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Sudan: UNAMID organizes Peace conference in El Sereif, North Darfur

18 March 2017 - 11:30pm
Source: UN-AU Mission in Darfur Country: Sudan

From 13 to 14 March 2017, UNAMID’s Civil Affairs Section, in collaboration with the UN Development Programme (UNDP), Oxfam America, local authorities and native Administrations, jointly organized a two- day peace conference in El Serief Locality to create a platform to discuss intercommunal conflict issues between the Beni Hussein, Northern Rezeigat and other minority tribes in the area and other areas of North Darfur state. The conference was also aimed at rebuilding social cohesion and maintenance of peaceful coexistence in the area.

The two-day event, which is part of the Mission’s continued mediation efforts to promote peaceful coexistence among local communities in Darfur, brought together more than 1000 participants including prominent tribal leaders from neighboring localities, West, South and Central Darfur states and Khartoum, civil society organization as well as government officials including the Deputy Wali of North Darfur, Mr. Mohammed Breraima Hassab Alnabei, UNAMID and UNDP representatives.

In their discussions, participants called for the establishment of joint mechanisms between Beni Hussein, northern Rezeigat, Zaghawa, and Bediat tribes to manage pastoralists’ movement and shared natural resources in Abo-Jidad Area, and the need to establish early warning systems to prevent inter-communal conflicts. The restoration of state authority, rule of law and public order through empowerment of law enforcement institutions such as police and judiciary in a manner that will facilitate control of outlaws, were also discussed.

Addressing the gathering, Mr. Hassan Gibril, UNAMID Head of office, Sector North, indicated that the peace conference was organized in line with the Mission’s mandate and priorities. He also encouraged all participants to continue to embrace mutual dialogue and to share limited resources in the area.

Mike Dzakuma, Acting Head of Civil Affairs Section, reiterated UNAMID’s readiness to continue the good collaboration with the state government, local authorities, the native administrations and communities to promote peaceful coexistence in the locality and across Darfur. He encouraged participants to actively contribute to the discussions and make recommendations for durable solutions to curb inter-communal conflicts and enhance social peace in the locality. “Recurrent tensions over access to shared limited natural resources including land, water, pasture and minerals is a major trigger for inter-communal violence, especially in localities west of El Fasher, North Darfur”, added Mr. Dzakuma.

Representing UNDP, Mr. Osman Abdulkareim, explained that his organization is currently implementing a project to promote reconciliation and coexistence for sustainable peace in Darfur. He added that the UNDP will contribute to all efforts aimed at resolving conflicts through peaceful mechanisms of reconciliation and mediation across Darfur.

Ahmed Ali, a representative of the organizing committee called on participants to discuss the establishment of Ajaweed committees to resolve tensions between the tribes and address issues related to land (Hakorat) and encouraged use of traditional conflict resolution mechanisms to achieve positive results.

The representative of the native administrations, Mr. Ismail Suleiman touched on the critical need to empower native administrations and the Ajaweed Councils to build social cohesion in Darfur. He also urged the government to collect arms from civilians and to form follow-up mechanisms for the effective implementation of reconciliations outcomes.

At the end of the Conference, Traditional leaders` signed an agreement on co-existence and rebuilding the social structures including denunciation of conflicts and all types of violence and culture of war and working towards disseminating the culture of peace. The agreement further commits all concerned to take all measures available to them to prevent the eruption of conflicts, denounce tribalism and embrace the spirit of acceptance of the other people’s concerns in order to regain trust and mutual coexistence to attain and achieve common shared benefits and interests.

The agreement also addressed the need to encourage collective efforts towards fighting criminals, outlaws and spoilers by not providing them with collective tribe’s protection so as to avoid impunity and encourage the dissemination of all good values, ethics and morals.

South Sudan: UNICEF South Sudan Humanitarian Situation Report #105, 1- 15 March 2017

18 March 2017 - 6:55pm
Source: UN Children's Fund Country: South Sudan, Sudan

Highlights

• Food security levels in the country remain critical, with famine declared in southern Unity state at the end of February. Access restrictions to affected areas is limiting the ability of the humanitarian community to respond. UNICEF and WFP dispatched five rapid response teams to southern Unity in late February/early March to provide immediate, lifesaving assistance to affected populations.

• The security situation in certain areas of Unity, Upper Nile, Jonglei and Greater Equatoria remains volatile due to ongoing clashes. High levels of insecurity are expected to persist through the dry season.

• The cholera outbreak in South Sudan appears to finally be receding, with only 15 new cases reported countrywide in the past week.

Situation Overview & Humanitarian Needs

People in counties of southern Unity state continue to suffer from severe food insecurity, with the situation likely to continue to deteriorate until at least July 2017. Leer and Mayendit counties are currently experiencing famine, and there is a risk of famine in Koch County. According to the latest Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) update, approximately 100,000 people currently face starvation in Leer and Mayandit counties, while one million are on the edge of famine. An estimated 5.5 million people in South Sudan (47 per cent of the population) are projected to be severely food insecure at the height of the 2017 lean season between May to July 2017, and over 1.1 million children are estimated to be acutely malnourished this year.

The famine-affected and threatened areas have also seen an increased incidence of illness, especially acute respiratory infections, diarrhoea and malaria. There is an increasing demand for healthcare services, however some facilities have been deserted as the communities move closer to available water sources. On top of this, there has been an increase in cattle raiding as communities try cope. Health facilities have been looted and there has been an increase in casualties in need of medical assistance.

The recent assessment mission to Kapoeta, Eastern Equatoria in mid-February found the overall food security and livelihods situation to be at a critical level as a result of two consecutive years of minimal rainfall that led to total crop failure. The area is the only location in South Sudan currently estimated to be in a drought situation. At the time of the assessment, all water points in the counties were being shared by humans and livestock, while many schools in rural villages were closed due to non-attendence by students, with hunger among children being cited as the reason. The poor food security situation is exacerbated by the ongoing economic crisis and high commodity prices in the markets. Additionally, unprecedented levels of cattle raiding has led to a lack of access to milk and meat for the Toposa pastoral community, the main inhabitants of Greater Kapoeta.

The security situation in certain areas of Unity, Upper Nile, Jonglei and Greater Equatoria remains volatile as violent clashes between the Sudan People’s Liberation Army (SPLA) and the SPLA – in Opposition (SPLAiO) continue. Armed skirmishes are expected to continue in the coming months until the end of the dry season. In addition, increased levels of cattle rustling is contributing to the high levels of insecurity in some areas.

Wau town continues to experience a critical water shortage as the Wau Urban Water System remains closed due fuel for operation being unavailable. Meanwhile, the water situation in Juba has improved as a result of increased access to fuel. Two water treatment plants are now operating at about 50 per cent capacity, and water trucking to the UN House Protection of Civilians (PoC) site is ongoing.
The number of cholera cases reported in the country remains low, with only 15 new cases reported in the past week, originating from Yirol and Malakal. Since the beginning of March, 91 new cases have been reported from Awerial (Lakes), Bor (Jonglei), Rubkona (Unity), Yirol East (Lakes) and Malakal (Upper Nile).

Since the cholera outbreak first began on 18 June 2016, a total of 5,574 cholera cases and 137 deaths have been reported, with a case fatality rate (CFR) of 2.46 per cent. Overall, Yirol East has seen the highest number of deaths out of all the affected counties, despite the first cholera case in the county only being reported on 3 February 2017. Since then, 342 cases and 31 deaths have been reported, for an overall CFR of 9 per cent.

Meanwhile, the number of measles cases in the country is rapidly declining, with only 11 new cases reported in the past two weeks.

Saudi Arabia: Bulletin sur le Criquet pèlerin (No. 461, février 2017)

18 March 2017 - 5:04pm
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations Country: Algeria, Egypt, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Libya, Mauritania, Morocco, Niger, Oman, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Somalia, Sudan, Tunisia, Western Sahara, Yemen

Situation Générale en février 2017

Prévision jusqu'à’mi-avril 2017

La situation relative au Criquet pèlerin s’est améliorée en février. Grâce aux opérations de lutte intensives, les infestations ont diminué le long de la côte de la mer Rouge, en Arabie saoudite, et les populations acridiennes ont décliné sur la côte du Soudan suite au dessèchement de la végétation. En Afrique du nord-ouest, des opérations de lutte limitées ont été réalisées contre quelques groupes résiduels d’ailés dans le nord-ouest de la Mauritanie. Pendant la période de prévision, les ailés se déplaceront des aires de reproduction hivernale aux aires de reproduction printanière. Cela pourra être particulièrement visible en Arabie saoudite où des groupes d’ailés et peut-être quelques petits essaims pourraient se former sur la côte et se déplacer vers l’intérieur. Une reproduction à petite échelle aura probablement lieu dans le nord de la Mauritanie, le long du versant méridional des monts Atlas, au Maroc et en Algérie, dans la vallée du Nil dans le nord du Soudan ainsi que dans le sud-est de l’Iran mais on s’attend à ce que les effectifs acridiens restent en-deçà de seuils menaçants dans toutes ces zones.

Sudan: Sudan: Inter-Agency Operational Update: South Sudanese refugee response, 1-28 February 2017

18 March 2017 - 7:08am
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: South Sudan, Sudan

KEY FIGURES

35,845 Number of South Sudanese refugees who have arrived in Sudan in 2017.

2017 new refugee arrivals by state

White Nile 9,702 (27%)

South Kordofan 8,665 (24%)

East Darfur 7,275 (20%)

West Kordofan 7,170 (20%)

South Darfur 3,033 (9%)

332,885 Number of South Sudanese refugees who arrived in Sudan since December 2013.

FUNDING US$ 166.65 million Inter-agency funding requirements for activities under the RRRP 2017

US$ 3.16 million Received by 11 appealing agencies, as of 10 February 2017. 2% funded Funding gap: US$ 163.5 million

PRIORITIES

  • Coordination of collaborative, inter-agency assistance to new arrivals in South Kordofan.

  • Completion of biometric registration at the Kario site in East Darfur.

  • State-level contingency planning for a increased influx of refugees into Sudan in 2017.

OPERATIONAL CONTEXT

Nearly 25,000 South Sudanese refugees arrived in Sudan in February, for a total of over 35,000 refugees arriving so far in 2017. It is now estimated that over 332,000 refugees have fled to Sudan since December 2013. UNHCR was expecting up to 60,000 new arrivals in Sudan in 2017; however, the rate of new arrivals has surpassed initial expectations.
In White Nile, the expansion of the Al Waral II, Al Redis II and Um Sangour sites is underway in anticipation of an increasing influx over the coming months. On 3 February, clashes close to Sudan forced the evacuation of the Al Kuek North border point. Approximately 900 people were transported to safety at the Um Sangour site. A new entry point has been established at Um Jelala, about 10 km from the border, where temporary registration of new arrivals was resumed by the Sudan Red Crescent Society (SRCS). SRCS is providing new arrivals with hot meals, water, medical assistance and nutrition screening. The refugees are then transferred to a refugee site, where they are biometrically registered by UNHCR and non-food items (NFIs) and shelter arrangements are made.
An inter-agency rapid assessment mission was conducted 21-27 February to assess the needs of refugees newly arrived to the El Amira reception centre and several settlements near El Leri, a remote area with limited access of humanitarian partners in South Kordofan. The mission met with local authorities, line ministries, host communities and refugee community leaders in Dar-Bati, Um Kawaro, and Elgoghb, and learned that the new arrivals are mostly from Upper Nile state in South Sudan, having entered Sudan on foot. Refugees are in urgent need of food, health and WASH services and NFIs. The majority of new arrivals were reported to be women, children and elderly persons with Shilluk ethnicity, with some Dinka who usually move onwards to other areas in Sudan, including Khartoum and White Nile. The mission identified 719 unaccompanied and separated children (UASC) among the new arrivals. Over 1,000 persons with special needs (PWSNs) have been identified, and vulnerability assessments are planned.
While the relationship between the refugees and host communities in the El Leri area are good, there does exist potential for friction over scarce local water resources in Dar-Bati. UNHCR began the distribution of 1,000 NFI kits to new arrivals. WFP dispatched emergency rations to cover the needs of both new arrivals and the pre-existing caseload. UNICEF is providing temporary water trucking to El Amira reception centre and El Leri for the next 45 days, while partners explore a more sustainable solution to local water shortages for refugees, which will also serve host community members who have shared available water in the area to date.
An inter-agency mission to Al Lait, North Darfur was conducted 12-16 February to determine the profile of 19,531 refugees who have resided across ten different locations since May 2016. Through field visits to hosting villages and discussions with community leaders, agencies learned that the refugees are from Northern Bahr Gazal, South Sudan and transited to North Darfur through West Kordofan. The host communities are sharing resources with the refugees; however, facilities are overstretched and require urgent multi-sector interventions including shelter and NFIs, food, health, nutrition, WASH, protection and livelihoods. The initial assessment indicates that the refugees, host community and local authorities would prefer community-based assistance with support to host communities. An inter-agency response plan is being developed. In the meantime, WFP will revisit Al Lait in mid-March to begin general food distribution, and UNHCR will conduct Level 1 (household) registration and distribute emergency shelters (ES) and NFIs.

Italy: Mediterranean Update, Migration Flows Europe: Arrivals and Fatalities: 17 March 2017

18 March 2017 - 6:44am
Source: International Organization for Migration Country: Afghanistan, Côte d'Ivoire, Eritrea, Gambia, Greece, Guinea, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Italy, Mali, Nigeria, Pakistan, Senegal, Spain, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, World

19,722 arrivals by sea in 2017 525 dead/missing published 09:00 CET 17 March 363,401 arrivals in 2016

World: Food Assistance Outlook Brief, March 2017

18 March 2017 - 4:26am
Source: Famine Early Warning System Network Country: Afghanistan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, El Salvador, Ethiopia, Guatemala, Guinea, Haiti, Honduras, Kenya, Lesotho, Liberia, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Rwanda, Senegal, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, World, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe

This brief summarizes FEWS NET’s most forward-looking analysis of projected emergency food assistance needs in FEWS NET coverage countries. The projected size of each country’s acutely food insecure population is compared to last year and the recent five-year average. Countries where external emergency food assistance needs are anticipated are identified. Projected lean season months highlighted in red indicate either an early start or an extension to the typical lean season. Additional information is provided for countries with large food insecure populations, an expectation of high severity, or where other key issues warrant additional discussion.

World: Global Migration Data Analysis Centre: Data briefing series: Issue No. 8, March 2017 - Migrant deaths and disappearances worldwide: 2016 analysis

17 March 2017 - 3:37pm
Source: International Organization for Migration Country: Afghanistan, Algeria, Bangladesh, Colombia, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, El Salvador, Eritrea, France, Gambia, Greece, Guatemala, Guinea, Honduras, Hungary, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Iraq, Italy, Mali, Mexico, Morocco, Myanmar, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Pakistan, Senegal, Serbia, Slovenia, Somalia, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, World, Yemen

Germany - A new data briefing produced by IOM’s Global Migration Data Analysis Centre (GMDAC) highlights a 27 percent increase in migrant deaths worldwide during 2016 compared to 2015. The number of migrant deaths and disappearances recorded by IOM increased significantly in many regions of the world, including the Mediterranean, the Middle East, North Africa, and Latin America.

Issue 8 of IOM’s GMDAC data briefing series, titled “Migrant Deaths and Disappearances Worldwide: 2016 Analysis”, provides an in-depth look at the recorded data on migrant deaths and disappearances throughout 2016. Key figures for regions in which migrant deaths have been recorded – namely, the Mediterranean Sea, Europe, North Africa, the Middle East, Southeast Asia, and the Americas – are explored.

“In 2016, IOM documented the deaths of 7,763 migrants worldwide,” said GMDAC Director Frank Laczko. “This represents an increase of 27 percent compared to 2015, and of 47 percent compared to 2014.”

Data collected by IOM’s Missing Migrants Project show that more than 5,085 migrants died in the Mediterranean in 2016 – a 34 percent increase compared to the 3,784 recorded 2015. This increase in deaths occurred despite increased search and rescue efforts compared with the previous year.

The increase of fatalities along the Central Mediterranean route is striking. In 2016, the number of deaths in the Central Mediterranean was the highest number recorded by IOM since 2014. The number of migrant deaths in the Mediterranean is higher than any year since at least 2000. The average number of deaths per incident in the Central Mediterranean almost doubled last year, from an average of 12 deaths per incident in 2015 to 33 deaths per incident in 2016.

The briefing also discusses the increase in the number of migrant deaths recorded in Africa. At least 1,280 migrant deaths were recorded in North Africa in 2016, nearly double the 672 deaths recorded in the region in 2015. Though this increase may be indicative of improved data collection efforts in the region, data compiled by Missing Migrants Project indicate that migration routes through southern Libya, in eastern Sudan and southern Egypt are highly risky for migrants.

The number of migrant deaths recorded in the Americas, including the Caribbean, also increased significantly in 2016. IOM´s Missing Migrants project recorded 707 deaths in the Latin America and the Caribbean in 2016, an increase of 43 percent over the 493 recorded in 2015.

The increase in migrant deaths and disappearances across many regions of the world, as highlighted by the data discussed in the briefing, indicate that migration became less – not more – safe.

For further information please contact: Julia Black at IOM GMDAC, Tel: +49 30 278 778 27, Email: jblack@iom.int

South Sudan: EU scales up response to famine and drought-affected countries in Horn of Africa with additional €165 million

17 March 2017 - 10:15am
Source: European Commission, European Commission's Directorate-General for European Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations Country: Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Uganda

On the occasion of an official visit to the African Union in Addis Ababa, Commissioner for International Cooperation and Development Neven Mimica, announced a support package of €165 million to address the multiple crises in the Horn of Africa region.

Commissioner Mimica said: "The sooner we act, the more lives we can save. This package of €165 million will support the urgent needs of South Sudanese people in the country and the region but also the millions of people at risk of famine in the Horn of Africa. With this additional support, the EU shows the way to other members of the international community to also respond urgently."

Commissioner for Humanitarian Aid and Crisis Management Christos Stylianides said: "The European Union is responding immediately to the needs arising from the severe famine in South Sudan and the dire droughts in Somalia, Ethiopia and Kenya. With this new assistance, we will do our upmost to contain the effects of these extremely challenging circumstances in the Horn of Africa.''

South Sudan crisis

From this package of support, €100 million will be allocated to respond to the humanitarian crisis caused by the violent conflict in South Sudan. Out of this, €30 million will provide lifesaving assistance to vulnerable people in South Sudan. Assistance will offer protection to women and children at risk, or victims, of human rights abuses, as well as support to treat alarming levels of malnutrition, diseases and water and sanitation. The remaining amount of €70 million will support South Sudan's neighbouring countries, notably Ethiopia, Uganda, Kenya and Sudan, to continue providing protection and addressing the needs of South Sudanese fleeing conflict and seeking shelter in their territories.

Droughts in Somalia, Ethiopia, Kenya

The second part of the package, in the amount of €65 million, is planned to respond to the serious droughts in Somalia, Ethiopia and Kenya. Changing climatic conditions and successive failed rains during the past three years are triggering a humanitarian crisis of huge proportions. The negative effects of the droughts are likely to intensify in 2017, as rains are projected to be below average during the next rain season. The situation is particularly dire in Somalia, where the number of people in need has increased drastically to 6.2 million, that is half the population, and where there is a real risk of famine later in 2017. A pre-famine alert has already been issued in February of this year.

Background

This new package will also scale up and strengthen over €400 million that the EU allocated in 2016 to address the humanitarian crises and the effects of El Niño in the region. It will also complement the €200 million which the EU approved in February this year to support the new Government of Somalia to continue transitioning out of fragility and building a resilience society.

Ethiopia: Ethiopia: Refugees and Asylum-seekers as of 28 February 2017

17 March 2017 - 9:37am
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Eritrea, Ethiopia, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Yemen

811,555 Registered Refugees and Asylum-seekers

237,157 Households

Somalia: Drought in Africa 2017

17 March 2017 - 9:05am
Source: IRIN Country: Angola, Burundi, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Lesotho, Madagascar, Malawi, Rwanda, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Swaziland, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, World, Zimbabwe

By Obi Anyadike, Editor-at-Large and Africa Editor

Farmers, traders and consumers across East and Southern Africa are feeling the impact of consecutive seasons of drought that have scorched harvests and ruined livelihoods.

Read more on IRIN

South Sudan: IHH Sends Emergency Aid to East Africa and Yemen

17 March 2017 - 8:19am
Source: IHH Country: Djibouti, Ethiopia, Kenya, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Yemen

IHH Humanitarian Relief Foundation delivered food aid to 4.000 people in Southern Sudan and 500 families in Yemen. Moreover IHH will soon open 110 new wells in East Africa.

IHH Humanitarian Relief Foundation continues humanitarian relief operations in five continents and 135 countries without discriminating in terms of race, religion, or denomination. IHH has recently launched a campaign for emergency aid to Somalia, Southern Sudan and Yemen, which are affected by drought and conflict. While 110 wells are under construction in East African countries 500 families have received food aid in conjunction with the campaign.

110 New Wells in East Africa

IHH teams started working on to open 40 wells in Somalia where the drought is most severely felt, 30 wells in Darfur, 10 wells in Kenya, 20 wells in Ethiopia, and 10 wells in Djibouti.

Thanks to the ongoing support of its donors IHH Humanitarian Relief Foundation has opened 2.680 wells in East African countries primarily in those struggling with drought such as Somalia, Ethiopia, Sudan and Kenya.

So the number of wells that IHH opened around the world reached 5.984.

Emergency Aid to 4.000 Families from Southern Sudan

IHH teams who went to Southern Sudan to coordinate the aid operations in the field started working in capital Juba. They are distributing food hampers each 27 kg that includes corn flour, wheat flour, vegetable oil, rice, sugar and beans.

IHH East Africa Department coordinator Ismail Songür, who is heading the team, said “If donors keep up their support we are planning to deliver aid to bigger number of people here.”

“We have carried out our aid in Mahad and Don Bosco camps located in Juba, capital of Sourthern Sudan. We have delivered emergency aid to 4.000 people living in the camps. Moreover we are planning to deliver aid to internally displaced people from Bentui region. Because the central government has totally collapsed here the need is greater. We hope to receive support from charitable donors,” he added.

Aid Delivered to 500 families in Yemen

14,4 million people need food and potable water in Yemen plagued by civil war. There are over 3 million internally displaced people who need safe shelters. IHH Humanitarian Relief Foundation carries out humanitarian operations nonstop in the region

In conjunction with the aid campaign launched for Yemen IHH delivered food aid to 500 families in Sana, and Amran.

New Aid on the Way

IHH is geared up to increase the aid with the support of donors.

World: Recovery, relapse, and episodes of default in the management of acute malnutrition in children in humanitarian emergencies: A systematic review

17 March 2017 - 3:54am
Source: Department for International Development, Tufts University, Oxfam Country: Afghanistan, Angola, Chad, Ethiopia, Kenya, Malawi, Niger, Sierra Leone, Sudan, World

This systematic review, commissioned by the Humanitarian Evidence Programme (HEP) and carried out by a research team from the University of Sheffield, represents the first attempt to apply systematic review methodology to establish the relationships between recovery and relapse and between default rates and repeated episodes of default or relapse in the management of acute malnutrition in children in humanitarian emergencies in low- and middle-income countries

  • the relationship between recovery and relapse; and between relapse and default or return default/episodes of default in children aged 6–59 months affected by humanitarian emergencies
  • reasons for default and relapse or return defaults/episodes of default in children aged 6–59 months affected by humanitarian emergencies.

Severe acute malnutrition (SAM, or severe wasting) and moderate acute malnutrition (MAM, or moderate wasting) affect 52 million children under five years of age around the globe. This systematic review seeks to establish whether there is a relationship between recovery and relapse or a relationship between default rates and/or repeated episodes of default or relapse following treatment for SAM and MAM in children aged 6–59 months in humanitarian emergencies. The review also seeks to determine the reasons for default and relapse in the same population.

The systematic review, together with corresponding executive summary and evidence brief, forms part of a series of humanitarian evidence syntheses and systematic reviews commissioned by the Humanitarian Evidence Programme. Other reports in the series review the evidence on interventions or approaches to mental health, child protection, market support and household food security, acute malnutrition, pastoralist livelihoods, shelter self-recovery and urban response.

The Humanitarian Evidence Programme is a partnership between Oxfam GB and the Feinstein International Center at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, Tufts University. It is funded by the United Kingdom (UK) government’s Department for International Development (DFID) through the Humanitarian Innovation and Evidence Programme.

Democratic Republic of the Congo: Rapport du Secrétaire général sur la mise en œuvre de l’Accord-cadre pour la paix, la sécurité et la coopération pour la République démocratique du Congo et la région (S/2017/208)

16 March 2017 - 1:48pm
Source: UN Security Council Country: Angola, Burundi, Central African Republic, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Rwanda, South Africa, South Sudan, Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Zambia

I. Introduction

  1. Établi en application de la résolution 2277 (2016) du Conseil de sécurité, par laquelle le Conseil m’a prié de lui rendre compte du respect des engagements pris dans l’Accord-cadre pour la paix, la sécurité et la coopération pour la République démocratique du Congo et la région1 , le présent rapport fait le point sur l’évolution de la situation depuis mon rapport du 4 octobre 2016 (S/2016/840), ainsi que sur les faits nouveaux intervenus sur le plan de la paix et de la sécurité dans l’est de la République démocratique du Congo et la région des Grands Lacs jusqu’au 28 février 2017.

II. Principaux faits nouveaux

A. Situation en matière de sécurité

  1. Au cours de la période considérée, les activités des groupes armés illégaux, notamment les Forces démocratiques de libération du Rwanda (FDLR), les Forces démocratiques alliées (ADF), les Forces de résistance patriotique de l’Ituri (FPRI), les groupes Maï-Maï et l’Armée de résistance du Seigneur, conjuguées à des tensions interethniques dans plusieurs zones de la République démocratique du Congo ont continué de menacer la sécurité et la stabilité de la région. Face à ce constat, les Forces armées de la République démocratique du Congo (FARDC) et la Mission de l’Organisation des Nations Unies pour la stabilisation en République démocratique du Congo (MONUSCO) ont poursuivi leurs opérations contre les FDLR, les ADF et les FPRI, comme je le décris en détail dans mes rapports sur la MONUSCO datés du 29 décembre 2016 (S/2016/1130) et du 10 mars 2017 (S/2017/206).

  2. La période considérée a été marquée par la reprise des affrontements entre les FARDC et des éléments de l’ex-Mouvement du 23 mars (ex-M23) dans le NordKivu, dans l’est de la République démocratique du Congo, ce qui n’était pas arrivé depuis la signature des Déclarations de Nairobi en décembre 2013. Après que, le 11 novembre 2016, Sultani Makenga, le chef militaire de l’ex-M23, a été signalé disparu de son domicile de Kampala, le Ministre congolais de la défense, Crispin Atama Tabe, a demandé au Mécanisme conjoint de vérification élargi de la Conférence internationale sur la région des Grands Lacs d’enquêter sur des informations selon lesquelles environ 180 anciens membres du M23 auraient quitté leur cantonnement de Bihanga (Ouganda) et infiltré le territoire du Rutshuru, dans la province du Nord-Kivu.

  3. Le 19 janvier 2017, le Gouvernement ougandais a publié une déclaration dans laquelle il annonçait avoir arrêté 101 anciens membres du M23 qui se rendaient en République démocratique du Congo. En outre, il y reconnaissait que quelque 40 combattants s’étaient auparavant échappés du camp de Bihanga, réaffirmait son attachement aux Déclarations de Nairobi et soulignait que l’Ouganda n’appuierait aucune activité visant à déstabiliser la République démocratique du Congo.

  4. Le 27 janvier, deux hélicoptères des FARDC se sont écrasés dans deux accidents distincts à Rutshuru, alors que les FARDC auraient affronté des combattants de l’ex-M23 à proximité. Le 29 janvier, la Force de défense rwandaise a indiqué qu’un groupe se réclamant de l’ex-M23 avait pénétré au Rwanda, apparemment pour fuir les combats avec les FARDC. Selon certaines informations, les autorités rwandaises ont remis les individus au Comité international de la Croix - Rouge afin que les mesures qui s’imposent soient prises en vertu du droit international.

  5. Le 22 février, un porte-parole des FARDC a indiqué que les forces armées congolaises avaient échangé des tirs pendant deux jours avec des combattants de l’ex-M23 près de Rutshuru, dans le Nord-Kivu, faisant au moins 16 morts parmi les rebelles. Le lendemain, un porte-parole des Forces de défense populaires de l’Ouganda a annoncé que 44 combattants de l’ex-M23 qui avaient fui vers l’Ouganda à la suite d’accrochages avec les FARDC avaient été arrêtés et étaient détenus dans un camp militaire de Kisoro, dans l’ouest du pays.

  6. L’arrivée en août 2016, dans l’est de la République démocratique du Congo, d’éléments du Mouvement/Armée populaire de libération du Soudan dans l’opposition (M/APLS dans l’opposition) fuyant le conflit au Soudan du Sud continue de poser problème et pourrait exacerber les tensions au sein des communautés locales fragiles et longtemps traumatisées par les activités des groupes armés. En outre, cela pourrait avoir des conséquences négatives sur les relations qu’entretiennent la République démocratique du Congo et le Soudan du Sud. Les autorités congolaises ont demandé à la MONUSCO d’évacuer le plus rapidement possible les éléments du M/APLS dans l’opposition qui se trouvaient sur le territoire congolais.

  7. Par ailleurs, le 21 décembre 2016, des affrontements opposant les FARDC et la Force de défense nationale du Burundi à Uvira, dans la province du Sud -Kivu, ont fait au moins cinq morts parmi les soldats burundais. Ces derniers auraient traversé la frontière alors qu’ils étaient à la poursuite d’éléments armés appartenant aux Forces nationales de libération (FNL). Les affrontements ont fait suite aux opérations menées par la Force de défense nationale pour neutraliser des rebelles burundais qui opéraient le long de la frontière avec la République démocratique du Congo.

  8. Au Burundi, bien que la situation globale en matière de sécurité se soit un peu améliorée, les violences se sont poursuivies avec la tentative d’assassinat sur le conseiller présidentiel Willy Nyamitwe le 28 novembre 2016 et l’assassinat du Ministre de l’environnement, Emmanuel Niyonkuru, le 1er janvier 2017.

  9. En Ouganda, l’affrontement entre les forces de sécurité et les milices locales dans le district de Kasese, dans la région de Ruwenzori, les 26 et 27 novembre 2016, a suscité un regain des tensions intercommunautaires dans les zones frontalières avec la République démocratique du Congo. Les combats ont éclaté parce que des gardes présumés du chef coutumier de Rwenzori, Charles Wesley Mumbere, accusé par les autorités ougandaises de diriger un mouvement sécessionniste, auraient attaqué des patrouilles de police et de l’armée. On rapporte qu’au moins 87 personnes ont été tuées et 149 autres arrêtées. Le 27 novembre 2016, la police a placé M. Mumbere en détention. Il a ensuite été libéré sous caution le 6 février 2017.

Democratic Republic of the Congo: Report of the Secretary-General on the implementation of the Peace, Security and Cooperation Framework for the Democratic Republic of the Congo and the Region (S/2017/208)

16 March 2017 - 1:46pm
Source: UN Security Council Country: Angola, Burundi, Central African Republic, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, Rwanda, South Africa, South Sudan, Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Zambia

I. Introduction

  1. The present report is submitted pursuant to Security Council resolution 2277 (2016), in which the Council requested me to report on the implementation of the commitments under the Peace, Security and Cooperation Framework for the Democratic Republic of the Congo and the Region.

It covers developments since the issuance of my report of 4 October 2016 (S/2016/840) and provides information on peace and security developments in the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo and the Great Lakes region until 28 February 2017.

II. Major developments

A. Security situation

  1. During the reporting period, the activities of illegal armed groups, including the Forces démocratiques de libération du Rwanda (FDLR), the Allied Democratic Forces (ADF), the Force de résistance patriotique de l’Ituri (FRPI), Mai-Mai groups and the Lord’s Resistance Army, combined with inter-ethnic tensions in several parts of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, have continued to threaten security and stability. In response, the Armed Forces of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (FARDC) and the United Nations Organization Stabilization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUSCO) have continued operations against FDLR, ADF and FRPI, as detailed in my reports on MONUSCO of 29 December 2016 (S/2016/1130) and of 10 March 2017 (S/2017/206).

  2. The reporting period witnessed the resumption of clashes between FARDC and elements of the former Mouvement du 23 mars (M23) in North Kivu, in the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, the first since the signing of the Nairobi Declarations in December 2013. Following reports of the disappearance on 11 November 2016 of Sultani Makenga, the military leader of the former M23, from his residence in Kampala, the Minister for Defence of the Democratic Republic of Congo, Crispin Atama Tabe, requested the Expanded Joint Verification Mechanism of the International Conference on the Great Lakes Region (ICGLR) to investigate reports that approximately 180 former members of M23 had left their cantonment in Bihanga, Uganda, and infiltrated Rutshuru territory in North Kivu province.

  3. On 19 January 2017, the Government of Uganda issued a statement noting that it had arrested 101 former members of M23 headed to the Democratic Republic of the Congo. In the statement, the Government acknowledged that some 40 combatants had escaped from the Bihanga camp earlier, reaffirmed its commitment to the Nairobi Declarations and stressed that Uganda would not support any activity intended to destabilize the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

  4. On 27 January, two FARDC helicopters crashed in two separate incidents in Rutshuru, as FARDC reportedly battled former M23 combatants in the vicinity. On 29 January, the Rwanda Defence Force indicated that a group claiming to belong to the former M23 and reportedly fleeing combat with FARDC had crossed into Rwanda. Reports indicate that the Rwandan authorities handed the individuals over to the International Committee of the Red Cross for appropriate action under international law.

  5. On 22 February, a spokesperson for FARDC indicated that Congolese armed forces had exchanged fire with ex-M23 combatants over a period of two days, near Rutshuru, North Kivu, killing at least 16 rebels. The following day, a spokesperson for the Uganda People’s Defence Forces announced that 44 ex-M23 combatants, who had fled to Uganda following clashes with FARDC, had been apprehended and were being held in a military camp in Kisoro, western Uganda.

  6. The arrival of elements of the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement/Army in Opposition (SPLM/A-IO) in the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo in August 2016, fleeing conflict in South Sudan, remains a matter of concern and could exacerbate tensions in fragile local communities that have long been traumatized by the activities of armed groups. Furthermore, the development could negatively affect relations between the Democratic Republic of the Congo and South Sudan. Congolese authorities have called upon MONUSCO to remove SPLM/A-IO elements on its premises from Congolese territory as soon as possible.

  7. In a separate development, on 21 December 2016, clashes occurred between FARDC and the Burundi National Defence Force in Uvira, South Kivu province, killing at least five Burundian soldiers. The latter had reportedly crossed the border in pursuit of armed elements from the Forces nationales de libération (FNL). The incident followed efforts by the Burundi National Defence Force to neutralize Burundian rebels operating along the border with the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

  8. In Burundi, while the overall security situation has somewhat improved, violence continued with the assassination attempt on Presidential Adviser Willy Nyamitwe, on 28 November 2016, and the killing of the Minister for Environment, Emmanuel Niyonkuru, on 1 January 2017.

  9. In Uganda, intercommunal tensions in the areas bordering the Democratic Republic of the Congo escalated when security forces clashed with local militia in Kasese District, Rwenzori region, on 26 and 27 November 2016. The fighting occurred after suspected guards of the Rwenzori traditional leader, Charles Wesley Mumbere, accused by Ugandan authorities of leading a secessionist movement, reportedly attacked police and army patrols. At least 87 were reported killed and 149 arrested. Police detained Mr. Mumbere on 27 November 2016. He was subsequently granted bail on 6 February 2017.

Sudan: Sudan: Humanitarian Bulletin | Issue 7 | 27 February – 12 March 2017 [EN/AR]

16 March 2017 - 10:58am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: South Sudan, Sudan

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Over 25,000 people in Belle Elsereif in South Darfur’s East Jebel Marra locality are in need of humanitarian aid.

  • Aid organisations continue to respond to the needs of over 53,000 Jebel Marra IDPs in North Darfur.

  • National cereal production is estimated at 8 million MT—a 70% increase compared to the five-year average.

  • Over 11,000 people in Kurmuk locality, Blue Nile State are facing serious water shortages.

FIGURES 2017 HRP

# people in need in Sudan (2017 HNO) 4.8 million

# people in need in Darfur (2017 HNO) 3 million

GAM caseload (2017 HNO) 2.2 million

South Sudanese refugee arrivals in Sudan - since 15 Dec 2013 (registered by UNHCR) - as of 8 March 2017 332,000

Refugees of other nationalities (registered by UNHCR) - as of 31 Oct 2016 140,626

FUNDING

564.8 million US$ received in 2016

58.1% Reported funding (as of 5 March 2017)

25,000 people in need of humanitarian assistance in East Jebel Marra locality, South Darfur

An inter-agency mission to Belle Elsereif village in East Jebel Marra locality, South Darfur, took place from 19 to 21 February to assess humanitarian needs in the area. People in Belle Elsereif and surrounding villages were affected by conflict between government forces and the Sudan Liberation Movement–Abdul Wahid (SLA-AW) between 2014 and 2015.

The mission estimated that about 25,000 people (14,000 internally displaced persons (IDPs), 7,500 returnees and 3,500 nomads) in the area need access to clean water and sanitation, health care and nutrition services, emergency household supplies, as well as education and protection support. The area lacks basic services and infrastructure. The mission stated that any humanitarian intervention should consider the nomadic communities who currently share the resources with the IDPs and returnees. Registration and verification of needs should take place before the delivery of humanitarian assistance. However, immediate assistance will soon be provided to the most vulnerable.

More water sources required to meet the needs of people in the area

There are three hand pumps in Belle Elsereif, the main village in the area, which serve both Belle Elsereif and 10 surrounding villages. People often have to wait up to three hours to collect water. According to the mission, existing water sources are sufficient to serve 3,500 out of the 17,600 people in the area. Other water sources are located 2 to 3 kilometres away, which poses potential health hazards as the water points are also used by animals, and also means inhabitants may face potential protection risks while collecting water. As a result, the people in the area depend on inadequate, contaminated water sources in the immediate vicinity. There are no sanitation facilities in the area, but a few families were attempting to construct improvised latrines. Some of the mission recommendations include increasing the number of water sources for use by villagers and nomads; building latrines and carrying out sanitation awareness activities; and activating water user committees in Belle Elsereif.

Urgent need for health and nutrition assistance

There is no health facility in Belle Elsereif, however, there is a clinic made out of local materials 3km away in Dobo Al Madrassa village, which has one medical assistant and one nurse. This clinic serves people in Belle Elsereif and surrounding villages. Recommendations include providing a wider range of health services; stocking existing facilities with essential medicines; vaccinating children and women; and carrying out health education and hygiene promotion activities.

A nutrition screening carried out in Belle Elsereif in September 2016 identified 43 children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) and four children with oedema—swelling caused by the accumulation of fluid in the body. High rates of oedema can lead to high mortality rates among malnourished populations. During the conflict, nutrition facilities in the area were destroyed or looted, and there are currently no nutrition facilities or staff in Belle Elsereif or the surrounding villages. If immediate interventions are not undertaken, the nutrition status of children will deteriorate, according to mission findings. Recommendations include starting outpatient therapeutic programmes (OTP) and therapeutic supplementary feeding programmes (TSFP) to tackle nutrition problems; and carrying out community awareness programmes to improve infant and young child feeding.

Schools need furniture and learning materials

There is one basic school in Belle Elsereif with 300 students and seven other schools in the surrounding villages accommodating 1,913 children. All schools lack teaching and learning materials and nearly all the teachers are volunteers. Recommendations include rehabilitating the schools in Belle Elsereif and surrounding villages; providing school furniture and learning materials; and bringing in teachers from the State Ministry of Education (SMoE).

Food support will be required during the lean season People in Belle Elsereif have sufficient stocks of food to meet their current needs. However, their food security is likely to deteriorate during the May-August lean season due to the consumption of these food stocks. Recommendations from the mission include providing agricultural supplies to ensure sufficient food production and to improve livelihood options; and training farmers on using better water harvesting/irrigation techniques.

Sudan: Sudan: Humanitarian Bulletin | Issue 7 | 27 February – 12 March 2017

16 March 2017 - 10:58am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: South Sudan, Sudan

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Over 25,000 people in Belle Elsereif in South Darfur’s East Jebel Marra locality are in need of humanitarian aid.

  • Aid organisations continue to respond to the needs of over 53,000 Jebel Marra IDPs in North Darfur.

  • National cereal production is estimated at 8 million MT—a 70% increase compared to the five-year average.

  • Over 11,000 people in Kurmuk locality, Blue Nile State are facing serious water shortages.

FIGURES 2017 HRP

# people in need in Sudan (2017 HNO) 4.8 million

# people in need in Darfur (2017 HNO) 3 million

GAM caseload (2017 HNO) 2.2 million

South Sudanese refugee arrivals in Sudan - since 15 Dec 2013 (registered by UNHCR) - as of 8 March 2017 332,000

Refugees of other nationalities (registered by UNHCR) - as of 31 Oct 2016 140,626

FUNDING

564.8 million US$ received in 2016

58.1% Reported funding (as of 5 March 2017)

25,000 people in need of humanitarian assistance in East Jebel Marra locality, South Darfur

An inter-agency mission to Belle Elsereif village in East Jebel Marra locality, South Darfur, took place from 19 to 21 February to assess humanitarian needs in the area. People in Belle Elsereif and surrounding villages were affected by conflict between government forces and the Sudan Liberation Movement–Abdul Wahid (SLA-AW) between 2014 and 2015.

The mission estimated that about 25,000 people (14,000 internally displaced persons (IDPs), 7,500 returnees and 3,500 nomads) in the area need access to clean water and sanitation, health care and nutrition services, emergency household supplies, as well as education and protection support. The area lacks basic services and infrastructure. The mission stated that any humanitarian intervention should consider the nomadic communities who currently share the resources with the IDPs and returnees. Registration and verification of needs should take place before the delivery of humanitarian assistance. However, immediate assistance will soon be provided to the most vulnerable.

More water sources required to meet the needs of people in the area

There are three hand pumps in Belle Elsereif, the main village in the area, which serve both Belle Elsereif and 10 surrounding villages. People often have to wait up to three hours to collect water. According to the mission, existing water sources are sufficient to serve 3,500 out of the 17,600 people in the area. Other water sources are located 2 to 3 kilometres away, which poses potential health hazards as the water points are also used by animals, and also means inhabitants may face potential protection risks while collecting water. As a result, the people in the area depend on inadequate, contaminated water sources in the immediate vicinity. There are no sanitation facilities in the area, but a few families were attempting to construct improvised latrines. Some of the mission recommendations include increasing the number of water sources for use by villagers and nomads; building latrines and carrying out sanitation awareness activities; and activating water user committees in Belle Elsereif.

Urgent need for health and nutrition assistance

There is no health facility in Belle Elsereif, however, there is a clinic made out of local materials 3km away in Dobo Al Madrassa village, which has one medical assistant and one nurse. This clinic serves people in Belle Elsereif and surrounding villages. Recommendations include providing a wider range of health services; stocking existing facilities with essential medicines; vaccinating children and women; and carrying out health education and hygiene promotion activities.

A nutrition screening carried out in Belle Elsereif in September 2016 identified 43 children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) and four children with oedema—swelling caused by the accumulation of fluid in the body. High rates of oedema can lead to high mortality rates among malnourished populations. During the conflict, nutrition facilities in the area were destroyed or looted, and there are currently no nutrition facilities or staff in Belle Elsereif or the surrounding villages. If immediate interventions are not undertaken, the nutrition status of children will deteriorate, according to mission findings. Recommendations include starting outpatient therapeutic programmes (OTP) and therapeutic supplementary feeding programmes (TSFP) to tackle nutrition problems; and carrying out community awareness programmes to improve infant and young child feeding.

Schools need furniture and learning materials

There is one basic school in Belle Elsereif with 300 students and seven other schools in the surrounding villages accommodating 1,913 children. All schools lack teaching and learning materials and nearly all the teachers are volunteers. Recommendations include rehabilitating the schools in Belle Elsereif and surrounding villages; providing school furniture and learning materials; and bringing in teachers from the State Ministry of Education (SMoE).

Food support will be required during the lean season People in Belle Elsereif have sufficient stocks of food to meet their current needs. However, their food security is likely to deteriorate during the May-August lean season due to the consumption of these food stocks. Recommendations from the mission include providing agricultural supplies to ensure sufficient food production and to improve livelihood options; and training farmers on using better water harvesting/irrigation techniques.

World: Disasters and national economic resilience

16 March 2017 - 7:47am
Source: ODI - Humanitarian Practice Network Country: Burkina Faso, Chad, Ethiopia, Kenya, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Nepal, Niger, Senegal, South Sudan, Sudan, Uganda, World

By Catherine Simonet, Eva Comba and Emily Wilkinson

This working paper provides an analysis of economic resilience at the national level, presenting a broad picture of changes in resilience to climate extremes over a 42 year period. It focuses on 12 countries in the Sahel, East Africa and Asia that are part of the UK Government funded resilience programme Building Resilience and Adaptation to Climate Extremes and Disasters (BRACED).

In this paper, authors create a typology of risk for countries that can be used to inform approaches to building resilience. Burkina Faso and Mali, for example, have a ‘mono-risk’ profile as they have experienced relatively few events, whereas Nepal has a ‘multi-risk’ profile and has experienced various disasters over the 42 year period analysed. Droughts are seen to have a disproportionate effect compared with other climate-related hazards, especially in Africa, and floods have also been very frequent.

This paper looks at how the national economies of different sets of developing countries are affected by disasters and have been able to ‘bounce back’ afterwards. The findings confirm a negative significant effect of disasters on economic growth: a climate event that affects 1% of the population contributes to a reduction in gross domestic product of 0.05% on average. In particular, the negative effects of climate-induced events are highly significant and important in landlocked countries, a category that includes many BRACED countries. More specifically, shocks seem to be absorbed one year following a disaster, but there is a negative impact on economic growth three years following a disaster.

Read the full report on ODI.

Sudan: European Union and UNIDO: to foster employment opportunities and economic growth in Sudan [EN/AR]

16 March 2017 - 6:35am
Source: European Union Country: Sudan, World

Ambassador Jean-Michel Dumond, Head of Delegation of the European Union to Sudan (EU) and Khaled El Mekwad, Representative of the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO), have signed an agreement to implement a project to foster employment opportunities and economic growth in Sudan.

The project is funded by the European Union through the EU Trust Fund for Africa, and its Regional Development and Protection Programme (RDPP) in the Horn of Africa, in which Sudan participates. The RDPP is one of the flagship initiatives within the broader “Valletta Action Plan” - a result of the Valletta Summit on Migration, held in the capital of Malta in November 2015 - which reiterates the EU’s strong commitment in addressing the root causes of displacement and irregular migration from Africa to Europe. The EU will provide €3m to the newly signed project.

UNIDO will implement the project over a period of three years by enhancing employment opportunities and stimulating entrepreneurship for migrant youth, refugees, asylum seekers and members of host communities in Khartoum State, Sudan. The project will benefit from demand-oriented skills development programmes involving technical vocational training, small business development and legal protection. The intervention is intended to provide alternatives to primary and secondary movements of migrants and refugees and enhance self-reliance opportunities. Special attention will be given to youth and women IDPs and migrants from Eritrea, Ethiopia, South Sudan and other neighbouring countries.

Ambassador Jean-Michel Dumond said: “This project will train youth, adult migrants and refugees with competitive technical and soft skills to enable them to find future jobs. The trainees will benefit from new opportunities to engage in decent work, entrepreneurship and lifelong learning. It will open new windows for them and will help in the eradication of poverty and with decreasing the unemployment levels.”

The EU Ambassador stressed that "through employment and learning we are addressing the root causes for migration and we encourage other countries to take an inclusive and people-centred approach to migration."

Khaled El Mekwad, UNIDO Representative, said, "This project is part of the Industrial Modernization Programme for Sudan initiated by UNIDO in 2013. Through vocational training and private sector support, we are trying to develop the new training skills demanded by the local and regional job markets, as well as skills for self-employment. This will ultimately contribute to poverty reduction and the creation of sustainable sources of livelihoods and development."

For more information or press inquiries, please contact:

Delegation of the European Union to the Republic of the Sudan

Address: Block 1B, Plot 10, Gamhoria Street, Khartoum, P.O. Box 2363

Tel: 249.(0) 183 79 93 93 - Fax: 799 399 – Mobile: 990095577

E-mail: delegation-soudan-info@eeas.europa.eu

Website: eeas.europa.eu/delegations/sudan/

Facebook: /www.facebook.com/European-Union-in-Sudan

South Sudan: South Sudan Situation: Regional overview of population of concern as of 28 February 2017

16 March 2017 - 1:34am
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Kenya, South Sudan, Sudan, Uganda

Syrian Arab Republic: R2P Monitor, Issue 32, 15 March 2017

15 March 2017 - 6:57pm
Source: Global Centre for the Responsibility to Protect Country: Burundi, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Iraq, Myanmar, Philippines, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Yemen

R2P Monitor is a bimonthly bulletin applying the Responsibility to Protect lens to populations at risk of mass atrocities around the world. Issue 32 looks at developments in Syria, Iraq, Yemen, Sudan, Myanmar, South Sudan, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Burundi, Philippines and Central African Republic.

Issue 32 also includes an insert regarding states that have endorsed the Kigali Principles on the Protection of Civilians. For more information on the Kigali Principles, see: Peacekeeping and the Kigali Principles.