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Lebanon: Humanitarian Bulletin Lebanon Issue 18 | 1 – 30 April 2016 [EN/AR]

3 hours 50 min ago
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Lebanon, occupied Palestinian territory, Syrian Arab Republic

HIGHLIGHTS

• Over 300 young Syrians, Lebanese and Palestinians fight prejudice through art.

• Reported rise in child labour and sexual exploitation of Syrian refugees.

• New water networks for 5,000 people in Tripoli’s conflict-scarred neighborhoods.

• 10,000 Syrian and Lebanese children receive WFP school meals for next six months.

Youth challenge prejudice through art

Young Syrians, Palestinians and Lebanese build peace together

Political leadership to prevent and end conflict is one of the five ‘Core Responsibilities’ listed by UN SecretaryGeneral Ban Ki-moon in his Agenda for Humanity, ahead of the World Humanitarian Summit that will take place in Istanbul on 23-24 May.

But conflict prevention and resolution is not solely the responsibility of political leaders: communities, individuals and local organizations also have a key role to play, and Lebanon’s civil society is rising to the challenge.

Several initiatives are bringing young people together in Lebanon to build a more peaceful future in which violence is not an option. ‘Better together’ is one of these projects: international NGO Search for Common Ground (SFCG) has partnered with two local organizations – Development for People and Nature Association (DPNA) in the South, and Lebanese Organization for Studies and Trainings (LOST) in the Bekaa – to implement this EU-funded peacebuilding initiative.

“It is where I found a home”

The two-year project engaged 320 young Palestinians, Lebanese and Syrians in constructive dialogue and taught them to challenge stereotypes through art. The youth crossed community divides to produce music, plays, films and paintings together, guided by a team of Syrian, Palestinian, and Lebanese artists. ‘Better Together’ ensured a safe space for these youth to talk about their fears and challenges, learn about non-violent conflict resolution, and build strong ties across their different communities. “‘Better Together’ was my support and gave me the courage to become a leader influencing my community. It is where I found a home,” says Khalil, a teenage Palestinian refugee who founded ‘Qalam Rasas’ (‘pencil’), a magazine about life in the Palestinian camps.

Refugees face exploitation and abuse

New reports say Syrian refugees risk serious abuse in Lebanon

Two recent reports from the Freedom Fund and Amnesty International point to serious allegations of abuse, exploitation, and in some instances slavery of the Syrian refugee population in Lebanon.

Around 1.1 million Syrians are registered as refugees in Lebanon, and the Government of Lebanon estimates that the real number of refugees could be as high as 1.5 million. Regulations imposed since May 2015 prohibit new refugee registration of Syrians in Lebanon – the most recent in a series of policies limiting Syrian refugees’ access to formal employment. Since January 2015, all Syrians who enter Lebanon and register as refugees have been required to sign a ‘Pledge not to Work’. In addition, many previouslyregistered Syrian refugees are unable to renew their residency cards every year, as refugee families cannot afford the renewal fee of US$200 per person. The outcome: Syrian refugees – registered or otherwise – seldom have the legal paperwork necessary to reside or work in Lebanon.

The April report from the Freedom Fund contends that these constraints on legal movement and employment for Syrian refugees in Lebanon have created an environment conducive to forced labour, child labour, early marriage, survival sex and sexual exploitation – acts that the Freedom Foundation asserts are tantamount to slavery. The report adds that these legal constraints contribute to a culture of impunity for the perpetrators, and of continued abuse and exploitation of refugees.

Child & forced labour on the rise

The Freedom Fund report alleges that child labour is on the rise, with up to 70 per cent of Syrian refugee children working in some areas, as reported by an NGO operating in the Bekaa valley, one of Lebanon’s agricultural hubs. This increase is attributed to increasing economic vulnerability and perceptions that children are less likely to be questioned or detained by authorities, among other factors. This finding is consistent with a July 2015 report by UNICEF and Save the Children which indicates that Syrian refugee children are sustaining households’ survival as partial or sole breadwinners, as well as the first 2016 Interagency Quarterly Dashboard on Child Protection which notes that “the prominence of child labour as a coping mechanism among Syrian refugees continues to be a primary protection concern”. Concerns about being detained at checkpoints are also corroborated by a January 2016 IRC report which highlights that Syrian men are the most frequent targets of raids, arrests and checkpoints in Lebanon.

Women face sexual violence, early marriage and trafficking

Refugee women face specific risks in Lebanon. The Freedom Fund report, as well as a February study by Amnesty International, argues that their uncertain legal status puts women refugees at increased risk of violence, harassment and exploitation. Women are most at risk when they are newly displaced: the LCRP found that 87 per cent of sexual violence reported in the first half of 2015 occurred shortly after arrival in Lebanon. The

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occupied Palestinian territory: Humanitarian Bulletin Monthly Report - March/April 2016

4 May 2016 - 10:37pm
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: occupied Palestinian territory

HIGHLIGHTS

● The number of Palestinian homes and livelihoods demolished by Israeli authorities in the West Bank so far in 2016 (as of mid-April), and the number of people displaced as a result, already exceeds the equivalent figures for the entire 2015.

● About 17 per cent of the homes destroyed or severely damaged during the 2014 hostilities in Gaza had been reconstructed; an estimated 75,000 people remain displaced.

● Palestinian rocket fire into southern Israel and Israeli airstrikes into Gaza continue putting civilian lives at risk and exacerbate the risk of further large-scale escalation; two Palestinian children killed in March.

Overview

The demolition of Palestinian homes and livelihood structures on the grounds of the lack of an Israeli building permit continued in the West Bank during March and April, placing households and entire communities at risk of forcible transfer. So far this year (as of mid-April), the Israeli authorities have demolished or confiscated nearly 600 Palestinian structures and displaced over 800 people. This is almost four times the monthly average for demolitions in 2015. More than one quarter of the targeted structures had been provided as humanitarian assistance, three times the monthly average in 2015. In his briefing to the UN Security Council on 18 April, the UN Secretary-General expressed his concern at the “alarming rate” of demolitions, noting that “Israel makes it almost impossible for Palestinians to acquire permits”.

Ongoing preparations for a new Israeli settlement in the southern West Bank have raised additional protection concerns, as highlighted in this Humanitarian Bulletin. In the aforementioned briefing, the Secretary-General warned that the “creation of new facts on the ground through demolitions and settlement building raises questions about whether Israel’s ultimate goal is, in fact, to drive Palestinians out of certain parts of the West Bank, thereby undermining any prospect of transition to a viable Palestinian state”.

This Bulletin also details some of the challenges to the reconstruction of homes destroyed in the Gaza Strip during the 2014 escalation of hostilities, in particular issues related to the registration of land with the Gaza authorities and the lack of adequate planning. An OCHA report released in April, presents the findings of a survey of internally displaced persons (IDPs) in Gaza as a result of such destruction, with an estimated 75,000 still homeless as we approach the second anniversary of the hostilities. As of writing, funding is still needed to reconstruct some 6,600 houses, or about 37 per cent of the overall caseload.

Referring to the Gaza Strip, the Secretary-General listed some recent concerns, including the continued failure of intra-Palestinian discussions to achieve genuine unity, the closing down of the Gaza Power Plant due to lack of fuel on 8 April, and the discovery of a tunnel crossing from Gaza into Israel on 18 April, described as a “dangerous and provocative move”. He noted that the conditions in Gaza are “intolerable”, and strongly encouraged “all Member States to fulfill their commitments to support the reconstruction and development of Gaza”.

The wave of violence that started in October 2015 continued into March with a number of Palestinian fatalities, the majority of them suspected perpetrators of attacks. The figures were slightly higher than those for the first two months of the year. Pre-existing concerns about the excessive use of force by Israeli forces in responding to Palestinian attacks were underscored during March by an incident caught on camera, showing the “apparent extra-judicial execution”1 of a suspected perpetrator by a soldier, who was later arrested and indicted of manslaughter. This Bulletin also covers Palestinian rocket fire into southern Israel and Israeli airstrikes into Gaza, which in March resulted in the killing of two Palestinian children and both of which exacerbates the risk of further largescale escalation.

In his reference to the ongoing violence, the Secretary-General reiterated: “There can never be any justification for stabbings, vehicle attacks, shootings, incitements to violence, or the glorification of killers”. He also noted that a “twenty-year-old Palestinian living under occupation has seen no political progress at all during his or her lifetime. Impatience and despair at that fact is one of the root causes of the violence… It is incumbent on all of us to do everything in our power to secure lasting peace”.

At risk of forcible transfer

The forcible transfer of protected persons from their normal place of residence is prohibited under Article 49 of the Fourth Geneva Convention, which also forbids deportations outside an occupied territory. Many Palestinian families and communities throughout the occupied West Bank, including East Jerusalem, are at risk of forcible transfer as Israeli practices have created a coercive environment that puts pressure on them to move. Although Bedouin and herders in Area C bear the brunt of this pressure, forcible transfer also takes other forms. The two sections below are the first in a series of articles in the Humanitarian Bulletin highlighting a range of situations across the oPt where Palestinians have been placed at heightened risk of forcible transfer

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occupied Palestinian territory: occupied Palestinian territory Humanitarian Bulletin March - April 2016

4 May 2016 - 10:37pm
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: occupied Palestinian territory

HIGHLIGHTS

● The number of Palestinian homes and livelihoods demolished by Israeli authorities in the West Bank so far in 2016 (as of mid-April), and the number of people displaced as a result, already exceeds the equivalent figures for the entire 2015.

● About 17 per cent of the homes destroyed or severely damaged during the 2014 hostilities in Gaza had been reconstructed; an estimated 75,000 people remain displaced.

● Palestinian rocket fire into southern Israel and Israeli airstrikes into Gaza continue putting civilian lives at risk and exacerbate the risk of further large-scale escalation; two Palestinian children killed in March.

Overview

The demolition of Palestinian homes and livelihood structures on the grounds of the lack of an Israeli building permit continued in the West Bank during March and April, placing households and entire communities at risk of forcible transfer. So far this year (as of mid-April), the Israeli authorities have demolished or confiscated nearly 600 Palestinian structures and displaced over 800 people. This is almost four times the monthly average for demolitions in 2015. More than one quarter of the targeted structures had been provided as humanitarian assistance, three times the monthly average in 2015. In his briefing to the UN Security Council on 18 April, the UN Secretary-General expressed his concern at the “alarming rate” of demolitions, noting that “Israel makes it almost impossible for Palestinians to acquire permits”.

Ongoing preparations for a new Israeli settlement in the southern West Bank have raised additional protection concerns, as highlighted in this Humanitarian Bulletin. In the aforementioned briefing, the Secretary-General warned that the “creation of new facts on the ground through demolitions and settlement building raises questions about whether Israel’s ultimate goal is, in fact, to drive Palestinians out of certain parts of the West Bank, thereby undermining any prospect of transition to a viable Palestinian state”.

This Bulletin also details some of the challenges to the reconstruction of homes destroyed in the Gaza Strip during the 2014 escalation of hostilities, in particular issues related to the registration of land with the Gaza authorities and the lack of adequate planning. An OCHA report released in April, presents the findings of a survey of internally displaced persons (IDPs) in Gaza as a result of such destruction, with an estimated 75,000 still homeless as we approach the second anniversary of the hostilities. As of writing, funding is still needed to reconstruct some 6,600 houses, or about 37 per cent of the overall caseload.

Referring to the Gaza Strip, the Secretary-General listed some recent concerns, including the continued failure of intra-Palestinian discussions to achieve genuine unity, the closing down of the Gaza Power Plant due to lack of fuel on 8 April, and the discovery of a tunnel crossing from Gaza into Israel on 18 April, described as a “dangerous and provocative move”. He noted that the conditions in Gaza are “intolerable”, and strongly encouraged “all Member States to fulfill their commitments to support the reconstruction and development of Gaza”.

The wave of violence that started in October 2015 continued into March with a number of Palestinian fatalities, the majority of them suspected perpetrators of attacks. The figures were slightly higher than those for the first two months of the year. Pre-existing concerns about the excessive use of force by Israeli forces in responding to Palestinian attacks were underscored during March by an incident caught on camera, showing the “apparent extra-judicial execution”1 of a suspected perpetrator by a soldier, who was later arrested and indicted of manslaughter. This Bulletin also covers Palestinian rocket fire into southern Israel and Israeli airstrikes into Gaza, which in March resulted in the killing of two Palestinian children and both of which exacerbates the risk of further largescale escalation.

In his reference to the ongoing violence, the Secretary-General reiterated: “There can never be any justification for stabbings, vehicle attacks, shootings, incitements to violence, or the glorification of killers”. He also noted that a “twenty-year-old Palestinian living under occupation has seen no political progress at all during his or her lifetime. Impatience and despair at that fact is one of the root causes of the violence… It is incumbent on all of us to do everything in our power to secure lasting peace”.

At risk of forcible transfer

The forcible transfer of protected persons from their normal place of residence is prohibited under Article 49 of the Fourth Geneva Convention, which also forbids deportations outside an occupied territory. Many Palestinian families and communities throughout the occupied West Bank, including East Jerusalem, are at risk of forcible transfer as Israeli practices have created a coercive environment that puts pressure on them to move. Although Bedouin and herders in Area C bear the brunt of this pressure, forcible transfer also takes other forms. The two sections below are the first in a series of articles in the Humanitarian Bulletin highlighting a range of situations across the oPt where Palestinians have been placed at heightened risk of forcible transfer

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Colombia: Colombia: Desplazamientos masivos en Litoral de San Juan (Chocó) - Informe de situación No. 2 (4/05/2016)

4 May 2016 - 9:52pm
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Colombia

Destacados

• Cerca de 2.760 indígenas de la etnia Wounaan y 1.598 afrocolombianos de 18 comunidades de zona rural del Litoral de San Juan (Chocó) sufren afectaciones humanitarias por las continuas operaciones militares y enfrentamientos entre la Fuerza Pública y un grupo armado no estatal, que se agudizaron entre el 13 de marzo y el 10 de abril (Ver tablas 1 y 2). Actualmente todas las comunidades del Litoral de San Juan sufren restricciones a la movilidad y riesgo de desplazamiento por la presión, presencia y amenazas de los actores armados no estatales y los constantes operativos militares.

• Cerca de 466 indígenas wounaan de la comunidad de Pichima Quebrada que se desplazaron el 10 de abril a Docordó, casco urbano de Litoral de San Juan, retornaron sin acompañamiento el pasado 26 de abril debido a las difíciles condiciones de albergue y salud. Sin embargo, el 3 de mayo 100 habitantes de la comunidad se desplazaron de nuevo a Docordó por amenazas del grupo armado no estatal.

• Otras 2.056 personas de 9 poblaciones, que se habían desplazado el 13 de marzo, regresaron a sus hogares, pero sufren restricciones a la movilidad.

• Durante las emergencias por desplazamientos y restricciones entre el 13 de marzo al 10 de abril, la UARIV atendió a 11 comunidades (3.132). Siete comunidades (1.114 personas) no han tenido respuesta humanitaria institucional por desconocerse su situación durante las entregas de la entidad.

• La Alcaldía de Litoral de San Juan atendió la emergencia con ayuda alimentaria y lugar de alojamiento en la cabecera de Docordó. Sin embargo, se evidenció que la magnitud de la situación superó sus capacidades, por lo que se requiere acompañar y fortalecer la institucionalidad local y realizar labores de incidencia ante las entidades de orden departamental para responder a futuras emergencias. Organizaciones del Equipo Local de Coordinación (ELC) Valle del Cauca y Chocó y Comité Interinstitucional Humanitario de Buenaventura (CIH) realizan acciones de seguimiento, incidencia y atención de las comunidades

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occupied Palestinian territory: OPT: Humanitarian Dashboard 1st January - 31 March

4 May 2016 - 1:09pm
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: occupied Palestinian territory

SITUATION OVERVIEW

The major drivers of humanitarian vulnerability in the occupied Palestinian territory (oPt) remain unchanged in 2016. The situation is characterized by a protracted occupation, now approaching its 50th year, the systematic denial of Palestinian rights, and continuing conflict, punctuated by frequent outbreaks of violence. The wave of violence that spread throughout the West Bank and other parts of the oPt in October 2015 continued throughout the first quarter of 2016, although the scope of incidents and casualties declined. Suspected perpetrators of attacks on Israelis account for the majority of Palestinian fatalities and concerns over excessive use of force by Israeli forces remain. The escalation has led to a sharp increase in arrest and detentions, including of children, increased restrictions on Palestinian movement throughout the West Bank, and punitive demolitions of the family homes of alleged perpetrators. There was a sharp increase in the number of Palestinian-owned structures destroyed, dismantled or confiscated by the Israeli authorities in the West Bank during the first three months of 2016. Some 499 structures, including 140 donor-funded humanitarian assistance, were destroyed, displacing 665 people, almost four times the monthly average for demolitions in 2015. Most structures were destroyed on the grounds of lack of building permits, which are almost impossible to obtain due to the discriminatory and unlawful planning policies applied in Area C and in East Jerusalem.

In the Gaza Strip, the August 2014 ceasefire, which ended the deadliest escalation in hostilities since the beginning of the Israeli occupation in 1967, has largely held and the blockade imposed by Israel in 2007 remains in place, albeit with some measures relaxed. Although no major displacement has taken place since the ceasefire, an estimated 75,000 people still remain displaced, with almost a quarter living in the rubble of their damaged homes. Due to ongoing Israeli restrictions, the slow pace of disbursement of pledges made by member states for reconstruction, and the inability of the Palestinian Government of National Consensus to assume effective government functions in Gaza, progress on reconstruction has been slow, with significant impact for IDPs, in particular. As of end-March 2016, about 16 per cent (3,000) of the approximately 18,000 uninhabitable homes had been reconstructed or repaired, following cash assistance from UN agencies or other international support. The 2014 Gaza war pushed the Palestinian economy into recession and although economic growth was 6.8 per cent in 2015, unemployment in Gaza is still almost 40 per cent. with youth unemployment close to 60 per cent, among the highest rates globally. According to the World Bank, the Gaza economy is not expected to rebound to pre-2014 levels before 2018.

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Chad: Tchad: impact de la crise nigériane dans la région du Lac Rapport de Situation n° 13 (29/04/2016)

4 May 2016 - 8:42am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Chad, Nigeria

Faits saillants

  • Malgré un risque sécuritaire accru dans le contexte de l’élection présidentielle du 10 avril, aucune conséquence humanitaire n’a été rapportée au niveau national ou dans la région du Lac, le jour du scrutin ou suite à la proclamation des résultats provisoires le 21 avril.

  • Les fonds disponibles sont épuisés alors que d’importants besoins humanitaires persistent dans tous les secteurs.

  • Un taux de 6,12% de malnutrition aigüe sévère (MAS) largement supérieur au seuil d’urgence de 2% a été rapporté parmi les 997 enfants déplacés dépistés par le PAM en avril sur huit sites de déplacement.

  • La réponse humanitaire se poursuit avec des cantines scolaires dans 10 écoles depuis début avril et un renforcement des activités de prévention et prise en charge des violences basées (VBG) sur le genre par UNFPA.

60 958 déplacés enregistrés depuis mai 2015
Dont : - 50 129 déplacés internes
- 605 ressortissants des pays tiers
- 10 224 retournés Tchadiens

39 715 déplacés* estimés pas encore enregistrés dans les sous- préfectures de Liwa, Daboua, Kangalom et Tchoukoutalia.

6 952 réfugiés dont 5 374 dans le camp de Dar-es-Salam depuis janvier 2015.

Aperçu de la situation

Le contexte d’insécurité perdure dans la région du Lac, avec des tirs d’armes légères et de mortiers (en provenance du Nigéria) signalés dans diverses localités au cours des dernières semaines, de même que la présence d’hommes suspectés d’appartenir à des groupes armés. Cependant ces incidents n’ont pas fait de victime civile ni eu d’impact humanitaire. Malgré le risque sécuritaire accru autour du scrutin présidentiel du 10 avril et de la proclamation des résultats provisoires le 21 avril, aucune conséquence humanitaire en lien direct avec le processus électoral n’a été rapportée.

Selon la dernière mise à jour des chiffres de déplacement réalisée par le Cluster Abris/AME/CCC, le nombre total de personnes déplacées dans la région du Lac atteint 106 353 personnes: 50 129 déplacés internes enregistrés, 39 715 déplacés estimés (statut non déterminé), 10 224 retournés, 6 220 réfugiés, et 605 ressortissants de pays tiers. Plusieurs nouveaux sites de déplacés auraient récemment été signalés par les autorités et certains partenaires. Il s’agit de Loudia, Lgui et Lom (sur l’axe Liwa), Yaré et Gouarama (au nord de Liwa, entre Kiskra et Kiskawa), et trois sites dans la zone de Bol (Foulatari Ligra et Sommi). Cependant leur existence reste à vérifier.

L’Equipe Humanitaire Pays et l’Intercluster travaillent sur une demande de nouveau financement CERF Réponse Rapide d’une part pour répondre aux besoins humanitaires dans la cuvette nord de la région du Lac (axe Liwa Daboua) et Kangalom et Tchoukoutalia ; et d’autre part pour faire face à la crise d’insécurité alimentaire et malnutrition dont la détérioration dans l’ensemble de la Bande Sahélienne, dont les régions du Lac, du Bar-el-Gazal et du Hadjer Lamis, est confirmée par les récents résultats du Cadre Harmonisé.

Par ailleurs les 592 déplacés de la région du Lac se trouvant dans le village d’Ideter (proche d’Am- Timan), continuent à bénéficier d’une assistance en santé de la part de l’ONG IMC, et ont reçu une distribution de vivres du PAM début avril. Il a été demandé aux déplacés qui veulent retourner vers leur zone d’origine dans la région du Lac (six villages de près de Baga-Sola) de manifester leur volonté. Des discussions sont en cours entre les autorités et les partenaires, notamment OIM, concernant un appui au retour et un paquet de réinsertion.

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Central African Republic: République centrafricaine: Aperçu humanitaire (au 2 mai 2016)

4 May 2016 - 7:10am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Central African Republic

Période à venir 3 au 9 mai :

Zone Centre :

Un plaidoyer pour un renforcement des patrouilles sur cet axe sera à nouveau effectué cette semaine dans le cadre du CMCoord.

Zone Est :

Du 30 avril au 7 mai, une mission se rendra à Bria pour appuyer les mécanismes de coordination et de suivi de la situation humanitaire dans la Haute-Kotto

Suivi de la problématique d’abris dans les 8 sites de Bambari.

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Democratic Republic of the Congo: Bulletin humanitaire R.D. Congo - Numéro 1 | 30 avril 2016

3 May 2016 - 5:36pm
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Democratic Republic of the Congo

Au sommaire

  • Des sites de déplacés menacés de fermeture P.1

  • El Nino et ses conséquences P.3

  • Beni, symbole de la protection des civils P.4

  • Technologie et sécurité alimentaire P.5

FAITS SAILLANTS

• 45 000 personnes déplacées affectées par la situation sécuritaire dans la zone de Mpati

• Inondations et sécheresse, la double conséquence d’El Nino affecte des centaines de milliers de Congolais

• Depuis 2014, le PAM utilise les nouvelles technologies pour suivre les données sur la sécurité alimentaire.

Nord-Kivu : Plus de 45 000 personnes déplacées vivent sous la menace de fermeture des sites

Depuis un peu plus d’un mois, plus de 45 000 personnes déplacées dans les sites de déplacement situés dans la zone de Mpati, en Territoire de Masisi, subissent les conséquences des affrontements entre les Forces armées de la République démocratique du Congo (FARDC) et les groupes armés.
Sept sites de déplacement de la zone de Mpati (Bweru, Bibwe, Kitso, Nyange, Kivuye, Mpati et Kalengera) sont directement touchés. Au cours des dernières semaines, ces sites ont été soit : vidés de leur population, partiellement vandalisés, accueillent de nouveaux déplacés ou encore sont sujets à une interdiction de retour décidée par les forces gouvernementales. Au total, ce sont 45 410 personnes déplacées – environ 20% de la population totale de personnes déplacées vivant dans les sites au Nord-Kivu – qui sont affectées.

La situation entraîne de graves problèmes de protection, notamment pour les personnes empêchées de retourner dans les sites et qui pour la plupart n’ont nulle part où aller. Certains sont en famille d’accueil alors que d’autres, ont trouvé refuge dans les lieux publics. «Les conditions difficiles à Goriba [5km sud-est de Mpati] m’ont obligée à retourner à Mpati, raconte une déplacée mère de cinq enfants. Je vis de la mendicité à Mpati. Mon mari est agriculteur et ne peut pas se rendre au champ en raison de l’insécurité».
De nombreux besoins, notamment en vivres et articles ménagers essentiels (AME), ont été constatés lors d’une mission inter-agence du 11 au 15 avril. La faisabilité de l'assistance en vivres et AME est toujours à l’étude (au moment de la publication).

Entretemps, les humanitaires se focalisent l’assistance communautaire en soins de santé et approvisionnement en eau et assainissement.

La communauté humanitaire inquiète Les humanitaires en appellent également à une amélioration des conditions sécuritaires dans la zone, en conformité avec les cadres juridiques internationaux et en respectant la dignité des personnes vulnérables. En effet, l’interdiction pour les personnes déplacées de retourner dans les sites, émise par les forces gouvernementales, soulève de grandes inquiétudes quant à la protection des civils. Cette situation fait craindre une fermeture forcée et définitive des sites concernés, ce qui mettrait à risque des milliers de personnes déplacées. En plus des sept sites déjà partiellement ou entièrement vidés, trois autres sites (Kashuga 1 et 2 et Mweso) accueillant plus de 19 000 déplacés risquent aussi d’être brusquement fermés.

Le sujet fait l'objet d'un engagement de haut niveau, y compris par le Secrétaire général de l'ONU Ban Ki-moon lors d'une récente mission en RDC. Dans un communiqué de presse émis le 13 avril, le Coordonnateur humanitaire, Dr Mamadou Diallo, a appelé les autorités à respecter les standards internationaux sur les personnes déplacées en rappelant que ces fermetures doivent être en conformité avec les obligations internationales de la RDC. Le Rapporteur spécial des Nations Unies pour les Droits des Personnes déplacées internes, Dr Chaloka Beyani, en visite au Nord-Kivu le 21 avril, a également réitéré le plaidoyer pour une fermeture ordonnée des sites, respectueuse des droits inscrits dans la Convention de Kampala et encrée sur une approche stratégique propice aux solutions durables.
La question de la fermeture et regroupement des sites de déplacement au Nord-Kivu est sur la table depuis 2014. A plusieurs reprises le Gouvernement a exprimé son intention de fermer tous les sites de déplacements au Nord-Kivu. Une stratégie visant à réduire progressivement le nombre de sites a été mise en place par la Commission nationale des réfugiés (CNR) et la communauté humanitaire – à travers les acteurs du groupe de travail sur la coordination et gestion des sites de déplacement (CCCM). Ce processus, basé sur une réduction significative des effectifs des sites et sur le désengagement des acteurs humanitaires de certains sites, a conduit à la fermeture de cinq sites au cours de l’année 2015 : Nzulo et Buhimba en mai 2015 ; Shasha, Lac Vert et Lusuli en septembre 2015. Ces fermetures se sont déroulées de façon coordonnée, en s’assurant que les personnes pouvaient retourner dans leur zone d’origine de façon sécuritaire ou se réinstaller ailleurs.

Toutefois, en janvier 2016, les autorités ont fermé abruptement le site de Mokoto, qui abritait plus de 4 200 déplacés, pour des raisons de sécurité nationale. La crainte est que la même situation ne se reproduise pour les sept sites de la zone de Mpati.

La province compte présentement un total de 53 sites de déplacements, incluant ceux de la zone de Mpati sous menace de fermeture.

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Ecuador: REDLAC Weekly Note on Emergencies Latin America & The Caribbean - Year 9 - Volume 451

3 May 2016 - 12:30pm
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Argentina, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Haiti, Honduras, Panama

Highlights

 EARTHQUAKE IN ECUADOR: The death toll from the earthquake rose to 660 people dead and 31 still missing. The government of Ecuador, local emergency services, the Red Cross and other organizations continue to provide food, potable water, shelter, emergency medical services and other basic services to the affected people.
Humanitarian partners continue deploying national and international assistance and performing multi sector initial rapid assessments (MIRA) in coordination with local counterparts.

  • RAINS AND FLOODS: Dominican Republic, Haiti, Honduras, Panama and Argentina, report floods in various regions due to heavy rains in the last weeks.

Earthquake

ECUADOR

The death toll from the earthquake on 16 April rose to 660 people. 31 are still missing and 51,376 received sanitary attention. Presently, 22421 people are sheltered in 39 active shelters and 64 temporary camps. There is concern about the uncertain number of non-sheltered people that were affected by the earthquake, particularly those located in remote and dispersed zones.
The government of Ecuador, local emergency services, the Red Cross and other organizations continue working together to provide food, potable water, shelter, emergency medical attention and other basic services to the affected people.
Humanitarian partners continue deployments of national and international assistance, and making multi sector initial rapid assessments (MIRA) in coordination with local counterparts.
An urgent Flash Appeal was launched on 22 April for USD $72.7 million to the donor community, public in general – through the media – and humanitarian partners. These funds will help to assist some 350,000 people for the next three months

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Ecuador: REDLAC Nota Semanal sobre Emergencias - América Latina y el Caribe - Año 9 - Volumen 451

3 May 2016 - 12:28pm
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Argentina, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Haiti, Honduras, Panama

Destacados

  • TERREMOTO EN ECUADOR: El número de fallecidos por el terremoto ocurrido el 16 de abril asciende a 660 personas y 31 personas continúan desaparecidas. El Gobierno de Ecuador, los servicios locales de emergencia, la Cruz Roja y otras organizaciones continúan trabajando juntas para proporcionar a las personas afectadas alimentos, agua potable, refugio, asistencia médica de emergencia y otros servicios básicos.
    Los socios humanitarios continúan con la movilización de la asistencia nacional e internacional y se realizan las evaluaciones multisectoriales (MIRA) en coordinación con las contrapartes locales.

  • LLUVIAS E INUNDACIONES: República Dominicana, Haití, Honduras, Panamá y Argentina, entre otros, registran inundaciones en varias de sus regiones debido a las fuertes lluvias de las últimas semanas.

Terremoto ECUADOR

El número de fallecidos por el terremoto ocurrido el 16 de abril asciende a 660 personas, 31 personas continúan desaparecidas y se ha prestado atención sanitaria a 51,376 personas. Actualmente, se registran 22,421 personas en 39 albergues activos y 64 albergues temporales. Existe una preocupación por el desconocimiento del número de personas no albergadas que han sido afectadas por el terremoto, particularmente por aquellas ubicadas en zonas alejadas y dispersas.
El Gobierno de Ecuador, los servicios locales de emergencia, la Cruz Roja y otras organizaciones continúan trabajando juntas para proporcionar a las personas afectadas alimentos, agua potable, refugio, asistencia médica de emergencia y otros servicios básicos.
Los socios humanitarios continúan con la movilización de la asistencia nacional e internacional y se realizan las evaluaciones multisectoriales (MIRA) en coordinación con las contrapartes locales.
El 22 de abril, fue lanzado el llamamiento humanitario urgente por un valor de US$ 72.7 millones a la comunidad de donantes, al público en general - a través de los medios de comunicación - y a los socios humanitarios. Con estos fondos se espera poder asistir a unas 350,000 personas durante los próximos tres meses

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Mali: Mali: Bulletin humanitaire, fév. – mars 2016

3 May 2016 - 10:07am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Mali

FAITS SAILLANTS

  • Soudure : 3 millions de personnes seront en insécurité alimentaire

  • Des écoles restent fermées dans le nord et le centre du pays

  • Us et coutumes, facteurs clés de la malnutrition au Mali

  • Analyse des conflits intercommunautaires à Ménaka

16 pour cent de la population malienne affectée par l’insécurité alimentaire cette année

Les résultats issus des travaux du cadre harmonisé tenus du 14 au 20 mars à Bamako indiquent une stabilisation progressive de l’insécurité alimentaire au pays. Actuellement trois cercles (Ménaka, Kidal et Abeïbara) sont en phase «sous pression » tandis que les 46 autres cercles et les 6 communes de Bamako sont en phase « minimale ». À la même période l’an dernier (mars 2015) deux cercles étaient en phase de « crise » et 11 cercles en phase « sous pression ».

Selon les prévisions, pendant la période de soudure (juin-août), aucun cercle ne sera en « crise » et le nombre de cercles2 « sous pression » passera de 3 à 12.
Les 37 autres cercles du pays et les 6 communes de Bamako resteront en phase « minimale ».

En terme de nombre de personnes affectées, l’analyse du cadre harmonisé indique qu’environ 241 000 personnes sont actuellement en phase de « crise » au pays, tandis que 1,8 million de personnes sont en phase « sous pression ».

Pendant la période de soudure, il est estimé que la population en phase de «crise » sera de 423 500 personnes, soit environ 2 pour cent de la population totale, et 2,6 millions de personnes seront en phase « sous pression », soit environ 14 pour cent de la population totale.

Moins d’écoles fonctionnelles dans le centre du pays

Le nombre d’écoles fermées dans la région de Mopti au centre du pays a augmenté depuis la rentrée scolaire il y a cinq mois. Cette dégradation de la situation est principalement liée à l’insécurité. Selon l’Académie d’enseignement de la région de Mopti, le nombre d’écoles fermées dans la région est passé de 67 en octobre 2015 à 117 en mars 2016, ce qui prive 13 000 enfants de leur droit fondamental à l’éducation et entraîne le chômage de 300 enseignants.

Au cours de la même période, le nombre d’écoles fermées a également augmenté dans la région de Gao, passant de 52 à 62.

Dans les autres régions touchées par le conflit, la tendance est plutôt à la réouverture progressive des écoles. Les progrès les plus importants sont notés dans la région de Tombouctou, où il ne reste que 52 écoles fermées par rapport à 93 lors de la rentrée scolaire. Dans la région de Kidal, une dizaine d’écoles ont pu rouvrir au cours de cette même période. Au total, le nombre d’écoles fermées en lien avec l’insécurité dans le centre et le nord du pays est passé de 284 en octobre 2015 à 277 en mars 2016.

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Mali: Mali: Humanitarian Bulletin, Feb. – March 2016

3 May 2016 - 10:04am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Mali

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Lean season: 3 million people will be food insecure

  • Some schools remain closed in the north and center of the country

  • Customs and traditions, keys factors of malnutrition in Mali

  • Analysis of intercommunity conflicts in Menaka

16 percent of the Malian population affected by food insecurity this year

The outcome of the meeting on the harmonized framework held from 14 to 20 March in Bamako indicates a gradual stabilization of food insecurity in the country. Currently three cercles (Menaka, Kidal and Abeïbara) are in "under stress" phase while the other 46 cercles and the 6 communes in Bamako are in "minimal" phase. At the same period last year (March 2015), two cercles were in "crisis" phase and 11 cercles in "under stress" phase.

According to forecasts, during the lean period (June-August), no cercle will be in “crisis” phase while the number of cercles "under stress"3 will increase from 3 to 12. The other 37 cercles of the country and the 6 communes in Bamako will remain in "minimal" phase.

In terms of the number of people affected, the analysis of the harmonized framework indicates that approximately 241,000 people are currently in "crisis" phase while 1.8 million people are in "stress" phase. During the lean period, it is estimated that 423,500 people will be in "crisis" phase, i.e. approximately 2 percent of the total population, and 2.6 million people will be in "stress" phase, i.e. approximately 14 percent of the total population.

Fewer schools are functional in the center of the country

The number of schools closed in the Mopti region in the center of the country has increased since the start of the academic year five months ago. This degradation of the situation is mainly linked to insecurity. According to the Education Academy in the region of Mopti, the number of schools closed in the region has increased from 67 in October 2015 to 117 in March 2016, which deprives 13,000 children of their basic right to education and leaves 300 teachers jobless.

During the same period, the number of schools closed has also increased in the region of Gao, from 52 to 62.

In the other regions affected by the conflict, schools are reopening gradually. The most significant progress is noted in the region of Timbuktu, where only 52 schools remain closed compared with 93 at the beginning of the school year. In the region of Kidal, a dozen schools have been able to reopen during the same period. In total, the number of schools closed in relation to insecurity in the center and north of the country has dropped from 284 in October 2015 to 277 in March 2016.

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Ethiopia: Ethiopia Weekly Humanitarian Bulletin, 02 May 2016

3 May 2016 - 8:46am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Ethiopia

Key Issues

  • Improved Belg (spring) rains lower requirements for water trucking but have increased demands for water treatment chemicals.

  • Member States pledge additional funding to El Nino affected countries at “Global Call to Action” event in Geneva.

  • Federal Ministry of Health completes a one week measles and polio campaign.

Ethiopia is responding to an El Niño-caused drought emergency: The El Niño global climatic event has wreaked havoc on Ethiopia’s summer rains. This comes on the heels of failed spring rains, and has driven food insecurity, malnutrition and water shortages in affected areas of the country. A well-coordinated response is already underway and expanding rapidly, although the scale of the developing emergency exceeds resources available. Given the lead times necessary for the procurement of relief items, the Government and its international partners have called for early action on this slow onset natural disaster.

Improved Belg Rains Continue to Ease Pressure on Water trucking Demands

Improved spring rains continue to ease the burden on water trucking although leading to increased flooding and demands for water treatment chemicals. In most parts of Oromia the Belg rain is improving, leading to localized flooding. Water trucking interventions have significantly decreased, from 184 trucks in first week of April down to 102 trucks by the end of the month. Zones where water trucks have been pulled out are facing cases of Acute Watery Disease (AWD), sharply increasing the demand for water treatment chemicals.

In the Somali region, good performance of the Belg rains is prompting people to move to areas of improved pasture and water availability. Water trucking operations conducted by the regional government and NGOs have been discontinued in the Sitti Zone.

The good performance of the late spring rains is forecast by the National Meteorological Agency (NMA) to continue in the southern and southeastern parts of Ethiopia. The agency has also predicted a high probability of normal to above normal summer rainfall. This is good news for smallholder farmers in Ethiopia’s highlands. The Belg is the short rainy season for northeast, east, central and southern highlands, and the main rainy season for south and southeast parts of the country. The Meher is the main rainy season across much of the Ethiopia except south and southeast of the country.

Member States’ briefing on ‘Global Call for Action: Responding to El Niño’, Yields Additional Funds for affected countries.

The Member States briefing `The Global Call for Action; Responding to El Nino’ convened by OCHA in Geneva on 26 April generated pledges for additional funding of US$ 500 Million for affected countries. But more is needed to address the global El Niño impact. Once converted, the funding gap for global El Nino needs is still over $1.7 billon. At least US$ 3.6 billion is required for the El Niño-related response plans across four affected regions in East Africa, Southern Africa, Central America and Asia Pacific.

The Humanitarian Requirement Document (HRD) for Ethiopia which seeks US$1.4 billion to assist 10.2 million Ethiopians in 2016 has received around US$800 million from the Government and the international community. But ongoing response is threatened by critical funding gaps in all sectors. The Government of Ethiopia, one of the largest funders of the response, jointly with members of the Ethiopia Humanitarian Country Team (EHCT), have been undertaking visits to donor capitals since April 25, including to Oslo and Geneva, to highlight the urgent need for increased funding. The Government of Ethiopia is joining the EHCT this week on visits to New York and Washington.

Federal Ministry of Health completes a one week measles and polio campaign.

On 28 April, the Federal Ministry of Health completed a one-week integrated vaccination campaign for children aged 6 month to 14 years targeting some 28 million children against measles and 16.5 million children against polio in 505 woredas. Measles is one of the causes of death among young children even though a safe and cost effective vaccine is available. The measles campaign will create awareness amongst herd community and prevent the circulation of measles virus in communities. For more information, contact: ocha-eth@un.org

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World: Southern and Eastern Africa region Humanitarian Bulletin Issue 02 | April 2016

3 May 2016 - 6:37am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Burundi, Kenya, Madagascar, World

Implementing the Agenda for Humanity in Southern and Eastern Africa

This month's regional bulletin highlights a few examples from the many progressive initiatives in the region, which if given the requisite political leadership and investment, will contribute to more effective, accountable humanitarian action, in line with the spirit of the World Humanitarian Summit (WHS).

The Summit scheduled for 23-24 May in Turkey, will for the first time, offer an opportunity for leaders from Governments, aid organizations, crisis-affected communities, private sector and academia to take stock of their strengths and challenges in humanitarian and development actions, and reaffirm their commitment to take action to prevent and end suffering, reduce the impact of future crises and transform financing to save lives.
The humanitarian situation in the eastern and southern Africa region has in the last six months significantly deteriorated as a result of continuing climatic and economic shocks and an increasing level of conflict. The global El Niño event has had a significant impact in southern Africa, parts of Sudan, Djibouti, north Somalia and northeastern parts of Ethiopia.
According to the Food and Nutrition Security Working Group, the number of people suffering from severe (crisis and emergency – IPC Phases 3 & 4) food insecurity and malnutrition in eastern Africa has increased from 18.2 million to 19.49 million; while in southern Africa an estimated 31.6m people remain food insecure.

An upsurge in violence continues to be reported in parts of Sudan, South Sudan, Somalia and Burundi. Economic shocks, including the decline of global oil prices and increasing food prices, has exacerbated existing chronic vulnerabilities. Protection of civilians is a serious issue in eastern Africa; host to an estimated 3.4 million refugees and 11 million IDPs. Compounding the dire humanitarian situation is the increasing funding shortfall.
A recurring theme during the regional WHS consultations is the need for humanitarian and development actors at all levels - local, national, regional and international - to recommit to deliver effectively and innovatively on the existing agendas for reform and transformation.
The region is fraught with structures and frameworks suitable for prevention of crises, which if politically and adequately enabled will engender peace, security and development, and empower affected people and governments to take up their rightful position as responders and duty bearers.

The WHS regional consultations are premised upon the Agenda for Humanity; a global framework for action, change and accountability, published by the Secretary - General Ban Ki-moon in February 2016. It has five core responsibilities for which we must take collective action for a shared and truly global humanitarianism.

i. Global leadership to prevent and end conflict

ii. Uphold the norms that safeguard humanity

iii. Leave no one behind

iv. Change peoples' lives- from delivering aid to ending need

v. Financing: Invest in humanity

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Philippines: Philippines Humanitarian Bulletin Issue 4 | 1 to 30 April 2016

1 May 2016 - 11:49pm
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Philippines
Highlights
  • 32 of 81 provinces in the Philippines are suffering drought.

  • Small-scale farmers hit by the drought in parts of Mindanao are exhausting coping strategies while local authorities work to deliver assistance.

  • 23,000 people remain displaced in Zamboanga City two and half years after the September 2013 conflict.

  • The Philippines seeks international classification for its search and rescue teams.

  • Philippine private sector gears up disaster preparedness ahead of the World Humanitarian Summit.

Sarangani farmers go hungry in drought El Niño brings drought to 40 per cent of the Philippines

“Now we seldom eat rice or bread, [and when we do] it’s mostly with just vegetables,” says farmer Jennie Korbo, while surveying the cracked, parched soil of what used to be a corn field in Sarangani province, Mindanao.

While the Philippines is in the midst of election fever, farmers in the south are suffering from El Niño-induced heat that is laying waste to normally productive land.

Jennie has lost her two last corn crops and is now in serious debt because of the drought.
The ribs of her two cows are clearly visible as they amble from tree to tree seeking shelter from the unrelenting sun. “I just give them water so that they feel full. They only eat the dried corn stubs from the field,” she says.

The provincial capital of Alabel in Sarangani is full of farmers like Jennie who depend on corn for their livelihood. The municipality declared a state of calamity in 2015 when the region began to feel the full impact of El Niño.

Now with an estimated 40 per cent of the country suffering drought, 11 provinces, 10 cities and 26 municipalities and barangays across the country - but mostly in Mindanao – have declared states of calamity. Some 182,000 farmers with 224,800 hectares of agricultural land have been affected by El Niño.

Local authorities struggle to respond quickly due to funding freeze

In Alabel, an estimated 5,500 hectares of land normally supporting corn – including Jennie’s 1.8-hectare rented farmland – lie unplanted since February due to the lack of water. About 500 hectares of banana plantation are also affected, municipal agriculturist Enriguito Dagupto estimates.

According to Dagupto, many of the farmers say their families are close to starvation and are waiting anxiously for assistance from the Government. “The national government has promised irrigation pumps and seeds but as of now they have not been delivered. The Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) is also promising food and clothing,” says Dagupto.

The farmers’ problems are compounded by the fact that government assistance has to follow special procedures for the 45 days in the lead up to the national and local elections in May. The municipality’s emergency funds are far from sufficient to help all those in need. “We have PhP3 million (US$64,000) in the calamity fund but are allowed to use only half of it [for this drought],” Dagupto says. The rest is saved for future possible calamities.

Although Sarangani province is among the poorest in the Philippines, its fertile land provides corn, rice, banana, coconut, vegetables and fruits for the rest of the country. Since February the region has lost half of its high-value crops, according to estimates.

The national weather bureau forecasts that dry conditions in parts of Mindanao may last until July. The local officials say they can only pray for the rain to come earlier. “We are getting worried that if assistance does not arrive in time, our people will really suffer. There may be massive hunger and peace and order will be affected,” says Dagupto.

Farmers cope with hardships as they await assistance

The Government has released $98 million to help counter the impact of El Niño on agriculture, through providing seeds, fertilisers, water pumps and technical training to the affected farmers and cloud seeding and other water supply augmentation. In addition, $11 million has been made available for emergency employment assistance and another $2 million for food distribution to the affected households. Unfortunately, none has arrived to help Jennie so far.

UN agencies, the Red Cross, and international and national NGOs are supporting the authorities with emergency food security assessment, distribution of food, water and other relief items, and financial and technical assistance to the affected farming communities especially in Mindanao.

While the scorching El Niño heat continues, Jennie slips deeper into debt. She borrowed PhP30,000 ($640) for seeds and fertilizer last August. “Before, we got 250 sacks of corn from my land; the last time I only harvested 20 sacks.” In February this year she did not plant at all.

Normally Jennie would earn PhP20,000 ($430) per harvest. Now she can’t pay back her loan with its steep 10 per cent monthly interest rate. Plus she needs money to pay the rent on her farmland and food for the family. The solution is to eat less, earn a few extra dollars from ad-hoc jobs and borrow more.

Jennie’s family is consuming bananas as an alternative to their staple food of rice. Her eldest son had to drop out of school to take a job as a motorcycle driver, while other siblings earned small fees for setting up an instant photography service at local end-of-school-year ceremonies.

These, however, are not sustainable means to make the family’s ends meet, and Jennie is worried about the decreasing water level in her hand-pumped tube well. If the family runs out of potable water, she may have to borrow again, from whomever she can, even though she will probably spiral downward into debt which may take a long time to repay, even after the weather improves.

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Ecuador: Ecuador: Terremoto Reporte de Situación No. 08 (al 02 de mayo de 2016)

1 May 2016 - 8:00pm
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Ecuador

Destacados

  • Varias misiones a terreno se han realizado para consolidar el proceso de las evaluaciones multisectoriales (MIRA). El aporte de los socios y las comunidades afectadas están contribuyendo al desarrollo del proceso.

  • El llamamiento internacional (US$72.7 millones) tiene un muy bajo financiamiento, por lo que urge a los donantes realizar aportes para la ejecución de los proyectos, en beneficio de las personas afectadas.

  • La población dispersa sigue siendo un tema de preocupación. Mientras las personas en albergues formales e informales están siendo atendidas con asistencia básica, la población dispersa está desatendida.

  • El número de personas muertas aumentó a 660 y a 51,3762 las atenciones en salud (4,605 atenciones a heridos en las primeras 72 horas de la emergencia). Se reportan aún 23 personas desaparecidas y cerca de 7,000 edificaciones destruidas. El número de personas albergadas ha disminuido a 22,754.

660 Personas muertas

51,376 Atenciones médicas (4,605 heridos por el terremoto)

350,000 Personas en necesidad, de entre 750,000 afectados

22,754 Personas albergadas

US$72 Millones En llamamiento para asistir a las personas más afectadas.

Panorama de la Situación

Las operaciones por el terremoto de Pedernales (7.8 grados, 16 de abril) entraron en su tercera semana. Las personas fallecidas aumentaron a 660 y disminuyeron a 23 las desaparecidas. La ayuda humanitaria continúa llegando a las zonas afectadas, principalmente los centros urbanos y las personas ubicadas en albergues.

El proceso MIRA continua y ha llegado a un punto crucial en que se empiezan a reflejar hallazgos, no solo del proceso de encuestas, sino también de una interacción con los socios humanitarios en terreno en dos misiones realizadas durante el pasado fin de semana (29 de abril – 1 de mayo) a Portoviejo y Pedernales. Se encuentran también en cursos evaluaciones sectoriales que complementaran este proceso.

Recientemente el Gobierno ha anunciado cambios de altos funcionarios que incluyen a la Secretaría de Gestión de Riesgos (SGR) el Ministerios de Comercio Exterior, la Secretaría Nacional del Agua (SENAGUA) y el Ministerio de Cultura e Inclusión Económica y Social (MIES).

Hay 560 escuelas afectadas de las cuales 166 tienen un grado de afectación medio y grave.

La SGR ha habilitado la página ecuadorlistoysolidario.com para canalizar todas las formas de ayuda nacional e internacional que se coordina para Ecuador.

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Ecuador: Ecuador: Earthquake Situation Report No. 07 (through 27 April 2016)

29 April 2016 - 2:15pm
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Ecuador

Highlights

  • Humanitarian partners continue to mobilize national and international assistance in coordination with local counterparts; multisector assessments (MIRA) are ongoing. The overview of the main needs is better known.

  • A Flash Appeal (US$72.7 million) has been presented to the donor community and humanitarian partners.

  • Concern exists regarding the lack of information on the number of people that have been affected but are not in shelters, particularly those in remote areas.

  • 1The number of casualties has reached 659 and health assistance has been provided to 27,732 (4,605 injured during the first 72 hours of the emergency). 42 persons are still missing and approximately 7,000 buildings have been destroyed. The number of people in shelters has increased to 29,067.

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Syrian Arab Republic: Syria Crisis: Bi-Weekly Situation Report No. 03 (as of 22 April 2016)

29 April 2016 - 11:11am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon, occupied Palestinian territory, Syrian Arab Republic, Turkey

Highlights

  • Fighting in Aleppo increases while relative calm continues to prevail in several parts of Syria

  • More than 40,000 displaced along Turkish/Syrian border

  • Conditions inside Yamouk Camp worsen

  • Further progress made in reaching hard-to-reach and besieged locations

  • Scoping mission to Darayya, undertaken; thousands of civilians in need

  • Evacuations for 515 people undertaken under Four Towns Agreement

Situation Overview

Since the 27 February cessation of hostilities agreement relative calm remains in many parts of Syria, despite increased fighting in some areas, particularly Aleppo.

An estimated 40,000 people were displaced in northern Syria after fighting between ISIL and NSAG east of the town of Azaz in northern Aleppo on 14 April.

As a precautionary measure, six camps for internally displaced persons [Ekkdeh, Al-Harameen, Bab Al-Iman, Sharmarin, Bab Al-Nour and Shamarik], approximately 40km north of Aleppo City and in close proximity to the Turkish border, were closed by camp management given their proximity to the front lines.

The displaced civilians, the vast majority from camps, headed to the town of Azaz, and the Bab Al-Salam and Sijjou IDP camps. As of 20 April, the majority of displaced people have settled around camps near the Bab al Salam border crossing point, in the open or under trees, or are staying with host families in Sijjou and nearby camps.

Some are staying in Azaz town, Afrin, or have moved to rural areas in western Aleppo.
Following the displacement, the Camp Coordination and Management Cluster (CCCM) rapidly reactivated the Azaz Task Force, conveying an emergency meeting on 15 April to ensure a swift response.

Partners have distributed food baskets and basic necessities to thousands of newly displaced people and are preparing to scale up the response as required. The situation of people stranded in the open and humanitarian delivery to the area is a source of concern, and the UN continues to monitor the situation closely.

Taking into account the previous influx of over 75,000 internally displaced people into the Azaz Sub-district in the first two months of the year, humanitarian needs have increased significantly.

On 16 April, the Office for the Special Envoy for Syria led a scoping mission to the town of Darayya, where an estimated 4,000 people remain besieged by GoS forces. The mission did not include humanitarian supplies. The mission witnessed very dire humanitarian conditions, characterized by severe shortages of food, medicines, medical equipment and supplies, health facilities and personnel.

This was the first time the UN accessed Darayya since 2012 despite many requests being made to the Syrian authorities. Following the mission, and based on its findings, the Humanitarian Coordinator submitted on 21 April another request to access Darayya with assistance for 4,000 people.

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Ethiopia: Humanitarian Bulletin Southern and Eastern Africa region, Issue 02 | April 2016

29 April 2016 - 8:40am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Angola, Burundi, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Swaziland, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Yemen, Zimbabwe

In this issue

  • Implementing the Agenda for Humanity P.1

  • IGAD-SADC and conflict prevention P.2

  • The Great Lakes Pact and Rule of Law P.3

  • Domesticating the Kampala Convention P.4

  • Burundi Humanitarian Hotline installed P.6

  • Launch of Humanitarian-Private Sector Platforms P.6

  • HoA Initiative: Financing Humanity P 7

KEY FIGURES

# of IDPs 11 m

# of refugees 3.4 m

# Severe food Insecure & malnourished in eastern Africa 20 m

# Food Insecure in southern Africa 32 m

Implementing the Agenda for Humanity in Southern and Eastern Africa

This month's regional bulletin highlights a few examples from the many progressive initiatives in the region, which if given the requisite political leadership and investment, will contribute to more effective, accountable humanitarian action, in line with the spirit of the World Humanitarian Summit (WHS).
The Summit scheduled for 23-24 May in Turkey, will for the first time, offer an opportunity for leaders from Governments, aid organizations, crisis-affected communities, private sector and academia to take stock of their strengths and challenges in humanitarian and development actions, and reaffirm their commitment to take action to prevent and end suffering, reduce the impact of future crises and transform financing to save lives.

The humanitarian situation in the eastern and southern Africa region has in the last six months significantly deteriorated as a result of continuing climatic and economic shocks and an increasing level of conflict. The global El Niño event has had a significant impact in southern Africa, parts of Sudan, Djibouti, north Somalia and northeastern parts of Ethiopia.

According to the Food and Nutrition Security Working Group, the number of people suffering from severe (crisis and emergency – IPC Phases 3 & 4) food insecurity and malnutrition in eastern Africa has increased from 18.2 million to 19.49 million; while in southern Africa an estimated 31.6m people remain food insecure.

An upsurge in violence continues to be reported in parts of Sudan, South Sudan, Somalia and Burundi. Economic shocks, including the decline of global oil prices and increasing food prices, has exacerbated existing chronic vulnerabilities. Protection of civilians is a serious issue in eastern Africa; host to an estimated 3.4 million refugees and 11 million IDPs. Compounding the dire humanitarian situation is the increasing funding shortfall.

A recurring theme during the regional WHS consultations is the need for humanitarian and development actors at all levels - local, national, regional and international - to recommit to deliver effectively and innovatively on the existing agendas for reform and transformation.

The region is fraught with structures and frameworks suitable for prevention of crises, which if politically and adequately enabled will engender peace, security and development, and empower affected people and governments to take up their rightful position as responders and duty bearers.
The WHS regional consultations are premised upon the Agenda for Humanity; a global framework for action, change and accountability, published by the Secretary - General Ban Ki-moon in February 2016. It has five core responsibilities for which we must take collective action for a shared and truly global humanitarianism.

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Ethiopia: Humanitarian Bulletin Eastern and Southern Africa region, Issue 02 | April 2016

29 April 2016 - 8:40am
Source: UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs Country: Angola, Burundi, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Kenya, Lesotho, Malawi, Mozambique, Namibia, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Swaziland, Uganda, United Republic of Tanzania, Yemen, Zimbabwe

In this issue

  • Implementing the Agenda for Humanity P.1

  • IGAD-SADC and conflict prevention P.2

  • The Great Lakes Pact and Rule of Law P.3

  • Domesticating the Kampala Convention P.4

  • Burundi Humanitarian Hotline installed P.6

  • Launch of Humanitarian-Private Sector Platforms P.6

  • HoA Initiative: Financing Humanity P 7

KEY FIGURES

# of IDPs 11 m

# of refugees 3.4 m

# Severe food Insecure & malnourished in eastern Africa 20 m

# Food Insecure in southern Africa 32 m

Implementing the Agenda for Humanity in Southern and Eastern Africa

This month's regional bulletin highlights a few examples from the many progressive initiatives in the region, which if given the requisite political leadership and investment, will contribute to more effective, accountable humanitarian action, in line with the spirit of the World Humanitarian Summit (WHS).
The Summit scheduled for 23-24 May in Turkey, will for the first time, offer an opportunity for leaders from Governments, aid organizations, crisis-affected communities, private sector and academia to take stock of their strengths and challenges in humanitarian and development actions, and reaffirm their commitment to take action to prevent and end suffering, reduce the impact of future crises and transform financing to save lives.

The humanitarian situation in the eastern and southern Africa region has in the last six months significantly deteriorated as a result of continuing climatic and economic shocks and an increasing level of conflict. The global El Niño event has had a significant impact in southern Africa, parts of Sudan, Djibouti, north Somalia and northeastern parts of Ethiopia.

According to the Food and Nutrition Security Working Group, the number of people suffering from severe (crisis and emergency – IPC Phases 3 & 4) food insecurity and malnutrition in eastern Africa has increased from 18.2 million to 19.49 million; while in southern Africa an estimated 31.6m people remain food insecure.

An upsurge in violence continues to be reported in parts of Sudan, South Sudan, Somalia and Burundi. Economic shocks, including the decline of global oil prices and increasing food prices, has exacerbated existing chronic vulnerabilities. Protection of civilians is a serious issue in eastern Africa; host to an estimated 3.4 million refugees and 11 million IDPs. Compounding the dire humanitarian situation is the increasing funding shortfall.

A recurring theme during the regional WHS consultations is the need for humanitarian and development actors at all levels - local, national, regional and international - to recommit to deliver effectively and innovatively on the existing agendas for reform and transformation.

The region is fraught with structures and frameworks suitable for prevention of crises, which if politically and adequately enabled will engender peace, security and development, and empower affected people and governments to take up their rightful position as responders and duty bearers.
The WHS regional consultations are premised upon the Agenda for Humanity; a global framework for action, change and accountability, published by the Secretary - General Ban Ki-moon in February 2016. It has five core responsibilities for which we must take collective action for a shared and truly global humanitarianism.

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