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Saudi Arabia: Yemen cross-border shelling kills Saudi child: civil defence

27 August 2016 - 4:47pm
Source: Agence France-Presse Country: Saudi Arabia, Yemen

Najran, Saudi Arabia | AFP | Saturday 8/27/2016 - 15:28 GMT

A rocket fired from Yemen killed a three-year-old boy Saturday in the Saudi border region of Najran, a civil defence official said, in the latest cross-border attack by Iran-backed Yemeni rebels.

Major Ali al-Shahrani, civil defence spokesman in southwest Saudi Arabia, told reporters a nine-year-old brother of the boy was also wounded when a Katyusha rocket hit their family's home.

The attack came a day after rockets fired from Yemen struck a power station in Najran, marking a rare hit on Saudi Arabia's infrastructure after months of periodic bombardment of the area.

Attacks have intensified since the suspension in early August of UN-brokered peace talks between the Shiite Huthi rebels and their allies, and Yemen's internationally-recognised government which has the military support of a Saudi-led Arab coalition.

Ten people have been killed in Najran since August 16, when a single strike claimed seven lives.

The Arab coalition has also stepped up its air raids in Yemen since the peace talks collapsed.

The coalition intervened in March last year to support President Abedrabbo Mansour Hadi after the Huthis and their allies seized much of Yemen.

it-ak/hc

© 1994-2016 Agence France-Presse

Yemen: Emergency Response Coordination Centre (ERCC) - ECHO Daily Map | 26/08/2016

27 August 2016 - 6:04am
Source: European Commission Humanitarian Aid Office Country: Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Somalia, Sudan, Yemen

Yemen: Yemen: Shelter / NFI / CCCM Cluster Planned Interventions for June 2016

27 August 2016 - 5:49am
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees, CCCM Cluster, Shelter Cluster Country: Yemen

Yemen: UN: Create International Inquiry on Yemen

26 August 2016 - 11:45am
Source: Human Rights Watch Country: Yemen

(Geneva, August 26, 2016) – The United Nations Human Rights Council should immediately create an international investigation into abuses in Yemen, Human Rights Watch said today. The UN high commissioner for human rights also called for a halt to arming the parties to the conflict in a report released in Geneva on August 25, 2016. He called the impact of the conflict on Yemen’s civilians “devastating.”

Since a Saudi Arabia-led coalition began its military campaign against Houthi forces in Yemen on March 26, 2015, at least 3,799 civilians have been killed and 6,711 wounded, according to the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR). The report’s recommendations strengthen calls made by nongovernmental groups, including Human Rights Watch, to the Human Rights Council to establish an international independent inquiry to investigate alleged violations by both sides and to individual countries to stop arming parties to the conflict known to have repeatedly violated the laws of war.

“Yemeni civilians have suffered serious laws-of-war violations by all sides for more than a year,” said John Fisher, Geneva director at Human Rights Watch. “They should not have to wait a moment longer for these abuses to be credibly and effectively investigated.”

The high commissioner’s report details numerous violations of international humanitarian and human rights law between July 1, 2015 and June 30, 2016, by both sides to the conflict.

The high commissioner reported that “Popular Committees” affiliated with the Houthis, also known as Ansar Allah, and army units loyal to former President Ali Abdullah Saleh have attacked residential areas, conducted sniper attacks against civilians, recruited and used child soldiers, and imposed a blockade on the city of Taizz that has led to a “near collapse of the health system.” Human Rights Watch has also documented violations by the Houthis and allied forces, including the use of antipersonnel landmines, use of child soldiers, indiscriminate shelling of civilian areas, and restrictions on aid to civilians in Taizz.

The high commissioner also said that Saudi-led coalition had struck schools, hospitals, markets, weddings, residential buildings, and public and private infrastructure in airstrikes; imposed a naval blockade and restrictions on air and land travel that have contributed to worsening the humanitarian crisis; and allegedly used cluster munitions. Human Rights Watch and Amnesty International alone have documented more than 70 unlawful coalition airstrikes, some of which may amount to war crimes, that have killed more than 900 civilians, and 19 attacks using internationally banned cluster munitions.

Peace talks between President Abdu Rabu Mansour Hadi’s government and the Houthis and former President Saleh’s party broke down in early August, and the fighting – with civilian casualties – continues. According to OHCHR figures, between July 1, 2015 and June 30, 2016, 1,259 civilians were allegedly killed and 1,360 injured as a result of coalition airstrikes, and 475 allegedly killed and 1,121 injured as a result of shelling by the Popular Committees and army units loyal to Saleh. The report also found that other groups, including Al-Qaida and the Islamic State (also known as ISIS), had caused civilian casualties, and that aerial drone strikes allegedly carried out by the United States may have killed civilians.

Nongovernmental organizations, including Human Rights Watch, have repeatedly called on the Human Rights Council to create an international mechanism to investigate alleged serious violations of international humanitarian law and violations and abuses of international human rights law by all parties to the conflict in Yemen.

Over the course of the conflict, the council has missed critical opportunities to address alleged violations in Yemen, Human Rights Watch said. On October 2, 2015, the council adopted by consensus a deeply flawed resolution that ignored earlier calls for an international inquiry into mounting abuses in the country, including by the high commissioner. Instead the council endorsed a Yemeni national commission established in September 2015 by President Hadi.

The high commissioner’s report found that the “commission did not enjoy the cooperation of all concerned parties and could not operate in all parts of Yemen,” and was “unable to implement its mandate in accordance with international standards.”

Nongovernmental organizations have also repeatedly called on countries including the US, the United Kingdom, and France to suspend weapon sales to Saudi Arabia until it curtails its unlawful airstrikes in Yemen and credibly investigates alleged violations. The high commissioner’s statement that the international community should “use its influence to prevent and end violations, and to refrain from encouraging or arming parties to the conflict,” reinforces these calls.

“The UN Human Rights Council should not turn its back on Yemeni civilians, and should deliver the justice to which they are entitled,” Fisher said. “The world’s leading human rights body should ensure that the egregious violations taking place in Yemen do not go unaddressed.”

World: GenCap Annual Report: 1 January to December 2014

26 August 2016 - 5:08am
Source: Inter-Agency Standing Committee Country: Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Egypt, Indonesia, Iraq, Jordan, Myanmar, Pakistan, Philippines, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Thailand, Ukraine, World, Yemen

2014 Annual Narrative Report of IASC Gender Standby Capacity Project

The GenCap Project was established in 2007 as an inter-agency resource under the auspices of the IASC Sub-Working Group on Gender and Humanitarian Action (now the Gender Reference Group and Humanitarian Action) and in collaboration with the Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC). The Project’s aim was to respond to the recognition that gender needed to be better integrated in humanitarian response, and was part of the IASC Humanitarian Reform. The Project deploys Senior Gender Advisors to strengthen the humanitarian system’s capacity in gender mainstreaming and gender equality programming.

This annual narrative report of the GenCap project provides an overview of the main project activities, outputs and impact in 2014 within the three main project focus areas: 1) the deployment of senior experts on mission; 2) gender training delivery and capacity building efforts; and 3) efforts to influence the system towards stronger ownership and awareness of Gender Equality Programming (GEP). 2014 marked the implementation of year one of the Project’s first three year strategy1 (endorsed in March 2015). The annual project strategy meeting (October 2015) was an opportunity to take stock of the strategy implementation in terms of giving stronger emphasis on GenCaps’ strategic advisory role to the HC/HCTs, sustainability of efforts, and the role of the GBV window within the larger project. The strategy was updated to reflect the SC decision to continue GBV deployments throughout 2016 and to make a stronger effort to streamline GenCap and GBV deployments and team building.

In 2014, the project has moved forward on the strategy implementation by giving increased focus to monitoring, preparing the ground for IASC Gender Marker adaptation and gradual handover to the cluster leads, with the main focus of deployments at country level and based on criteria set in strategy. Global level support targeted global clusters and HPC processes with coordinated SRP country support and country missions, and capacity building of Advisors to enable a more strategic engagement with HC/HCTs.

As the GenCap project was established within the framework of the IASC, the SU participated as an observer at most IASC Gender Reference Group (GRG) meetings to stay abreast with policy level debates and advocacy. The GenCap project also provided support to the 2014 review of the implementation of the IASC Gender Policy Statement2 and input to the GRG issued Gender Alerts.

World: 2016 GenCap Appeal: IASC Gender Standby Capacity Project

26 August 2016 - 4:35am
Source: Inter-Agency Standing Committee Country: Central African Republic, Guinea, Jordan, Liberia, Nepal, Sierra Leone, South Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, World, Yemen

2016 budget (in USD): US$ 3.88 million

Implementation period: 1 January 2016 to 31 December 2016

2016 deployments: 188 months of GenCap Adviser gender mainstreaming deployments and 12 months of Regional Gender Based Violence Adviser deployments, for a total of 200 deployment months for the project.

Countries of deployment: Needs-based, according to requests of country teams and weighing criteria related to urgency of need, presence of relevant humanitarian frameworks and architecture and potential impact agreed to by the Steering Committee.

Areas of intervention: Gender mainstreaming of all sectors of humanitarian responses through:

  • Strategic advice to Humanitarian Country Teams (HCTs) and Humanitarian Coordinators (HCs)
  • Support to clusters (country and global levels)
  • Capacity strengthening
  • Support to phases of the Humanitarian Programme Cycle (needs assessment, strategic planning, implementation and monitoring)
  • Advocacy for gender mainstreaming -Sustainable GBV regional capacity building by regional senior advisers.

Yemen: UNHRD Operations Update - Response to the Crisis in Yemen, as of 25 August 2016

26 August 2016 - 3:09am
Source: World Food Programme Country: Djibouti, Yemen

Since the escalation of the conflict in March 2015, UNHRD has supported 6 Partners responding to the crisis by sending 454.2 MT of critical relief items, equipment and medical supplies to Djibouti and Yemen. Most recently, UNHRD dispatched 35 metric tons of medicine to Hoedida on behalf of WHO.

For information about stocks available for emergency deployment through UNHRD’s Loan and Borrow facility, please visit www.unhrd.org or contact unhrd.customerservice@wfp.org.

Yemen: ACTED supports Yemeni families with livestock distribution

26 August 2016 - 12:33am
Source: Agency for Technical Cooperation and Development Country: Yemen

In hopes of breathing life into an economy stagnated by conflict, ACTED relaunches livestock distribution activities in Al Hudaydah and Raymah Governorate.

In Yemen’s rural western governorates of Al Hudaydah and Raymah, families depend on livestock as an important secondary source of income for households in most communities. However, as the economy across Yemen took a downward turn, so did the livestock industry. Recurrent flooding in the region, which resulted in the death of some animals, only made the situation worse. To support these communities, ACTED, with funding from OFDA, is once again distributing livestock, this time to 1,020 vulnerable households across both governorates. On Sunday, over 80 families in Hudaydah gathered to receive their two sheep (one male and one female) each from ACTED. Some members of the communities will also be receiving training on veterinary care in order to support the community as the herds naturally expand. As one of the first of more distributions to come, ACTED is optimistic that these sheep will offer a sustainable livelihood strategy for the affected peoples in Raymah and Hudaydah.

Yemen: A glimpse of ACTED's work with Yemeni coffee farmers in the mountains of Raymah

26 August 2016 - 12:30am
Source: Agency for Technical Cooperation and Development Country: Yemen

The war continues to rage uninterrupted in Yemen and the country spirals into chaos, with 14.4 million people struggling with food insecurity and 2.82 million persons currently internally displaced, according to the latest UNOCHA figures. However, the governorate of Raymah, in western central Yemen, remains a place of relative calm. Farmers in Raymah continue their long tradition of coffee harvesting and pruning the coffee fruit as the summer seasons comes to an end. Due to the high altitudes of the mountains, farmers are able to produce very a very distinctive type of coffee, for which they are able to demand the highest price on the international market. However, these farmers are poor and their coffee yields remain low. ACTED has been working in Raymah since 2013, in cooperation with EuropeAid, in an effort to unlock the industry’s potential and improve the living conditions of these farmers who make it all possible. Up to a 1,600 farmers continue to benefit from ACTED’s coffee production and water conservation techniques training this month.

Click here to see more of ACTED's work in Raymah.

Djibouti: Djibouti: Inter-agency update for the response to the Yemeni situation #46 (1 – 15 August 2016)

25 August 2016 - 11:28pm
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Iraq, Somalia, Syrian Arab Republic, Yemen
KEY FIGURES

3,618 Refugees currently hosted in Djibouti pending further physical verification exercises

1,636 Registered females.

1,299 Registered children and adolescents

HIGHLIGHTS
  • According to the latest available statistics from IOM and the Government of Djibouti, a total of 36,162 persons of mixed nationalities have arrived in Djibouti as of end of July 2016 (since 26 March 2015). Of those, 19,636 persons (54 per cent) are Yemeni nationals, 14,562 (40 per cent) are transiting migrants and 1,964 persons (6 per cent) are Djiboutian returnees.

  • As at 15 August 2016, there are 3,618 refugees currently in Djibouti (pending forthcoming verification exercises in Obock town and Djibouti city). Markazi camp hosts over 1,400 refugees.

PRIORITIES
  • Ensure protection of refugees and asylum seekers and provide assistance.

  • Provide documents to refugees.

  • Work with the government to ensure access to territory and freedom of movement.

  • Continue to develop the infrastructure at Markazi camp.

  • Continue border monitoring activities.

Operational Context and Migration

UNHCR carries out regular border monitoring in Djibouti by observing activities at Obock port as well as entry points along the villages north of Obock. UNHCR has observed a decrease in new arrivals compared to previous months; this may be due to the harsh weather conditions in Obock. Meanwhile, UNHCR continues to advise refugees in Markazi camp on the dangers of return to Yemen.

Yemen: 2016 Yemen Situation - Regional Refugee and Migrant Response Plan - Funding snapshot as at 15 August 2016

25 August 2016 - 2:29pm
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Djibouti, Ethiopia, Somalia, Sudan, Yemen

Yemen: United States Announces Additional Humanitarian Aid for Yemen, 25 August 2016

25 August 2016 - 12:34pm
Source: US Department of State Country: United States of America, Yemen

Media Note
Office of the Spokesperson
Washington, DC
August 25, 2016

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry announced today nearly $189 million in additional humanitarian assistance in response to the crisis in Yemen, bringing the total U.S. humanitarian assistance for Yemen to more than $327 million in fiscal year 2016. The contribution will help meet urgent humanitarian needs of the most vulnerable people in the Middle East's poorest and most food insecure country, as well as Yemeni refugees in neighboring countries.

Specifically, the new funding—which will be provided through UN and non-governmental partners—includes additional food and nutrition assistance to help those suffering from moderate to severe malnutrition, emergency health care, hygiene kits, psychosocial support, and access to safe drinking water and sanitation. The United States is also providing critical support to improve the capacity of Hudaydah Port to receive humanitarian and commercial supplies. In addition, this new funding will provide critical protection, shelter, and other assistance for Yemeni refugees in the Horn of Africa.

Since the conflict broke out in March 2015, more than 3.1 million Yemenis have been displaced and more than 80 percent of the country—or 21 million people—are in need of humanitarian assistance. The USAID-funded Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) estimates that between seven to 10 million people in Yemen are currently in need of emergency food assistance.

The United States has mobilized a robust humanitarian response to the crisis in Yemen despite the complex and insecure operating environment. The United States remains committed to relieving the suffering of the Yemeni people and others displaced by conflict through the provision of humanitarian aid, as well as continued support for peace talks to ultimately end the conflict in Yemen.

Yemen: Report of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights: Situation of human rights in Yemen, Advanced Edited Version (A/HRC/33/38)

25 August 2016 - 11:02am
Source: UN Human Rights Council Country: Yemen

Summary

The present report is submitted pursuant to Human Rights Council resolution 30/18. In the report, the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights provides an overview of the extent and quality of the cooperation between the national commission of inquiry and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights. He also describes alleged violations and abuses of international human rights law and alleged violations of international humanitarian law by parties to the ongoing conflict. The High Commissioner concludes the report with recommendations for the parties to the conflict in Yemen.

Yemen: Zeid urges accountability for violations in Yemen [EN/AR]

25 August 2016 - 10:54am
Source: UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights Country: Yemen

 Arabic 

GENEVA (25 August 2016) – In light of the gravity of alleged breaches of international humanitarian law and international human rights law in Yemen, and given challenges faced by the national commission of inquiry, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein today called on the international community to establish an international, independent body to carry out comprehensive investigations in Yemen.

In a report mandated by the UN Human Rights Council and released today, the UN Human Rights Office has laid out a number of serious allegations of violations and abuses committed by all sides to the conflict in Yemen, highlighting in particular their impact on civilian lives, health and infrastructure.

Between March 2015 and 23 August 2016, an estimated 3,799 civilians have been killed and 6,711 injured as result of the war in Yemen.* At least 7.6 million people, including three million women and children are currently suffering from malnutrition and at least three million people have been forced to flee their homes.

“The perpetuation of the conflict and its consequences on the population in Yemen are devastating,” the report states. “The international community…has a legal and moral duty to take urgent steps to alleviate the appalling levels of human despair.”

The report contains examples of the kinds of possible violations of international humanitarian law and international human rights law that have occurred between 1 July 2015 and 30 June 2016, including attacks on residential areas, marketplaces, medical and educational facilities, and public and private infrastructure; the use of landmines and cluster bombs; sniper attacks against civilians; deprivation of liberty; targeted killings; the recruitment and use of children in hostilities; and forced evictions and displacement.

In several of the documented military attacks, the report states that the UN Human Rights Office was unable to identify the presence of possible military objectives. “In numerous situations where military targets could be identified, there remain serious concerns as to whether the incidental loss of civilian life, injury to civilians and damage to civilian objects that could be expected from the attack were not excessive in relation to the anticipated concrete and direct military advantage apparently sought,” the report states.

While a national commission of inquiry was established in September 2015 by Yemeni President Abd Rabbuh Mansur Hadi, the report found that the commission did not enjoy the cooperation of all concerned parties and could not operate in all parts of Yemen. It was thus unable to implement its mandate in accordance with international standards.

“Civilians in Yemen have suffered unbearably over the years from the effects of a number of simultaneous and overlapping armed conflicts,” High Commissioner Zeid said. “And they continue to suffer, absent any form of accountability and justice, while those responsible for the violations and abuses against them enjoy impunity. Such a manifestly, protractedly unjust situation must no longer be tolerated by the international community.”

High Commissioner Zeid also urged all parties to the conflict to work towards a negotiated and durable solution to the conflict in the best interest of the Yemeni people and to ensure full respect for international humanitarian law.

ENDS

  • The figures relating to casualties and internally displaced people as stated here have been updated beyond the period covered by the report itself.

An integrated multimedia page, with the full report, videos and additional material, is available here:_www.ohchr.org/YemenReport2016_

For more information and **media requests**, please contact Ravina Shamdasani (+41 22 917 9169 / rshamdasani@ohchr.org ) or Cécile Pouilly  (+41 22 917 9310 / cpouilly@ohchr.org

For your news websites and social media: Multimedia content & key messages relating to our news releases are available on UN Human Rights social media channels, listed below. Please tag us using the proper handles:
Twitter: @UNHumanRights
Facebook: unitednationshumanrights
Instagram: unitednationshumanrights
Google+: unitednationshumanrights
Youtube: unohchr

Yemen: Zeid urges accountability for violations in Yemen

25 August 2016 - 10:54am
Source: UN Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights Country: Yemen

 Arabic 

GENEVA (25 August 2016) – In light of the gravity of alleged breaches of international humanitarian law and international human rights law in Yemen, and given challenges faced by the national commission of inquiry, UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein today called on the international community to establish an international, independent body to carry out comprehensive investigations in Yemen.

In a report mandated by the UN Human Rights Council and released today, the UN Human Rights Office has laid out a number of serious allegations of violations and abuses committed by all sides to the conflict in Yemen, highlighting in particular their impact on civilian lives, health and infrastructure.

Between March 2015 and 23 August 2016, an estimated 3,799 civilians have been killed and 6,711 injured as result of the war in Yemen.* At least 7.6 million people, including three million women and children are currently suffering from malnutrition and at least three million people have been forced to flee their homes.

“The perpetuation of the conflict and its consequences on the population in Yemen are devastating,” the report states. “The international community…has a legal and moral duty to take urgent steps to alleviate the appalling levels of human despair.”

The report contains examples of the kinds of possible violations of international humanitarian law and international human rights law that have occurred between 1 July 2015 and 30 June 2016, including attacks on residential areas, marketplaces, medical and educational facilities, and public and private infrastructure; the use of landmines and cluster bombs; sniper attacks against civilians; deprivation of liberty; targeted killings; the recruitment and use of children in hostilities; and forced evictions and displacement.

In several of the documented military attacks, the report states that the UN Human Rights Office was unable to identify the presence of possible military objectives. “In numerous situations where military targets could be identified, there remain serious concerns as to whether the incidental loss of civilian life, injury to civilians and damage to civilian objects that could be expected from the attack were not excessive in relation to the anticipated concrete and direct military advantage apparently sought,” the report states.

While a national commission of inquiry was established in September 2015 by Yemeni President Abd Rabbuh Mansur Hadi, the report found that the commission did not enjoy the cooperation of all concerned parties and could not operate in all parts of Yemen. It was thus unable to implement its mandate in accordance with international standards.

“Civilians in Yemen have suffered unbearably over the years from the effects of a number of simultaneous and overlapping armed conflicts,” High Commissioner Zeid said. “And they continue to suffer, absent any form of accountability and justice, while those responsible for the violations and abuses against them enjoy impunity. Such a manifestly, protractedly unjust situation must no longer be tolerated by the international community.”

High Commissioner Zeid also urged all parties to the conflict to work towards a negotiated and durable solution to the conflict in the best interest of the Yemeni people and to ensure full respect for international humanitarian law.

ENDS

  • The figures relating to casualties and internally displaced people as stated here have been updated beyond the period covered by the report itself.

An integrated multimedia page, with the full report, videos and additional material, is available here:_www.ohchr.org/YemenReport2016_

For more information and **media requests**, please contact Ravina Shamdasani (+41 22 917 9169 / rshamdasani@ohchr.org ) or Cécile Pouilly  (+41 22 917 9310 / cpouilly@ohchr.org

For your news websites and social media: Multimedia content & key messages relating to our news releases are available on UN Human Rights social media channels, listed below. Please tag us using the proper handles:
Twitter: @UNHumanRights
Facebook: unitednationshumanrights
Instagram: unitednationshumanrights
Google+: unitednationshumanrights
Youtube: unohchr

Djibouti: WFP Djibouti Country Brief, July 2016

25 August 2016 - 5:14am
Source: World Food Programme Country: Djibouti, Yemen

Highlights

  • WFP requires additional resources before the end of August to provide school meals to 18,000 school children attending schools in the rural and suburban areas near of Djibouti-city. The new school year begins in September. Without additional funding at the start of the school year, in September, school attendance will most likely be affected.

WFP Assistance

The protracted relief and recovery operation (PRRO) aims to stabilize or reduce undernutrition among children aged 6–59 months, pregnant women and nursing mothers; stabilize or improve food consumption for targeted households and individuals; and restore or stabilize access to basic services and community assets.

WFP ensures that registered refugees living in camps and the most food insecure Djiboutian populations have access to an adequate daily caloric intake through the distribution of food rations, including specialized food products. The rations are aimed at treating moderate acute malnutrition and prevent chronic and acute malnutrition. WFP also distributes cash to refugees in camps and electronic vouchers to the most vulnerable households in the suburbs of Djibouti city. Refugee girls receive a take home ration to encourage girls' school enrolment and attendance. People living with HIV/AIDS on antiretroviral treatment and TB patients on direct observation treatment are provided with specialized nutrition products to support treatment and recovery.

In addition, WFP is supporting a safety net intervention seeking to mitigate the effects of HIV/AIDS on affected households through income generating activities. WFP supports food insecure communities and households with asset creation activities that enhance their resilience to chronic shocks and risks related to climate change.

The development operation supports access to basic education for all school-aged children in rural areas and semi-urban areas of Djibouti city. The objectives are to increase access to education at regional, national and community levels; make progress towards a nationally owned school feeding programme and promote an equitable access to and utilization of education among girls in particular through the reduction of drop-out rates and improvement of attendance.

School children enjoy diversified school meals in targeted rural pre-primary and middle schools thanks to a combination of WFP-internationally purchased commodities and locally purchased fresh food with complementary funds allocated by the Government of Djibouti. A take-home ration of oil is provided to families of school girls in grade 3 through grade 5 as an incentive to send girls to school and maintain their enrolment and attendance through the 9th grade. WFP is supporting the capacity of the government towards the establishment of a sustainable national school feeding programme.

Yemen: UNHRD Operations Update - Response to the Crisis in Yemen, as of 24 August 2016

25 August 2016 - 3:00am
Source: World Food Programme Country: Djibouti, Yemen

Since the escalation of the conflict in March 2015, UNHRD has supported 6 Partners responding to the crisis by sending 452.7 MT of critical relief items, equipment and medical supplies to Djibouti and Yemen. Most recently, UNHRD dispatched 35 metric tons of medicine to Hoedida on behalf of WHO.

For information about stocks available for emergency deployment through UNHRD’s Loan and Borrow facility, please visit www.unhrd.org or contact unhrd.customerservice@wfp.org.

World: Informe de la Representante Especial del Secretario General para la Cuestión de los Niños y los Conflictos Armados (A/71/205)

24 August 2016 - 3:33pm
Source: UN General Assembly Country: Afghanistan, Central African Republic, Colombia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Iraq, Mali, Myanmar, Nigeria, Philippines, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, World, Yemen

Resumen

Este informe se presenta a la Asamblea General conforme a lo dispuesto en su resolución 70/137 sobre los derechos del niño, en la que solicitó a la Representante Especial del Secretario General para la Cuestión de los Niños y los Conflictos Armados que siguiera presentando informes a la Asamblea General sobre las actividades emprendidas en cumplimiento de su mandato, con información de sus visitas sobre el terreno, y sobre los progresos alcanzados y los problemas que subsisten en relación con la cuestión de los niños y los conflictos armados. El informe abarca el período comprendido entre agosto de 2015 y julio de 2016. En él se describen las tendencias actuales y también se reflexiona sobre los 20 años transcurridos desde que la Asamblea, mediante su resolución 51/77, creó el mandato relativo a los niños y los conflictos armados. Además, en el informe se proporciona información acerca de las visitas sobre el terreno realizadas por la Representante Especial, su colaboración con organizaciones regionales y asociados internacionales y el diálogo con partes en conflicto, y se incluye una actualización sobre la campaña “Niños, No Soldados”. También se plantea un conjunto de desafíos y prioridades de la agenda de la Representante Especial y se concluye con una serie de recomendaciones para mejorar la protección de los niños afectados por los conflictos.

I. Introducción

1. En su resolución 70/137, la Asamblea General solicitó a la Representante Especial del Secretario General para la Cuestión de los Niños y los Conflictos Armados que siguiera presentando informes, tanto a la Asamblea como al Consejo de Derechos Humanos, sobre las actividades emprendidas en cumplimiento de su mandato, con información de sus visitas sobre el terreno, y sobre los progresos alcanzados y los problemas que subsisten en relación con la cuestión de los niños y los conflictos armados. La solicitud se basó en el mandato otorgado por la Asamblea en su resolución 51/77, en la que recomendó, entre otras cosas, que la Representante Especial procurara que se tomara mayor conciencia y promoviera la reunión de información acerca de los sufrimientos de los niños afectados por los conflictos armados, y estimulara la cooperación internacional para asegurar el respeto de los derechos de los niños en esas situaciones. En consonancia con ese mandato, y de conformidad con lo solicitado por la Asamblea en su resolución 70/137, en el presente informe se proporciona información actualizada sobre la campaña “Niños, No Soldados”. También se ponen de relieve los progresos alcanzados durante el último año y se resumen las prioridades inmediatas, así como los objetivos de más largo plazo fijados para impulsar la cuestión de los niños y los conflictos armados, en colaboración con los Estados Miembros de las Naciones Unidas, las entidades de las Naciones Unidas, las organizaciones regionales y subregionales y la sociedad civil.

II. Estado de la cuestión de los niños y los conflictos armados

A. Panorama general de las tendencias y los desafíos

2. La Representante Especial presentará este informe a la Asamblea General 20 años después de la aprobación de la resolución 51/77, por la que se estableció el mandato relativo a la cuestión de los niños y los conflictos armados. El 20º aniversario del mandato brinda la oportunidad de hacer un balance de los numerosos logros obtenidos y poner de relieve las esferas que están más rezagadas. En su informe pionero acerca de las repercusiones de los conflictos armados sobre los niños (A/51/306), que fue presentado a la Asamblea en 1996, Graça Machel describió la brutalidad extrema a que estaban expuestos millones de niños atrapados en conflictos y demostró el carácter central de la cuestión para las agendas internacionales de derechos humanos, desarrollo y paz y seguridad.

3. Si bien ha habido progresos sustanciales en los últimos dos decenios, como se indica en el presente informe, en el segundo semestre de 2015 y a principios de 2016 persistían graves problemas para la protección de los niños afectados por los conflictos armados. La intensidad de las violaciones graves de los derechos de los niños aumentó en una serie de situaciones de conflicto armado. Preocupó especialmente la proliferación de agentes que participaban en los conflictos armados. Las operaciones aéreas transfronterizas realizadas por coaliciones internacionales o Estados Miembros a título individual, especialmente en zonas pobladas, produjeron entornos sumamente complejos para la protección de los niños. Los efectos en los niños de la incapacidad colectiva de prevenir conflictos y ponerles fin son graves: existen regiones en crisis y las violaciones de los derechos de los niños se están agravando en varios conflictos. Las violaciones se relacionan directamente con el ultraje al derecho internacional humanitario y el derecho internacional de los derechos humanos por las partes en los conflictos.

4. Los conflictos prolongados han tenido efectos considerables en los niños. En la República Árabe Siria, según el Enviado Especial para Siria, el conflicto ya ha causado la muerte de más de 400.000 personas, incluidos miles de niños. En el Afganistán, en 2015 se registró el mayor número de bajas infantiles desde que las Naciones Unidas empezaron a documentar sistemáticamente las bajas civiles en 2009. En Somalia, la situación siguió siendo peligrosa para los niños: el número de violaciones de derechos registradas no mostró señales de disminuir en 2016, y centenares de niños fueron secuestrados, reclutados, utilizados, brutalmente muertos y mutilados. Cabe señalar, como ejemplo sumamente inquietante, la situación en Sudán del Sur, donde los niños fueron víctimas de las seis categorías de violaciones graves de sus derechos, en particular durante las brutales ofensivas militares lanzadas contra las fuerzas de la oposición. El deterioro de la situación en julio de 2016 es especialmente preocupante por la situación penosa de los niños. En el Iraq, los intensos enfrentamientos armados y los ataques contra la población civil perpetrados por el Estado Islámico en el Iraq y el Levante han causado la muerte de miles de civiles, entre ellos muchos niños. En el Yemen, el conflicto ha continuado intensificándose, con niveles alarmantes de reclutamiento, muerte y mutilación de niños y ataques contra escuelas y hospitales.

Yemen: UNICEF Yemen Crisis Humanitarian Situation Report (July 2016)

24 August 2016 - 3:07pm
Source: UN Children's Fund Country: Yemen

Highlights:

  • Yemen’s situation is negatively impacted by halt in the peace negotiation, ongoing hostilities and worsening economic situation. The escalated conflict, higher prices of fuel and basic goods, and a considerable cash shortage are deeply affecting national systems – particularly the health system. Enormous humanitarian needs in Yemen are expected to increase in the coming months.

  • Despite challenges in humanitarian access, particularly in Taiz governorate and border locations, UNICEF and partners continued providing supplies across the country and mobile teams reached over 43,000 children, pregnant and lactating women with health and nutrition services.

  • During July, UNICEF’s water trucking capacity increased granting access to safe water to more than 32,000 people (16,000 children) in communities not connected to the public water network. In addition, over 30,000 people (50 per cent children) benefited from the rehabilitation of rural water projects.

Situation Overview & Humanitarian Needs

After 17 months of ongoing conflict in Yemen, the humanitarian situation is appalling and continues to deteriorate. Kuwait-based peace negotiations resumed on 16 July after a two-week pause, but ended at the end of the month. Hostilities intensified during July in several locations, causing civilian victims and access constraints. Moreover, rising tensions were reported in Taiz governorate where the prolonged closure on Taiz city has been reinforced, depriving population from access to humanitarian assistance, according to a recent statement by the Humanitarian Coordinator.

Yemeni children are paying a great price of the current conflict, not only with over 2,700 children killed and injured but also because of the devastating consequences of the deteriorating economic situation and declining public services. National systems are on the verge of collapse, especially the health system. The prices of the basic food basket in June were the highest in the last six months, while the prices of cooking gas, diesel and petrol increased significantly by 119 per cent, 78 per cent and 123 per cent respectively, higher than pre-crisis prices.1 The current conflict is affecting the fragile economy, the central bank reserve is running low causing a severe shortage of cash. The situation worsened in July when some government staff salary were not paid. In the current scenario, needs are expected to increase, families will struggle to afford food, water, fuel and to provide basic health services and education for their children. Despite current challenges, UNICEF is taking preventive measures to mitigate any disruption in the humanitarian operation and will continue to work closely with counterparts and partners in order to provide assistance for the most affected and vulnerable children and families.

World: Rapport de la Représentante spéciale du Secrétaire général pour le sort des enfants en temps de conflit armé (A/71/205)

24 August 2016 - 3:04pm
Source: UN General Assembly Country: Afghanistan, Central African Republic, Colombia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Iraq, Mali, Myanmar, Nigeria, Philippines, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, World, Yemen

Résumé

Ce rapport est soumis en application de la résolution 70/137 de l’Assemblée générale relative aux droits de l’enfant, dans laquelle l’Assemblée prie la Représentante spéciale du Secrétaire général pour le sort des enfants en temps de conflit armé de continuer à lui présenter des rapports sur les activités menées en exécution de son mandat, notamment sur les visites qu’elle effectue sur le terrain ainsi que sur les progrès réalisés dans le cadre de l’action engagée pour lutter contre les violences faites aux enfants et sur les problèmes qu’il reste à surmonter en la matière. Le présent rapport décrit l’évolution de la situation sur la période comprise entre août 2015 et juillet 2016. Il revient aussi sur les 20 années écoulées depuis la création du mandat du Représentant spécial pour les enfants et les conflits armés, en vertu de la résolution 51/77 de l’Assemblée générale. Le rapport contient également des informations sur les visites effectuées sur le terrain par la Représentante spéciale, sur sa coopération avec les organisations régionales et les partenaires internationaux et sur le dialogue qu’elle a engagé avec les parties, ainsi que sur les avancées de la campagne « Des enfants, pas des soldats ». Il décrit certaines des difficultés rencontrées et les domaines sur lesquels son action porte en priorité, et se termine par une série de recommandations visant à améliorer la protection des enfants touchés par les conflits.

I. Introduction

1. Dans sa résolution 70/137, l’Assemblée générale prie la Représentante spéciale du Secrétaire général pour le sort des enfants en temps de conflit armé de continuer à lui présenter des rapports sur les activités entreprises en application de son mandat, notamment sur les visites qu’elle effectue sur le terrain, les progrès réalisés et les obstacles restant à surmonter dans le cadre de l’action menée en faveur des enfants touchés par les conflits armés. Cette demande découle du mandat donné par l’Assemblée générale dans sa résolution 51/77, qui recommande que le Représentant spécial fasse prendre davantage conscience de la condition dramatique des enfants touchés par les conflits armés, incite à recueillir des éléments d’information sur cette situation et oeuvre à l’établissement d’une coopération internationale qui permette de faire respecter les droits des enfants pendant les conflits armés. Conformément à ce mandat, et comme l’Assemblée le demande dans sa résolution 70/137, le présent rapport rend compte de l’évolution de la campagne « Des enfants, pas des soldats ». Il met également en évidence les progrès réalisés au cours de l’année écoulée et expose les priorités immédiates ainsi que les projets à exécuter à plus long terme dans le cadre de l’action engagée en faveur des enfants touchés par les conflits armés, en collaboration avec les États Membres, les organismes des Nations Unies, les organisations régionales et sous-régionales et la société civile.

II. Bilan des travaux exécutés sur le sort des enfants en temps de conflit armé

A. Aperçu des tendances et des difficultés

2. La Représentante spéciale présentera ce rapport à l’Assemblée générale 20 ans après l’adoption de la résolution 51/77 qui a créé le mandat pour le sort des enfants en temps de conflit armé. Ce vingtième anniversaire est l’occasion de dresser un bilan des nombreuses avancées réalisées et de mettre en lumière les domaines dans lesquels il faut encore progresser. Dans son rapport historique (A/51/306) présenté à l’Assemblée générale en 1996, Graça Machel décrivait l’extrême brutalité subie par les enfants pris dans un conflit et soulignait que cette question devait s’inscrire au coeur de l’action internationale pour les droits de l’homme, le développement, la paix et la sécurité.

3. Malgré les progrès substantiels accomplis ces vingt dernières années, comme le démontre le présent rapport, le deuxième semestre 2015 et le début de l’année 2016 ont encore été marqués par de sérieuses difficultés qui ont entravé la protection des enfants touchés par un conflit armé. Les violations graves à leur encontre se sont intensifiées sur de nombreux terrains de conflit et la multiplication des acteurs engagés dans ces troubles a été très préoccupante. Les opérations aériennes transfrontalières menées par des coalitions internationales ou à titre individuel par des États Membres, notamment dans des zones habitées, ont créé des conditions très défavorables à la protection des enfants. L’échec collectif à prévenir et faire cesser les conflits a de graves conséquences pour les enfants, car des régions sont en proie à l’instabilité et les violations commises contre des enfants s’intensifient dans différentes zones de conflit. Ces violations sont la conséquence directe du peu d’intérêt apporté au respect des droits de l’homme et du droit international humanitaire par les parties au conflit.

4. Les conflits prolongés ont des effets considérables sur les enfants. Selon l’Envoyé spécial pour la Syrie, le conflit en République arabe syrienne a causé la mort de plus de 400 000 personnes, dont des milliers d’enfants. En Afghanistan, on a dénombré en 2015 le plus grand nombre de victimes parmi les enfants depuis 2009, quand l’Organisation des Nations Unies a commencé à recenser systématiquement les victimes civiles. En Somalie, les enfants sont toujours en grand danger : le nombre de violations constatées ne semble pas diminuer en 2016 et des centaines d’enfants sont enlevés, enrôlés, utilisés, brutalement tués et mutilés. L’exemple du Soudan du Sud est l’un des plus inquiétants, car les enfants y ont été victimes des six violations graves, en particulier pendant les violentes offensives militaires contre les forces d’opposition. Le sort des enfants est très préoccupant en raison de la détérioration de la situation depuis juillet 2016. En Iraq, l’intensité des affrontements armés et des attaques visant les civils menés par l’État islamique d’Iraq et du Levant a causé la mort de milliers de civils, dont de nombreux enfants. Au Yémen, l’escalade continue du conflit s’est accompagnée d’un nombre alarmant d’enfants recrutés, tués et mutilés, mais aussi des attaques contre les écoles et les hôpitaux.