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Sudan: Sudan: Humanitarian Bulletin | Issue 48 | 21 – 27 November 2016 [EN/AR]

3 December 2016 - 7:30am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Chad, South Sudan, Sudan

HIGHLIGHTS

  • About 1,250 people have reportedly returned from Chad to Habila locality, West Darfur, according to HAC.

  • 2016 harvest in Sudan is expected to be above‑average levels, as the 2016 rainy season has been favourable, according to FAO.

  • On 23 November, SPLM-N signed an Action Plan with the UN to end and prevent the recruitment and use of children in conflict.

  • The 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence campaign has started in Sudan.

FUNDING

427.7 million US$ received in 2016

44% Reported funding

Sudanese refugees return from Chad to Habila locality, West Darfur - HAC

The Government of Sudan’s Humanitarian Aid Commission (HAC) in West Darfur State has received reports that about 1,250 people (250 families) have returned from Chad to Sisi village in Gobe administrative unit, Habila locality in recent weeks. HAC and humanitarian partners are planning to visit the area to verify these reports and assess the number and needs of returnees.

On 25 November, the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) and the World Food Programme (WFP) said in a joint statement that 43 per cent of refugee households in the camps in Chad are food insecure. The statement also noted that due to lack of resources, WFP had to reduce food rations by more than half. Camps in the east of Chad host some 310,000 refugees from Darfur, according to UNHCR.

In West Darfur, the International Organization for Migration (IOM) started a return monitoring exercise to improve the tracking of refugee returnees. The exercise was completed in 20 return villages in El Geneina locality. IOM plans to complete the exercise in the remaining seven localities by the end of 2016.

Sudan: Sudan: Humanitarian Bulletin | Issue 48 | 21 – 27 November 2016

3 December 2016 - 7:30am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Chad, South Sudan, Sudan

HIGHLIGHTS

  • About 1,250 people have reportedly returned from Chad to Habila locality, West Darfur, according to HAC.

  • 2016 harvest in Sudan is expected to be above‑average levels, as the 2016 rainy season has been favourable, according to FAO.

  • On 23 November, SPLM-N signed an Action Plan with the UN to end and prevent the recruitment and use of children in conflict.

  • The 16 Days of Activism against Gender-Based Violence campaign has started in Sudan.

FUNDING

427.7 million US$ received in 2016

44% Reported funding

Sudanese refugees return from Chad to Habila locality, West Darfur - HAC

The Government of Sudan’s Humanitarian Aid Commission (HAC) in West Darfur State has received reports that about 1,250 people (250 families) have returned from Chad to Sisi village in Gobe administrative unit, Habila locality in recent weeks. HAC and humanitarian partners are planning to visit the area to verify these reports and assess the number and needs of returnees.

On 25 November, the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) and the World Food Programme (WFP) said in a joint statement that 43 per cent of refugee households in the camps in Chad are food insecure. The statement also noted that due to lack of resources, WFP had to reduce food rations by more than half. Camps in the east of Chad host some 310,000 refugees from Darfur, according to UNHCR.

In West Darfur, the International Organization for Migration (IOM) started a return monitoring exercise to improve the tracking of refugee returnees. The exercise was completed in 20 return villages in El Geneina locality. IOM plans to complete the exercise in the remaining seven localities by the end of 2016.

Yemen: 2016 Yemen Situation - Regional Refugee and Migrant Response Plan - Funding snapshot as at 20 November 2016

2 December 2016 - 10:44pm
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Djibouti, Ethiopia, Somalia, Sudan, Yemen

The requirements presented in this funding snapshot refer to the 2016 Regional Refugee and Migrant Response Plan covering the period January to December 2016.

Funding level

RRP requirements: $94,130,731

Funding received: $34,817,230

% funded: 37%

Yemen: Yemen Situation - 2016 Funding Update as of 29 November 2016

2 December 2016 - 10:40pm
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Djibouti, Egypt, Ethiopia, Somalia, Sudan, Yemen

172.2 M required for 2016
75.0 M contributions received, representing 44% of requirements
97.2 M funding gap for the Yemen Situation

South Sudan: South Sudan - Crisis Fact Sheet #2, Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 (as of December 2, 2016)

2 December 2016 - 6:44pm
Source: US Agency for International Development Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Kenya, South Sudan, Sudan, Uganda, United States of America

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Insecurity increases population displacement, humanitarian needs in Greater Equatoria, Unity

  • Relief actors continue cholera response efforts across South Sudan

  • Ongoing conflict increases number of South Sudanese refugees

KEY DEVELOPMENTS

  • Violence continues to limit humanitarian access across South Sudan. The UN reported more than 90 humanitarian access incidents from November 1–28, while insecurity prompted UN partners to relocate 135 aid workers during the month of October. The UN has expressed concern regarding attacks against relief workers and urged all parties to the conflict to allow humanitarian organizations to reach populations in need.

  • The USAID-funded Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) projects that food security will deteriorate in northern South Sudan from February–May 2017 due to poor harvest yields, disruption of livelihood activities, and high staple food prices.

World: Humanitarian Funding Update November 2016 - United Nations Coordinated Appeals

2 December 2016 - 1:32pm
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Afghanistan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Ecuador, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Iraq, Libya, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Ukraine, World, Yemen, Zimbabwe
  • As of 30 November 2016, UN-coordinated appeals and refugee response plans within the Global Humanitarian Overview (GHO) require US$22.1 billion to meet the needs of 96.2 million humanitarian crisis-affected people in 40 countries. Together the appeals are funded at $11.4 billion, leaving a shortfall of $10.7 billion.

  • In November, the funding requirements for the initial Flash Appeal for Haiti to respond to the most urgent humanitarian needs caused by Hurricane Matthew increased by $19 million, bringing the total to $139 million. The Flash Appeal targets the 750,000 people most in need of assistance until the end of the year. In Somalia, needs continue to rise due to drought, conflict, displacement and lack of basic services. Partners require $471 million before the end of the year to provide life-saving assistance to vulnerable communities. Critical clusters such as food security, health, education and protection are all funded below 35 per cent.

  • The Libyan Humanitarian Response Plan remains underfunded at 30 per cent. Only four out of 98 hospitals in Libya work at full capacity and the severe lack of funding has meant critical needs in the health sector continue to be unmet. Meanwhile, the Libya Flash Appeal which requests $10.7 million by the end of the year, is only 5 per cent funded. The appeal seeks to provide urgent protection and life-saving assistance to 79,400 people in the Libyan city of Sirte. Please see icon overleaf for information on other urgent funding needs.

  • In 2016, the Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF) has disbursed $408 million to 47 countries. In November alone, almost $16 million was disbursed to four crises, including to assist 385,000 Afghan returnees from Pakistan, stranded Syrian refugees in the Berm, South Sudanese refugees in the CAR, and internally displaced persons in the Republic of Congo. CERF is currently projecting an income of nearly $425 million for 2016, which leaves a shortfall of $25 million on the $450 million funding target for this year. The CERF High-Level Pledging Conference for 2017 will be held on 13 December in New York and chaired by the United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon.

  • Country-based pooled fund (CBPF) allocations, including planned allocations, in 2016 total $531 million to 369 partners through 1,010 projects. Some 18 per cent ($98 million) have gone to national NGOs; 45 per cent ($241.5 million) to international NGOs; 36 per cent ($189 million) to UN agencies and 0.5 per cent ($2.7 million) to the Red Cross/Red Crescent. CBPFs have been instrumental in supporting some 32 million people with health services, 14.7 million people with water and sanitation interventions and some 14.5 million people with nutritional support. Since January 2016, 18 Member States have contributed a total of $549 million for operations in 17 countries.

Yemen: Desert Locust Bulletin 458 (November 2016)

2 December 2016 - 11:34am
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Country: Algeria, Chad, Djibouti, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, India, Libya, Mali, Mauritania, Morocco, Niger, Oman, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Somalia, Sudan, Western Sahara, World, Yemen

Mauritania: Desert Locust situation update 2 December 2016

2 December 2016 - 11:23am
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Country: Algeria, Chad, Eritrea, Mali, Mauritania, Morocco, Niger, Sudan, Western Sahara, Yemen

Desert Locust outbreak continues in **Mauritania** while smaller ones develop in **Eritrea** and **Yemen**

A Desert Locust outbreak continues in western **Mauritania** where ground control operations are in progress against hopper bands and groups of hoppers and adults within an area of about 300 km by 200 km between Nouakchott and Atar as well as along a 100 km stretch of coast south of Nouakchott. Breeding has extended into the southern portion of the **Western Sahara** in the extreme south of **Morocco** where hatching occurred and limited control operations are underway against small hopper bands that are forming. Another generation of breeding could occur in **Mauritania** if temperatures remain warm. 

More groups, bands and perhaps a few small swarms are expected to form in the outbreak area. Adult groups and perhaps a few small swarms may move progressively northwards during periods of warm southerly winds and reach northern **Mauritania** and adjacent areas of the **Western Sahara** where breeding will occur in areas that received heavy rains in October. 

Elsewhere in the region, scattered adults persist along the southern side of the Atlas Mountains in **Morocco** and in western **Algeria**. Small-scale breeding continues in the extreme south of **Algeria** near the **Mali**an border where control was carried out. In northern **Niger**, local breeding occurred in Tamesna and the Air Mountains and limited control was undertaken recently.

In the Central region, small local outbreaks developed on the Red Sea coast in **Eritrea** and **Yemen** while a short-lived outbreak from last month subsided in **Sudan**. Ground control operations are in progress in both countries but limited in **Yemen** due to insecurity. Small-scale breeding will cause locust numbers to increase along both sides of the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden coasts during December.

World: Frontiers of CLTS: Innovations and Insights - CLTS in Post-Emergency and Fragile States Settings

2 December 2016 - 6:24am
Source: Institute of Development Studies Country: Afghanistan, Haiti, Nepal, Pakistan, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, World

This issue of Frontiers of CLTS explores the potential, and some of the recorded learning, on how CLTS, as a community-based, collaborative approach to sanitation behavioural change, can be applied successfully in contexts of fragility and displacement, leading to communities more convinced and prepared to maintain and develop safe sanitation practices.

United Republic of Tanzania: Refugee Situation in Northwest Tanzania - Statistical Report (Sunday, 27 November 2016)

1 December 2016 - 11:04pm
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Rwanda, Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania

Sudan: The UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office Signs a New Agreement with IOM to Support Sudan’s Criminal Justice System in Addressing Human Trafficking

1 December 2016 - 5:03pm
Source: International Organization for Migration Country: Sudan, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

The United Kingdom and the International Organization for Migration signed an agreement to support the Government of Sudan in continuing to develop initiatives that address human trafficking in the country. With funding from the UK, IOM Sudan will work with Sudan’s Ministry of Justice and the Judiciary to enhance the capacity of the criminal justice system by strengthening the investigation and prosecution of perpetrators, while providing a better understanding of the 2014 Anti-Trafficking legal framework to improve institutional coordination on the issue.

The 9 month nationwide Project aims to create an understanding of the Anti-Trafficking Act as well as the utilization of the new law to increase efforts to investigate suspected human trafficking cases, prosecute and provide appropriate sentencing for trafficking offences, and provide justice and protection to victims of the crime. Most importantly, this Project will address the need to streamline the new law with the preexisting penal codes under which cases of trafficking have been tried.

The main GoS implementation partners for this Project are the Ministry of Justice, the Judiciary, the Office of the General Prosecutor, the National Committee to Combat Trafficking, other members of the criminal justice system and the Ministry of Interior.

In the Signing ceremony held this week, H.E Ambassador Michael Aron stated: "Addressing irregular migration issues and especially the heinous crime of human trafficking is our shared responsibility. We welcome the steps the Government of Sudan has taken in passing the Anti-Trafficking law and establishing the National Committee to Combat Trafficking, and hope that by the UK’s contribution, in partnership with the IOM, we can support their efforts to tackle the challenges of trafficking and smuggling."

IOM Sudan’s Chief of Mission, Mr. Mario Lito Malanca expressed his appreciation for this partnership and stated that "IOM’s goal is to provide technical support to the Criminal Justice System in Sudan to operationalize the 2014 Anti-Trafficking Act to prosecute suspected human traffickers. IOM hopes to continue working with the Government of Sudan and United Kingdom on migration management in the country, especially in addressing human trafficking and smuggling."

World: Price Watch October 2016 Prices November 30, 2016

1 December 2016 - 4:14pm
Source: Famine Early Warning System Network Country: Afghanistan, Democratic Republic of the Congo, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Mauritania, Mozambique, Nicaragua, Nigeria, Pakistan, Senegal, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sudan, Tajikistan, Uganda, World, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Key Messages

  • In West Africa, regional staple food production during the 2016/17 marketing year is expected to be similar to 2015/16 and well above average. International rice and wheat imports continue to support regional market supplies. Markets remained disrupted throughout the Lake Chad Basin and in parts of Central and Northern Mali. The recent depreciation of the Naira has led to price increases across Nigeria. High prices along with local policy measures created incentives for expanded grain production, but has also led to reduced purchasing power for Sahelian livestock and cash crops.

  • In East Africa, staple food prices were mixed, seasonally increasing or remaining stable in surplus-producing Uganda and Tanzania as the lean season started, while seasonally declining in Sudan, South Sudan, Kenya, and Ethiopia with the start of harvests. Prices remain above average across the region, and are especially high in South Sudan. Markets remain disrupted by insecurity in Yemen.

  • In** Southern Africa**, regional maize availability is currently adequate, despite consecutive years of well-below average regional production. Maize prices are above their respective 2015 and five-year average levels region wide. Imports by South Africa and Zimbabwe from well-supplied international grain markets have offset a portion of the regional deficit, while maize export restrictions in Zambia remained in place. Prices remain high and variable in Mozambique, which is experiencing supply constraints and where other factors contribute to food trade and price dynamics.

  • In Central America, maize and bean supplies from the Primera harvest continued to supply markets across the region. Maize and bean prices seasonally declined or were stable. Hurricane Matthew destroyed crops and market infrastructure across much of southwestern Haiti. Market activities resumed in the major markets of Les Cayes and Jeremie, but varies considerably across smaller markets.

  • In Central Asia, average regional harvests and above-average stocks sustained adequate supplies. Prices are below 2015 levels in Kazakhstan and above-average in structurally-deficit Tajikistan. Prices continued to be near average in Afghanistan and Pakistan.

  • **International **staple food markets remain well supplied. Regional price indices reflect high prices in East Africa. Rice and soybean prices fell while wheat and maize prices stabilized in October. Crude oil prices remained well below-average.

World: CrisisWatch November 2016

1 December 2016 - 4:10pm
Source: International Crisis Group Country: Afghanistan, Algeria, Angola, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, China, Colombia, Côte d'Ivoire, Cyprus, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Guatemala, Guinea-Bissau, Haiti, India, Indonesia, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Japan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Lebanon, Libya, Mali, Mauritania, Mexico, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Paraguay, Philippines, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Serbia, Somalia, South Sudan, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, Thailand, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Uganda, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), Western Sahara, World, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Global Overview NOVEMBER 2016

November saw violence escalate again in Syria, Myanmar, the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and Cameroon. Attacks by pro-regime forces on rebel strongholds in Syria resumed, causing significant civilian casualties. In Myanmar’s Rakhine state intensifying violence displaced tens of thousands of Rohingya Muslims, while a major attack by armed groups near the Chinese border threatened to undermine the country’s fragile ethnic peace process. In DRC, violence rose in the east and the regime continued to repress dissent, underscoring the risk that renewed protests, likely in December when President Kabila’s second term officially ends, could turn violent. In Cameroon, Boko Haram stepped up its attacks in the Far North and minority English-speakers clashed with security forces in the North West region. The victory of Donald Trump in the U.S. presidential election on 8 November created uncertainty about possible shifts in future U.S. foreign policy priorities and positions, including on a number of conflicts and prominent geostrategic arenas – among them the future of the historic multilateral nuclear accord with Iran.

Sudan: Sudan: Key Message Update, November 2016

1 December 2016 - 2:53pm
Source: Famine Early Warning System Network Country: Sudan

Harvests improve food security outcomes, but austerity measures may impact staple food prices

Key Messages

  • Harvests in October/November are expected to significantly reduce the number of people in Crisis (IPC Phase 3) or higher, from peak levels during the June to September 2016 lean season. Own-produced foods, reductions in staple food prices, improved harvest labor opportunities, and increased livestock productivity should improve household food access and result in Minimal (IPC Phase 1) or Stressed (IPC Phase 2) outcomes in most areas. Crisis (IPC Phase 3) outcomes remain likely in parts of South Kordofan and Jebel Marra areas of Darfur.

  • The Government of Sudan introduced new measures in early November, which reduced the value of the Sudanese Pound against the U.S. Dollar and included a reduction of fuel subsidies, an increase in electricity tariffs, and the lifting of subsidies on imported medication. By increasing transport costs, these measures are likely to put upward pressure on prices for staple food commodities. The Central Bank of Sudan also initiated an incentive policy that increased the foreign exchange rate that is similar to the exchange rate on the parallel market. The policies also include a 20 percent increase of government wages, effective November 2016.

  • Retail sorghum prices remained stable or decreased by up to 20 percent from September to October on most markets. In general, October sorghum prices were approximately 20 percent higher than in October 2015 and 10 percent above the recent two-year average. Field reports suggest sorghum prices have declined more than usual in November in main production markets in eastern and central Sudan (e.g. Gadarif, Sennar markets). These decreases, in spite of austerity measures, are likely an indication of above-average harvests, and the result of traders releasing stocks from the previous year.

  • In August/September 2016, the Ministry of Health and partners conducted a mass screening using MUAC to identify cases of acute malnutrition among children aged 6-59 months in the 18 states of Sudan. Among the 4 million children (or about 75 percent of children under five years old in Sudan) screened, approximately 53,545 were identified with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) and 267,017 with moderate acute malnutrition (MAM). The numbers of children with acute malnutrition were highest in North Darfur, South Kordofan, and Central Darfur.

Sudan: Harvests improve food security outcomes, but austerity measures may impact staple food prices

1 December 2016 - 2:53pm
Source: Famine Early Warning System Network Country: Sudan

Key Messages

  • Harvests in October/November are expected to significantly reduce the number of people in Crisis (IPC Phase 3) or higher, from peak levels during the June to September 2016 lean season. Own-produced foods, reductions in staple food prices, improved harvest labor opportunities, and increased livestock productivity should improve household food access and result in Minimal (IPC Phase 1) or Stressed (IPC Phase 2) outcomes in most areas. Crisis (IPC Phase 3) outcomes remain likely in parts of South Kordofan and Jebel Marra areas of Darfur.

  • The Government of Sudan introduced new measures in early November, which reduced the value of the Sudanese Pound against the U.S. Dollar and included a reduction of fuel subsidies, an increase in electricity tariffs, and the lifting of subsidies on imported medication. By increasing transport costs, these measures are likely to put upward pressure on prices for staple food commodities. The Central Bank of Sudan also initiated an incentive policy that increased the foreign exchange rate that is similar to the exchange rate on the parallel market. The policies also include a 20 percent increase of government wages, effective November 2016.

  • Retail sorghum prices remained stable or decreased by up to 20 percent from September to October on most markets. In general, October sorghum prices were approximately 20 percent higher than in October 2015 and 10 percent above the recent two-year average. Field reports suggest sorghum prices have declined more than usual in November in main production markets in eastern and central Sudan (e.g. Gadarif, Sennar markets). These decreases, in spite of austerity measures, are likely an indication of above-average harvests, and the result of traders releasing stocks from the previous year.

  • In August/September 2016, the Ministry of Health and partners conducted a mass screening using MUAC to identify cases of acute malnutrition among children aged 6-59 months in the 18 states of Sudan. Among the 4 million children (or about 75 percent of children under five years old in Sudan) screened, approximately 53,545 were identified with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) and 267,017 with moderate acute malnutrition (MAM). The numbers of children with acute malnutrition were highest in North Darfur, South Kordofan, and Central Darfur.

Yemen: East Africa : Key Message Update - November 2016

1 December 2016 - 2:44pm
Source: Famine Early Warning System Network Country: Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Yemen

Conflict and drought to drive severe acute food insecurity through at least May 2017

Key Messages

  • A major food security emergency continues in Yemen as an estimated seven to 10 million people face Crisis (IPC Phase 3) or worse acute food insecurity. In Ta’izz and southern coastal areas of Al Hudaydah, conflict-related disruptions to livelihoods are causing Emergency (IPC Phase 4) outcomes, with elevated levels of acute malnutrition and excess mortality likely. Although data is limited, some populations could face Catastrophe (IPC Phase 5) between October 2016 and May 2017 in areas where conflict has most restricted livelihoods and humanitarian access.

  • Despite the ongoing harvest, persistent insecurity continues to drive Crisis (IPC Phase 3) and Emergency (IPC Phase 4) outcomes in much of South Sudan. Many internally displaced persons in parts of Western Bahr el Ghazal, Unity, and Greater Equatoria already in Emergency (IPC Phase 4) have limited access to their farms or humanitarian assistance. Poor households in Unity and Northern Bahr el Ghazal with little harvests could face Catastrophe (IPC Phase 5) during the atypically long February to July lean season, in the absence of humanitarian assistance.

  • Poor performance of October to December rainfall in central and southern Somalia, southern and southeastern Ethiopia, and northern and northeastern Kenya is leading to a second consecutive below-average season. Poor pasture regeneration is leading to poor livestock body conditions, atypical livestock migration, and below-average food and income from livestock and livestock products. Harvests and labor income from agricultural activities are also expected to be well below average in some areas. Crisis (IPC Phase 3) is expected between January and May 2017 in parts of these areas.

  • Although food security is expected to improve in most Kiremt-dependent areas in Ethiopia, below-average Meher harvests in eastern and central Oromia and SNNPR are expected to lead to limited improvements in food security, particularly in worst-affected areas such as East and West Hararghe. The early exhaustion of food stocks and reduced coping capacity following consecutively poor Meher seasons in these areas, combined with additional needs in pastoral areas, will lead to higher than normal assistance needs through at least mid-2017.

  • In Sudan, 2016/17 harvests are expected to be above average, which are already contributing to improvements in food security in many areas affected by drought in 2015. However, improvements in food security are likely to be limited by displacement and conflict-related restrictions on agricultural activities and trade in parts of South Kordofan, Blue Nile, and Jebel Marra areas of Darfur. In addition, recent austerity measures may lead to increased transportation costs that could impact staple food prices.

World: Global Weather Hazards Summary December 1 - 7, 2016

1 December 2016 - 2:16pm
Source: Famine Early Warning System Network Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Botswana, Costa Rica, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Dominican Republic, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kyrgyzstan, Madagascar, Mauritania, Mozambique, Nicaragua, Panama, Somalia, Sudan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, United Republic of Tanzania, Uzbekistan, World, Zambia, Zimbabwe

Insufficient and uneven rainfall exacerbates ground conditions in East Africa

Africa Weather Hazards

  1. Locust outbreak has occurred in western Mauritania. Ground control operations are in progress, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization.

  2. Poor early season precipitation has resulted in increasing moisture deficits and deteriorating ground conditions throughout portions of Angola, southern DRC, and northern Zambia.

  3. Largely suppressed seasonal rainfall since late September had led to significant dryness across many parts of the Greater Horn of Africa. While increased rains over Kenya and southern Ethiopia during late November is likely to help pastoral conditions and water availability, seasonal moisture deficits and poorly timed rainfall is expected to negatively impact crop production in the region.

  4. Locust outbreak was reported in North Kordofan and northwest of Khartoum regions, according to local authorities of Sudan. Control operations are in progress.

Italy: Italy Sea Arrivals Dashboard (January – October 2016)

1 December 2016 - 12:29pm
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Bangladesh, Côte d'Ivoire, Eritrea, Gambia, Guinea, Italy, Mali, Nigeria, Senegal, Somalia, Sudan, World

159,427 Sea arrivals Jan-Oct 2016
140,987 Sea arrivals Jan-Oct 2015

Between 1 January and 30 October 2016, 159,427 persons arrived to Italy by sea, compared to 140,987 sea arrivals in the first ten months of 2015. This represents a 13% increase compared to last year.
October arrivals this year (27,384) are higher than numbers recorded over the same period of 2015 (8,916) and 2014 (15,279). Last year, monthly arrivals had peaked in July, then slowly decreased to year’s end. In 2014, a peak in sea arrivals was observed in September, with numbers decreasing from October onward. In 2016, the highest number of monthly sea arrivals was registered in October, following a considerable decrease in September. UNHCR is investigating factors that could have led to the surge of arrivals in October.

World: Crisis Overview 2016: Humanitarian Trends and Risks for 2017

1 December 2016 - 10:05am
Source: Assessment Capacities Project Country: Afghanistan, Burundi, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Iraq, Libya, Mali, Nigeria, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Venezuela (Bolivarian Republic of), World, Yemen, Zimbabwe

Introduction

The Crisis Overview 2016: Humanitarian Trends and Risks for 2017, outlines the countries where needs are greatest, and growing, as we approach the end of 2016.

Based on our weekly Global Emergency Overview (GEO), and four years of data on humanitarian needs across 150 countries, we have identified ten countries where humanitarian needs are likely to be highest in 2017, as well as four that merit attention as they face a potential spike in needs. We also consider the humanitarian situation in the northern triangle region of Latin America, where the wide-ranging humanitarian impact of pervasive gang violence is chronically underreported.

COUNTRY SELECTION

The ten countries identified to be in highest humanitarian need in this report are those that have consistently been at Level 3 (Severe Humanitarian Crisis) in the ACAPS GEO for the 12 weeks preceding the report (mid-July to early October), and that we consider likely to be facing worse situations in the coming year.

The GEO measures underlying vulnerability, access constraints, and current needs to determine overall need for humanitarian assistance. It ranks countries according to three levels: situation of concern, humanitarian crisis, and severe humanitarian crisis.
The second list adds four countries, and one region that our monitoring and analysis determines to be at significant risk of a new or increased humanitarian crisis within the coming six months.

Our overview does not attempt to predict sudden-onset disasters, rather to analyse the broad evolution of the situation in countries hit by longer-term, more complex crises.
Despite the regional nature of many crises, we focus on countries because data collection and response is generally country-focused.

Comparing disasters is an intricate and controversial endeavour, and we cannot fully account for the complexity and diversity of the many crises around the world. This report is not therefore intended to rank or compare the humanitarian situation in different countries directly, but simply to summarise the evolution in the most pressing humanitarian needs.

Sudan: Sudan, Darfur groups hold consultations over cessation of hostilities

1 December 2016 - 7:40am
Source: Sudan Tribune Country: Sudan

December 1, 2016 (KHARTOUM) - The Sudanese government disclosed that consultations were taking place in Addis Ababa to determine the positions of Darfur rebel combatants within the framework of a cessation of hostilities agreement to signed with the armed groups.

Talks between the government and two armed groups in Darfur, Justice and Equality Movement (JEM) and Sudan Liberation Movement-Minni Minnawi (SLM-MM), over a humanitarian cessation of hostilities are deadlocked since last August.

The government demands the armed groups should provide all the details to localise the positions of their fighters on the ground, a matter the rebels refuse before the signing of ceasefire agreement. Khartoum also rejects a demand by the two groups to monitor the humanitarian operations in the region. The release of Prisoners of War (POW) and the Doha framework agreement were also among the outstanding issues.

In press statements after a meeting with the U.S. Special Envoy Donald Booth who is currently in Khartoum, the Head of Darfur Peace Office and Government Chief Negotiator Amin Hassan Omer Wednesday said they are holding discussions with JEM and SLM-MM to determine the positions of their fighters in Darfur.

He said that these consultations would wrap up on Wednesday evening.

"There is an initial agreement that the determination of troop positions will be fixed by the African Union based on established standards for determination of military positions," he said.

According to the Sudanese official, the meeting with Booth discussed the resumption of negotiations on the cessation of hostilities and the humanitarian access.

Omer reiterated the government keenness to achieve peace, stressing that Doha Document for Peace in Darfur (DDPD) should be considered as the basis of negotiations.

"We briefed the Special Envoy about the outcome of the informal consultations as we reached an agreement on three of the four issues. And now remains a fundamental issue related to the DDPD which is the basis for future negotiations," he said.

The chief negotiator further pointed that JEM recently released prisoners who had been jailed in South Sudan, adding that his government released JEM child soldiers.

"We agreed that the release of POW who are not yet tried can be considered according to the progress of dialogue between the two parties and the resumption of peace process," Omer said.

Before to meet Omer, Booth was received by the Sudanese Presidential Assistant Ibrahim Mahmoud Hamid who heads government delegation for peace talks with the SPLM-N over the five-year conflict in Sudan’s Two Areas.

The official news agency SUNA reported that the meeting discussed the ongoing efforts to reach a cessation of hostilities agreement within the African Union brokered Roadmap Agreement signed by the government rebel groups and National Umma Party.

Omer announced that the Head of the African Union High Level Implementation Panel (AUHIP) Thabo Mbeki would visit Khartoum within the upcoming days to discuss the resumption of peace talks with the Sudanese officials.

Mbeki’s visit had been several times announced in the past months.

(ST)