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World: Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Sector Update - October 2014

16 October 2014 - 11:54am
Source: US Agency for International Development Country: Iraq, Philippines, Sudan, United States of America, World preview

SECTOR OVERVIEW

Water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) programs represent vital components of USAID Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance (USAID/OFDA) responses to rapid-onset disasters and complex emergencies, as disaster-affected populations are more susceptible to illness and death from waterborne and communicable diseases. WASH interventions in emergencies often include promotion of good hygienic practices, construction or repair of latrines, removal of solid waste, and provision of safe, treated water. Activities such as building latrines and establishing waste removal systems can prove even more challenging in areas with high water tables, hard rock sites, and dense populations.

In FY 2014, USAID/OFDA provided more than $137 million for WASH programs in 27 countries. USAID/OFDA also links emergency WASH activities with transition and development programs funded by other USAID offices and incorporates institutional partners—such as local governments—in program planning and implementation to promote the sustainability of water and hygiene-focused projects.

Sudan: Farmer slain in East Jebel Marra, displaced shot in West Darfur

15 October 2014 - 4:28pm
Source: Radio Dabanga Country: Sudan

EAST JEBEL MARRA / WEST DARFUR (15 Oct.) - Militiamen shot dead a farmer in the area of Dabanga in East Jebel Marra on Wednesday. On the same day, two residents of Riyadh camp for the displaced in West Darfur were seriously injured.

Speaking to Radio Dabanga, a relative of the victim said that “seven government-backed militiamen shot at Juma Adam Abdelrahman, while he was working on his farm on Wednesday afternoon”. “He died on the spot. The killers then took his money and belongings, and left.”

Drunken soldier

In El Riyadh camp, El Geneina locality, West Darfur, a man and a woman were seriously injured, when a drunken army soldier fired at the camp, a camp elder told Radio Dabanga. They had to be transferred to El Geneina Hospital for urgent treatment.

Sudan: Rebels claim attack on Central Darfur military area

15 October 2014 - 4:25pm
Source: Radio Dabanga Country: Sudan

NIERTETI / KHARTOUM (15 Oct.) - Darfuri rebel forces reportedly killed eight government and militia troops, in an attack on the military area of El Zubeir in Central Darfur today.

Mustafa Tambour, the spokesman for the mainstream Sudan Liberation Movement, led by Abdel Wahid El Nur (SLM-AW), said that this morning, at about 5 am, rebel fighters attacked El Zubeir military area, 1 km east of Nierteti town.

“Eight eight government and militia troops, among them a colonel, were killed, and several were wounded. We also seized large quantities of weapons, ammunition, and other military supplies. The rest of the outlaws fled in the direction of Nierteti.”

Tambour acknowledged that three rebel fighters were killed, and six were wounded.

South Sudan: IOM Response to South Sudan Crisis (as of 13 October 2014)

15 October 2014 - 9:36am
Source: International Organization for Migration Country: Ethiopia, Kenya, Sudan, Uganda, South Sudan preview

Link: IOM Regional Response to South Sudan Crisis, External Sitrep, 6 - 12 October 2014

Sudan: Sudan: Humanitarian Bulletin Issue 41 | 6 - 12 October 2014 [EN/AR]

15 October 2014 - 6:31am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Central African Republic, Sudan, South Sudan preview


HIGHLIGHTS

  • UNHCR reports that the number of South Sudanese refugees in Sudan has passed the 100,000 mark, while funding remains low.

  • HAC Blue Nile says first inter-agency needs assessments since 2011 will take place in early November. According to aid agencies, about 240,000 people need humanitarian aid in Blue Nile.

  • An estimated 18,400 IDPs in North Darfur’s Korma town are receiving humanitarian assistance.

  • UNHCR has registered 1,700 refugees from CAR in Nyala, South Darfur.

FIGURES

People in need of humanitarian aid in Sudan - 6.9 million

Displaced people in Sudan - 2.9 million

IDPs in Darfur in 2013 in 2014 - 2 million (to date) 428,291

GAM caseload - 2 million

Refugees in Sudan (UNHCR) - 157,000

South Sudanese refugees in Sudan - since 15 Dec 2013 (UNHCR) - 100,493

FUNDING

986 million requested in 2014 (US$)

47.2 % reported funding

Sudan: Sudan: Humanitarian Bulletin Issue 41 | 6 - 12 October 2014

15 October 2014 - 6:31am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Central African Republic, Sudan, South Sudan preview

HIGHLIGHTS

  • UNHCR reports that the number of South Sudanese refugees in Sudan has passed the 100,000 mark, while funding remains low.

  • HAC Blue Nile says first inter-agency needs assessments since 2011 will take place in early November. According to aid agencies, about 240,000 people need humanitarian aid in Blue Nile.

  • An estimated 18,400 IDPs in North Darfur’s Korma town are receiving humanitarian assistance.

  • UNHCR has registered 1,700 refugees from CAR in Nyala, South Darfur.

FIGURES

People in need of humanitarian aid in Sudan - 6.9 million

Displaced people in Sudan - 2.9 million

IDPs in Darfur in 2013 in 2014 - 2 million (to date) 428,291

GAM caseload - 2 million

Refugees in Sudan (UNHCR) - 157,000

South Sudanese refugees in Sudan - since 15 Dec 2013 (UNHCR) - 100,493

FUNDING

986 million requested in 2014 (US$)

47.2 % reported funding

Sudan: Sudan: Humanitarian Dashboard (30 September 2014)

15 October 2014 - 5:27am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Sudan, South Sudan preview

OVERVIEW

A total of 6.9 million people are in need of humanitarian assistance in Sudan. Since the beginning of 2014, fighting between Government security forces and armed movements have led to the internal displacement of an estimated over 400,000 people in Darfur. Ongoing conflict in South Sudan has led to almost 100,000 people crossing the border into Sudan. Heavy rains and floodings that began in late July 2014 have affected some 277,085 people.

Sudan: Sudan: Humanitarian Snapshot (30 September 2014)

15 October 2014 - 5:22am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Central African Republic, Chad, Ethiopia, Sudan, South Sudan preview

The number of people in need of humanitarian assistance has risen by 800,000 since the start of 2014 (as of July 2014). This is in addition to some 6.1 million people who required humanitarian assistance at the start of 2014. These new humanitarian needs have primarily been generated by the displacement of over 400,000 people in Darfur, the arrival of almost 100,000 refugees from South Sudan and alarming levels of malnutrition, with the GAM rate for Sudan exceeding the 15% emergency threshold.

While humanitarian needs have grown, the capacity of humanitarian organizations in Sudan to respond to these needs has reduced. Overall, we see a declining trend in the capacity of aid organizations to respond resulting in less presence in areas of need and a growing number of organizations reducing their operational footprint or leaving Sudan due to financial or operational constraints. The number of aid workers in Darfur has fallen from 6,850 in November 2013 to 5,440 in August 2014. At the start of 2009 there were 17,700 aid workers in Darfur. The increase in humanitarian needs, and decrease in humanitarian capacity and funding has led to a deterioration in humanitarian services. For instance insufficient water and sanitation services have been directly linked to an outbreak of Hepatitis E in South Darfur’s IDP camps, claiming the lives of some 150 people.

Sudan: Adopting Resolution 2179 (2014), Security Council Extends Mandate of United Nations Interim Security Force for Abyei, Urging Parties to Resolve Outstanding Issues

14 October 2014 - 8:39pm
Source: UN Security Council Country: Sudan, South Sudan

SC/11598

7276th Meeting (AM)

While reiterating demands for progress between the parties on outstanding issues, the Security Council this morning extended the mandate of the United Nations Interim Security Force for the disputed Abyei area bordering Sudan and South Sudan until 28 February 2015.

Through the unanimous adoption of resolution 2179 (2014), the Council made no major changes in the mandate of the Force, known as UNISFA. It demanded an end to delays in the reconvening of the Abyei Joint Oversight Committee, in making the Joint Border Verification and Monitoring Mechanism operational and in establishing other local governance, security and confidence-building mechanisms required by the 2011 agreement on the area.

Noting Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon’s concerns over inclusion of Abyei in Sudanese national elections, the Council also condemned the continued presence of Sudanese police and South Sudan troops in the area in violation of Council resolutions.

It called on the Secretary-General to explore options, with support from the African Union and other partners, for the parties to use "creative provisions based on mutual understanding" to expedite the implementation of outstanding administrative and security agreements.

In his latest report on Abyei (document S/2014/709), the Secretary-General said that the situation on the ground has been relatively calm. However, there was a persistent risk of intercommunity conflict that could worsen relations between Sudan and South Sudan.

Following the adoption, the representative of South Sudan, Francis Mading Deng, and that of Sudan, Rahamtalla Mohamed Osman Elnor, welcomed the renewal of the UNISFA mandate and affirmed the commitments of their Governments to resolving outstanding issues through peaceful means.

Mr. Deng, recognizing that there was an impasse, said that central in overcoming it was settling the self-determination of the Ngok Dinka tribes, which had already voted to join South Sudan in a referendum. If that referendum was not recognized as legitimate then recommendations for a new referendum must be acted upon.

In addition, intercommunity reconciliation required the release of the findings on the assassination of the Ngok Dinka Paramount Chief, a conference on cattle stealing and resolving of the issue of oil police, he said. He welcomed the Secretary-General's decision to appoint an official for humanitarian needs in the area to further facilitate dialogue between the Ngok Dinka and the Misseriya nomads. Further international support was critical.

Mr. Elnor welcomed provisions of the UNISFA text that called for resolution of problems in Abyei through negotiation and intercommunity dialogue, and reaffirmed his country's commitment to the 2011 agreement. He cautioned that solutions outside that agreement, including unilateral measures, would not attain the required stability. Until a negotiated settlement was reached, however, he stressed that Abyei remained a part of Sudan. He commended Ethiopia for its contributions to UNISFA.

The meeting began at 10:05 a.m. and ended at 10:20 a.m.

Resolution

The full text of resolution 2179 (2014) reads as follows:

"The Security Council,

"Recalling its previous resolutions and its presidential statements on the situation in Sudan and South Sudan, and in particular, resolutions 1990 (2011), 2024 (2011), 2032 (2011), 2046 (2012), 2047 (2012), 2075 (2012), 2104 (2013), 2126 (2013) and 2156 (2014), as well as presidential statements S/PRST/2012/19 and S/PRST/2013/14, and the Council’s press statements of 18 June 2012, 21 September 2012, 28 September 2012, 6 May 2013, 14 June 2013, 14 February 2014 and 17 March 2014,

"Reaffirming its strong commitment to the sovereignty, independence, unity, and territorial integrity of Sudan and South Sudan, and to the purposes and the principles of the Charter of the United Nations, and recalling the importance of the principles of good neighbourliness, non-interference and regional cooperation,

"Reiterating that the territorial boundaries of States shall not be altered by force, and that any territorial disputes shall be settled exclusively by peaceful means,

"Affirming the priority it attaches to the full and urgent implementation of all outstanding issues from the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA),

"Reaffirming its previous resolutions 1265 (1999), 1296 (2000), 1674 (2006), 1738 (2006) and 1894 (2009) on the protection of civilians in armed conflict; 1612 (2005), 1882 (2009), 1998 (2011), 2068 (2012), and 2143 (2014) on children and armed conflict; 1502 (2003) on the protection of humanitarian and United Nations personnel; and 1325 (2000), 1820 (2008), 1888 (2009), 1889 (2009), 1960 (2010), 2106 (2013) and 2122 (2013) on women peace and security,

"Recalling the commitments made by the Government of Sudan and the Government of South Sudan in the 20 June 2011 Agreement between the Government of Sudan and the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement on Temporary Arrangements for the Administration and Security of the Abyei Area, the 29 June 2011 Agreement between the Government of the Sudan and the Government of South Sudan on Border Security and the Joint Political and Security Mechanism (JPSM), and the 30 July 2011 Agreement on the Border Monitoring Support Mission between the Government of Sudan and the Government of South Sudan, as well as the 27 September 2012 Agreements on Cooperation and Security Arrangements, the JPSM’s 8 March 2013 decision, and the Implementation Matrix of 12 March 2013, reached by the Government of Sudan and the Government of South Sudan in Addis Ababa under the auspices of the African Union High-level Implementation Panel (AUHIP),

"Emphasizing the importance of the full participation of women in the implementation of agreements and in the prevention and resolution of conflict and peacebuilding more broadly,

"Expressing its full support for the efforts of the African Union on the situation between the Republic of Sudan and the Republic of South Sudan, in order to ease the current tension, facilitate the resumption of negotiations on post-secession relations and the normalization of their relations, recalling in this regard the African Union Peace and Security Council (AUPSC) Communiqués of 24 April 2012, 24 October 2012, 25 January 2013, 7 May 2013, 29 July 2013, 23 September 2013, 26 October 2013, 12 November 2013 and 12 September 2014; the AUPSC Press Statement of 6 November 2013; and the Statement from the Chairperson of the African Union Commission on 28 October 2013,

"Noting with concern the stalled efforts by the Government of Sudan and the Government of South Sudan to demilitarize the Safe Demilitarized Border Zone (SDBZ), including the “14 Mile Area”, and to fully implement the Joint Border Verification and Monitoring Mechanism (JBVMM), in accordance with Security Council resolution 2046 and the AUPSC Roadmap of 24 April 2012, as a result of South Sudan’s continued disagreement with the location of the SDBZ centreline,

"Underlining the importance of fully establishing and maintaining effective JBVMM monitoring of the SDBZ, including the “14 Mile Area”,

"Stressing that both countries will have much to gain if they show restraint and choose the path of dialogue instead of resorting to violence or provocations,

"Welcoming further regular meetings between President Bashir and President Salva Kiir for continuing dialogue, recalling the United Nations Security Council decision in resolution 2046 that the parties must resume immediately negotiations to reach agreement on Abyei final status under the auspices of the AUHIP, calling upon all parties to engage constructively in the process mediated by the AUHIP towards final agreement on the final status of Abyei Area, and stressing that the parties must immediately implement pending aspects of the 20 June 2011 Agreement, in particular to resolve the dispute over the Abyei Area Council and immediately establish the Abyei Area Administration and Abyei Police Service,

"Commending the continued assistance provided to the parties by the AUHIP, including its Chairman President Thabo Mbeki, former Presidents Abdulsalami Abubakar and Pierre Buyoya, the Chairperson of the Intergovernmental Authority on Development, Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn, the Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for Sudan and South Sudan, Haile Menkerios, and the United Nations Interim Security Force for Abyei (UNISFA),

"Commending the efforts of UNISFA in effectively carrying out its mandate, including by its ongoing facilitation of peaceful migration throughout the Abyei Area, conflict prevention, mediation and deterrence, and expressing its deep appreciation for the work of the troop-contributing countries,

"Noting with concern the fragility of the security situation in Abyei Area, acknowledging UNISFA’s contribution to enhanced peace and stability since its deployment, and determined to prevent the recurrence of violence against or displacements of civilians and to avert intercommunal conflict,

"Expressing its determination that the future status of Abyei shall be resolved by negotiations between the parties in a manner consistent with the CPA and not by the unilateral actions of either party,

"Deeply concerned by the public administration and rule of law vacuum in the Abyei Area, due to continued delays in the establishment of the Abyei Area Administration, Council and Police, including a special unit to deal with particular issues related to nomadic migration, which are essential to maintain law and order and prevent intercommunal conflict in Abyei,

"Noting with concern the continued threat of intercommunal violence in the Abyei Area, including the ongoing tensions that prevent UNISFA’s and other agencies’ Sudanese staff from returning to Abyei,

"Noting that the continued delay in establishing the temporary institutions and resolving the final status of Abyei contributes to tension in the region, urging all parties to refrain from any unilateral action to aggravate intercommunal relations within Abyei Area, and expressing concern over the continued implications of what the AUPSC described in their 6 November 2013 press statement as “the decision by the Ngok Dinka to conduct a unilateral referendum”,

"Taking note of the 7 September 2014 announcement by the Sudan National Election Commission to include the Abyei Area as a geographical constituency in the 2015 elections, which according to the 30 September 2014 Secretary-General’s report (S/2014/709) “can pose a serious risk to the stability of Abyei”,

"Bearing in mind the importance of coherence of United Nations assistance in the region,

"Welcoming and encouraging efforts by the United Nations to sensitize peacekeeping personnel in the prevention and control of HIV/AIDS and other communicable diseases in all of its peacekeeping operations,

"Stressing the need for effective human rights monitoring, including of any sexual and gender-based violence and violations and abuses committed against children, taking note that there have been no developments with regard to the operationalization of human rights monitoring in the Abyei Area, and reiterating its concern at the lack of cooperation by the parties with the Secretary-General to this end,

"Further stressing the urgency of facilitating the delivery of humanitarian assistance to all affected communities in the Abyei Area,

"Affirming the importance of voluntary, safe, orderly return and sustainable reintegration of displaced persons, and of peaceful and orderly migration cycles respecting the traditional migratory routes from Sudan to South Sudan through Abyei, and urging UNISFA to take measures as necessary to ensure security in the Abyei Area in accordance with its mandate,

"Recalling its resolution 2117 (2013), and expressing grave concern at the threat to peace and security in Abyei arising from the illicit transfer, destabilizing accumulation and misuse of small arms and light weapons,

"Expressing concern with the residual threat of landmines and explosive remnants of war in the Abyei Area, which hinders the safe return of displaced persons to their homes and safe migration,

"Taking note of the 30 September 2014 Secretary-General’s report (S/2014/709), including its assessment that the political and security situation on the ground is relatively calm, but can easily escalate into open conflict, with a commensurate risk of deterioration of bilateral relations between Sudan and South Sudan, and the recommendations contained therein,

"Recognizing that the current situation in Abyei and along the border between the Sudan and South Sudan continues to constitute a serious threat to international peace and security,

"1. Decides to extend until 28 February 2015 the mandate of the United Nations Interim Security Force for Abyei (UNISFA) as set out in paragraph 2 of resolution 1990 (2011) and modified by resolution 2024 (2011) and paragraph 1 of resolution 2075 (2012), and acting under Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations, further decides to extend until 28 February 2015 the mandate of UNISFA as set out in paragraph 3 of resolution 1990, and determines that for the purposes of paragraph 1 of resolution 2024 (2011), support to the operational activities of the JBVMM shall include support to the Ad Hoc Committees, as appropriate when so requested by consensual decisions of these mechanisms, within UNISFA’s operational area and existing capabilities;

"2. Takes note of the recommendations in the 30 September Secretary-General’s report, and welcomes the UNISFA initiatives to support resumption of community dialogue and administration by the communities under Abyei Joint Oversight Committee (AJOC) supervision; in this regard, calls upon the communities and the Governments of Sudan and South Sudan to take concrete steps towards that goal; and further welcomes the current and future support in these efforts from the United Nations, African Union and Government of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia;

"3. Reiterates its demand that Sudan and South Sudan immediately resume the work of the AJOC, and calls upon the Government of South Sudan to name immediately an AJOC Co-Chair to ensure steady progress on the implementation of the 20 June 2011 Agreement, including the implementation of the AJOC decisions, and requests the Secretary-General to provide an assessment of progress on these issues in his regular reports, including on his recommendations resulting from the May 2014 Strategic Review of UNISFA;

"4. Further reiterates its demand that Sudan and South Sudan urgently commence the establishment of the Abyei Area Administration and Council, including by resolving the deadlock over the composition of the Council, and constitute the Abyei Police Service, to enable it to take over policing functions throughout the Abyei Area, including the protection of oil infrastructure, in accordance with their commitments in the 20 June 2011 Agreement;

"5. Decides to maintain the troops authorized by resolution 2104 (2013) already deployed, and that the remaining authorized forces continue to be deployed consistent with the progressive reactivation of the JBVMM, to enable UNISFA to provide required force protection to the JBVMM and to enable UNISFA to fully support the JBVMM to conduct extended operations into the SDBZ as soon as possible, and requests the Secretary-General to keep the Council fully updated on the status of deployment as part of his regular reporting cycle;

"6. Expresses concern regarding the stalled efforts to fully operationalize the JBVMM, as a result of South Sudan’s continued disagreement with the location of the SDBZ centreline, and calls upon the Government of Sudan and the Government of South Sudan to make timely and effective use of the JBVMM, JPSM, and other agreed joint mechanisms to ensure the security and transparency of the SDBZ, including the “14 Mile Area”;

"7. Urges renewed efforts to determine conclusively the SDBZ centreline on the ground, and reiterates that the centreline of the SDBZ in no way prejudices the current or future legal status of the border, ongoing negotiations on the disputed and claimed areas, and demarcation of the borders;

"8. Underscores that UNISFA’s protection of civilians mandate as set out in paragraph 3 of resolution 1990 (2011) includes taking the necessary actions to protect civilians under imminent threat of physical violence, irrespective of the source of such violence;

"9. Condemns the presence of South Sudan security service personnel and Diffra Oil Police units deployed in the Abyei Area, as well as the repeated entry of Misseriya militias into the territory, and reiterates its demands that immediately and without preconditions the Government of South Sudan fully redeploy its security service personnel from the Abyei Area and that the Government of Sudan also redeploy the Oil Police in Diffra from the Abyei Area, and further reiterates, in accordance with relevant resolutions, in particular resolution 1990 and resolution 2046, that the Abyei Area shall be demilitarized from any forces, as well as armed elements of the local communities, other than UNISFA and the Abyei Police Service;

"10. Supports the AJOC’s 3 May 2013 decision on Abyei’s status as a weapons-free area, underscores the AUPSC’s concern in its 7 May 2013 Communiqué over reports that various communities living in Abyei are heavily armed, recalls that the 20 June 2011 Agreement on Temporary Arrangements for the Administration and Security of the Abyei Area stipulates that Abyei should be a weapons-free area and that only UNISFA is authorized to carry weapons inside the area, and in this regard, urges the two Governments to take all necessary steps to ensure that Abyei is effectively demilitarized, including through disarmament programs as necessary;

"11. Requests that UNISFA, consistent with its mandate and within its existing capabilities, observe, document and report on the movement of weapons into Abyei and the presence of weapons within Abyei as part of the Secretary-General’s regular reporting cycle;

"12. Urges the two Governments immediately to take steps to implement confidence-building measures among the respective communities in Abyei Area, including through reconciliation processes at the grass-roots level and supporting UNISFA in convening a peace conference between the Ngok Dinka and Misseriya traditional chiefs, and strongly urges all Abyei communities to exercise maximum restraint in all their engagements and to desist from inflammatory acts or statements that may lead to violent clashes, or any further unilateral activities;

"13. Requests UNISFA to continue its dialogue with the AJOC and with the Misseriya and Ngok Dinka communities on effective strategies and oversight mechanisms for ensuring full compliance by all relevant parties with Abyei’s status as a weapons-free area, with a particular priority placed on the urgent elimination of heavy or crew-served weapons, as well as rocket-propelled grenades, and calls upon the Governments of Sudan and South Sudan, the AJOC, and the Misseriya and Ngok Dinka communities to extend full cooperation to UNISFA in this regard;

"14. Calls upon all parties to cooperate fully with the findings and recommendations following the Abyei Area Joint Investigation and Inquiry Committee’s (AAJIIC’s) investigation into the killing of a UNISFA peacekeeper and the Ngok Dinka paramount chief;

"15. Expresses its intention to review as appropriate the mandate of UNISFA for possible reconfiguration of the mission in light of the compliance by Sudan and South Sudan with the decisions set forth in resolution 2046 and their commitments as set forth in the Agreements of 20 June, 29 June, 30 July 2011 and 27 September 2012, including the redeployment of all forces from the SDBZ, achieving full operational capability for the JVBMM, and the Ad Hoc Committees, as well as completing the full demilitarization of the Abyei Area;

"16. Calls upon all Member States, in particular Sudan and South Sudan, to ensure the free, unhindered and expeditious movement to and from Abyei and throughout the SDBZ of all personnel, as well as equipment, provisions, supplies and other goods, including vehicles, aircraft, and spare parts, which are for the exclusive and official use of UNISFA;

"17. Renews its call upon the Governments of Sudan and South Sudan to provide full support to the United Nations, including by promptly issuing visas to military, police and civilian United Nations personnel, including humanitarian personnel, without prejudice to their nationality, facilitating basing arrangements and flight clearances, and providing logistical support, and calls upon all parties to fully adhere to their obligations under the Status of Forces Agreements;

"18. Recognizes the absence of critical infrastructure projects affecting UNISFA peacekeeping personnel, notes the action being taken to address this situation, and urges the Secretary-General to continue to take the measures available to him to remediate this situation and better enable UNISFA to implement its mandate;

"19. Demands that the Government of Sudan and the Government of South Sudan continue to facilitate the deployment of the United Nations Mine Action Service to ensure JBVMM freedom of movement as well as the identification and clearance of mines in the Abyei Area and SDBZ;

"20. Further demands that all parties involved provide humanitarian personnel with full, safe and unhindered access to civilians in need of assistance and all necessary facilities for their operations, in accordance with international law, including applicable international humanitarian law, and United Nations guiding principles of humanitarian assistance;

"21. Requests the Secretary-General to ensure that effective human rights monitoring is carried out, and the results included in his reports to the Council, and reiterates its call upon the Government of Sudan and the Government of South Sudan to extend their full cooperation to the Secretary-General to this end, including by issuing visas to the concerned United Nations personnel;

"22. Requests the Secretary-General to take the necessary measures to ensure full compliance of UNISFA with the United Nations zero tolerance policy on sexual exploitation and abuses and to keep the Council informed if cases of such conduct occur;

"23. Stresses that continued cooperation between the Government of Sudan and Government of South Sudan is also critical for peace, security and stability and the future relations between them;

"24. Requests the Secretary-General, with support from the African Union Commission and the Federal Democratic Government of Ethiopia, to explore options in the context of the 12 September 2014 AUPSC Communiqué which urges the Parties to use creative provisions based on mutual understanding to expedite implementation of the outstanding administrative and security elements of the June 2011 Agreement, as appropriate, and to include their findings in the consolidated recommendations on UNISFA to be presented to the Security Council in the next report of the Secretary-General;

"25. Requests the Secretary-General to continue to inform the Council of progress in implementing UNISFA’s mandate in two written reports, no later than 1 December 2014 and 2 February 2015 respectively, and continue to bring to the Council’s immediate attention any serious violations of the above referenced agreements;

"26. Notes the Secretary-General’s efforts to ensure close cooperation among United Nations missions in the region, including UNISFA, the United Nations Mission in the Republic of South Sudan (UNMISS), and the African Union-United Nations Hybrid Operation in Darfur (UNAMID), as well as his Special Envoy for Sudan and South Sudan, and requests him to continue this practice;

"27. Decides to remain actively seized of this matter."

For information media. Not an official record.

South Sudan: Looking back to look ahead? Reviewing key lessons from Operation Lifeline Sudan and past humanitarian operations in South Sudan

14 October 2014 - 5:09pm
Source: Overseas Development Institute, Tufts University Country: Sudan, South Sudan preview

1 Introduction

One of the most bitter tragedies of Sudan is that the dilemmas facing humanitarian organizations today are almost exactly those faced repeatedly over the last ten years.
Francois Jean (MSF) 1993

[T]he threat to the children of South Sudan is mounting by the minute ... We are perilously close to seeing history repeat itself.
Anthony Lake (UNICEF) 2014

Since December 2013, South Sudan has once again been embroiled in wide-scale internal conflict, resulting in the internal displacement of 1.3 million people, with an additional 450,000 seeking refuge in neighbouring countries. The fighting and displacement has led to significantly increased requirements for humanitarian assistance, and a significantly scaled-up response, with some 3.8 million people in need, only 2.7 million of whom have been reached with some proportion of what they require (OCHA, 2014). Given the shortfalls in aid and the constraints – both physical and political – in accessing affected populations, there is widespread fear that the situation will deteriorate further before it improves. Humanitarian agencies have been trying to scale up operations over the past eight months, and will continue to do so into the foreseeable future.

Since 2012, the Secure Livelihoods Research Consortium (SLRC) has been conducting research on livelihoods in conflict-affected and post-conflict situations in eight countries, including South Sudan. Since the renewed outbreak of conflict in 2013, SLRC has re-oriented its research towards the current crisis. Interviews conducted with Government of South Sudan officials, donors and humanitarian agencies by the research team in June 2014 suggested that a retrospective view of large-scale humanitarian operations in South Sudan in the past would be helpful for the current operation. There was very much a mantra among respondents – particularly in the humanitarian community – of ‘not repeating the mistakes of OLS’ (Operation Lifeline Sudan), but no clear consensus on what those ‘mistakes’ were, or what lessons should be gleaned. While the constraints were many, and no doubt mistakes were made, OLS was in its time an innovative approach to negotiated access to war-affected populations on both sides of a civil war that had both positive and negative impacts on both the war and the civilian population. It would be myopic to simply consider the ‘mistakes’ of OLS, and naive to think that one could simply apply the ‘lessons’ of OLS to today’s context. Nevertheless, there is good reason for today’s donors and humanitarian aid workers to have a greater sense of what actually happened during OLS, and to foster deeper discussion between South Sudanese officials (most of whom experienced OLS first hand) and contemporary humanitarian agency officials (most of whom did not). This brief review is offered towards the goal of promoting greater understanding.

OLS was reviewed on a number of occasions, and the reader is encouraged to look at those reviews in greater detail (the major ones are referenced here). This short paper will raise only the most salient points arising out of those reviews and reviews of related humanitarian operations. During its lifespan, OLS received – and responded to – a significant amount of criticism, in some cases adapting its approach and procedures. Critical analysis has continued since, hence the desire to review the lessons that were learned (or are still to be learned) just as yet another large-scale humanitarian response is required in South Sudan. The purpose of this paper is not so much to present the distilled learning from the experience of an earlier era, but to attempt to put past efforts in context to promote discussion and innovation now.

The paper is structured as follows. The next (second) section is a brief introduction to Operation Lifeline Sudan – what it was and what it grew out of – followed by a brief summary of overall evaluations of OLS and its impact. The third section is a more detailed breakdown of the major criticisms of OLS, focusing particularly on its unintended impacts and outcomes. The fourth section highlights some more positive outcomes, focusing particularly on learning and adaptation over time. The final section is our attempt to distil some key ideas arising from the experience and put them more fully at the service of the current humanitarian response.

Researching livelihoods and services affected by conflict Working Paper 24

South Sudan: Looking back to look ahead? Reviewing key lessons from Operation Lifeline Sudan and past humanitarian operations in South Sudan

14 October 2014 - 5:09pm
Source: Overseas Development Institute, Tufts University Country: Sudan, South Sudan preview

1 Introduction

One of the most bitter tragedies of Sudan is that the dilemmas facing humanitarian organizations today are almost exactly those faced repeatedly over the last ten years.
Francois Jean (MSF) 1993

[T]he threat to the children of South Sudan is mounting by the minute ... We are perilously close to seeing history repeat itself.
Anthony Lake (UNICEF) 2014

Since December 2013, South Sudan has once again been embroiled in wide-scale internal conflict, resulting in the internal displacement of 1.3 million people, with an additional 450,000 seeking refuge in neighbouring countries. The fighting and displacement has led to significantly increased requirements for humanitarian assistance, and a significantly scaled-up response, with some 3.8 million people in need, only 2.7 million of whom have been reached with some proportion of what they require (OCHA, 2014). Given the shortfalls in aid and the constraints – both physical and political – in accessing affected populations, there is widespread fear that the situation will deteriorate further before it improves. Humanitarian agencies have been trying to scale up operations over the past eight months, and will continue to do so into the foreseeable future.

Since 2012, the Secure Livelihoods Research Consortium (SLRC) has been conducting research on livelihoods in conflict-affected and post-conflict situations in eight countries, including South Sudan. Since the renewed outbreak of conflict in 2013, SLRC has re-oriented its research towards the current crisis. Interviews conducted with Government of South Sudan officials, donors and humanitarian agencies by the research team in June 2014 suggested that a retrospective view of large-scale humanitarian operations in South Sudan in the past would be helpful for the current operation. There was very much a mantra among respondents – particularly in the humanitarian community – of ‘not repeating the mistakes of OLS’ (Operation Lifeline Sudan), but no clear consensus on what those ‘mistakes’ were, or what lessons should be gleaned. While the constraints were many, and no doubt mistakes were made, OLS was in its time an innovative approach to negotiated access to war-affected populations on both sides of a civil war that had both positive and negative impacts on both the war and the civilian population. It would be myopic to simply consider the ‘mistakes’ of OLS, and naive to think that one could simply apply the ‘lessons’ of OLS to today’s context. Nevertheless, there is good reason for today’s donors and humanitarian aid workers to have a greater sense of what actually happened during OLS, and to foster deeper discussion between South Sudanese officials (most of whom experienced OLS first hand) and contemporary humanitarian agency officials (most of whom did not). This brief review is offered towards the goal of promoting greater understanding.

OLS was reviewed on a number of occasions, and the reader is encouraged to look at those reviews in greater detail (the major ones are referenced here). This short paper will raise only the most salient points arising out of those reviews and reviews of related humanitarian operations. During its lifespan, OLS received – and responded to – a significant amount of criticism, in some cases adapting its approach and procedures. Critical analysis has continued since, hence the desire to review the lessons that were learned (or are still to be learned) just as yet another large-scale humanitarian response is required in South Sudan. The purpose of this paper is not so much to present the distilled learning from the experience of an earlier era, but to attempt to put past efforts in context to promote discussion and innovation now.

The paper is structured as follows. The next (second) section is a brief introduction to Operation Lifeline Sudan – what it was and what it grew out of – followed by a brief summary of overall evaluations of OLS and its impact. The third section is a more detailed breakdown of the major criticisms of OLS, focusing particularly on its unintended impacts and outcomes. The fourth section highlights some more positive outcomes, focusing particularly on learning and adaptation over time. The final section is our attempt to distil some key ideas arising from the experience and put them more fully at the service of the current humanitarian response.

Researching livelihoods and services affected by conflict Working Paper 24

South Sudan: Researching livelihoods and services affected by conflict: Looking back to look ahead? Reviewing key lessons from Operation Lifeline Sudan and past humanitarian operations in South Sudan, Working Paper 24

14 October 2014 - 5:09pm
Source: Tufts University Country: Sudan, South Sudan preview

1 Introduction

One of the most bitter tragedies of Sudan is that the dilemmas facing humanitarian organizations today are almost exactly those faced repeatedly over the last ten years.
Francois Jean (MSF) 1993

[T]he threat to the children of South Sudan is mounting by the minute ... We are perilously close to seeing history repeat itself.
Anthony Lake (UNICEF) 2014

Since December 2013, South Sudan has once again been embroiled in wide-scale internal conflict, resulting in the internal displacement of 1.3 million people, with an additional 450,000 seeking refuge in neighbouring countries. The fighting and displacement has led to significantly increased requirements for humanitarian assistance, and a significantly scaled-up response, with some 3.8 million people in need, only 2.7 million of whom have been reached with some proportion of what they require (OCHA, 2014). Given the shortfalls in aid and the constraints – both physical and political – in accessing affected populations, there is widespread fear that the situation will deteriorate further before it improves. Humanitarian agencies have been trying to scale up operations over the past eight months, and will continue to do so into the foreseeable future.

Since 2012, the Secure Livelihoods Research Consortium (SLRC) has been conducting research on livelihoods in conflict-affected and post-conflict situations in eight countries, including South Sudan. Since the renewed outbreak of conflict in 2013, SLRC has re-oriented its research towards the current crisis. Interviews conducted with Government of South Sudan officials, donors and humanitarian agencies by the research team in June 2014 suggested that a retrospective view of large-scale humanitarian operations in South Sudan in the past would be helpful for the current operation. There was very much a mantra among respondents – particularly in the humanitarian community – of ‘not repeating the mistakes of OLS’ (Operation Lifeline Sudan), but no clear consensus on what those ‘mistakes’ were, or what lessons should be gleaned. While the constraints were many, and no doubt mistakes were made, OLS was in its time an innovative approach to negotiated access to war-affected populations on both sides of a civil war that had both positive and negative impacts on both the war and the civilian population. It would be myopic to simply consider the ‘mistakes’ of OLS, and naive to think that one could simply apply the ‘lessons’ of OLS to today’s context. Nevertheless, there is good reason for today’s donors and humanitarian aid workers to have a greater sense of what actually happened during OLS, and to foster deeper discussion between South Sudanese officials (most of whom experienced OLS first hand) and contemporary humanitarian agency officials (most of whom did not). This brief review is offered towards the goal of promoting greater understanding.

OLS was reviewed on a number of occasions, and the reader is encouraged to look at those reviews in greater detail (the major ones are referenced here). This short paper will raise only the most salient points arising out of those reviews and reviews of related humanitarian operations. During its lifespan, OLS received – and responded to – a significant amount of criticism, in some cases adapting its approach and procedures. Critical analysis has continued since, hence the desire to review the lessons that were learned (or are still to be learned) just as yet another large-scale humanitarian response is required in South Sudan. The purpose of this paper is not so much to present the distilled learning from the experience of an earlier era, but to attempt to put past efforts in context to promote discussion and innovation now.

The paper is structured as follows. The next (second) section is a brief introduction to Operation Lifeline Sudan – what it was and what it grew out of – followed by a brief summary of overall evaluations of OLS and its impact. The third section is a more detailed breakdown of the major criticisms of OLS, focusing particularly on its unintended impacts and outcomes. The fourth section highlights some more positive outcomes, focusing particularly on learning and adaptation over time. The final section is our attempt to distil some key ideas arising from the experience and put them more fully at the service of the current humanitarian response.

Sudan: State of Emergency imposed in East Darfur

14 October 2014 - 3:35pm
Source: Radio Dabanga Country: Sudan

KHARTOUM (14 Oct.) - The Sudan Armed Forces Army have admitted that a brigadier was molested by militiamen in Ed Daein, capital of East Darfur, on Thursday. Today, the State of Emergency will be imposed in the entire state of East Darfur.

On Thursday, elements of the paramilitary Border guards, and the Rapid Support Forces (RSF), commanded by the security apparatus, raided a train in Ed Daein on Thursday in search of weapons.

It was rumoured that the train, en route from Nyala to Khartoum, transported large quantities of arms and ammunition for Ma'aliya militant tribesmen in East Darfur's Adila locality. Tensions between the warring Ma'aliya and Reizeigat in East Darfur are running high these days.

Col. Sawarmi Khalid Saad, the spokesman for the Sudanese army, acknowledged in a press statement on Monday that Brig. Gen. Esam Mustafa Surour, commander of the 25th Division in Ed Daein, was severely beaten by paramilitary combatants, when he attempted to prevent them to raid the train. On Sunday, the spokesman had denied the assault.

RSF leaders said that the brigadier abused the militiamen, who then responded by molesting him. Apart from searching the train, they plundered a number of shops in the vicinity of the train station.

Curfew

The commissioner of El Daein locality, Ali El Taher Sharif, informed Radio Dabanga that the State of Emergency would be announced for East Darfur state on Tuesday.

“A curfew will be imposed from 7 pm until 7 am, to curb the widespread acts of killing, kidnapping, and plundering by outlaws”.

Mali: Cereal Supply/Demand Balance for Sub-Saharan Africa as of Early September 2014

14 October 2014 - 12:03pm
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization Country: Angola, Benin, Botswana, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Cabo Verde, Central African Republic, Chad, Comoros, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gabon, Gambia, Ghana, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mozambique, Namibia, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Sao Tome and Principe, Senegal, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Africa, Sudan, Swaziland, Togo, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Zambia, Zimbabwe preview

World: Global Emergency Overview Snapshot 08–14 October

14 October 2014 - 8:19am
Source: Assessment Capacities Project Country: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Bolivia (Plurinational State of), Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic People's Republic of Korea, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, El Salvador, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guatemala, Guinea, Haiti, Honduras, India, Iraq, Jordan, Kenya, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Paraguay, Philippines, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Tonga, Uganda, Ukraine, World, Yemen, South Sudan preview

Central African Republic: 5,600 people have fled Bangui after a new wave of violence killed at least eight and injured 56. WASH and health are priority needs among the IDPs. A UN peacekeeper was ambushed and killed on the outskirts of the capital. In Kemo, IDPs have been slow to return as tensions have increased: ex-Seleka attacked Dekoa market on 11 October.

Libya: Violence continues, and over 331,000 people are in need of humanitarian assistance. 100,000 have been displaced since September, bringing the total number of displaced to 290,000. IDPs are living with host families or in public buildings.

Yemen: 80,000 people have been displaced by violence so far in 2014. Two attacks were reported in Hadramaut in the last week. In Sanaa, an Al Qaeda attack on Al Tahrir square killed 47. The violence in the capital has raised critical concerns regarding violations of international humanitarian law and human rights.

Updated: 14/10/2014. Next update: 21/10/2014

Global Emergency Overview Web Interface

Chad: Tchad : Vue Génerale des Opérations - Statistiques par camp, bureau et région de la population des personnes concernées par le HCR (Au 12/10/2014)

14 October 2014 - 3:13am
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Nigeria, Sudan preview

Sudan: Attacks, killings, rape in Darfur

14 October 2014 - 2:31am
Source: Radio Dabanga Country: Sudan

DARFUR (13 Oct .) - A young woman of Hamidiya camp for the displaced in Zalingei locality, Central Darfur, was raped on Thursday. On Monday, a woman was shot dead by a soldier in East Jebel Marra, and farmers and gunmen clashed near El Salam camp in South Darfur.

Speaking to Radio Dabanga, the coordinator of the Central Darfur camps reported that a displaced woman (17) of the Hamidiya camp was assaulted by two militiamen at Wadi Ayour.

“She was on her way to visit her mother in the area of Undero, when the two men stopped her. They beat her, before raping her alternately for an hour.”

“Passers-by found her lying on the ground in a bad physical and mental condition. They transported her to a hospital in Zalingei,” he said.

Deribat garrison

On Monday morning, Sarah Juma Hamed (25) was shot dead by gunmen in the military area of Deribat in East Jebel Marra, when she resisted a rape attempt.

“She had left the village of Tebi to fetch water, when a soldier of the Sudanese army attacked her,” a relative of the victim reported to Radio Dabanga. “She resisted fiercely, whereupon the soldier fired three shots, killing her instantly.”

The source said that Hamed’s relatives saw “not much use” in informing the commander of Deribat garrison, as most complaints have been ignored in the past

Displaced farmer assaulted

On the same morning, three gunmen attacked Abdallah Ibrahim, resident of El Salam camp for the displaced in South Darfur, when he was working at his farm in the area of Abga Rajil, south of Nyala, the capital of South Darfur.

“They shot at him, injuring both his hands,” an el Salam camp elder told Radio Dabanga. “They then beat him with their sticks, and killed his donkey.”

“A group of farmers rushed to help Ibrahim, and clashed with the assailants. One of the gunmen, Gamar Mohamed, was killed, and another, Abu Himeid, was wounded. Policemen transported the body and both wounded to Nyala Hospital.”

Sudan: Rizeigat, Ma’aliya clash in Sheiria, East Darfur

14 October 2014 - 2:30am
Source: Radio Dabanga Country: Sudan

SHEIRIA LOCALITY (13 Oct .) - One tribesman was killed and others injured in a fierce clash between Rizeigat and Ma’aliya in the area of Abu Dungul in Sheiria locality, East Darfur, on Sunday. Abu Dungul village was pillaged and burnt to ashes.

Hundreds of people fled their homes in Abu Dungul, when the village was attacked after a clash between Rizeigat and Ma’aliya tribesmen, in which one man was killed, and several were wounded. Rizeigat raided the village, and plundered the houses and shops, after which they torched the entire village.

Member of Parliament for Sheiria constituency, Feisal Ahmed El Nur, told Radio Dabanga that the situation in the area is “extremely unstable; the situation can explode any moment”.

He explained that herders have overrun Sheiria locality with their camels which are damaging vast tracts of farmlands. “Many farmers fear that they will not be able to harvest their crops, and many people expect more clashes in the near future.”

Sudan: External Situation Report on the Population Movements in Sudan (28 September - 11 October 2014)

13 October 2014 - 10:19pm
Source: International Organization for Migration Country: Sudan, South Sudan preview

Introduction

During the reporting period (28 September - 11 October), the number of South Sudanese who tracked and registered by IOM teams have been reduced dramatically, where a total of 383 South Sudanese tracked and registered in the last two weeks, in which 194 persons have been tracked in the first week (between 28th of September to 4th of September) and 189 persons tracked in the second week (5th of September to 11th of September) of the reporting period. The number of South Sudanese have been reduced with almost 50 percent in the first week of the reporting period compare with the 27th of September report (the number reduced from 378 persons to 194 persons). The number of South Sudanese reduced from 54 person per day in the last reporting period to 27 person per day.

Sudan: South Kordofan activists detained for demanding water, electricity

13 October 2014 - 2:17pm
Source: Radio Dabanga Country: Sudan

ABU JUBAIHA (13 Oct.) - Security agents detained two more student activists in Abu Jubaiha town, in the south-eastern part of South Kordofan on Thursday.

“The detention of university students Mohamed Mokhtar Alo and Mohamed Shaga by elements of the National Intelligence and Security Service (NISS) brings the number of detained activists being held by the security apparatus to eight,” a relative of one of the detainees reported to Radio Dabanga from Abu Jubaiha town.

“The first six were detained on 30 September after they had handed a memorandum to the local authorities, demanding the provision of clean drinking water and electricity services.”

“Later on Thursday, the two detained, together with Moataz El Jeili, veterinarian, Mohamed Abdel Ghaffar and Ahmed Adam El Jarari, university graduates, El Daw Kambal Suleiman, Sudan University student, Nadir El Sheikh, student at Kordofan University, Sirajeldin El Naeema, and El Buseili Saleh, trader, were deported in a heavily guarded white Buffalo car to an undisclosed destination.”

“The security forces also raided El Marfaein village, 5 km south of Abu Jubaiha, in search of student Ibrahim El Nimiya,” he added.

On 6 October, residents of Abu Jubaiha organised a sit-in in front of the NISS office in the town, demanding the release of the detainees. A delegation consisting of Abu Jubaiha notables and youth representatives met with the commissioner of Abu Jubaiha locality, and NISS officers, who promised to release the detained youths.

NISS agents later detained 15 of the protesters, among them women.