Sudan - ReliefWeb News

Syndicate content
ReliefWeb - Updates
Updated: 4 hours 49 min ago

Sudan: Sudan: ICRC postpones operation to transfer detainees

7 hours 15 min ago
Source: International Committee of the Red Cross Country: Sudan

Khartoum (ICRC) – The International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) has postponed an operation scheduled for 23 and 24 June, to transfer detainees held by the Sudan People's Liberation Movement – North (SPLM-N) in Blue Nile and South Kordofan states, to the Sudanese authorities in Khartoum.

After months of negotiations and preparations, all parties involved asked the ICRC to conduct this operation, allowing it to use its planes. Unfortunately, the final authorization to take off on the said dates was not granted, and the operation has been postponed to a later date.

The ICRC calls on all parties involved to continue working together to allow the concerned detainees to return home to their families as soon as possible.

Acting as neutral intermediary is central to ICRC's mandate, and it stands ready to provide this humanitarian service at all times.

Since 2012, the ICRC has facilitated the repatriation of 32 prisoners of war released by the governments of Sudan and South Sudan. It has also facilitated the handover of Sudanese and foreign detainees released by armed opposition groups in Darfur.

For further information, please contact:

Asia Kambal, ICRC Khartoum, +249 912 164 931

Jason Straziuso, ICRC Nairobi, +254 733 622 026

Krista Armstrong, ICRC Geneva, + 41 79 447 37 26

Israel: Refugee status for Sudanese asylum seeker in Israel

11 hours 37 min ago
Source: Radio Dabanga Country: Israel, Sudan

Last week Israel awarded refugee status to a Sudanese national for the first time when it recognised Darfuri Mutasim Ali, the leader of a protest movement by asylum seekers, as a refugee.

Israeli Interior Minister Arye Dery made the decision at the recommendation of a professional committee, Haaretz reported on Thursday.

Mutasim Ali (29), one of the leaders of the Sudanese asylum seekers’ community in Israel, submitted his request for asylum four years ago. He began his protest movement about two and a half years ago to demand that Israel give African asylum seekers better treatment. He was subsequently sent to the open detention facility in Holot and held there for 14 months. After a legal battle, a court eventually ordered his release because the state had failed to respond to his asylum request in a timely fashion.

On Thursday, four years after submitting his request, Ali finally received an affirmative response, making him the first Sudanese to win refugee status.

The Darfuri left his native village in 2003 to study geology at a Sudanese university, where he, member of the rebel Sudanese Liberation Movement, also became politically active. He organised non-violent protests, disseminated information about the situation in Sudan, especially the government’s treatment of Darfur is, and called for international intervention in the Darfur conflict.

Ali was detained without trial several times, held in isolation, and tortured. He eventually fled Sudan, and in May 2009 he arrived in Israel, where he spent his first few months in prison.

“I thank the State of Israel for allowing me to be here for all these years and for accepting my asylum application,” Ali said on Thursday. “I promise that Israel won’t regret it. I’ll continue to contribute my bit to Israeli society and the asylum seekers’ community in Israel.

“I intend to use the status I was given to improve the situation in Darfur, so that I can return home safely when the time comes,” he added. “I urge the Israeli government and all countries worldwide to work to end the bloodshed in Darfur and other parts of Sudan. Until then, I’ll continue to work on behalf of the refugee community in Israel.”

Ali’s attorney, Asaf Weitzen, praised the decision. “It’s very exciting that after all the hardships, after such a lengthy period of uncertainty and imprisonment and after endless legal proceedings, Mutasim has received the status he deserves,” Weitzen said.

He added that he hopes this decision is the first sign of a broader change in Israeli policy.

(Ilan Lior/Haaretz)

Sudan: Sudan opposition parties expected to sign the Roadmap soon: Khartoum

11 hours 40 min ago
Source: Sudan Tribune Country: Sudan

June 25, 2016 (KHARTOUM). Sudan Presidential Assistant and Deputy Chairman of the ruling National Congress Party, Ibrahim Mahmoud Hamid, Saturday said he expects that armed groups and National Umma Party leader, Sadig al-Mahadi sign soon the African Union brokered Roadmap Agreement for peace in Sudan.

Hamid said that there are contacts between the head of the African Union High Level Implementation Panel (AUHIP), Thabo Mbeki and the holdout opposition groups, and parallel contacts between the chief mediator and the government.

In a press statement following a meeting of the NCP Political Consultative Council, he expected that the opposition forces will shortly sign the Roadmap Agreement and then all the concerned parties will meet after Eid al-Fitr holidays.

"We are waiting for the signing of this groups, which discussed the map especially Imam Sadiq al-Mahdi, Darfur movements and SPLM-North. They are in direct contact with the AUHIP head who in turn is in direct contact with the government."

"In the coming days, we expect the road map to be signed and a meeting to be held after Ramadan Festival including the political forces that are part of the map, the government and the (National Dialogue) Higher Coordinating Mechanism (7 +7)," he further said.

Hamid further said that the consultative council was briefed on the different stages of the national dialogue - as the drafting process of the national document-, the meeting of the President with the 7+7 committee, and convening the political parties leaders for a meeting to determine the date of the general conference, its agenda and documents.

Last may, the 7+7 said the general assembly of the dialogue process will be in October 2016, but this month it announced the 6th of August a new date for this important gathering to endorse the outcome of the different committees.

NCP Deputy Chairman further said that national dialogue supporters as Presidents Thabo Mbeki, Abd al- Salam Abu Baker of the AUHIP, African Union, IGAD chair and Ethiopian Prime Minister, beside U.S. and EU representatives will be invited to attend National Dialogue General Conference.

OPPOSITION SHOULD SIGN THE ROADMAP

In a separate statements, the presidential aide called on the opposition forces to sign the Roadmap, adding it would not be changed as the holdout groups requested.

“If the opposition forces refuse to sign the Roadmap, government will continue finalizing the national dialogue,” Ibrahim Mahmoud told SMC, stressing that the Roadmap paves the way for ending war and conflict in Sudan.

Also, he hoped that the spirit of national responsibility prevails on narrow and partisan interests and the holdout opposition groups join the Roadmap Agreement.

We are "Keen not to miss any of the parties, and we are waiting to hear that armed movements and Sadiq al-Mahdi have joined (the process) because the National Dialogue is the largest political dynamic in the past years."

Last week, the opposition umbrella of the Sudan Call said they will propose a supplemental document to the African Union mediation, and would reassess their position from the Roadmap Agreement according to its feedback.

Sudan Call opposition umbrella called to hold a preparatory meeting for the national dialogue; ensuring political and press freedoms, release of political detainees and to set up a transitional government to implement the outcome of the national dialogue.

However, the head of the African Union High Level Implementation Panel (AUHIP) has declined the proposal by Sudanese opposition groups to negotiate a supplemental document to the Roadmap Agreement.

(ST)

Sudan: Relief convoy robbed in South Darfur

25 June 2016 - 10:52am
Source: Radio Dabanga Country: Sudan

On Wednesday, four vehicles loaded with relief materials were stopped and pillaged on the road between Kass and Shattai localities in South Darfur.

A witness told Radio Dabanga that the vehicles, which belong to the regional authority, were intercepted by a group of militiamen in Land Cruisers, motorcycles and camels under a hail of fire.

The stolen relief materials included food, tents, sheeting, blankets, plates, solar panels, mattresses, tools, household utensils.

World: Understanding the climate-conflict nexus from a humanitarian perspective: a new quantitative approach

24 June 2016 - 6:27pm
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Cambodia, Chad, China, Ethiopia, Haiti, India, Kenya, Madagascar, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, Philippines, Somalia, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Tajikistan, United Republic of Tanzania, Viet Nam, World

Introduction

This occasional policy paper aims to improve the humanitarian sector’s understanding of the nexus between climate change and violent conflict. This is crucial, given that about 80 per cent of the humanitarian crises with an inter-agency humanitarian appeal are conflict related, and climate change is expected to exacerbate this. The chair’s summary of the World Humanitarian Summit made it clear that in order to prevent conflict, a complementary approach which includes addressing climate change, is needed. The High-Level Panel on Humanitarian Financing also highlighted “the growing inter-linkages between humanitarian, development, peacekeeping and climate change-related interventions” and their relevance for humanitarian action.

This paper suggests a series of indicators and new metrics for assessing the risk of climate change-induced conflict for 157 countries covering more than 99 per cent of the world’s population. The aim is to identify indicators that can help to identify countries that are exposed to what is described here as the climate-conflict nexus, i.e, the intersection between two key factors: weak institutions and pre-existing social fragility, as well as climate change vulnerability. Measuring and quantifying these interlinks, particularly their humanitarian impact, is essential for delivering on the High-Level Panel’s call to reflect their implications in humanitarian finance allocations.

This paper identifies 20 countries in the climate-conflict nexus. They encompass some 780 million people living mostly in South Asia, South-East Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. All of the countries in the climate-conflict nexus are low- or lower-middle-income nations, where the international humanitarian system is already actively providing life-saving assistance to millions of people affected by recurrent humanitarian crises.

In the wake of last year’s COP21 agreement in Paris and the World Humanitarian Summit, it is important to provide further research and analysis on the interlinks between climate change and conflict, and to better understand how newly agreed climate finance can help support the countries that are most vulnerable to climate change-induced conflict.

This paper presents a new composite measure called the Resource and Climate Vulnerability Index (RCVI), which provides a framework for observing and ranking the countries most at risk from resource stress and changes in weather patterns. Due to a lack of data, the analysis does not include microstates. Their exclusion does not imply they are free from climate change vulnerability. By comparing the RCVI to a measure developed by the Institute of Economics and Peace called the Positive Peace Index, which captures the key institutions, attitudes and structures that maintain peace, it is possible to quantify the climate-conflict nexus and contribute to a better understanding of possible future humanitarian needs.

Independently, climate change does not lead to violence. As is made clear in conflict and climate change literature, it is the intersection between vulnerability to climate change and broader institutional and socioeconomic fragility that drives the potential for conflict and violence. Countries that are most vulnerable to climate change are often the least developed or most fragile. This is a significant factor in determining the climate-conflict nexus. Social unrest, intergroup grievances and gender-based violence can increase if a country or Government is unable to provide the resources needed to cope with a changing environment or destruction from extreme weather conditions, or if international climate change adaptation support is insufficient. This, in turn, may contribute to violent conflict.

Fundamentally, many high-income countries that will experience changing weather patterns or shocks to their resource supply due to climate change will have a greater capacity to manage social and economic stresses that may eventuate from climate change. Conflict and social upheaval are much less likely in contexts whereby competition for scarce natural resources is less intense due to lower concentrations of vulnerable populations and fewer people exposed to shocks in livelihood patterns. The quantitative analysis in this paper is based on the existing literature on the link between climate change and conflict.

This conceptualizes climate change predominately as a stressor negatively driving at least two critical factors: forced displacement and resource scarcity leading to increased risk of violence and conflict. Countries with weak institutions, high levels of poverty and agricultural-based economies are particularly vulnerable to these negative stressors or threat multipliers.

Gender inequality further exacerbates risk and vulnerabilities related to climate change and disasters, as well as in conflict. This paper refers to the gender inequality of risk in a changing climate (the fact that women are disproportionally affected by disasters and conflict) as a root cause of fragility at all levels.

This research aims to spur discussion and deeper analysis on the links between conflict and climate change to inform the critical decisions that policymakers, practitioners and Governments will make to mitigate and adapt to the worst impacts of climate change in the coming years to prevent human suffering and save more lives.

Niger: Niger Flow Monitoring Points (FMP), Reporting Period: 14 - 20 June 2016

24 June 2016 - 5:35pm
Source: International Organization for Migration Country: Algeria, Benin, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Liberia, Libya, Mali, Niger, Nigeria, Senegal, Sudan, Togo, World

IOM firmly believes in humane and orderly migration for all and all data reported through the flow monitoring aims to inform and highlight a migratory phenomenon in an area with dangers for migrants (challenging climate, dangerous road conditions, vulnerability to trafficking/other exploitation/abuse). Proportionally, the flows measured by IOM in the Agadez region are heavily concentrated on the route to and from the Libyan border. Migrants going towards Libya represent 68% of recorded migrants while those coming from Libya to Niger represent 20%.

The outoing flows during the past month continue to decrease while the incoming flows fluctuate. This time last month the incoming flow was over 16 000 whereas this week indicated around 11 000 migrants going towards Libya and Algeria. The incoming flows have fluctuated between 4000 and 6000 in the past month. The graph below details the weekly incoming and outgoing flows.

Djibouti: Djibouti: Inter-agency update for the response to the Yemeni situation #43 (1 - 20 June 2016)

24 June 2016 - 3:40pm
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Iraq, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Somalia, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Yemen

HIGHLIGHTS

  • According to the latest available statistics from IOM and the Djibouti government, 35,562 persons of mixed nationalities have arrived in Djibouti as of 23 April 2016 (since 26 March 2015). Of those, 19,636 persons (56 per cent) are Yemeni nationals, 13,962 (38 per cent) are transiting migrants and 1,964 persons (6 per cent) are Djiboutian returnees.
  • As at 20 June 2016, there are 3,523 refugees currently in Djibouti (pending forthcoming verification exercises in Obock town and Djibouti city). Markazi camp hosts approximately 1,365 refugees.

KEY FIGURES

3,523
Refugees currently hosted in Djibouti pending further physical verification exercises
1,600
Registered females.
1,256
Registered children and adolescents.

PRIORITIES

  • Ensure protection of refugees and asylum seekers and provide assistance.
  • Provide documents to refugees.
  • Work with the government to ensure access to territory and freedom of movement.
  • Continue to develop the infrastructure at Markazi camp.
  • Continue border monitoring

UPDATE ON ACHIEVEMENTS
Operational Context and Migration

World Refugee Day is celebrated each year on 20 June to commemorate the strength, courage and resilience of millions of refugees around the world. With 65.3 million people forced to flee globally, that means one human in every 113 is displaced by conflict or persecution. UNHCR sees 2016 as a year to take collective responsibility and action to end the conflicts which force people to flee their homes and countries and also to help the millions of people whose lives have been destroyed by this violence. UNHCR has urged people around the world to stand #WithRefugees and to sign a petition which will be delivered to UN Headquarters in New York ahead of the UN General Assembly meeting on September 19.

The petition asks governments to: Ensure every child gets an education; Ensure every refugee family has somewhere safe to live; Ensure every refugee can work or learn new skills to make a positive contribution to their community. The Government of Djibouti has generously opened its doors to people fleeing their homes to escape violence, conflict and drought. Today Djibouti hosts over 19,000 refugees, the majority of whom are Somali refugees. This year, the Government of Djibouti will be celebrating World Refugee Day after the holy month of Ramadan and though celebrations will cover all refugees country-wide, an official ceremony will take place in Obock where Yemeni refugees are hosted.

Meanwhile, UNHCR continues to advise refugees in Markazi camp on the dangers of return to Yemen. The numbers of returns have significantly decreased. In February, March and April there were 846 returns, in May 158 returns and in June so far 30 returns.

Italy: Mediterranean Migrant Arrivals in 2016: 214,861; Deaths: 2,861

24 June 2016 - 9:26am
Source: International Organization for Migration Country: Côte d'Ivoire, Cyprus, Egypt, Eritrea, Gambia, Greece, Italy, Libya, Mali, Morocco, Nigeria, Senegal, Somalia, Spain, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, World

Italy - IOM reports an estimated 214,861 migrants and refugees entered Europe by sea in 2016 through 22 June, arriving in Italy, Greece, Cyprus and Spain.

Deaths so far this year are 2,861 compared with 1,838 through the first six months of 2015. In other words, fatalities on the Mediterranean Sea in 2016 stand over 1,000 ahead of last year’s mid-year total, with one week remaining before 2016’s mid-year point.

IOM Libya Chief of Mission Othman Belbeisi reported on Thursday (23 June) that Libya’s Coast Guard indicated five migrant boats were rescued off the coast near Zawiya with approximately 1,000 migrants on board, with one casualty reported. IOM Libya is currently working to find out more information about the incident and provide those in need with Non-Food Item relief kits and hygiene kits.

Belbeisi noted that May 2016 saw a spike in the number of maritime incidents off the Libyan coast, making it the deadliest month to date this year, with 1,086 migrants reported as dead or missing. Between 22 and 28 May alone, over 3,600 migrants were rescued at sea and brought back to Libya.

IOM’s spokesman in Rome Flavio Di Giacomo reported Friday that the Italian Navy and international vessels rescued some 5,000 migrants in the Channel of Sicily in 40 separate operations since early yesterday morning. Those rescued remain en route to various Italian ports.

IOM estimates that from 1 January to 22 June 2016 at least 55,563 migrants have arrived in Italy via sea routes. Adding the 5,000 being reported today, IOM’s latest total is 60,563 or some 10,000 shy of the total through the end of June 2015, when arrivals totalled 70,354 – an indication that traffic this year from Libya and Egypt, while robust, remains almost identical with last year’s totals during a similar period.

IOM Athens reports that, since Monday, a total of 117 migrants or refugees arrived on various islands from Turkey. For the month – through June 22 – IOM Athens estimates 1,095 migrants or refugees have arrived by sea along the Mediterranean’s eastern route – compared with almost 157,000 arriving through the end of May.

Since the start of 2015, IOM estimates a total of 1,011,568 have arrived in Greece via so-called “blue borders” – a daily average of about 1,800 men, women and children over nearly 18 months. IOM notes the average daily arrival since the late March implementation of an accord between Turkey and the European Union to limit arrivals has dropped to fewer than 100 per day, and fewer than 50 per day this month.

For the latest Mediterranean Update infographic, please go to:
https://missingmigrants.iom.int/sites/default/files/Mediterranean_Update...

For the latest arrivals and fatalities in the Mediterranean, please visit: http://migration.iom.int/europe

Learn more about the Missing Migrants Project at: http://missingmigrants.iom.int

For further information please contact:

Flavio Di Giacomo, IOM Italy, Tel: +39 347 089 8996, Email: fdigiacomo@iom.int
IOM Greece: Daniel Esdras, Tel: +30 210 9912174, Email: iomathens@iom.int or Kelly Namia, Tel: +302109919040, +302109912174, Email: knamia@iom.int
Abby Dwommoh at IOM Turkey, Tel: +903124551202, Email: adwommoh@iom.int
Amr Taha at IOM Egypt Tel: +202-27365140, Email: iomegypt@iom.int
IOM Geneva: Joel Millman, Tel: +41.22.717.9486 – Mobile: +41.79.103.8720, Email: jmillman@iom.int or Leonard Doyle, Tel: + 41 79 285 7123, Email: ldoyle@iom.int
IOM Libya Othman Belbeisi, Tel +216 29 600389, Email: obelbeisi@iom.int or Ashraf Hassan, Tel: +21629794707 - Email: ashassan@iom.int

Greece: Mediterranean Migrant Arrivals in 2016: 214,861; Deaths: 2,861

24 June 2016 - 8:25am
Source: International Organization for Migration Country: Côte d'Ivoire, Cyprus, Egypt, Eritrea, Gambia, Greece, Italy, Libya, Mali, Morocco, Nigeria, Senegal, Somalia, Spain, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, World

Italy - IOM reports an estimated 214,861 migrants and refugees entered Europe by sea in 2016 through 22 June, arriving in Italy, Greece, Cyprus and Spain.

Deaths so far this year are 2,861 compared with 1,838 through the first six months of 2015. In other words, fatalities on the Mediterranean Sea in 2016 stand over 1,000 ahead of last year’s mid-year total, with one week remaining before 2016’s mid-year point.

IOM Libya Chief of Mission Othman Belbeisi reported on Thursday (23 June) that Libya’s Coast Guard indicated five migrant boats were rescued off the coast near Zawiya with approximately 1,000 migrants on board, with one casualty reported. IOM Libya is currently working to find out more information about the incident and provide those in need with Non-Food Item relief kits and hygiene kits.

Belbeisi noted that May 2016 saw a spike in the number of maritime incidents off the Libyan coast, making it the deadliest month to date this year, with 1,086 migrants reported as dead or missing. Between 22 and 28 May alone, over 3,600 migrants were rescued at sea and brought back to Libya.

IOM’s spokesman in Rome Flavio Di Giacomo reported Friday that the Italian Navy and international vessels rescued some 5,000 migrants in the Channel of Sicily in 40 separate operations since early yesterday morning. Those rescued remain en route to various Italian ports.

IOM estimates that from 1 January to 22 June 2016 at least 55,563 migrants have arrived in Italy via sea routes. Adding the 5,000 being reported today, IOM’s latest total is 60,563 or some 10,000 shy of the total through the end of June 2015, when arrivals totalled 70,354 – an indication that traffic this year from Libya and Egypt, while robust, remains almost identical with last year’s totals during a similar period.

IOM Athens reports that, since Monday, a total of 117 migrants or refugees arrived on various islands from Turkey. For the month – through June 22 – IOM Athens estimates 1,095 migrants or refugees have arrived by sea along the Mediterranean’s eastern route – compared with almost 157,000 arriving through the end of May.

Since the start of 2015, IOM estimates a total of 1,011,568 have arrived in Greece via so-called “blue borders” – a daily average of about 1,800 men, women and children over nearly 18 months. IOM notes the average daily arrival since the late March implementation of an accord between Turkey and the European Union to limit arrivals has dropped to fewer than 100 per day, and fewer than 50 per day this month.

For the latest Mediterranean Update infographic, please go to: https://missingmigrants.iom.int/sites/default/files/Mediterranean_Update...

For the latest arrivals and fatalities in the Mediterranean, please visit: http://migration.iom.int/europe

Learn more about the Missing Migrants Project at: http://missingmigrants.iom.int

For further information please contact:

Flavio Di Giacomo, IOM Italy, Tel: +39 347 089 8996, Email: fdigiacomo@iom.int
IOM Greece: Daniel Esdras, Tel: +30 210 9912174, Email: iomathens@iom.int or Kelly Namia, Tel: +302109919040, +302109912174, Email: knamia@iom.int
Abby Dwommoh at IOM Turkey, Tel: +903124551202, Email: adwommoh@iom.int
Amr Taha at IOM Egypt Tel: +202-27365140, Email: iomegypt@iom.int
IOM Geneva: Joel Millman, Tel: +41.22.717.9486 – Mobile: +41.79.103.8720, Email: jmillman@iom.int or Leonard Doyle, Tel: + 41 79 285 7123, Email: ldoyle@iom.int IOM Libya Othman Belbeisi, Tel +216 29 600389, Email: obelbeisi@iom.int or Ashraf Hassan, Tel: +21629794707 - Email: ashassan@iom.int

Ethiopia: Humanitarian Bulletin Southern and Eastern Africa region, Issue 03 | June 2016

24 June 2016 - 8:15am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Botswana, Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Somalia, South Africa, South Sudan, Sudan, Swaziland, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Zimbabwe

KEY HIGHLIGHTS

  • Women and girls among displaced people remain at high risk of GBV in the region.

  • Conflict-related sexual violence (CRSV) is the most prevalent form of GBV in humanitarian settings in eastern Africa.

  • Child marriage, rape and physical abuse are the common forms of GBV in stable environments, including southern Africa.

  • Regional WHS Commitments on gender call for end to financing gender blind programming.

Overview of Gender-Based Violence (GBV) trends in eastern and southern Africa

This month's regional bulletin outlines some key aspects of GBV in humanitarian settings in the region and highlights some promising global, regional and country-level initiatives towards addressing GBV, including through the commitments made at the just-ended World Humanitarian Summit (24-25 May); a summary of which is included in the bulletin.

GBV and Conflict Related Sexual Violence

Gender-based Violence (GBV), a fundamental violation of human rights, pervades the eastern and southern Africa region and often results in adverse economic and social consequences for men, women, their children, families, communities and States in development as well as in humanitarian settings.

The region remains prone to conflicts and natural disasters, resulting in massive displacements, livelihoods insecurity, food and water shortages, which heighten the vulnerability of girls and women to GBV, particularly rape, sexual assault, physical violence, early marriage and denial of economic resources. Sixty percent of all maternal deaths take place in humanitarian settings and all forms of gender based violence against women and girls spike during disasters and conflict. Countries in eastern Africa continue to record high rates of conflict-related sexual violence, including as a weapon of war; particularly in Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, DRC and most recently, Burundi. In southern Africa - despite being in the development phase - most countries are reporting high GBV incidents, including during natural disasters such as the current El Niño-related drought and flood conditions.

On the occasion of the International Day for the Elimination of Sexual Violence in Conflict, held on 19 June globally, the UN Secretary General recognised "sexual violence is a threat to international peace and security, a serious violation of international humanitarian and human rights law, and a major impediment to post-conflict reconciliation and economic development." During the 19th June commemorations, twenty four individuals and civil society organisations in Sudan called on the Sudanese government to end the widespread sexual violence committed by its security forces and to reverse the atmosphere of impunity that fosters it Read the full statement.

According to UNHCR, in the context of the unrest in Burundi since April 2015, 323 incidents of GBV involving 264 women and 59 girls reportedly occurred either in Burundi or during flight. The International Rescue Committee (IRC) reports that on average, two to three women report being raped each week in incidents relating to collecting firewood up to 15 kilometres outside the camps in Tanzania.

In South Sudan, spikes in GBV were linked to illegal use of arms, new mass displacements, cattle raids and food insecurity.

In Sudan, new cases of sexual violence were recorded in North Darfur’s Jebel Marra; while in Somalia the majority of the cases were from IDPs. Access remains a major challenge in South Sudan,
Somalia and Sudan, limiting survivor’s ability to seek timely care and support; and humanitarian actor’s ability to reach survivors and those vulnerable to GBV.

Additionally, the fear of reprisals remains a key challenge for survivors of GBV, leading to a prevalent culture of silence. Failures or delays in reporting have meant that survivors present themselves for post GBV violation after the recommended 72 hours when effective health support can be provided, or not at all. The culture of silence is not only predominant in countries in conflict in the region, but also in more stable countries. Access to justice has been constrained by impunity, deeply entrenched attitudes on gender injustices and weak institutional capacities on gender justice.

South Sudan: South Sudan Situation: UNHCR Regional Update 91 (16 - 31 May 2016)

24 June 2016 - 6:16am
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Kenya, South Sudan, Sudan, Uganda

HIGHLIGHTS

  • In Democratic Republic of Congo, a total of 11,966 South Sudanese refugees are registered in the Haut-Uélé province of DRC, of which 11,120 biometrically registered and 846 pre-registered. Further verification missions are planned towards the month of June.

  • In Gambella, Ethiopia, UNHCR and most implementing partners have resumed humanitarian activities in Jewi, Kule and Tiekidi refugee camps, with the exception of Action Against Hunger (ACF) in Jewi camp. The security situation remains calm though fragile and unpredictable.

  • In Kenya, Immigration officials closed the border at Nadapal to new arrivals from South Sudan. Only individuals who pay the USD 50 visa fee are allowed entry into Kenya. The situation has led to refoulement of approximately 200 vulnerable asylum seekers, mainly consisting of women and children.

  • The influx of South Sudanese into Sudan continues, with over 70,000 new arrivals in 2016. Land for establishment of a site in East Darfur to host the new arrivals and decongest Khor Omer camp has been identified. In White Nile State, the relocation of families to the newly developed Al Waral site is ongoing.

  • The Maaji III settlement in Uganda, opened earlier this year, has already reached its 12,000 capacity. A new site has been identified, Pagirinya, which will be able to host up to 22,000 refugees. The Rt. Hon. Prime Minister Ruhakana Rugunda, is heading the government of Uganda’s delegation to the World Humanitarian Summit, where Uganda is expected to call on the international community to support Uganda’s approach to refugee management, through the Government’s Settlement Transformative Agenda and the Government/UN/World Bank Refugee and Host Population Empowerment (ReHoPE) framework.

  • In South Sudan, UNHCR and Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) completed distribution of seeds and agricultural tools to 200,000 refugees and their host communities across South Sudan to help them become more self-sufficient in a country facing a serious food crisis.

Operational Context

On 12 May, South Sudan deposited the instruments of accession to the 1969 Convention Governing the Specific Aspects of Refugee Problems in Africa. The instruments were given to the African Union (AU) Representation in Juba for delivery to the AU Secretariat in Addis Adaba. On 23 May, the Parliament endorsed South Sudan’s accession to the East African Community, following the signing of the accession treaty and protocols by President Kiir in Dar es Salaam in April.

On 24 May, Human Rights Watch released its report “South Sudan: Civilians Killed, Tortured in Western Region,” providing evidence of government soldiers’ deadly attacks on civilians in and around the western town of Wau after the August 2015 peace deal. A day later, International Crisis Group released its report “South Sudan’s South: Conflict in the Equatorias,” highlighting that the Agreement on the Resolution of the Conflict in South Sudan (ARCSS), designed to primarily address a war in the Greater Upper Nile region, is an imperfect solution to other conflict fault lines.

On 27 May, South Sudan’s Council of Ministers recognized the presence of Sudan People’s Liberation Movement/Army-In Opposition (SPLM/A-IO) forces in Greater Equatoria and Greater Bahr el Ghazal and approved to allow them to assemble. The Joint Monitoring Ceasefire Committee (JMCC) will be responsible for identifying their cantonment sites.

On 30 May, a refugee and two local South Sudanese sustained fatal injuries during an incident in Upper Nile’s Doro refugee camp.

UNHCR staff on the ground are gathering exact details about the circumstances of these deaths. Tensions have been growing between the two communities for weeks over the alleged theft of livestock. The situation is calmer following UNHCR’s engagement with local authorities, refugee leaders and host community representatives as well as the deployment of UN peacekeepers, though security remains volatile due to the heightened presence of armed groups and weapons in the camps.

On 31 May, the Security Council adopted a resolution renewing the South Sudan sanctions regime for an additional year, and the Panel of Experts for 13 months. The resolution requests the Panel of Experts to provide a special report to the Council within 120 days on security issues facing the transitional government and how they have affected the implementation of the peace agreement

Yemen: Yemen Situation: Regional Refugee and Migrant Response – Population movement out of Yemen (as of 15 June 2016)

24 June 2016 - 4:37am
Source: International Organization for Migration, UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Oman, Saudi Arabia, Somalia, Sudan, Yemen

Yemen: Yemen Situation: Regional Refugee and Migrant Response: Arrivals from Yemen into the Horn of Africa - as of 15 June 2016

24 June 2016 - 4:28am
Source: International Organization for Migration, UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Djibouti, Ethiopia, Somalia, Sudan, Yemen

Since conflict erupted in Yemen in March 2015, Yemenis, Somalis, national returnees and people of other nationalities have fled Yemen into the Horn of Africa, namely Djibouti, Ethiopia, Somalia and Sudan.

Yemen: Yemen Situation: Population movement from and to Yemen (as of 30 May 2016)

24 June 2016 - 4:22am
Source: International Organization for Migration, UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Djibouti, Ethiopia, Oman, Saudi Arabia, Somalia, Sudan, Yemen

In March 2015, conflict erupted in Yemen and thousands of refugees and migrants fled to neighbouring countries, including Oman, Saudi Arabia, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Somalia and Sudan. While the number of new arrivals from Yemen remain low in 2016, the ongoing humanitarian crisis inside the country remains dire. At the same time, large numbers of refugees and migrants from the Horn of Africa make the journey into Yemen.

Sudan: Better together: a common approach to sustainable return in North Darfur

24 June 2016 - 3:25am
Source: UN Development Programme Country: Sudan

Protracted and complex are the new normal. 

Over the last year the international community has been gearing up to establish the Sustainable Development Goals - a new 15-year vision that promises to “leave no one behind”. At the same time however, the majority of today’s humanitarian crises are protracted in nature and pose a significant obstacle to achieving those goals. This is why ‘business as usual’ and the traditional idea of a linear transition between humanitarian and development assistance is no longer appropriate. The importance of bridging the humanitarian – development divide to better address immediate needs while pursuing durable solutions for displaced people was also emphasized at the World Humanitarian Summit that took place in May 2016. UN agencies committed to ‘New Ways of working’ to ensure collective and shared outcomes across the humanitarian response, climate change and development.

The humanitarian community is translating this concept of joined-up humanitarian – development into a number of multisector and multiannual response frameworks.

The Humanitarian Country Team (HCT) has developed the Protracted Displacement Strategy that promotes self-reliance for Internally Displaced People while in displacement.

The Recovery, Return and Reintegration (RRR) Sector designed a Multi-Sector Response Framework for Sustainable Return to bring together humanitarian and development actors for an integrated response in selected areas of return. The framework proposes outcome-oriented multi-year planning and action to meet people’s immediate needs, reduce vulnerabilities and build on existing capacities to provide opportunities for a more resilient future and support durable solutions. The strategy marks a break from just assessing needs to analyzing coping mechanisms, risks, and vulnerabilities and to strengthen local capacity as part of humanitarian action. It also encourages a funding mechanism that involves investing in rather than spending on return communities.

Ultimately, the return framework aims to ensure voluntary, dignified and safe return. This can be achieved by jointly addressing the lack of security (notably due to the absence of justice and police institutions), the lack of access to basic services, shortage of economically and environmentally viable livelihoods, and limited access to land and environmental assets.

Collective outputs for greater sustainability. The Um Baru pilot.

To put this into practice, a group of eight national and international NGOs with support from the UN is currently piloting this approach in the Um Baru locality in North Darfur. They have set up an Um Baru Coordination Mechanism to closely work between themselves and other operational partners in the area and are finalizing agreements to begin implementation. With a total of over US$ 750,000 funding provided by the Sudan Humanitarian Fund for a period of twelve months they are paving the way for a gradual reduction of humanitarian needs to ensure the more than 30,000 returnees in the area can withstand a range of shocks and crises.

Through this multi-sector approach which promotes integrated planning and joint implementation by all partners, the people returning from across Darfur and Chad to Orchi village and the surrounding settlements will stand a better chance of re-establishing their lives in their place of origin.  ‘Through this project, we can continue providing local medical services for the people of Orchi for one year’, explains Ahmed Elsadig Mohammed from the Anhar for Peace, Development and Humanitarian Work Organization. “Before, when I was sick, we had to go by donkey all the way to Um Baru town. Now I can get my medication just here in the village’, states one woman in the Orchi clinic waiting room.

With more than six hours distance between those places, this will give the people of the area much needed time to focus on essential livelihoods activities. With a greater focus on creating synergies between partners and building on existing structures, UNDP will provide a solar water pump to improve water supply that has previously been established by the Italian NGO COOPI (and who will now focus on promoting hygiene in the communities). With water collection still predominantly being women’s responsibility, this joint approach will give them more time to engage in the area’s first Women and Youth Centre that is being constructed by the Humanitarian Assistance Programme Organization (ASSIST) to promote their active participation in community planning and to receive vocational training in a safe environment.

‘But the challenge is to find a way of keeping the doctors and services in this area beyond the duration of this project’, warns Anhar. To make this happen and to deliver on this new multi-annual way of working, the RRR Sector and partners are starting to engage development organisations, livelihood programmes and donors to ensure the continuation of interventions after the initial 12-months interventions.

Gender mainstreaming for better outcomes. The Um Baru pilot also operationalizes the recently endorsed HCT Gender Strategy by using sector specific gender tools at each stage of the programme cycle. For example, gender issues were incorporated into an interagency assessment in March 2016. The more targeted questions helped identify specific challenges of women, girls, men and boys in accessing health, WASH, shelter and livelihoods. Across sectors, the absence of women and girls from decision-making structures was identified as a key barrier to their meaningful participation in community planning and response. “We go to the community and rely on the sheikhs (who are mostly men) to help identify needs”, one partner noted.

During the first meeting of the Um Baru Coordination Group, partners recognized that implementing gender commitments remains a challenge as it calls for a shift in thinking and doing things, but agreed that this principled approach can lead to better outcomes. The RRR Coordinator concluded the meeting highlighting that “it is important to map multiple entry points within the community to reach specific groups of the returnee population who may be hard to reach due to gender, age or disability. Ultimately, people’s needs and capacities should inform the priorities and services we design”.

For more information on the Multi-sector Return Framework please contact the RRR Sector Coordinators at eva.lescrauwaet@undp.org and sebastian.kratzer@undp.org, and Geeta Kuttiparambilgeeta kuttiparambilgeeta@un.org for questions regarding the HCT Gender Strategy.

United Republic of Tanzania: Refugee Situation in Tanzania - Daily Statistical Report (Thursday, 23-Jun-2016)

23 June 2016 - 10:14pm
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Burundi, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Rwanda, Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania

The current Burundi refugee situation in Tanzania began late April 2015. The months that followed saw significantly high number of persons of concern arrivng in Tanzania, mainly through Kagunga, a tiny border village along Lake Tanganyika and other entry points in Kigoma region. The population was relocated to Nyarugusu camp, which was already host to 65,000 persons of concern, mainly DR Congolese. The camp quickly ran out of capacity to host the new population, prompting the opening of a new camp, Nduta, in Kibondo district on 07-Oct-2015. Nduta's capacity has been put at 60,000. Another camp, Mtendeli in Kakonko district, also began officially receiving refugees from Burundi on 14-Jan-2016. The two new camps will host Burundian refugees, while other nationals fleeing the Burundi situation, mostly DR Congolese will continue to be hosted in Nyarugusu.

South Sudan: South Sudan Crisis - Regional Impact Situation Report #70, 22 June 2016

23 June 2016 - 12:17pm
Source: World Food Programme Country: Ethiopia, Kenya, South Sudan, Sudan, Uganda

Highlights

  • Deteriorating food and nutrition security, driven by high food prices and the declining economic situation is affecting South Sudanese across the country.

  • In Sudan and Uganda, the rate of new arrivals has slowed compared to previous months. It remains to be seen whether the numbers will increase given the deteriorating food security conditions in South Sudan.

  • WFP requires USD 74 million for the next six months to meet the needs of all refugees in Ethiopia, Kenya, Sudan and Uganda. Food stocks are stretched and WFP requires immediate funds, particularly for Sudan and Uganda.

Overview

Despite progress in the political situation following the formation of the Transitional Government of National Unity, the economic decline, depreciation of the South Sudanese pound and sporadic violence in some parts of the country continue to have a significant impact on the humanitarian needs within the country.

Reports indicate attacks by armed groups in Raja town on 15 June resulted in death, destruction of property and displacements. In addition, clashes between government forces and an armed group were reported in Leer town, Unity State. The deteriorating economic conditions coupled with rising prices of essential commodities is contributing to rising criminality in most parts of the country.

Food insecurity remains a key concern throughout the country. The economic decline and high inflation combined with disrupted harvests and livelihoods continue to worsen the food security situation. Eastern Equatoria, Northern Bahr el Ghazal and Western Bahr el Ghazal are exhibiting the most rapid decline in the food security situation. WFP is scaling up its efforts to reach food insecure households through the lean season to prevent a further decline in the food security and nutritional status of the population. General food distributions are ongoing alongside food assistance for assets programmes in Northern Bahr el Ghazal and Eastern Equatoria.

In addition to providing food assistance inside South Sudan, WFP provides food assistance for refugees at border crossings, during transit, at reception centres and upon settlement in the camps. Nutrition interventions are ongoing to treat and prevent malnutrition for children below 5 years, pregnant women and breastfeeding mothers.

Sudan: Sweden supports United Nations humanitarian air service in Sudan

23 June 2016 - 9:05am
Source: World Food Programme Country: Sudan

KHARTOUM – The United Nations World Food Programme (WFP) today welcomed a contribution from the Government of Sweden to support the WFP-operated United Nations Humanitarian Air Service (UNHAS) in Sudan.

This contribution from Sweden, of SEK 5 million (approximately US$600,000), will allow WFP to continue running a safe and reliable air service to hundreds of humanitarian staff serving vulnerable communities across Darfur and elsewhere in Sudan.

“UNHAS continues to play a unique role in humanitarian operations across the world through delivering humanitarian cargo and transporting workers to and from affected areas,” said the Swedish Ambassador to Sudan, Mette Sunnergren. “Sweden will continue to support UNHAS in order to support humanitarian logistics in Sudan in 2016.”

In recent months, UNHAS has played a significant role in flying aid workers into locations where people fleeing the conflict in Jebel Marra area have gone. The air service has ensured that staff were on the ground to conduct a rapid assessment and provide much-needed assistance.

“We are very grateful to the people and Government of Sweden for this timely contribution that helps us maintain this critical service to the humanitarian community to facilitate our reaching those in urgent need of assistance, wherever they are,” said WFP Sudan Representative and Country Director Adnan Khan.

During the first quarter of 2016, UNHAS has made more than 1,150 flights carrying nearly 9,000 passengers and has also performed two medical evacuations.

In 2015, UNHAS carried 37,129 passengers - half of them UN staff and the remainder mostly NGO staff, in addition to a small number of government officials dealing with humanitarian affairs, donor representatives and diplomats.

Established in Sudan in 2004, UNHAS is run by a steering committee comprising representatives of UN agencies, NGOs and donors, but is directly managed by WFP Sudan. On average, UNHAS transports 3,500 passengers and 20 metric tons of light cargo each month to more than 40 locations in Sudan. It also provides medical and security evacuations when needed.

The humanitarian air service - like WFP, is entirely funded by voluntary contributions - relies on a fleet of five aircraft (two fixed-wing aircraft and three helicopters) based in Khartoum, Nyala, El-Fasher and Geneina. While the fixed-wing aircraft provide air shuttle services from Khartoum to the three Darfur state capitals, the helicopters facilitate humanitarian travel to areas that are inaccessible by road, either due to insecurity or poor road conditions. Other contributors to UNHAS in Sudan include Canada, the European Commission Humanitarian Aid and Civil Protection Department, Germany, Japan, Sweden, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, the United States of America and the Common Humanitarian Fund.

WFP is the world's largest humanitarian agency fighting hunger worldwide, delivering food assistance in emergencies and working with communities to improve nutrition and build resilience. Each year, WFP assists some 80 million people in around 80 countries.

Follow us on Twitter @wfp_media @wfp_mena

For more information please contact:
Amor Almagro, WFP/Khartoum, Tel. +249 183248001 (ext. 2114), Mob. + 249 912174853 Email: amor.almagro@wfp.org
Abdulaziz Abdulmomin, WFP/Khartoum, Tel. +249 183248001 (ext. 2123), Mob. +249 912167055 Email: Abdulaziz.abdulmomin@wfp.org

Sudan: Sudan: Humanitarian Bulletin | Issue 25 | 13 – 19 June 2016

23 June 2016 - 4:49am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: South Sudan, Sudan

HIGHLIGHTS

• Heavy rains and flash floods in Sennar State have destroyed 1,160 houses and damaged another 1,320 homes, according to SRCS.

• On 17 June, the Government of Sudan announced a 4-month ceasefire in South Kordofan and Blue Nile states.

• An estimated 1,800 newly displaced people in West Kordofan State need humanitarian assistance, according to HAC.

• In 2016, about 72,000 South Sudanese have arrived in White Nile, East Darfur, South Darfur, South and West Kordofan states.

Floods destroy and damage houses in Sennar State

Heavy rains and flash floods in Singa, the capital of Sennar State have destroyed 1,160 houses and damaged another 1,320 homes, according to the Sudanese Red Crescent Society (SRCS). One public building and 36 latrines were destroyed, while another public building and 50 latrines were damaged, according to the findings of a needs assessment in Singa carried out by SRCS, the government’s Humanitarian Aid Commission (HAC) and the General Directorate of Civil Defense on 17 June.

As part of an initial response, Civil Defense and SRCS have unblocked drainage networks, relocated affected people and distributed sandbags to protect from flooding. HAC in Sennar reported that 3,000 mats, 10,000 mosquito nets, 5,000 pieces of plastic sheeting, 3,000 tents, 10,000 blankets, 3,000 kitchen sets, food, sanitary items and medicine were urgently needed to respond to the needs of the affected people. SRCS estimates that about 14,900 people (2,500 families) have been affected so far.

In El Gezira State, heavy rains and strong winds have destroyed several buildings in the state’s capital, Madani, according to local media reports. There have also been reports of rains and flash flooding in parts of Blue Nile, White Nile and Gedaref states, and the Kordofan and Darfur regions. Over the past few years, heavy rain and floods have destroyed or damaged private houses and public buildings such as schools and hospitals, affecting thousands of people. During the rainy season, there is an increase in water borne diseases, especially diarrhoea. The rainy season usually starts in Sudan in June and ends in September-October.

Rainfall and median temperature outlook for June-September 2016

According to the Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD) update issued on 31 May, the regional consensus climate outlook for the June to September 2016 rainfall season indicates an increased likelihood of above normal rainfall over most of the northern parts of the Greater Horn of Africa (including Sudan). The IGAD report said there is an increased likelihood of flood risk during the rainfall peak months of August and September across Ethiopia, South Sudan and Sudan. IGAD in Eastern Africa was created in 1996 to assist and complement the efforts of the Member States to achieve food security and environmental protection, promotion and maintenance of peace and security and humanitarian affairs, and economic cooperation and integration.

World: Actualización sobre la información en el Mediterráneo, Flujos migratorios en Europa: Llegadas y muertes (21 Junio 2016)

23 June 2016 - 3:51am
Source: International Organization for Migration Country: Afghanistan, Bulgaria, Chile, Costa Rica, Côte d'Ivoire, Cyprus, Eritrea, Gambia, Greece, Guinea, Hungary, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Italy, Mali, Mexico, Nigeria, Pakistan, Panama, Peru, Serbia, Somalia, Spain, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Turkey, United States of America, World

214.691 llegadas por mar en 2016
2.861 muertos/desaparecidos

publicado a las 10:00 hs. (horario Europa Central) 21/6/16
1.011.712 llegadas en 2015