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Yemen: Massive humanitarian needs in Yemen as conflict continues

9 hours 9 min ago
Source: International Committee of the Red Cross Country: Yemen

As Yemen approaches marking two years since the start of the conflict, the country faces one of the biggest humanitarian crises in the world. Around three million people -ten percent of the population- have been displaced, and ten million are uncertain of how they will provide food for themselves.

Over the past year, the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) has worked against challenges and recurring security incidents in Yemen and was able to help around three million people across the country. Still, millions of Yemenis lack access to safe water and health care services and without an end to the conflict, no amount of assistance can cover the massive needs in Yemen.

Highlights of ICRC's work in Yemen in 2016:

  • Benefited more than 3.3 million people through activities in water and sanitation
  • Supported monthly 20 key primary health centers across Yemen, providing medications and medical supplies for the direct benefit of 292,457 individuals
  • Distributed food rations including rice, beans, lentils, oil, tea and sugar to 210,430 people in 21 districts
  • Supported in garbage collection, ensuring a safe and clean environment for more than 90,000 people
  • Visited 6 places of detention, monitoring the living conditions of more than 11,000 detainees
  • Provided more than 1,920 body bags and 45 retrieval kits to authorities and arms carriers

Yemen: Yemen: Cholera Outbreak Situation Report | As of 15 Jan 2017

9 hours 26 min ago
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Yemen

Key Figures

  • As of 11 January 2017, 15,658 suspected cholera cases have been reported in 156 districts.

  • A total of 180 out of 841 cases have tested positive for Vibrio Cholera, serotype Ogawa.

  • Overall, the epidemic curve shows a declining trend from week 51 onwards, while the attack rate remains high in some high risk districts.

  • Health response is underway through 26 Diarrhea Treatment Centres (DTC) in 24 districts; while WASH partners are undertaking response in 29 districts.

  • An additional $3 million is being allocated through the 2017 HPF reserve allocation to address outstanding gaps.

Situation Overview

  • The cholera/Acute Watery Diarrhea (AWD) epidemic curve shows a declining trend of incidences from week 51 onwards (18 to 24 Dec). The downward trend is occurring in most affected districts, while in some the outbreak is stabilizing. Similarly, the case fatality rate (CFR) of 0.6 percent has been declining steadily since week 41 of 2016 (9 to 15 Oct), when it peaked at 8.6 per cent.

  • As of 11 January, a total of 15,658 suspected cholera/AWD cases were reported from 157 districts in 15 governorates: Al Hudaydah (23 per cent), Taiz (14.7 per cent), Aden (10.2 per cent), Ibb (9.5 per cent), Al Bayda (8.9 per cent), Al Dhale’e (8.2 per cent), Hajjah (7.1 per cent), Sana’a (6.7 per cent), Lahj (5.2 per cent),
    Raymah (3.7 per cent), Amanat Al Asimah (1.6 per cent), and 1.3 per cent from Abyan , Dhamar, Amran, Al Jawf governorates. An estimated 34 per cent of the total suspected cholera/AWD cases are children below five years of age. Cumulatively, 180 (21 per cent) of the samples from 46 districts tested positive for Vibrio Cholera, serotype Ogawa (see Table 3.2).

  • A total of 99 deaths associated with Cholera/AWD have been reported from Aden, Abyan, Al Bayda, Dhamar, Al Dhale’e, Al Hudaydah, Amanat Al Asimah, Hajjah, Ibb, Sana’a and Taizz, of which 11 deaths in Aden, Amran, Hajjah, Raymah, Ibb and Sana’a have been confirmed by laboratory to be cholera. The cumulative cholera case fatality rate (CFR) as of 11 Jan is 0.6%.

  • The attack rate as of 11 January is 6.7 per 10,000 of population compared to 6 per 10,000 of population as of 31 December 2016. The high risk districts based on the attack rate and number of cholera/AWD cases are Mukayras in Al Bayda (187 per 10000); Al Hali in Al Hudaydah (96 per 10000); Sa'fan in Sana’a (92 per 10000); Al Mahabishah in Hajjah (90 per 10000); and Al Husha in Al Dhale'e (55 per 10000) (see figure 1.1). The high attack rate indicates the need to scale up response in these priority districts.

  • More than 20 months of conflict has caused the collapse of basic services and institutions. Only 45 per cent of health facilities are functioning, and even these face severe shortages in medicines, equipment, and staff. The lack of capacity, coupled with predisposing conditions such as population displacement, overcrowding and inadequate sanitation have contributed to the occurrence and spread of the Cholera/AWD outbreak.

Yemen: Yemen: Cholera Outbreak Situation Report | As of 15 January 2017

9 hours 26 min ago
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Yemen

Key Figures

  • As of 11 January 2017, 15,658 suspected cholera cases have been reported in 156 districts.

  • A total of 180 out of 841 cases have tested positive for Vibrio Cholera, serotype Ogawa.

  • Overall, the epidemic curve shows a declining trend from week 51 onwards, while the attack rate remains high in some high risk districts.

  • Health response is underway through 26 Diarrhea Treatment Centres (DTC) in 24 districts; while WASH partners are undertaking response in 29 districts.

  • An additional $3 million is being allocated through the 2017 HPF reserve allocation to address outstanding gaps.

Situation Overview

  • The cholera/Acute Watery Diarrhea (AWD) epidemic curve shows a declining trend of incidences from week 51 onwards (18 to 24 Dec). The downward trend is occurring in most affected districts, while in some the outbreak is stabilizing. Similarly, the case fatality rate (CFR) of 0.6 percent has been declining steadily since week 41 of 2016 (9 to 15 Oct), when it peaked at 8.6 per cent.

  • As of 11 January, a total of 15,658 suspected cholera/AWD cases were reported from 157 districts in 15 governorates: Al Hudaydah (23 per cent), Taiz (14.7 per cent), Aden (10.2 per cent), Ibb (9.5 per cent), Al Bayda (8.9 per cent), Al Dhale’e (8.2 per cent), Hajjah (7.1 per cent), Sana’a (6.7 per cent), Lahj (5.2 per cent),
    Raymah (3.7 per cent), Amanat Al Asimah (1.6 per cent), and 1.3 per cent from Abyan , Dhamar, Amran, Al Jawf governorates. An estimated 34 per cent of the total suspected cholera/AWD cases are children below five years of age. Cumulatively, 180 (21 per cent) of the samples from 46 districts tested positive for Vibrio Cholera, serotype Ogawa (see Table 3.2).

  • A total of 99 deaths associated with Cholera/AWD have been reported from Aden, Abyan, Al Bayda, Dhamar, Al Dhale’e, Al Hudaydah, Amanat Al Asimah, Hajjah, Ibb, Sana’a and Taizz, of which 11 deaths in Aden, Amran, Hajjah, Raymah, Ibb and Sana’a have been confirmed by laboratory to be cholera. The cumulative cholera case fatality rate (CFR) as of 11 Jan is 0.6%.

  • The attack rate as of 11 January is 6.7 per 10,000 of population compared to 6 per 10,000 of population as of 31 December 2016. The high risk districts based on the attack rate and number of cholera/AWD cases are Mukayras in Al Bayda (187 per 10000); Al Hali in Al Hudaydah (96 per 10000); Sa'fan in Sana’a (92 per 10000); Al Mahabishah in Hajjah (90 per 10000); and Al Husha in Al Dhale'e (55 per 10000) (see figure 1.1). The high attack rate indicates the need to scale up response in these priority districts.

  • More than 20 months of conflict has caused the collapse of basic services and institutions. Only 45 per cent of health facilities are functioning, and even these face severe shortages in medicines, equipment, and staff. The lack of capacity, coupled with predisposing conditions such as population displacement, overcrowding and inadequate sanitation have contributed to the occurrence and spread of the Cholera/AWD outbreak.

Yemen: Yemen operation: Facilitation of logistics services to the humanitarian community, January - December 2016

14 hours 22 min ago
Source: World Food Programme, Logistics Cluster Country: Djibouti, Yemen

Yemen: Yemen: Protection Cluster Achievements (Jan - Dec 2016)

14 hours 37 min ago
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees, Protection Cluster Country: Yemen

World: Journalist killed every four days in 2016

17 January 2017 - 6:39pm
Source: UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization Country: Iraq, Syrian Arab Republic, World, Yemen

According to UNESCO, 101 journalists were killed in the pursuit of a story in 2016, which on average constitutes one casualty every four days. This represents an increase when compared to the average annual trend over the previous decade (2006-2015), set forth in the latest UNESCO Director-General’s Report on the Safety of Journalists and the Danger of Impunity published in November 2016, where every five days a media worker paid the ultimate toll for his or her work.

“Even though the number of journalists killed in 2016 is slightly lower than in the previous year, the perils and challenges faced by media workers worldwide show no sign of abating,” stated Frank La Rue, UNESCO Assistant Director-General for Communication and Information. “The profession of a journalist is not a safe one, and a press accreditation card or display of media equipment has often served as an extra reason to be targeted.”

The 2016 figure compares to 115 in 2015 as recorded by UNESCO, 98 in 2014 and 90 in 2013. Each killing is condemned by the UNESCO Director General who calls for a judicial investigation to bring the killers to book.

The most lives were lost in the Arab States, where the armed conflicts in the Syrian Arab Republic, Iraq and Yemen have claimed the largest share. Media operating in Latin America and the Caribbean saw 28 casualties, including bloggers and freelancers, constituting the region as second deadliest in 2016.

Although impunity statistics are not yet available for the cases of killings in 2016, widespread impunity for acts of violence against the media has long been a cause for concern: barely one out of ten cases of killed journalists has led to a conviction in the past.

“When crimes against journalists, of any kind, remain unpunished, it implies that media can continuously be harassed and attacked,” added Mr La Rue. “Impunity slowly gags journalists and media, where fear of reprisal turns into self-censorship, depriving each and every one of us from vital information.” This climate of impunity demonstrates that publishing and broadcasting stories can pose lethal risks, leaving less room for in-depth reporting on sensitive information or inconvenient truths.

Online hate speech and gender-based harassment were also evident in 2016 as additional dangers next to the physical threats toward the lives of journalists.

UNESCO coordinates the UN Plan of Action on the Safety of Journalists and the Issue of Impunity, the first concerted effort in tackling these issues. Entering its fifth year of implementation, it brings together all stakeholders, including civil society organizations, academia, media houses, intergovernmental bodies as well as government actors. The UN Plan of Action has provided a large impetus to addressing the plight of media worldwide, and actively contributes to the 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda.

CONTACTS

Saorla McCabe
33-1 45 68 42 62
Programme Specialist

Yemen: United States announces $76 million in humanitarian assistance for Yemen

17 January 2017 - 4:19pm
Source: US Agency for International Development Country: United States of America, Yemen

Tuesday, January 17, 2017
USAID Press Office
Telephone: +1.202.712.4320 | Email: Press@usaid.gov | Twitter: @USAID

Today the United States announced more than $76 million in new humanitarian assistance to respond to the urgent needs of the Yemeni people throughout the country, bringing the total U.S. humanitarian assistance for Yemen to nearly $404 million since 2015.

As part of this additional funding, the U.S. Government will contribute $68 million to the UN World Food Program's (WFP) emergency operation to augment support for the needs of six million vulnerable Yemenis.

U.S. funding will also help prevent the spread of cholera by supporting health and hygiene programs throughout the country. Additionally, an earlier contribution to WFP to provide mobile cranes for the Al Hudaydah Port will arrive soon, improving the capacity of the port to receive humanitarian and commercial supplies.

In addition, more than $6 million of the newly announced assistance will go to the International Organization for Migration (IOM) to aid vulnerable migrants in Yemen and the Horn of Africa, including through assisted voluntary returns to their homes. It will support IOM's activities to provide life-saving humanitarian assistance to migrants fleeing or expelled from Yemen, as well as raise awareness among migrants about the dangers of travelling to Yemen.

Prior to the current conflict, Yemen was the poorest and most food insecure country in the region. According to the latest Famine Early Warning Systems Network (FEWS NET) estimates, between 7 and 10 million people require emergency food assistance. The number of people in need would be significantly higher without the on-going, large-scale international humanitarian food assistance response.

The United States remains committed to providing humanitarian support to the people of Yemen while we work to end the conflict. The United States has urged all parties to resume a cessation of hostilities based on the April 10 terms and conditions as soon as possible. We also call upon all parties to ensure that unfettered humanitarian access is possible throughout the country. It is critical that other humanitarian donors also increase their support to help meet the need of all of those affected by the conflict.

Yemen: Over Two Million Yemenis Displaced by Conflict: IOM

17 January 2017 - 11:30am
Source: International Organization for Migration Country: Yemen

Yemen - The humanitarian crisis in Yemen caused by the ongoing conflict over the past 22 months has led to the internal displacement of over 2.1 million Yemenis. It is also complicating an already difficult situation for thousands of migrants from the Horn of Africa attempting to cross the country on the way to Saudi Arabia.

A high-ranking delegation from IOM earlier this month visited Sana’a, Yemen to assess and support IOM Yemen’s efforts to aid displaced Yemenis and migrants in the country.

Carmela Godeau, IOM’s Regional Director for Middle East and North Africa based in Cairo, and Mohammed Abdiker, Director of IOM’s Department of Operations and Emergencies, visited a settlement of displaced Yemenis in Sana’a and met local partners working with IOM to provide health care and non-food items to help displaced families cope with winter weather.

The delegation also visited one of the 31 Child Friendly Spaces that IOM has opened in Yemen. These provide direct assistance to displaced children. They aim to ease the stress and effects of the conflict on children, in addition to providing awareness-raising sessions and psychosocial support for traumatized children.

Other visits allowed the IOM delegation to see the work of an IOM health clinic, which provides primary health care to displaced Yemenis and migrants, including psychosocial support to those suffering from displacement and war traumas.

Meetings were organized with the IOM staff from Sana’a, Al Hudaydah and Aden, to further discuss the ongoing IOM work in 18 Yemeni governorates. Consultations also took place with UN partner agencies including UNOCHA, UNHCR, UNDP and UNICEF, NGOs and the local authorities in Sana’a.

“It is of utmost importance for IOM to understand the prevailing situation in the country, to help IOM at the global level to advocate for more assistance to the people suffering in Yemen,” said Godeau. “This visit is timely, as it comes before the official launching of the UN Humanitarian Response Plan, which will be launched on 8 February 2017 in Geneva.”

The meetings in Sana’a led to a broader understanding of the situation on the ground, which in turn will facilitate preparations of IOM’s action plan for 2017. The visit to Sana’a was followed by a visit to Riyadh, where IOM Yemen Chief of Mission Laurent de Boeck briefed the officials and the donor community on activities carried out by IOM in Yemen.

He particularly focused on the health situation of both displaced Yemenis and migrants from the Horn of Africa. IOM mobile health teams are operating in 18 of 22 governorates to deliver primary health care and provide referrals. IOM is particularly concerned by the increasing number of migrants arriving in Yemen – up to 12,000 every month – and is calling for support to provide food, shelter and protection and evacuate the most vulnerable.

For further information please contact Saba Malme at IOM Yemen, Tel: + 967 736 800 329, Email: smalme@iom.int

World: Aperçu de la situation humanitaire mondiale 2017

17 January 2017 - 11:23am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Afghanistan, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Central African Republic, Chad, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Egypt, Ethiopia, Fiji, Haiti, Iraq, Libya, Mali, Mauritania, Myanmar, Niger, Nigeria, occupied Palestinian territory, Rwanda, Senegal, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Swaziland, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey, Uganda, Ukraine, United Republic of Tanzania, World, Yemen, Zimbabwe

Avant-propos

“La Résolution 46/182 des Nations Unies reste aussi pertinente et fondamentale aujourd’hui qu’en décembre 1991 et les principes d’humanité, de neutralité, indépendance et d’impartialité qu’elle contient continuent de guider une assistance humanitaire stratégique, coordonnée et efficace aux personnes qui en ont besoin”

À travers le monde, un écosystème croissant d’acteurs humanitaires allant des communautés locales aux gouvernements nationaux, des organisations internationales au secteur privé, dispense une assistance et une protection vitales aux personnes qui en ont besoin. Leur travail est plus nécessaire et plus courageux que jamais. Plus de 128,6 millions de personnes ont besoin actuellement d’une assistance humanitaire dans 33 pays. En 2017, la communauté internationale a besoin de 22,2 milliards de dollars pour répondre aux besoins des 92,8 millions de personnes les plus vulnérables. Au cours des 12 derniers mois, les acteurs humanitaires ont sauvé, protégé et soutenu plus de personnes que les années passées depuis l’avènement des Nations Unies. En 2016, les appels de fonds ont été plus importants que jamais auparavant. Mais aussi, au moment où nous parlons, plus de personnes ont des besoins humanitaires, essentiellement en raison des crises prolongées qui durent de plus en plus longtemps. Il est déplorable qu’avec l’escalade persistante des besoins humanitaires, l’écart se creuse davantage entre ce qui doit être fait pour sauver et protéger un plus grand nombre de personnes actuellement et les financements que les humanitaires reçoivent pour le faire et pouvoir y accéder.

Cet Aperçu de la situation humanitaire mondiale 2017 coïncide avec le 25ème anniversaire de la Résolution 46/182 de l’Assemblée générale qui a posé les fondements de l’écosystème humanitaire d’aujourd’hui. Ce système résulte d’une série continue de catastrophes subites, de conflits, de sécheresses et d’autres situations d’urgence illustrant la nécessité d’organisations humanitaires internationales qui répondent de manière collaborative, stratégique et efficace en faisant le meilleur usage des ressources disponibles. La Résolution 46/182 des Nations Unies reste aussi pertinente et fondamentale aujourd’hui qu’en décembre 1991 et les principes d’humanité, de neutralité, indépendance et d’impartialité qu’elle contient continuent de guider une assistance humanitaire stratégique, coordonnée et efficace aux personnes qui en ont besoin. Cette résolution a marqué une étape décisive pour les Nations Unies et leurs partenaires. Elle reste aussi pertinente et fondamentale aujourd’hui qu’en décembre 1991 et les principes d’humanité, de neutralité, indépendance et d’impartialité qu’elle contient continuent d’orienter le travail humanitaire.

Les structures, les responsabilités et les outils qu’elle a créés, comme les appels consolidés, demeurent capitaux pour notre travail. Les États membres ont fondamentalement compris qu’une coordination effective a un effet multiplicateur sur la force de l’action humanitaire. Cette année, le Sommet humanitaire mondial a témoigné de l’immense effort déployé par toutes les parties prenantes pour faire avancer cette vision en la faisant mieux répondre aux besoins humanitaires et réduire la vulnérabilité. Ce Programme d’action pour l’humanité annonce un changement, une transformation et une plus grande détermination des humanitaires à ne laisser personne de côté. Cette tâche est cruciale puisque les besoins humanitaires continuent d’augmenter et que les efforts humanitaires sont entravés par la réduction de l’accès, l’irrespect croissant des droits humains et les violations flagrantes du droit international humanitaire. Les travailleurs humanitaires sont de plus en plus exposés à un risque d’attaques ciblées. Avec le changement climatique, les catastrophes naturelles devraient devenir plus fréquentes, plus violentes et plus graves ; et les crises causées par l’homme pourraient se prolonger davantage. Il y a tout de même des changements positifs: le nombre croissant d’acteurs locaux, nationaux et internationaux, les ressources financières et concrètes plus importantes, les nouvelles technologies de communications et de cartographie et un plus grand nombre de pays ayant la volonté politique et des mécanismes en place pour se préparer à une réponse aux catastrophes. Nous devons accélérer les changements positifs pour relever les défis de 2017 et au-delà.

Le « Grand Bargain» et la «nouvelle manière de travailler» impliquant un engagement global et collectif dans la réponse aux crises sont des composantes essentielles du Programme d’action pour l’humanité. Nous mettons tout en œuvre pour l’amélioration des évaluations des besoins et de l’analyse conjointe. Nous accélérons certaines dispositions existantes pour les Plans de réponse humanitaire (HRP) pour 2017 avec, par exemple, la planification et le financement pluriannuels des crises prolongées en alignant ainsi les besoins humanitaires immédiats sur le droit de survivre et de prospérer. En août, l’Equipe humanitaire pays de la République démocratique du Congo (RDC) a conçu un plan triennal venant compléter les éléments de l’action humanitaire, du développement et du maintien de la paix. La République centrafricaine (RCA), le Cameroun, la Somalie, le Soudan et le Tchad présentent également des plans triennaux pour 2017.

Somalia: Somalia Task Force on Yemen Situation: Inter-Agency Update #22 (1 - 31 December 2016)

17 January 2017 - 6:15am
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Ethiopia, Somalia, Yemen

KEY FIGURES

189 New arrivals from Yemen

2,595 Refugees and asylum-seekers children enrolled to schools

484 Refugees and asylum-seekers supported with healthcare assistance

299 Refugee households provided with the business grants

747 Yemeni refugees families provided with the blanket cash assistance

FUNDING

USD 39.3 million Requested for the Somalia Response Plan for Yemen Situation (JanuaryDecember 2016)

HIGHLIGHTS

  • 189 new arrivals, including 153 Somalis, 30 Yemenis and six Ethiopians have been assisted by UNHCR;

  • UNHCR supported 2,595 refugee and asylum-seekers with monthly school fees, through Action Africa Help-International (AAH-I), Gruppo per le Relazioni Transculturali (GRT) and Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC);

  • Health care assistance was provided to 484 refugees and asylum-seekers by UNHCR and implementing partners Danish Refugee Council (DRC) and GRT;

  • Blanket cash assistance and business grants were provided to 1,046 households.

Yemen: Amnesty International response to the Saudi Arabia-led coalition’s investigations

16 January 2017 - 10:14pm
Source: Amnesty International Country: Yemen

The Saudi Arabia-led coalition’s investigative mechanism, the Joint Incidents Assessment Team (JIAT), published a series of legal conclusions in August, October and December 2016 surrounding specific air strike incidents where concerns have been raised that international humanitarian law (IHL) may have been breached.

Amnesty International has reviewed all publically available legal and factual conclusions and in response, has written today to Lieutenant General Mansour Ahmed Al-Mansour, legal advisor to the JIAT, to express the organization’s concern the JIAT’s investigations appear to be falling short of international standards including those of transparency, independence, impartiality and effectiveness. Amnesty International has also sought further information regarding the JIAT’s methodology and mandate.

Amnesty International has also reviewed and evaluated responses made by General Ahmed al-Asiri regarding the organization’s findings on the coalition’s use of UK-manufactured cluster munition.

Amnesty International believes that the JIAT may fall short of international standards in a number of key areas including, but not limited, to:

Mandate: It remains unclear what the JIAT’s mandate is, what it will do with its findings, whether it will identify possible perpetrators, how it will ensure prosecution of those suspected of criminal responsibility for crimes under international law, or whether it is mandated to identify systematic patterns of violations.

Authority: It is unclear what powers the JIAT has to subpoena witnesses, obtain relevant documents and other evidence, ensure co-operation from government officials and members of armed forces of coalition members; and whether it has the authority to require coalition members to suspend from duty officials involved in the matters it is looking into; whether its recommendations are binding vis-à-vis coalition members and if there is a committee to oversee the implementation of these recommendations. If these powers are indeed absent, it would be a serious shortcoming undermining the prospect that the JIAT could help ensure truth, justice andreparation for victims and their families.

Transparency: Information regarding the JIAT is not readily available publicly and its methodology remains unclear. Amnesty International is concerned that the following information is not public: the qualifications of its members, detailed information on its terms of reference and a detailed timeline of its work to date (published and unpublished) or a work plan. Amnesty International has not been able to find a detailed explanation of the standards that the JIAT has followed in monitoring, reporting and verifying alleged violations.

Impartiality: The JIAT does not outline the criteria set out for the selection of theincidents to date. Amnesty International fears that the JIAT’s legal and factual conclusions thus far indicate a greater willingness to absolve the coalition members of responsibility. The JIAT does not state what its sources are, how it cross checks factual information and whether it interviewed victims, witnesses and medical staff.

To Amnesty International’s knowledge, the JIAT has not investigated a single cluster munition attack to this day.

Ethiopia: Ethiopia: Refugees and Asylum-seekers as of 30 November 2016

16 January 2017 - 10:10pm
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Eritrea, Ethiopia, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Yemen

783,401 Registered Refugees and Asylum-seekers

228,402 Households

Yemen: UN envoy in Yemen meeting with President, senior officials to push for greater aid access

16 January 2017 - 5:21pm
Source: UN News Service Country: Yemen

16 January 2017 – The United Nations Special Envoy for Yemen, Ismail Ould Cheikh Ahmed, is today in Aden, highlighting the need for a truce to allow in humanitarian aid and move along the peace process.

“We are encouraging the parties to commit to restoring the 10 April Cessation of Hostilities and take immediate measures which will prevent further deterioration of the economic and humanitarian situation,” the Special Envoy said referring to an agreement by Yemeni parties in 2016, but whose terms and conditions have since been violated.

“The current political stalemate is causing death and destruction every day,” the UN Special Envoy said. “The only way to stop this is through the renewal of the Cessation of Hostilities followed by consultations to develop a comprehensive agreement.”

“Yemen's political elites have a responsibility to shield people from further harm, protect their country's future and commit to a peaceful settlement,” he continued.

Earlier today, Mr. Ould Cheikh Ahmed arrived in the eastern Yemeni city for meetings with President Abd Rabbo Mansour Hadi, Prime Minister Ahmed bin Daghr and Foreign Minister Abdel Malik Mekhlafi, according to a UN spokesperson.

The visit follows a week of meetings with senior officials from the Governments of Saudi Arabia, Oman and Qatar in Riyadh, Muscat and Doha, respectively.

In a meeting with President Hadi, Mr. Ould Cheikh Ahmed said he discussed the key elements of a comprehensive agreement, based on consultations in Kuwait, which would help bring an end to the war and Yemen's return to a peaceful and orderly transition.

“I asked the President to act swiftly and engage constructively with the UN's proposal for the sake of the country's future,” Mr. Ould Cheikh Ahmed said, stressing that a peace agreement, combined with a well-articulated security plan and an inclusive government formation is the only way to end the fighting.

According to the UN spokesperson, the Special Envoy will travel to the capital city of Sana'a in the coming days to share the same message with the Representatives of Ansar Allah and General People's Congress.

Kenya: Kenya: Kakuma New Arrival Registration Trends 2017 (as of 16 Jan 2017)

16 January 2017 - 3:52am
Source: UN High Commissioner for Refugees Country: Angola, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Congo, Côte d'Ivoire, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Iran (Islamic Republic of), Kenya, Nigeria, Pakistan, Russian Federation, Rwanda, Saudi Arabia, Sierra Leone, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Yemen, Zimbabwe

Yemen: Yemen - Emergency Food Assistance: Number of Beneficiaries Targeted/Reached by the Food Security and Agriculture Cluster Partners - December 2016

16 January 2017 - 3:42am
Source: World Food Programme, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Food Security Cluster Country: Yemen

Yemen: Yemen 4ws Partners Coverage based on Food Security and Agriculture Cluster activities - December 2016

16 January 2017 - 3:37am
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Food Security Cluster Country: Yemen

Yemen: Yemen - Emergency Livelihoods Assistance: Total number of Beneficiaries Targeted/Reached by the Food Security and Agriculture Cluster Partners - December 2016

16 January 2017 - 3:31am
Source: World Food Programme, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Food Security Cluster Country: Yemen

Syrian Arab Republic: R2P Monitor, Issue 31, 15 January 2017

16 January 2017 - 12:16am
Source: Global Centre for the Responsibility to Protect Country: Burundi, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Iraq, Myanmar, Nigeria, Philippines, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Yemen

R2P Monitor is a bimonthly bulletin applying the Responsibility to Protect lens to populations at risk of mass atrocities around the world. Issue 31 looks at developments in Syria, Iraq, Yemen, Sudan, Myanmar (Burma), South Sudan, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Burundi, Philippines, Central African Republic and Nigeria.

Syrian Arab Republic: R2P monitor - 15 January 2017 Issue 31

16 January 2017 - 12:16am
Source: Global Centre for the Responsibility to Protect Country: Burundi, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Iraq, Myanmar, Nigeria, Philippines, South Sudan, Sudan, Syrian Arab Republic, Yemen

R2P Monitor is a bimonthly bulletin applying the Responsibility to Protect lens to populations at risk of mass atrocities around the world. Issue 31 looks at developments in Syria, Iraq, Yemen, Sudan, Myanmar (Burma), South Sudan, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Burundi, Philippines, Central African Republic and Nigeria.

Yemen: Monthly Market Monitoring Bulletin (December 2016)

15 January 2017 - 6:25am
Source: Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Government of Yemen Country: Yemen

Key Highlights

  • Globally: Wheat export prices showed mixed trends in November but remained below their year-earlier levels. The benchmark US wheat (No.2 Hard Red Winter, f.o.b.) price averaged USD 191 per tonne, slightly down from October and nearly 10 percent below the corresponding month last year.
    Imported commodities: The increasing prices of key imported food commodities in December are attributable to various socioeconomic factors including the recent shortage of hard currency to import. In the FSIS targeted governorates, average prices increased by 7.19% for Vegetable cooking oil, 4.31% for Faba beans, 3.38% for Wheat and 2% for Rice. The December prices are higher than pre-crisis era by 45.14% for rice, 43.88% for sugar and least 24.66% for Wheat flour.

  • Locally produced cereals: As a result of November 2016 harvesting season in almost all targeted governorates, the December prices of all locally produced cereals declined nominally. Nevertheless, the prices remained higher than the pre crises prices by 49.13% for sorghum, by 44.90% for millets, by 60.47% for maize and by 69.23% for barley.

  • Fuel Commodities: Diesel prices in all governorates remained stable while petrol prices declined with highest decline of 20.9% recorded in Hodeida followed by Taiz and Lahej Governorates by 16.23% and 13.47% respectively when compared to November 2016. Despite the decline of Petrol prices, when compared to pre-crisis period the prices are higher ranging from 16.67% in Hadramout to 72.0% in Taiz. December cooking gas prices in Taiz Governorate are higher by132.68% when compared to pre crisis era prices.

  • Importation: Traders have reportedly stopped or in a process of stopping wheat imports due to financing problems resulting from the Central Bank crisis and local banks difficulties to convert the local currency into US dollars, needed to make purchases, due to limited supplies of foreign currency. The impact of the stoppage may be witnessed in coming months with possibility of highly priced imported food commodities or unavailability in some markets if no mitigation measures are undertaken.

  • Availability of food commodities in the markets: Monitoring data from Sana’a City, Dhamar, Hajjah, Hodeida, Hadramout and Lahej markets generally shows availability of basic food and non-food commodities apart from unavailability due to seasonality factors. However, Taiz City in particular the physical and economic access to basic food and non-food commodities is a big challenge either due to higher prices, limited quantities and in some cases total unavailability of food commodities eg some types of fish.