim du HCR, Monsieur Mr O’ Dwyer Edward John et les représentants d’ECHO et BPRM, cet atelier a réuni les agents du HCR (N’Djamena et bureaux de l’est), les partenaires, les autorités administratives et politiques ainsi que les responsables des services déconcentrées du Ouaddaï, du Sila, du Wadi Fira et de l’Ennedi Est.

Dans leurs allocutions d’ouverture et de clôture, le Représentant par intérim du HCR et le Secrétaire Général de la Région du Ouaddaï se sont réjouis de la collaboration entre les deux institutions et souhaités que cela permette de trouver des solutions idoines et durables aux réfugiés et aux populations hôtes. Ils ont également émis le vœu que les recommandations qui seront issues des travaux du COP soient prises en compte pour une meilleure planification des actions à entreprendre en 2018/2019. Aussi, ont-ils tour à tour remercié très chaleureusement les bailleurs ECHO et BPRM pour leurs apports indéfectibles et permanents.

Plusieurs présentations notamment sur les Stratégies de protection et de solutions durables, l’Education, la Protection de l’Enfance et la protection communautaire, la Santé Publique et Nutrition, l’Eau et Assainissement, les Moyens de subsistance, l’Energie, l’Environnement et les innovations ont fait l’objet de débats très constructifs et des recommandations ont été formulées pour une meilleure planification 2018/2019.

Les représentants d’ECHO et BPRM ont manifesté leur satisfaction face aux activités réalisées ainsi qu’aux projections pour 2018/2019 avant de réaffirmer leur entière disponibilité à continuer d’appuyer l’opération du Tchad dans ses activités en faveur des réfugiés et des populations hôtes.

Après les deux jours de travaux, une visite de courtoisie au Gouverneur du Ouaddaï. Au cours de leur entretien, le Représentant Adjoint a remercié les autorités pour leur soutien constant qui permet au HCR et à ses partenaires de réaliser leurs activités en faveur des refugies et des personnes sous mandat malgré la réduction des fonds de 47%. Il a également sollicité comme par le passé l’appui permanent du Gouvernement pour la protection des réfugiés, l’insertion et l’inclusion socio-économique à long terme. Le Gouverneur, dans sa réponse, a réaffirmé son entière disponibilité à accompagner les initiatives du HCR surtout pour l’intégration locale et le rapatriement volontaire avant de recommander à tous les humanitaires de recourir toujours aux escortes lors de leurs déplacements en raison de la présence d’armes dans la région.

Sudan: Hundreds mark World Water Day in North Darfur

23 March 2017 - 12:34pm
Source: UN-AU Mission in Darfur Country: Sudan

EL FASHER – Hundreds of people gathered in El Fasher, North Darfur to mark World Water Day at a UNAMID-supported event held at Abu Shouk camp for internally displaced persons (IDPs).

Participants at the 22 March event included the Minister of Culture and Environment, North Darfur, Hamza Abass Khalil, government officials, community leaders, Sheikhs, Omdas (tribal leaders), women and youth groups, along with UNAMID staff.

World Water Day – which is marked around the globe on 22 March every year – is about taking action on water. This year’s theme – “Why waste water?” – highlighted the importance of improving water quality and reducing, treating and reusing wastewater.

Mr. Khalil said at the El Fasher event that his Ministry was ready to work closely with UNAMID to improve the environment in North Darfur.

“Cooperation between the Government, UNAMID and the citizens is essential for the protection of water and the environment”, said Mr. Khalil.

Yahiya Mohamed, Chief of Omdas at Abu Shouk, commended UNAMID for organizing the activity. He urged the government and international organizations to continue their support for IDPs, particularly in the rehabilitation of water points at the camp.

Nafisa Mohamed, representing women at the camp, called on all women at Abu Shouk to actively participate in activities aimed at protecting water sources and improving the camp environment.

Hassan Gibril, UNAMID’s Head of Office for Sector North, who was representing the Mission’s Acting Joint Special Representative at the event, said that lack of adequate access to water for all is one of the main non-political drivers of the ongoing conflict in Darfur.

Mr. Gibril highlighted measures taken by the Mission to facilitate the harvesting of rainwater and ensure wastewater treatment was carried out to the level recommended by the World Health Organization.

“This treated wastewater is used as a substitute for fresh water to meet the non-potable water demands of the Mission`s personnel, such as toilet flushing, tree planting, car washing, construction work, dust control and firefighting,” said Mr. Gibril.

Activities during the event included a cleaning exercise by UNAMID peacekeepers and the local community, hygiene promotion and distribution of cleaning materials. A quiz highlighted issues related to the protection of water and the environment, along with UNAMID’s mandate. Darfuri musician, Halima Sassa, entertained the audience through drama and songs of peace.

The El Fasher event was organized jointly by UNAMID`s Communications and Public Information Section, the Water and Environment Protection Unit and the Environment Office in the Office of the Director Mission Support.

UNAMID, through its dedicated Water and Environmental protection section, continues to evaluate and monitor its environmental practices to ensure that both its staff and the Darfuri people benefit from good practices designed to ensure development and economic growth in Darfur.

Chad: Chad: Humanitarian situation overview (as of 28th February 2017)

23 March 2017 - 9:33am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Central African Republic, Chad, Nigeria, Sudan

Chad is facing interconnected humanitarian crises in a context of chronic poverty and low economic development. The security situation in neighboring countries has led to large population movements into Chad, as well as internal displacement for several years.
Millions of people are affected by food insecurity and malnutrition, especially in the Sahel belt, and this situation is likely to worsen during the lean season. The country is also experiencing persistent measles epidemics and thousands of cases of malaria that have a direct impact on morbidity and mortality. All these factors expose already vulnerable populations to recurrent humanitarian crises, exacerbating their vulnerability and affecting their resilience.