annexe-i
work unit performance indicators

Annex I: Work Unit Performance Indicators

This table is a consolidated list of indicators for all headquarters work units, regional offices and field offices reflecting progress against OCHA’s Strategic Framework. It includes a measurement of performance ( indicator) and its corresponding achievement.

Goal 1 Consolidated Humanitarian Reform that Ensures Adequate and Relevant Humanitarian Response

  1.1 Properly functioning and supported CERF  
  Headquarters  
  Advocacy and Information Management Branch  
  Advocacy and Public Information Section Number of op-eds, press releases, success stories and other public information products produced 12 CERF newsletters, 25 stories for the CERF website, 15 briefings and interviews on the CERF, 20 press releases and statements, and the reprint and translation of the CERF brochure into 5 languages  
         
  External Relations and Support Mobilization Branch  
  Consolidated Appeals Process Section CERF and CAP continued to collaborate closely in 2007, with country teams using the CAP as a guide to allocating CERF funds. The pilot Common Humanitarian Funds in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Sudan based their funding allocations on their CAPs, a practice that will be incorporated into the replication model for Common Humanitarian Funds.  
  Development of underfunding analytical method for IASC agreement and completion of two global underfunding analyses per the agreed method Analyses completed on time (January and July), with IASC agreement on method  
  Correct reflection of all CERF grants on the Financial Tracking Service website, and all CERF applications in flash appeals Achieved  
  Donor and External Relations Section At the High-Level Conference on the CERF in December 2007, 70 donors pledged US$ 420 million, an increase of US$ 70 million on 2006. Western Union became the first corporate sponsor to announce a pledge for CERF.  
  Number of additional Member States contributing towards the CERF 12 new Member States (as well as the Holy See and the United Nations Foundation) for a total of 85 contributors.  
  Fiduciary reporting for private donations established by the end of the year OCHA signed an agreement with United Nations Fund for International Partnerships in October that enables the United Nations Foundation to transfer funds received from private individuals to the CERF account; US$ 117,959 was transferred in 2007  
         
  Policy Development and Studies Branch  
  Evaluation and Studies Section ESS managed evaluations which reviewed the effectiveness of the CERF and the cluster approach in order to provide structured inputs into how they can be strengthened; these two evaluations were the most comprehensive evaluations on these pillars of the reform to date.  
  Number and percentage of evaluation recommendations that were implemented By end 2007, 114 (70%) of the 163 recommendations from evaluations conducted during the year had been implemented or were in the process of being implemented  
  Number and percentage of CERF evaluation recommendations that were implemented By end 2007, 8 of the 15 recommendations (53%) were implemented and the rest were in the process of being implemented  
         
  Regional Offices  
  Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific CERF support provided to/in most disaster-prone countries All requests for CERF support met  
  Regional Office for Latin America and the Caribbean Number and percentage of requests received that met all CERF criteria 1 received, 4 others supported; 80% met CERF criteria  
         
  Field Offices  
  Burundi Percentage of CERF requests that met deadlines within the prescribed timeframes 100% of requests submitted met the criteria and were approved  
  Chad Average number of days between HC’s decision to request CERF money and the receipt of requests by CERF Secretariat 5 days  
  Côte d’Ivoire Percentage of CERF project proposals that met all CERF criteria 96% of projects (of 17) met CERF criteria, including for the first time 2 NGO projects sponsored by UNDP (only 1 project proposal was rejected)  
  Eritrea Number and percentage of requests received that met all CERF criteria 100% (requests received from UNDP, UNICEF, UNHCR and WHO)  
  Ethiopia Average number of days between request for Humanitarian Response Fund funding received by OCHA and HC’s approval 2–10 days  
  Average number of days between request for CERF funding received by HC and request sent to Emergency Relief Coordinator for approval 25 days  
  Number and percentage of requests received that met all CERF criteria 100%  
  Zimbabwe Percentage of proposals submitted by HC that were approved for CERF funding by the Emergency Relief Coordinator 90%  
         
  1.2 Fully deployed, functioning and funded clusater system (in new emergencies and countries selected by the IASC) Logistics Division Unit

Headquarters
 
  Advocacy and Information Management Branch  
  Advocacy and Information Management Branch In the context of humanitarian reform, AIMB led an inter-agency exercise to define cluster responsibilities in relation to the management of information during emergencies. Operational guidance was developed, then endorsed, through the Cluster Task Team, and a related training module was delivered at cluster training workshops.  
  Field Information Services In 2007, FIS achieved inter-agency consensus through the IASC to define a new framework for managing humanitarian information and data. FIS also worked with IASC partners to establish agreements on information exchange practices, standards and principles and shared data preparedness measures, as well as the analytical scope and related expectations within and between clusters.  
    Using the South Asia earthquake operation as a baseline, the degree to which stakeholders (in a survey) consider information management has improved in the cluster system The situation in Kenya in late December was the first new humanitarian emergency in which the agreed operational guidance was applied following its approval in October (results of evaluations and surveys will only be available in 2008)  
  Information Technology Section ITS coordinated the deployment of emergency telecommunications in new emergencies and provided global support to the Emergency Telecommunications Cluster. Two key achievements of this cluster in 2007 were: the securing of adequate and appropriate stockpiles to respond to one large-scale emergency using funds raised under the Global Cluster Appeal; and the establishment of stand-by partnership agreements with Microsoft, Télécoms Sans Frontières and the Swedish Rescue Services Agency.  
    Number of new emergencies in which the Emergency Telecommunications Cluster was deployed within 1 week 12 (Bangladesh, Chad, the Dominican Republic, Ghana, Guinea, Ethiopia, Mexico, Mozambique, Nicaragua, Pakistan, Peru, Darfur); stand-by partners were deployed as first responders in 9  
         
  Emergency Services Branch  
  Logistics Support Unit LSU participated in the discussions of the Logistics Cluster at the global level, and closely followed its activities at the field level. LSU continued to provide proactive input into a number of projects of interest to OCHA in the Emergency Shelter Cluster (such as the standardization of non-food shelter items). Close contact was established with the Water, Sanitation and Health Cluster in relation to its project on emergency materials and the mapping of humanitarian stockpiles.  
  Coordination and Response Division In 2007, CRD worked to integrate the principles of humanitarian reform into OCHA’s operations by leading an inter-branch Cluster Mainstreaming. The Division worked closely with the United Nations DPA and DPKO on integrated mission planning, including the establishment of: a multidimensional presence in Chad and the Central African Republic; a joint African Union/United Nations operation in Darfur; and the political mission in Nepal.  
    Percentage of CAP countries and new emergencies with Humanitarian Coordinators with fully functioning clusters Of the 12 countries with a CAP and a Humanitarian Coordinator in 2007, seven used the cluster approach Of the 15 new emergencies, 4 used clusters  
    Percentage of CRD staff trained in humanitarian reform 100%  
         
  Displacement and Protection Support Services Number and percentage of humanitarian emergencies with clearly defined cluster leads for IDP protection, shelter and camp coordination/camp management Cluster approach was applied in 12 countries, the majority of which have functioning cluster leads for protection, shelter and camp coordination  
         
  Humanitarian Reform Support Unit HRSU facilitated the launch of the Global Cluster Appeal for 2007, which sought US$ 63 million from donors, and it assisted in the preparation of a report on the impact of funding of the Global Cluster Appeal for 2006. HRSU worked with IASC partners to develop standard operating procedures for the designation of cluster needs in new and ongoing emergencies. At the field level, HRSU conducted inter-agency training and support missions to 10 countries and 3 regions upon request, and deployed surge. Several OCHA training programmes were adapted and new ones developed in line with cluster approach evaluations in 2005 and 2006.  
    Number of regional- and country-level cluster workshops conducted IASC humanitarian reform country workshops were conducted in the Central African Republic, Chad, Ethiopia, Madagascar, Guinea, Niger, Afghanistan, Haiti, Timor-Leste and Zimbabwe

Regional workshops were conducted in Johannesburg, Amman and Bangkok
 
    Percentage of Global Cluster Appeal funded 53%  
    Number of new emergencies responded to by utilizing the cluster approach The cluster approach was used in 4 sudden-onset emergencies (Mozambique, Bangladesh, Madagascar and Pakistan)  
         
  Regional Offices  
  Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific Number of IASC Country Teams/IASC members who were supported on clusters in the most disaster-prone countries IASC Country Teams/IASC members in 14 priority countries provided with training on the cluster approach Regional cluster support/meeting structure was established  
  Regional Office for Latin America and the Caribbean Number and percentage of new emergencies in the region where the cluster approach was implemented 75% (and cluster principles were applied in all preparedness activities across the region)  
  Regional Office for Southern Africa Number of new emergencies and preparedness planning activities in the region where the cluster approach was implemented 4 responses (Swaziland, Lesotho, Madagascar, Mozambique) and 6 contingency plans (Zambia, Mozambique, Madagascar, Comoros, Malawi, Zimbabwe)  
         
  Field Offices  
  Democratic Republic of the Congo Percentage of clusters that achieved their objectives as defined by the 2007 Humanitarian Action Plan 60%  
  Percentage of clusters using standardized monitoring tools 80% undertook nationwide mapping of their sector’s priorities  
  Ethiopia Number and percentage of clusters established and fully functioning 8 clusters and 4 working groups were established; 5 clusters and 3 working groups were fully functioning (Protection Cluster did not receive government support)  
  Uganda Number of functioning clusters and percentage of clusters using available and appropriate coordination tools 7 clusters and 3 sub-clusters were fully functional holding regular meetings in Kampala and in Acholi and Lango districts 100% used appropriate coordination tools  
  Zimbabwe Number of relevant clusters established and fully functioning None (rollout was stalled because of NGO concerns)  
         
  Emergency Services Branch  
  Logistics Support Unit LSU participated in the discussions of the Logistics Cluster at the global level, and closely followed its activities at the field level. LSU continued to provide proactive input into a number of projects of interest to OCHA in the Emergency Shelter Cluster (such as the standardization of non-food shelter items). Close contact was established with the Water, Sanitation and Health Cluster in relation to its project on emergency materials and the mapping of humanitarian stockpiles.  
  Coordination and Response Division In 2007, CRD worked to integrate the principles of humanitarian reform into OCHA’s operations by leading an inter-branch Cluster Mainstreaming. The Division worked closely with the United Nations DPA and DPKO on integrated mission planning, including the establishment of: a multidimensional presence in Chad and the Central African Republic; a joint African Union/United Nations operation in Darfur; and the political mission in Nepal.  
    Percentage of CAP countries and new emergencies with Humanitarian Coordinators with fully functioning clusters Of the 12 countries with a CAP and a Humanitarian Coordinator in 2007, seven used the cluster approach Of the 15 new emergencies, 4 used clusters  
    Percentage of CRD staff trained in humanitarian reform 100%  
  Displacement and Protection Support Services Number and percentage of humanitarian emergencies with clearly defined cluster leads for IDP protection, shelter and camp coordination/camp management Cluster approach was applied in 12 countries, the majority of which have functioning cluster leads for protection, shelter and camp coordination  
  Humanitarian Reform Support Unit HRSU facilitated the launch of the Global Cluster Appeal for 2007, which sought US$ 63 million from donors, and it assisted in the preparation of a report on the impact of funding of the Global Cluster Appeal for 2006. HRSU worked with IASC partners to develop standard operating procedures for the designation of cluster needs in new and ongoing emergencies. At the field level, HRSU conducted inter-agency training and support missions to 10 countries and 3 regions upon request, and deployed surge. Several OCHA training programmes were adapted and new ones developed in line with cluster approach evaluations in 2005 and 2006.  
    Number of regional- and country-level cluster workshops conducted IASC humanitarian reform country workshops were conducted in the Central African Republic, Chad, Ethiopia, Madagascar, Guinea, Niger, Afghanistan, Haiti, Timor-Leste and Zimbabwe Regional workshops were conducted in Johannesburg, Amman and Bangkok  
    Percentage of Global Cluster Appeal funded 53%  
    Number of new emergencies responded to by utilizing the cluster approach The cluster approach was used in 4 sudden-onset emergencies (Mozambique, Bangladesh, Madagascar and Pakistan)  
         
  Regional Offices  
  Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific Number of IASC Country Teams/IASC members who were supported on clusters in the most disaster-prone countries IASC Country Teams/IASC members in 14 priority countries provided with training on the cluster approach

Regional cluster support/meeting structure was established
 
  Regional Office for Latin America and the Caribbean Number and percentage of new emergencies in the region where the cluster approach was implemented 75% (and cluster principles were applied in all preparedness activities across the region)  
         
  1.3 Greater engagement and coordination with national and international NGOs  
  Headquarters  
  External Relations and Support Mobilization Branch  
  External Relations and Support Mobilization Branch A partnership was established with the Pan African Press Association (with membership including approximately 2,000 members from the African media), through which information about OCHA’s humanitarian activities in Africa was disseminated. A key event for ERSMB in 2007 was OCHA’s participation in a round-table meeting on Global Risk Reduction, focusing on how journalists can become more actively involved in climate change issues.  
  Number of strategic partnership framework documents developed with key donors A strategic partnership framework agreement was developed with New Zealand  
  Number of strategic dialogues initiated with new private sector actors Dialogue was initiated with 5 new private sector partners (Sony, Volkswagen, Rotary Club, Nestle and Veolia)  
         
  Policy Development and Studies Branch  
  Gender Advisory Team GAT organized an inter-agency regional workshop for cluster actors and gender focal points in central and east Africa, at which 7 teams underwent training on the use of IASC gender and gender-based violence programming tools in order to better mainstream gender equality into all sector/cluster work. GAT worked with cluster leads and cluster members at headquarters and field locations to strengthen recognition of gender as a cross-cutting issue, and initiated the development of an interactive training course on gender and gender-based violence with the NGO InterAction.  
    Percentage of OCHA offices supporting the creation of gender networks in the field and supporting them to use and roll out the IASC Gender Handbook 58% (15 of 26) of OCHA offices supported gender networks  
    Percentage of OCHA field offices with Gender Action Plans and reporting on annual implementation 38% of OCHA field offices (10 of 26) had Gender Action Plans

90% of offices with Gender Action Plans had reported on their implementation
 
         
  IASC Secretariat Percentage of agencies participating in the Global Humanitarian Platform meeting at the principal or CEO level 88%  
    Number of pilot humanitarian community partnership teams established in selected countries ‘Principles of Partnership’, endorsed by the Global Humanitarian Platform to establish more equitable humanitarian country teams, were piloted in Zimbabwe, Indonesia and Panama  
    Number of NGOs presenting in IASC Working Group meetings NGOs led sessions in every IASC Working Group meeting  
    Number of NGOs actively participating in IASC subsidiary bodies and other IASC initiatives 2 new IASC subsidiary bodies were co-led by NGOs  
         
  Regional Offices  
  Regional Office for Central and East Africa Number of partners from United Nations Agencies and NGOs participating in ROCEA-sponsored activities such as joint analysis missions and regional workshops 30% of RHPT members were NGOs

Attendance by NGOs at ROWA meetings and workshops was 37%
 
         
  Field Offices  
  Central African Republic Number of NGO projects included in CAPs Out of 80 projects in the revised CAP, 30 were NGO projects; 15 out of 19 international NGOs had at least 1 project in the CAP

Out of 75 projects included in the 2008 CAP, 34 were NGO projects
 
  Chad Number and percentage of NGO projects included in the 2007 CAP 41 projects of a total of 103 (40%) were from NGOs  
  Colombia Number and percentage of NGOs participating in monthly meetings 80%; 45 international NGOs and 11 United Nations Agencies  
  Democratic Republic of the Congo Percentage of Humanitarian Action Plan funds allocated to NGOs NGOs received 32% directly; much of the remaining funding was allocated to NGOs through United Nations Agencies  
  Eritrea Number of NGOs that signed up to participate in sectors Most relevant NGOs attended Health, Nutrition, Water and Sanitation and Education sector coordination meetings  
  Haiti Number of NGOs that provided information about their humanitarian and recovery activities More than 120 national and international NGOs and United Nations Agencies provided regular information on their projects and programmes  
  Iran Number of humanitarian reform training sessions held individually or jointly 4  
  occupied Palestinian territory Increase in number of NGOs involved in the CAP 12 United Nations Agencies and 28 NGOs (15 international, 13 national) participated, with 103 projects in the 2007 CAP and 120 projects in the revised 2007 CAP  
    Percentage of NGO funding within the CAP Approximately 3%; it is important to note that the UNRWA and WFP alone received 82% of oPt’s funding (US$ 226 million of US$ 272 million)  
  Sri Lanka Number of NGOs participating in IASC Country Team meetings IASC had 31 members and observers

As well as the 8 United Nations Agencies that were full members, 4 national NGOs and 10 international NGOs attended as standing invitees; the Red Cross movement attended as an observer
 
         
  1.4 Strengthened in-country coordination  
  Headquarters  
  Advocacy and Information Management Branch  
  Advocacy and Public Information Section APIS supported 2 regional offices and 4 country offices in the development of media and advocacy strategies. It provided to staff Policy Instruction for OCHA Advocacy, Guidelines on OCHA Advocacy, and the Handbook on Public Information.  
  Number of public information surge missions compared to 2006 3 missions (1 fewer than in 2006)  
  Field Information Services Number of field office work plans that incorporated information management components 100%, and an increasing number also had dedicated information management capacity  
  Information Technology Section ITS supported the two cluster/sector lead training programmes and provided orientation on the use of ICT in coordination for RCs/HCs during their training. ICT services and infrastructure were upgraded in 10 OCHA field offices.  
         
  External Support and Mobilization Branch  
  Geographical Coordination Monitoring Section Number of deployments and missions 7 deployments, 17 missions  
  Surge Capacity Section Number of staffing gaps filled through OCHA’s Stand-By Partnership Progammes 44  
    Number of requests met by SCS staff in relation to filling critical staffing gaps in OCHA field offices 6 SCS staff deployments  
         
  Policy Development and Studies Branch  
  Policy Development and Studies Branch Degree of satisfaction expressed by key stakeholders with guidelines developed by PDSB (survey) 4 country reviews of, or mission reports on, humanitarian presence and principles in peace support operations; 75% satisfaction

2 reviews on how to enhance relief and development synergies in slow-onset disasters; 4 (38%) of recommendations fully implemented and 4 (50%) partially implemented by December
 
  Coordination and Response Division CRD worked with field offices to support adherence to MOSS/MORSS in the field, in addition to supporting humanitarian security coordination activities such as the United Nations/NGO-endorsed ‘Saving Lives Together’ initiative. CRD maintained its focus on transition and recovery during 2007 and represented OCHA in the Joint Initiative on Recovery Coordination aimed at promoting continuity in coordination support throughout the transition to recovery. The Joint Initiative enabled OCHA, UNDP and UNDGO to issue joint position papers on transition, and transitional strategies were developed for 8 OCHA field offices where the situation was transitioning to a recovery phase.  
    Percentage of countries which have implemented field security systems 50%  
    Percentage of existing operations that had a clearly stated exit strategy and transition timeline 50%  
  Displacement and Protection Support Services Number of UNDAC Emergency Field Coordination Trainings using modules which incorporate field best practices on protection and displacement All three training events, including a presentation on OCHA’s protection policy instruction and field implementation  
  Emergency Preparedness Section EPS, with regional offices, facilitated contingency planning in support of governments and country teams. Two UNDAC preparedness missions to assess national response capacities were supported by EPS. Training sessions on needs assessment were provided in Uganda and Côte d’Ivoire, in collaboration with OCHA’s CAP Section.  
    Number of contingency planning and simulation exercises supported 6 (Angola, Algeria, Comoros, Mozambique, Zambia and Zimbabwe)  
  Humanitarian Coordination Strengthening Project The induction of newly appointed HCs was standardized, ensuring that all incoming HCs are thoroughly briefed by humanitarian partners before being deployed to the field. Compacts between the Emergency Relief Coordinator and HCs started to be developed to help HCs identify and focus on priorities, and to provide a documented basis for mutual accountability. A workshop on coordinating humanitarian emergencies for RCs in the Asia-Pacific region familiarized RCs with their role and the tools available to them in case of disaster. Several policy papers were drafted on the establishment and disestablishment of HC positions, HC designation and the interface between HCs and OCHA field offices.  
    Number of RCs participating in humanitarian and emergency response tools workshops 33  
    Number of trained HCs in the pool 24  
    Number of individuals completing coordination training programmes for HCs and RCs 33  
         
  Humanitarian Reform Support Unit Number of training programmes incorporating new reform elements 4 OCHA: United Nations Disaster Assessment and Coordination, Emergency Field Coordination Training, Stand-By Partners (ProCap), Civil–Military

3 cluster-specific: IOM/UNHCR Camp Coordination and Camp Management training, Shelter (IFRC) and Logistics (WFP)
 
    Percentage of field operations with inclusive humanitarian country teams 19 countries reported that they established inclusive humanitarian country teams either prior to or during 2007  
    Number of cluster coordinators trained 88  
         
  IASC Secretariat The IASC Secretariat supported the Humanitarian Coordinators Group (chaired by OCHA). A mapping exercise of IASC field coordination was conducted in the second half of 2007 as a basis for further strategic discussion and policy guidance on humanitarian coordination in the field.  
    Number of field operations with inclusive humanitarian country teams At least 19 broad-based, inclusive humanitarian country teams were identified (7 others ‘IASC-inspired’)  
         
  IRIN IRIN improved affected communities’ access to information by developing active links with local communities and civil society, and by reinforcing multilingual text and audio services.  
    Number of radio programmes produced in local languages 923 programmes in 10 languages were aired by 110 stations  
    Number of reporters trained Approximately 150 radio reporters were trained (in Angola, Burundi, Côte d’Ivoire, Liberia and Uganda)  
         
  Pandemic Influenza Contingency Field missions to priority countries were conducted to support in-country planning, advocate with governments and facilitate simulations.  
  Number of regional preparedness platforms created and number of new partners participating Regional ‘platforms’ bringing together United Nations Agencies, the Red Cross movement, international NGOs and intergovernmental bodies were established in 3 regions (West Africa, South Africa and the Asia-Pacific)  
         
  Regional Offices and Regional Disaster Response Advisers  
  Regional Office for Latin America and the Caribbean Number of humanitarian country teams established 3 (in Nicaragua, Guatemala and Barbados)  
  Number of United Nations Country Teams with updated emergency response plans 7  
  Number of National Disaster Response Advisers recruited 4 (in Nicaragua, Guatemala, Ecuador and Peru)  
  Percentage of new emergencies using the cluster approach 100%  
  Regional Office for Southern Africa ROSA led IASC regional efforts to improve the coherence of both preparedness and response bringing together representatives of national disaster authorities, national AIDS councils and Vulnerability Assessment Committees from 8 countries with regional and international humanitarian responders to develop a framework for intergovernmental and partner collaboration in preparing for and responding to natural disasters. As a result, there was more coherence across the region, particularly in relation to: inclusive coordination in relation to the CERF, flash appeals, rapid response and assessments; broader assessment of vulnerability beyond the issue of food insecurity; and incorporation of cross-cutting issues (HIV/AIDS, gender, disaster risk reduction) in preparedness and response activities.  
  Number of partners and country teams endorsing the regional strategy 33 regional partners agreed on a framework for their ongoing collaboration

About 70 participants (United Nations, NGOs, government, Red Cross) agreed to a ‘Declaration of Intent’ initiating a regional emergency preparedness and response framework
 
  Regional Office for West Africa A CERF training workshop aimed at United Nations Agencies’ staff in the region was held in May to familiarize partners with CERF procedures. ROWA facilitated workshops on humanitarian reform, a CAP training-of-trainers, a review of the context and trends of the West Africa 2007 CAP and the regional 2008 CAP for West Africa.  
  Number of functioning IASC platforms at regional and country levels 6 IASC platforms (General Coordination, Food Security and Nutrition, Health, Protection, Natural Disasters, Emergency Working Group) were functioning and meeting on average on a monthly basis  
  Regional Disaster Response Adviser for Central Asia Regional coordination among United Nations Country Teams was promoted at a meeting during which it was agreed to develop a regional contingency plan and a regional humanitarian information management portal. Chaired by the Tajik Government, the partners of Tajikistan’s Rapid Emergency Assessment and Coordination Team coordinated their activities on a regular basis, and in late 2007 OCHA and its partners supported the United Nations in Kyrgyzstan to establish a similar coordination structure.

(Note: Due to the later-than-scheduled opening of the Regional Disaster Response for Central Asia, many of the objectives in the Office’s work plan were not able to be completed.)
 
  Number of United Nations Country Teams trained in UNDAC standard operating procedures 0  
  Number of Humanitarian Partnership Teams formally established 2  
         
  Field Offices  
  Burundi Attendance rates of heads of United Nations Agencies and NGOs in Humanitarian Partnership Team meetings Over 70% participation in 4 IASC Country Team meetings (with more than 80% of agreed actions implemented)  
  Number of sectors with common baseline data and commonly agreed targets All 4 sectoral groups had common baseline data and agreed targets  
  Exit strategy and transition timeline endorsed by key partners Formal endorsement was achieved during discussions in May and September  
  Number of sector and global coordination meetings chaired by National Committee for the Coordination of Aid (NACC) members Although the coordination of humanitarian activities was not taken up at Government level, the Government did take the lead on the key issue of IDPs and refugees

The repatriation and reintegration group was chaired by the Government and met regularly – at least monthly
 
  Number of functioning provincial NACC ‘antennas’ NACC dropped its plans to open regional ‘antennas’ and instead focused its work at the national level with development partners  
  Central African Republic Percentage of decisions taken in humanitarian coordination meetings that were implemented About 90% of decisions were promptly implemented  
  Number and percentage of clusters/sectors with common data baseline and commonly agreed targets 100%; all 10 clusters agreed on targets and a clear strategy for their sector  
  Colombia Percentage of decisions taken in humanitarian coordination meetings that were implemented At least 60% of decisions were being implemented  
  Number and percentage of thematic and sectoral groups that met regularly 3 thematic (Protection, Early Recovery, Humanitarian Assistance) and 6 sectoral (Education, Food, Water and Sanitation, Health and Mine Action) groups met on a monthly basis  
  Number of regions with functioning coordination mechanisms (such as IDP committees) facilitated by OCHA 6  
  Côte d’Ivoire Percentage of relevant recommendations jointly agreed to by humanitarian actors and key stakeholders that were implemented as planned 95% of the 20 recommendations were implemented by July  
  Eritrea Number of functioning coordination forums and degree of satisfaction of key stakeholders with OCHA’s coordination services as assessed through surveys 3 (OCHA’s coordination services were limited to supporting IASC meetings, preparing/reviewing the CHAP, and interagency contingency planning)  
  Ethiopia Percentage of decisions taken in humanitarian coordination meetings that were implemented 70%  
  Number of regional coordination forums with defined terms of reference 5 (Amhara, Somali, Oromiya, Gambella and Afar)  
  Haiti Number of sectors that met at least monthly 3 sectors (Nutrition, Shelter, Protection) started to meet (not yet monthly)  
  Degree of satisfaction of key stakeholders with OCHA coordination United Nations Agencies, NGOs and donors informally expressed their satisfaction with OCHA  
  Nepal Percentage of coordination meetings resulting in actionable decisions 80%  
  Percentage of agencies/organizations participating in interagency assessments 80% of the IASC participated in assessments in response to floods, landslides, political unrest and IDP issues  
  occupied Palestinian territory Strategy developed with the Country Team by June in support of the HC’s priorities Strategy was developed and regular operational coordination meetings (for which OCHA acted as Secretariat) were held  
  Russian Federation Number of OCHA tools and services transferred to the RC’s Office OCHA tools and services were transferred to the North Caucasus Theme Group instead of the RC’s Office  
  Somalia Degree of satisfaction among IASC, donors and other key stakeholders with OCHA’s services, including identification and prioritization of needs Moderate to high degree of satisfaction based on informal discussions with stakeholders and client review of information products used for prioritization of humanitarian needs  
  Sudan Number and percentage of OCHA functions handed over to the RC’s Office OCHA office in Abyei handed over to the RC in May

By 1 June the only OCHA presence in South Sudan was in Juba, focusing on emergency preparedness and response support
 
  Uganda Percentage of coordination structures properly transitioned from OCHA to UNDP in recovering areas None; UNDP Uganda will not assume a coordination role in recovery as anticipated  
  Zimbabwe Number and percentage of sectoral committees that met at least on a monthly basis (including ad hoc meetings) 11 out of 12 IASC Country Team meetings were held (91%)

10 out of 12 Working Group Chairs meetings were held (83%)
 
         
  1.5 Improved tools and services (to adapt to humanitarian reform outcomes)  
  Headquarters  
  Advocacy and Information Management Branch  
  Advocacy and Public Information Section APIS created a website on humanitarian reform linked to OCHA’s intranet. The Section also provided cluster-related advocacy support and guidance to HRSU.  
  Media database for editors/journalists in Middle East functioning by end 2007 Not achieved due to lack of staff resources  
  ReliefWeb In 2007, over 32,000 documents were published on ReliefWeb (slightly fewer than in 2006), while the number of maps published increased from 1,766 in 2006 to 2,760 in 2007 in response to the higher number of small-scale emergencies (each represented in a map). The number of French and Spanish documents published increased by 10%.

ReliefWeb’s technical infrastructure was improved, allowing the inclusion of new search functionality, interface improvements and enhanced tools for measuring productivity and site usership. Preparations were begun for a system overhaul in 2008.
 
  Number of content partnerships established 229 (8% increase on 2006)  
  Field Information Services FIS began work on adapting and updating its suite of information management tools and services, including Humanitarian Information Centres, on the basis of inter-agency consultations and feedback as well as the outcomes of OCHA’s Information Management Review.  
  Number of information management surge staff deployed within 72 hours of a new crisis FIS deployed 1 information management staff member within 72 hours to the Pakistan floods/Cyclone Yemyin in July/September, the Peru earthquake in August, and the DPRK floods in August; 2 staff members were deployed to the Ghana floods in September  
  Information Analysis Section In 2007, the IAS – in collaboration with ITS – undertook an organization-wide review of OCHA’s information management products, services, governance practices and systems, resulting in a multi-year strategy and implementation plan for improvements based on the review. The plan includes a phased strategy to improve the quality and consistency of OCHA’s core information products and services, including building a more coherent family of websites and enhancing information technology systems, tools and platforms to maximize the potential of the latest technologies.  
  Information Technology Services An HRSU website was developed and launched in March, and a pandemic influenza contingency preparedness website that allows partners around the world to report on national pandemic influenza contingency preparedness was launched in August.  
  Number of OCHA field/regional offices reporting well-functioning telecommunications connectivity 24  
         
  Emergency Services Branch  
  Civil–Military Coordination Section There were 8 UN-CMCoord Officer deployments to complex humanitarian emergencies made possible by the newly established roster of UN-CMCoord Officers, through which expertise was sourced and deployed to: Iraq (1 to Jordan), Afghanistan (1 to UNAMA), Sudan (5 to OCHA and UNAMID) and Chad (1 to OCHA). An internal audit of the OCHA Central Register of Disaster Management Capacities was not possible during 2007 due to a shortage of human resources.  
  Number and percentage of MCDA requests issued within three hours of receipt 2 MCDA requests issued within three hours of receipt, or 100%  
  Number of additional countries providing MCDA for the disposal of the United Nations through the Central Register of Disaster Management Capacities/MCDA Directory None; despite continued interest from Member States, expansion of contributing nations to the MCDA Directory was stalled following the decision to undertake a more detailed and externally led review to examine the Central Register  
  Number and percentage of UN-CMCoord Officers deployed within 48 hours of request to natural disasters and complex emergencies, as a Humanitarian Common Service UN-CMCoord Officers deployed in 7 emergency deployments within 48 hours, or 100%  
  Environmental Emergencies Section EES, in cooperation with the Ministry of Environment of the Netherlands, developed a methodology to assist emergency responders identify secondary risks after sudden-onset natural disasters.  
  ‘Flash Environmental Assessment Tool’ field tested in at least one disaster and results/lessons learned incorporated into tool design by September 2007 Accomplished, however there was a delay in field testing due to external factors (the first batch of selected experts was trained for field testing to be carried out in 2008)  
         
  Field Coordination Support Section Team leader training was conducted to ensure competent leadership of missions. Capacity-building for disaster-prone countries was emphasized through disaster response preparedness missions (including to Laos and Bolivia). The development of the INSARAG network and promotion of common standards for international search and rescue continued through: the staging of a regional earthquake response exercise in Mongolia; regional meetings and workshops; and five international external classifications of USAR teams.  
    Number and percentage of tools (or services) aligned with humanitarian reform priorities 7, or 100% (UNDAC, IHP, APHP, INSARAG, GDACS, VOSOCC and OSOCC)  
    Number of potential UNDAC team leaders who have completed the UNDAC team leader training 20  
    Number of international urban search and rescue and humanitarian response actors making use of the VOSOCC for exchange of operational information and coordination of response activities 7,000  
    Use of GDACS and the VOSOCC by international responders and affected countries during disasters and online simulation exercises VOSOCC was modified to serve as a platform for standardized information exchanges, including GDACS

GDACS network was strengthened to include 33 stakeholders
 
  Logistics Support Unit By the end of 2007, the Directory of Emergency Stockpiles contained information about 59 warehouses around the world. To assist in the delivery of emergency consignments, the Unit gathered and disseminated contact information about more than 100 customs posts and cooperated with the UNJLC for the launch, in late 2007, of its comprehensive Customs Information Guide covering around 20 countries.  
  Number of countries aware of the Model Agreement for Customs Facilitation Contact established with 17 countries  
  Number of Model Agreements signed with interested governments 1 (Nepal)  
  Number of complaints received from the field or from donors none (1 case of miscommunication)  
  Number of requests for support for logistics issues received (from within or outside OCHA) An average of 2 during relief operations in Madagascar, Mozambique, Peru and Bangladesh, as well as a few ad hoc requests outside emergencies  
         
  External Relations and Support Mobilization Branch  
  Consolidated Appeals Process Section Financial Tracking Service (FTS) website offers user-tested advanced features including advanced and keyword searches, personalization options and user aids Done, however some recommendations from the user testing are yet to be implemented  
  FTS database contains, and website displays, funding data for 90% of Official Development Assistance-eligible countries that receive international humanitarian aid per FTS definition FTS captured information on humanitarian funding to 126 countries (likely to exceed the contents of the OECD database), although some data missing within those countries  
         
  Policy Development and Studies Branch  
  Gender Advisory Team GAT completed production of the IASC Gender Handbook in 6 languages and managed its broad distribution. Requests for GenCap Advisers exceeded supply, leading GAT to work with the Norwegian Refugee Council to prepare for a second recruitment in 2008, which will seek to double the size of the pool.  
  Establishment of the Gender Roster in 2007 GenCap was established with 17 roster members (a related monitoring and evaluation mechanism was established and a Gender Resource CD-ROM and GenCap Toolkit CD-ROM were also produced)  
  Number of gender advisers deployed 9 advisers deployed in response to requests from 13 humanitarian situations  
  Evaluation and Studies Section ESS was tasked with managing a 1-year trial of inter-agency real-time evaluations along with UNICEF (with the support of a steering committee composed of NGOs and United Nations Agencies). The ability of the real-time evaluations to feed into emergency decision making on the ground still needs to be improved.  
    Number and percentage of new CAPs and flash appeals that contained the new standardized monitoring and evaluation component None; the production of the planned outputs was postponed due to higher priority being placed on supporting humanitarian reform  
  Displacement and Protection Support Services Number and percentage of ProCap deployments of Senior Protection Officers against requests from protection-mandated agencies of HC/United Nations Country Teams ProCap fulfilled 100% of requests for core team deployments which were endorsed by the ProCap Steering Committee (17 deployments to 4 protection-mandated organizations in 14 countries)  
  Increase in percentage of stand-by personnel with non-European and non-North American nationality in existing rosters At least 10% increase in stand-by personnel of non-European and non-North American nationality in existing rosters  
         
  IRIN IRIN focused on improving access to timely, accurate and balanced information by establishing integrated news-gathering, production and editing capabilities across all of its multimedia products.  
  Integrated news production capacity established by end 2007, with a multimedia approach applied to all major humanitarian events and issues Achieved  
         
  Staff Development and Learning Section Two Emergency Field Coordination Training (EFCT) courses were held in 2007, with 45 OCHA staff members and 11 IASC staff trained in the principles and practice of effective coordination and interpersonal skills. Training in administration was conducted in Bangkok and Nairobi for field staff and in New York for CRD. The materials used in the EFCT were revised to accommodate humanitarian reform principles and priorities – with particular emphasis on clusters and working with HCs. Field staff participated in training courses on internet services, information management and civil–military coordination.  
  Number of changes made to existing staff development training programmes to reflect humanitarian reform priorities A significant number due to the re-writing of the EFCT  
  Number of other e-learning programmes developed in-house using the existing content management authoring tool In progress for the staff induction course  
  Number of staff who have used the orientation CD None; orientation CD not developed yet  
         
  Regional Offices and Regional Disaster Response Advisers  
  Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific ROAP strengthened its surge capacity with in-house training for all staff (international and national) in Thailand. Two ROAP staff attended UNDAC training in New Zealand in November. Regional IASC Network partners participated in a humanitarian reform workshop in January and training on use of the CERF in November. ROAP also further strengthened its routines for, and ensured application of, standard operating procedures in all surge capacity deployments.  
  Percentage of deployable staff with adequate training in surge capacity by June 2007 100%  
  Regional Office for Central and East Africa ROCEA coordinated the mapping of crisis-affected areas across the region and provided reference maps for key partners. Support to the Data Exchange Platform for the Horn of Africa was critical in ensuring regional data preparedness in cross-border situations.  
  Number of OCHA field offices with strengthened information management and IT capacity Support for strengthened capacity was provided to 6 OCHA field offices (DRC, Burundi, Somalia, Uganda, Kenya, Sudan)  
  Regional Office for Latin America and the Caribbean ROLAC adapted its training on preparedness tools and mechanisms to reflect humanitarian reform issues, and specific targeting of UNETTs and RCs in this training helped agencies to prepare for cluster implementation.  
  Number and percentage of tools or services aligned with humanitarian reform priorities 5 tools (including training kits for RCs, Emergency Response Plans, a UNETT workshop and Rapid Needs Assessments)  
  Regional Office for the Middle East, North Africa and Central Asia A plan to roll out OCHA’s services and response tools is developed and used successfully by mid 2007 The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, UAE, Qatar, Libya and Kuwait joined and participated in UNDAC and INSARAG events

The first ever regional CMCoord training took place in UAE

A major regional conference on humanitarian reform was held in Jordan
 
  Regional Disaster Response Adviser for the Pacific With support from ROAP and in cooperation with UNICEF, ROAP, UNDP and the Pacific Islands Applied Geoscience Commission, the RDRA Office was one of the co-hosts and organizers of a 5-day workshop on Information Management for Emergencies held in November for teams from 6 Pacific countries. The Office also provided continued support to the development of Pacific Disaster Net, a joint initiative between the Pacific Islands Applied Geoscience Commission, UNDP, the IFRC and OCHA for the development of a Pacific Disaster and Risk Management portal.  
  Number of UNDAC deployments in proportion to disasters 1 of 1  
  Regional Disaster Response Adviser for Central Asia Awareness of UNDAC and INSARAG increased in the region, demonstrated by United Nations contingency plans in Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan and Turkmenistan that make provisions for activating these services. Regional emergency preparedness priorities were identified at a high-level meeting for Central Asia in Delhi, where the governments of Tajikistan, Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan and Kazakhstan agreed to explore the possibility of establishing a regional centre for disaster management. Turkmenistan did not participate at the meeting, but was informed of its outcome.  
         
  Field Offices  
  Burundi Number of sectors for which the ‘Who Does What Where’ database incorporated data from major development partners All sectors except refugees included data from partners involved in humanitarian and development programmes  
  Chad Number and percentage of IASC Country Team members having agreed to use standardized information management methodology All 25 members of the IASC Country Team (100%) accepted the Information Management Centre’s products  
  Colombia Number and percentage of tools or services aligned with humanitarian reform priorities 6 tools, services (‘Who Does What Where’ database, humanitarian coordination intranet) and products (weekly situation reports, humanitarian briefing kits, monthly reports, IASC bulletins)  
  Côte d’Ivoire Number of priority inter-agency humanitarian actions supported with appropriate data and information tools Matrices of actions and recommendations were developed and monitored by sub-offices and the Abidjan office  
  Nepal Percentage increase in United Nations and NGO projects designed using the data preparedness kit 80% (including the use of P-codes, reference maps, base GIS layers and other GIS data)  
  Percentage of satisfied users of OCHA’s tools and services Estimated at 90%  
  Papua New Guinea Establishment of the Emergency IT and Telecommunications Committee and Emergency Response Team by June 2007 As membership of the Emergency IT and Telecommunications Committee overlapped with that of the IASC Disaster Management Team Working Group, the latter convened in its place and covered many of the same topics  
  Somalia Number of days between the onset of a natural disaster and deployment of staff and resources Estimated at 5–7 days; there were some delays in staff deployment partly due to the limited flight schedule to and within Somalia  
  Sri Lanka Number of updated information products received by counterparts at the central and local levels Over 400 maps were distributed; more than 60 agencies and 3,500 projects were included in the ‘Who Does What Where’ database  
    Degree of satisfaction with tools and services provided by OCHA Information Management Unit as reported through surveys Increased reference to and demands for OCHA information products indicated a high level of satisfaction  
         
  1.6 Strengthened Consolidated Appeals Process  
  Headquarters  
  External Relations and Support Mobilization Branch  
  External Relations and Support Mobilization Branch NGO participation in CAPs was measurably better in 2007 and in the 2008 CAPs published late in the year. More NGOs and greater numbers of NGO projects featured in consolidated and flash appeals, and the proportion of NGO projects increased. The CAP Section’s messaging and outreach to clusters, field offices and NGOs, and support for the cluster approach from OCHA in general, directly contributed to these improvements.  
  Consolidated Appeals Process Section Percentage of CAP countries that publish needs analyses (separately or as part of CAP documents) 44%  
  Percentage of appeals that include NGO projects 100%  
  Percentage of CAP guideline documents that provide information on the interaction between CAP and humanitarian reform elements Revision of Flash Appeal Guidelines complete (another revision due in 2008); CAP Technical Guidelines revised for 2008; IASC CAP Guidelines not revised  
  Desks, CAP Section and the IASC CAP sub-working group identify ‘quasi-CAP’ countries by means of field reports, humanitarian funding data and early warning analysis, and familiarize the OCHA field office on how to proceed with CAP methods ‘Quasi-CAPs’ were developed successfully for 2007 or 2008 for Sri Lanka, Nepal, North Caucasus, and Iraq (countries that could still benefit from a ‘quasi-CAP’ include Colombia, Afghanistan and Eritrea)  
     
  Field Offices  
  Burundi Number of development actors engaging in CHAP None; it was decided to focus the 2007 CHAP/CAP on emergency projects only as other plans/frameworks for development programmes were available through bilateral or multilateral mechanisms  
  occupied Palestinian territory Percentage of CAP funded 61% (US$ 260.7 million)  
  Zimbabwe Percentage of funding for CAP 56% (US$ 220 million received against revised requirements of US$ 395 million)  
         
  Goal 2 Recognized Leadership Role in Humanitarian Advocacy and Policy  
  2.1 Improved, and publicly profiled, analysis of global and country humanitarian trends and issues  
  Headquarters  
  Advocacy and Information Management Branch  
  Advocacy and Information Management Branch AIMB supported field missions to OCHA offices in the Middle East (the oPt office, the Amman-based office for Iraq and the regional office in Dubai) to develop information-related strategies and support advocacy and public information activities.  
  Advocacy and Public Information Section Number of op-eds, press releases, success stories and other public information products produced 470 press releases, talking points and statements on humanitarian issues

340 interviews (arranged for senior management and others

4 op-eds appeared in more than 24 key newspapers and were reprinted in 52 other papers

12 speeches and 3 articles
 
  ReliefWeb Humanitarian trends and patterns were better highlighted through the inclusion of Humanitarian Profile Maps and information graphics. A ‘Latest Natural Disasters’ section was introduced, giving greater visibility to emergencies and allowing chronological viewing and easier identification of common trends.  
    Number of days for which site functioned at optimum level 365 (some site interruptions were experienced, but only for a maximum of a few hours)  
         
  Emergency Services Branch  
  Environmental Emergencies Section In June, EES organized the 7th meeting of the Advisory Group on Environmental Emergencies, at which governments, national and international NGOs, environmental scientists, emergency responders and international organizations, as well as large industrial companies, engaged in a critical review of the needs and challenges facing the environmental emergencies governance system. A key result of this meeting was an agreement to launch a new multi-stakeholder undertaking, known as the ‘Rosersberg Initiative’, to act on many of the identified issues. EES was requested to act as Secretariat to this initiative.  
  Level of satisfaction as expressed through a survey with tools and services provided by EES 100% satisfaction  
         
  External Relations and Support Mobilization Branch  
  External Relations and Support Mobilization Branch Number of analytical papers drafted on chronically underfunded crises and global trends in humanitarian financing Papers on the overhaul of flash appeals and underfunded emergencies paper were initiated

The Global Humanitarian Overview Matrix was developed and shared internally on a weekly basis from August onwards
 
  Extent to which media products based on OCHA inputs reflect key OCHA concerns 100 interviews and notes for the press on OCHA’s response to emergencies  
  OCHA Liaison Office in Brussels Frequency of discussions on key humanitarian issues Discussions held on a weekly basis with the EU, NATO, the Council of Europe, the OSCE and United Nations Agencies and NGOs based in Brussels

Discussions with the incoming Slovenian European Union Presidency were held twice a month to ensure that humanitarian affairs were kept on the European Union agenda
 
         
  Policy Development and Studies Branch  
  Protection of Civilians Section In order to more systematically monitor and analyse global protection trends and to advance work on developing an enhanced information mechanism, focus was placed specifically on the issue of constraints to humanitarian access. In collaboration with field offices POC developed an initial typology of constraints to humanitarian access, and a rigorous methodology for data collection and reporting on access restrictions was also under development.  
  Number of OCHA field offices with established protection of civilians reporting mechanisms 6  
  Emergency Preparedness Section To promote understanding of cyclical disasters and to alert field offices to upcoming risks, EPS initiated the quarterly electronic dissemination of ‘Disaster Risk Trends’, which provides an in-depth analysis of projected natural hazards, climate-related events, locust plagues and epidemics. EPS also coordinated OCHA’s contribution to the establishment of a Tsunami Early Warning System in the Indian Ocean.  
  Number of up-to-date disaster risk profiles maintained in database None (2 quarterly issues were disseminated in electronic form, but no database was established)  
         
  IRIN IRIN promoted well-informed humanitarian decision-making by providing contextual information and analysis about humanitarian issues and events, highlighting neglected emergencies and using film and photography to raise awareness of key humanitarian issues. Its films were increasingly able to be screened by major broadcasters and online partners (OneWorld, YouTube) because of IRIN’s adoption of new technology in film production.  
  Number of high-quality reports and analyses produced that contributed to improved understanding of global and humanitarian trends and issues, particularly in relation to sudden-onset and neglected crises 6,076 news and analysis reports, 12 publications and in-depth reports, 58 updated country profiles

Rapid coverage of Bangladesh floods and ongoing reporting on neglected crises including the Central African Republic
 
  Number of photographs and films made available 1,260 photos made available online (8,155 photo downloads were recorded in six months)

5 documentary films (9,000 DVDs distributed as well as online access) and 17 video shorts (in English and Arabic) were produced
 
  Ad hoc and systematic feedback Short online surveys were undertaken and extensive preparations were made for audience research to be conducted in 2008  
  Website results Google Search linked 370,000 pages to IRIN website; 1.5 million pages cited IRIN as a source; RSS feeds were accessed 12 million times (100% growth on 2006)

Use of IRIN sites rose 13% to an average of 222,000 visits per month (compared to 196,000 in 2006)
 
         
  Pandemic Influenza Contingency Regional planning officers reviewed most United Nations Country Teams’ plans within their region, providing assistance to key staff involved (often through support missions). PIC developed an online database for tracking readiness and populated it with information on the degree of pandemic preparedness of United Nations Country Teams and national governments – in order to track progress and support the prioritization of action by PIC and its partners.  
  Number of pandemic contingency plans reviewed and updated 140 United Nations Country Team plans and 143 national government plans were reviewed  
         
  Regional Offices  
  Regional Office for Central and East Africa The expansion and restructuring of the Information Management and Analysis Unit strengthened regional analysis and contributed to the development of public information products. In 2007, ROCEA produced 5 periodical information and analysis products, and additional ad hoc reporting in response to new developments.  
  Percentage of increased funding levels for neglected emergencies in the region Overall CAP funding for emergencies in the region increased from 63% in 2006 to 79% in 2007

5 countries received proportionately increased CERF underfunded funding against requirements compared to 2006
 
  Regional Office for the Middle East, North Africa and Central Asia A media strategy was developed for the Secretary-General’s Special Humanitarian Envoy, including the production of op-eds, organization of interviews and plans for media training.

Partner agencies’ appeals were promoted to donors and the media in the region, generating increased interest by private corporations. An Arabic language briefing pack for the 2008 Humanitarian Appeals was produced and distributed to media and donors.
 
  Percentage increase in the number of requests for information from, and references to, OCHA and its services in various media Requests for information from regional media and the public increased dramatically due to the recruitment of a public information officer and the consequent enhanced visibility  
  Regional Office for Southern Africa ROSA supported improved information management and assessment during 4 emergencies; however, the lack of dedicated information management capacities hindered progress in this area.

ROSA provided support to RCs in 5 countries to coordinate the response to floods and cyclones. Given that the region had not faced a rapid-onset crisis since 2001, OCHA’s role in providing early warning, triggering a response and then supporting its implementation was critical.
 
  Number of country-based preparedness and response information platforms established and supported 2 regional online discussion forums were launched for disaster preparedness and contingency planning (specifically for AHI)  
  Number and percentage of emergency situations flagged by early warning reports Threats in countries at most risk routinely flagged – 9 times (100%) for Zimbabwe, Madagascar, Zambia, Swaziland, Lesotho, Namibia, Comoros, Mozambique and Angola  
  Regional Office for West Africa Number of country Early Warning and Background Analysis Notes submitted in accordance with guidelines Quarterly early warning analysis submitted, situation reports and public information bulletins issued monthly, monitoring media reports issued weekly

1 regional briefing kit was made available
 
         
  Field Offices  
  Chad Number of situation reports and maps on key issues (security incidents, movement populations, access) produced 36 situation reports and approximately 130 maps were produced by the Information Management Centre  
  Côte d’Ivoire Number of analytical documents produced to raise public awareness on humanitarian challenges A comprehensive study on IDPs was undertaken to assess immediate priorities and an IDP strategy based on the Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement was developed

A study on the formulation of strategies for western Côte d’Ivoire was undertaken
 
  Democratic Republic of the Congo Number of public information and analysis products 300 products distributed through websites, email and the print media  
  Number of press releases issued 10 press releases; 12 Humanitarian Focus articles on major issues; weekly telephone interviews with major media organizations; at least 1 monthly briefing at the press conference held by MONUC  
  Ethiopia Number of OCHA press releases and reports reflected in local newspapers and on public broadcast 80 (both local and international media)  
  occupied Palestinian territory Percentage increase in number of requests for information from and references to OCHA and its services in various media While the number of requests for information was not systematically tracked, awareness of OCHA in oPt, its availability to respond and its reputation as a reliable source of information can be measured by the quality and number of delegations briefed: 123, an increase of 65% on 2006 (international and local NGOs up 300%, media up 175%, diplomatic/parliamentary missions up 60%, and academic institutions up 200%)  
  Russian Federation Number and percentage of vulnerable civilians in Chechnya identified and referred to assistance and protection by third quarter As of 31 October, the total number of IDPs in Chechnya was 10,720, and a total of 14,172 IDPs from Chechnya were registered for assistance in Ingushetia  
         
  2.3 More coherent and sharpened advocacy on humanitarian issues and principles  
  Headquarters  
  Advocacy and Information Management Branch  
  Field Information Services FIS worked with ReliefWeb and external partners in organizing the Global Symposium+5 on Information for Humanitarian Action, held in October. FIS supported regional and field offices to ensure that information management tools, systems and products effectively supported local humanitarian advocacy strategies, including the integration of ReliefWeb, the IRIN and the FTS into field office websites.  
  Number and percentage of international humanitarian organizations participating in the Humanitarian Information Network and submitting outputs to OCHA’s information dissemination portals With more than 300 participants from over 100 entities (governments, United Nations Agencies, the Red Cross movement, NGOs, scientific and research institutes, academia, the media and the private sector), the Global Symposium+5 was the largest and most diverse gathering of humanitarian information professionals to have taken place  
  Information Technology Section ITS helped increase support for the ratification of the Tampere Convention on the Provision of Telecommunication Resources for Disaster Mitigation and Relief Operations. The Section also organized a special meeting of the Working Group on Emergency Telecommunications to address spectrum frequency management during humanitarian response.  
  Number of emergencies in which Tampere Convention was invoked/applied 12  
  Percentage increase in number of references to humanitarian aspects in ICT initiatives References to the humanitarian aspects of ICT initiatives were documented in NetHope publications, in ITU resolutions and recommendations, and by the Business Council for International Understanding

The importance of C-band Satellite Communications to the humanitarian community was mentioned at the ITU World Radio Conference
 
  ReliefWeb Degree of satisfaction recorded in feedback from user testing sessions on accessibility and utility for decision-making 4,560 survey responses were received containing primarily positive comments, with suggestions for improvements integrated into work plans for 2008  
         
  External Relations and Support Mobilization Branch  
  Geographical Coordination Monitoring Section Number of OCHA-initiated country- or region-specific discussions with interested Humanitarian Liaison Working Group and IASC members held quarterly or more often as required 55 Humanitarian Liaison Network meetings

14 IASC briefings

11 Humanitarian Liaison Working Group meetings

21 Member State briefings, including 7 appeal launches
 
         
  Policy Development and Studies Branch  
  Evaluation and Studies Section Number of agencies that have agreed to implement Tsunami Evaluation Coalition recommendations At least 7 United Nations Agencies along with national Red Cross societies continued to address and promote the Coalition’s recommendations  
  Protection of Civilians Section A study on the implementation of peacekeeping operations’ protection mandates was identified as the first essential step in developing clear guidance on the protection role of peacekeepers. A framework was developed for this study which will be undertaken in partnership with the United Nations Department of Peacekeeping Operations in 2008.  
    Number of advocacy events on the protection of civilians in armed conflict held in collaboration with NGOs and Member States 8  
         
  Emergency Preparedness Section EPS undertook awareness-raising activities on a number of key humanitarian issues and presented a paper on Disaster Risk Reduction in the Context of Humanitarian Action at the IASC Working Group meeting in November. EPS also co-organized several meetings on the humanitarian impact of climate change with its key partners and participated in the drafting of an OCHA strategic position paper on climate change.  
  Number and percentage of EPS recommendations translated into action 9 discussion papers and tools posted online, including the Disaster Response Preparedness Toolkit  
         
  IRIN IRIN improved the delivery of all of its products to an expanding readership by upgrading its technology, expanding internet-based delivery and undertaking systematic outreach to ensure information reaches key end users.  
  Percentage rise in readership level Total email subscriptions up 27% (to 46,000); Middle East email subscriptions up 174% (from 2,478 to 6,796; Asia email subscriptions up 66% (from 6,580 to 10,953)  
  Percentage of IRIN information products that are available directly via the internet 90% of IRIN products were available online (most radio content was not posted)  
         
  Regional Offices  
  Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific Advocacy for humanitarian issues and IASC-endorsed principles was improved with the establishment of the regional IASC Network, which benefited from the broad participation of NGO partners. ROAP provided operational briefs on 13 priority countries, as well as situation reports in response to disasters such as the flooding in Pakistan and DPRK and the cyclone in Bangladesh.  
  Number of key stakeholders among regional military and civil defence staff and humanitarian actors familiarized with IASC-endorsed guidelines More than 2,000 regional military and civil defence staff and humanitarian actors familiarized  
  Regional Office for Latin America and the Caribbean ROLAC promoted humanitarian principles in common inter-agency advocacy activities during its participation in a number of events and forums – a Sphere (Humanitarian Charter and Minimum Standards in Response) workshop, FAHUM and a GHP exercise.  
  Number of countries where national authorities, the United Nations system and other relevant partners’ staff were trained in basic humanitarian principles None; training package in progress  
  Number of OCHA articles, press briefing and op-eds published covering humanitarian issues and principles Development of weekly notes on humanitarian crises, monthly updates, alert notes, an IASC REDLAC Newsletter, communiqués – all posted on both ROLAC’s website and RedHum  
  Regional Office for Southern Africa ROSA re-formed the regional IASC Advocacy Working Group under the leadership of Oxfam to ensure a more coordinated and common approach to raising awareness of humanitarian issues in the region. The Advocacy Working Group began defining a framework for collaboration, and United Nations Agencies conducted joint messaging on key humanitarian crises in the region.  
         
  Field Offices  
  Central African Republic Number of international media articles on the Central African Republic 7,700  
  Côte d’Ivoire Number and frequency of situation reports and press releases, number of advocacy activities targeting local communities, and percentage of key local media disseminating OCHA information products 50 (out of 52 expected) weekly situation reports were released, emailed and posted online; 500 bi-daily press monitoring handouts emailed; 6 press releases issued  
  Eritrea Number of common advocacy strategies/platforms developed and implemented No common advocacy strategy was developed  
  Haiti Number of joint needs assessment missions conducted by United Nations Agencies, government counterparts and NGOs More than 6  
  Iran Number of common advocacy platforms established 3 organizations participated in systematic humanitarian advocacy  
  Number of interviews with the media 4  
  Number of recipients of OCHA’s newsletter 230  
  Number of articles published 20  
  Nepal Number of clearances for agencies and NGOs working in controlled areas OCHA negotiated for access and the release of NGO staff in at least 6 abduction incidents  
  Percentage decrease in occurrences of Basic Operating Guidelines violations 5% (this does not necessarily reflect an improvement in operational space, as some agencies made programmatic adjustments in ‘high security risk areas’ and some staff or projects were relocated to more accessible areas)  
  occupied Palestinian territory Percentage of vulnerable population accessible for humanitarian assistance 100% – however the full implementation of humanitarian programmes was severely hampered by increasing restrictions on access, particularly in the Gaza Strip  
  Russian Federation Endorsement of the Protection Strategy for Transition by the IASC Field Team by the end of the second quarter Protection activities were increasingly scrutinized by authorities and significantly restricted in scope, eliminating the possibility of developing a broad protection strategy  
  Somalia Degree of implementation of IASC advocacy strategy and strategic framework on IDPs and amount of resources raised IASC advocacy group was formed and chaired by OCHA; development of IASC policy position papers was supported by OCHA

Development of Joint Operating Principles was facilitated, field-level consultations were held, implementation on some components started
 
  Increased funding levels for recovery activities Funding levels for recovery activities did not increase; CERF applications linking life-saving activities with early recovery were not funded  
  Number of community development projects with a protection and gender dimension Protection and Gender-Based Violence Working Groups were developed in 3 new locations

IDP Working Group and IASC Protection Cluster co-chaired by OCHA at the national level

Mixed migration taskforce was chaired by OCHA in the field, the development of a mixed migration strategy was facilitated, and emergency programme implementation was monitored
 
  Sri Lanka OCHA Liaison Desk fully functional in the Ministry of Disaster Management and Human Rights by end 2007 Achieved  
  Sudan Number of inter-agency advocacy strategies and platforms A draft advocacy strategy was discussed and developed, then expanded into a number of more focused strategies responding to evolving needs

Advocacy platforms were established through the Inter-Agency Working Group on Communications and daily liaison with UNMIS and UNAMID
 
  Number of humanitarians and/or peacekeepers and national authorities participating in workshops and trainings Weekly CMCoord induction presentations were made to UNMIS Military Observers

2 OCHA-run CMCoord workshops were attended by a total of 58 participants (approximately half humanitarian, half military), plus approximately 40 through participation in the UNMIS civil–military cooperation workshop
 
         
  2.4 Shared policy positions (in pursuit of a common humanitarian understanding and messaging)  
  Headquarters  
  Emergency Services Branch  
  Civil Military Coordination Section CMCS disseminated and promoted the use of the Oslo Guidelines and MCDA Guidelines, conducting presentations at conferences, seminars, workshops and meetings. This work was supplemented by the training of around 320 civilian and military actors at UN-CMCoord training events along with a significant number of NATO military personnel in pre-deployment training for Afghanistan and readiness training for the NATO Response Force/Combined Joint Task Force. Training support was also provided to the military staff colleges of NATO member and partner states.  
  Number and percentage of deployed UN-CMCoord Officers fully conversant in the use of existing UN-CMCoord guidelines, handbooks and reference documents 15 UN-CMCoord fully conversant in the use of existing UN-CMCoord guidelines, handbooks and reference documents, or 100%  
  Logistics Support Unit In March, as part of phase I of a cooperation project with IFRC and Care, OCHA published a scoping study on the use of timber in construction during humanitarian relief operations. It also contributed to guidelines on the use of plastic sheeting, published during mid 2007 by IFRC and Oxfam. Eight peer review meetings were held in connection with the revision of the Shelter after Disaster Guidelines in order to consider proposed changes and agree on the final text.  
  Number of policies agreed upon in the revision of the Shelter after Disaster Guidelines 100%  
         
  Policy Development and Studies Branch  
  Policy Development and Studies Branch In close consultation with the Civil–Military Coordination Section and the relevant CRD desk, PDSB contributed to several context- and country-specific sets of civil–military guidelines (Afghanistan, the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Sudan) and provided field offices with the necessary background material.  
  Number and percentage of partners agreeing to adopt proposed policy positions 75% of OCHA’s suggestions and recommendations on the humanitarian impact of sanctions were reflected in debates/ decisions of United Nations Sanctions Committees and the Security Council

Report on the DRC recommended against the imposition of sanctions on the fragile exploitation industry, to which the Security Council agreed

100% of policy positions on interaction with armed personnel were endorsed by relevant entities (Country Teams, ECHA, IASC)
 
  Gender Advisory Team GAT assisted in revitalizing a taskforce on sexual exploitation and abuse by United Nations and related personnel, for which it undertook a co-chairing function. New priorities were set and an inventory of sexual exploitation and abuse incidents were uploaded to a revamped website An awareness-raising and training film, To Serve with Pride: Zero Tolerance for Sexual Exploitation and Abuse, was produced with GAT, and a Facilitator’s Guide to the film was made available.  
  United Nations system-wide action to address Sexual Exploitation and Abuse by United Nations Staff and Related Personnel revitalized ECHA/ECPS Sexual Exploitation and Abuse Taskforce was revamped and a work plan established; sexual exploitation and abuse tools and materials were made more widely accessible to all actors

The General Assembly issued a resolution providing the mandate for support to victims of sexual exploitation and abuse, to be piloted over the next 2 years
 
  Protection of Civilians Section The POC Section provided guidance to OCHA’s field offices (including Sri Lanka, Somalia and Chad) to strengthen their protection response. More formalized support was provided through a workshop in Afghanistan on the protection of civilians in armed conflict, however plans for a similar workshop in Somalia were postponed due to security issues. In support of their growing protection role, the POC Section convened a workshop for 6 regional organizations in West Africa. Support for a number of specific projects was provided to the African Union, including negotiation of the African Union Convention for the Protection and Assistance of IDPs in Africa and integrated mission planning for the African Union Mission to Somalia.  
  Number of regional organizations engaged in the Protection of Civilians Consultative Network 24  
         
  Displacement and Protection Support Services Adoption of inter-agency road map by the IASC DPSS supported the Protection Cluster Working Group Chair in convening a retreat to determine its vision and plan of action

As a way of developing shared inter-agency policy positions related to displacement and protection, DPSS supported the development of the IDP Protection Handbook, the IDP Profiling Guidelines and the guidelines on durable solutions for IDPs (these tools were endorsed by the IASC or the Working Group)
 
         
  IASC Secretariat Percentage of IASC and ECHA action points acted upon and monitored 100% of action points agreed in the IASC and ECHA were monitored

88% of action points agreed to in the IASC and 62% in ECHA were implemented
 
  Number of IASC-developed tools (or services) aligned with humanitarian reform priorities that have a dissemination strategy 3: IASC Gender Handbook; the IASC Guidelines on Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in Emergency Settings; and the revised IASC Contingency Planning Guidelines  
  Percentage of ECHA meetings attended by senior-level executives All ECHA meetings were attended by Principals or their Deputies  
         
  Regional Offices  
  Regional Office for West Africa The Regional Inter-Agency Protection and Population Movements Working Group and ROWA identified 3 major protection issues: gender-based violence; youth and youth violence; and population movements. Background papers were prepared and disseminated on the protection breaches identified, covering the contexts and institutional gaps and making recommendations for new strategies to address the issues. These papers were endorsed during a regional and sub-regional organizations meeting on the protection of civilians in West Africa, paving the way for a regional protection strategy for West Africa.  
  Number and percentage of protection breaches 3 main protection breaches identified, considered as crosscutting with all other protection issues in the region  
         
  Field Offices  
  Uganda Number of briefing notes on each cluster issue circulated OCHA facilitated the drafting of 4 inter-agency briefing papers  
         
  2.5 Greater incorporation of risk reduction objectives into humanitarian (including recovery and transition) strategies  
  Headquarters  
  Emergency Services Branch  
  Environmental Emergency Section EES developed a self-assessment tool for governments involved in environmental emergency response, which is made available on the request of national authorities. In February, at the request of the Turkish authorities, an environmental response preparedness mission to Turkey was deployed, and the tool was applied with success.  
  Number of countries in which the tool for response preparedness was tested by June 2007 1  
  Number of additional environmental experts nominated by governments for UNDAC roster who have received induction training 1  
         
  Policy Development and Studies Branch  
  Policy Development and Studies Branch Adoption of disaster preparedness indicators by IASC by end 2007 Version 1 of Hyogo Framework for Action disaster preparedness indicator package completed (to be piloted in at least 3 field locations before becoming a core component of the EPS preparedness toolkit in 2008)  
         
  Coordination and Response Division CRD focused on mainstreaming the principles of risk reduction throughout OCHA through the establishment of the inter-branch Early Warning Contingency Planning Working Group in collaboration with the Emergency Preparedness Section. The group developed a multi-risk prioritization mechanism, the ‘Global Focus Model’ (based on tool developed by ROAP), and an agreed set of minimum preparedness actions, and produced the quarterly IASC Early Warning–Early Action Report.

The Emergency Directors Meeting, an inter-agency body recommended by the Humanitarian Response Review, was convened at the beginning of 2007 and met three times during the year to agree on early actions in response to potential high-risk national and regional scenarios. CRD provided input to the United Nations Inter-Agency Framework for Coordination on Preventative Action – an internal United Nations mechanism that provides coordinated support to the Resident Coordinator/United Nations Country Team to take early action for conflict prevention.
 
  Progress on the IASC Inter-Agency Contingency Planning Guidelines for Humanitarian Assistance Endorsed by the IASC and tested in Haiti and the Philippines  
  Percentage of regional offices that contributed to the Global Focus Model 100%  
  Emergency Preparedness Section EPS was active in increasing donors’ awareness of preparedness projects, at the same time as gathering information on funding sources and their guidelines and application criteria for organizations seeking preparedness funding. EPS was also involved in developing and launching the new Inter-Agency Contingency Planning Guidelines for Humanitarian Assistance and in producing an indicators package on preparedness in support of the Hyogo Framework for Action.  
  Number of staff trained in disaster risk reduction issues 11 OCHA staff in Côte d’Ivoire, 1 in ROWA

15 OCHA staff also attended needs assessment workshops
 
  Pandemic Influenza Contingency PIC promoted the ‘convergence’ of pandemic planning into other initiatives, including contingency planning for scenarios such as natural hazards and complex emergencies. Through the production of publications and undertaking of direct advocacy, PIC lobbied for the incorporation of pandemic preparedness into existing disaster management structures, plans and frameworks in Zimbabwe, Malawi, Indonesia, Cambodia, Cape Verde, Egypt and Morocco. A guidance note entitled ‘75 Things Governments and their Partners Should Do to Prepare for Influenza Pandemic’ was produced and disseminated, while work on a follow-up ‘Vital Infrastructure Readiness Framework’ advocacy document for governments was initiated.  
  Number of simulations organized/supported at regional/ country level 17 (at least one priority country per region)  
         
  Regional Offices and Regional Disaster Response Advisers  
  Regional Office for Asia and the Pacific Number of countries in the Asia-Pacific region where planning support was provided 6 (Bangladesh, Bhutan, Fiji, Indonesia, Papua New Guinea and Timor-Leste)  
  Number of countries where data preparedness assessments were undertaken 6 (Indonesia, Maldives, Nepal, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea and Timor-Leste)  
  Number of countries with AHI preparedness plans 11 (Bangladesh, Bhutan, Cambodia, DPRK, Lao PDR, Malaysia, Myanmar, Mongolia, Pakistan, Thailand and Vietnam)  
  Number of countries with revised terms of reference for United Nations Disaster Management Teams 6 (Bhutan, China, Fiji, Pakistan, Papua New Guinea and Thailand)  
  Regional Office for Latin America and the Caribbean ROLAC reinforced REDLAC by developing standard operating procedures for common action and facilitating joint projects on rapid assessment and information management. It also assisted CEPREDENAC in promoting the Coordination Centre for Humanitarian Action.  
  Number of countries where the United Nations Disaster Management Team/UNETT was using an updated inter-agency preparedness plan 7 (all countries where a disaster occurred)  
  Number of emergency preparedness and response activities conducted with REDLAC and other regional partners 24 meetings with United Nations Agencies, NGO partners and some donors

Ad hoc meetings on emergencies and on specific REDLAC projects (RedHum, Panorama and Rapid Needs Assessments)
 
  Regional Office for the Middle East, North Africa and Central Asia ROMENACA identified vulnerable countries in need of support for emergency and disaster response preparedness, analysis and planning. Internal disaster management systems were bolstered by support to disaster preparedness activities and the establishment of in-country contingency plans.  
  Number of days for Regional Office response to sudden-onset disasters and conflicts No major sudden-onset crises in the region  
  Number of countries provided with support for in-country contingency planning exercises 4 (Algeria, Morocco, Lebanon and Syria)  
  Regional Office for Southern Africa ROSA, in close cooperation with the BCPR, ensured greater incorporation of humanitarian principles and disaster risk reduction within 8 contingency plans and 5 common humanitarian actions plans. Lack of capacity hindered the Office from participating as much as it could have in national development planning; however, some concerns were addressed by other partners.  
  Number and percentage of plans incorporating humanitarian principles and disaster risk reduction 7 contingency plans (Angola, Zambia, Mozambique, Madagascar, Comoros, Malawi, Zimbabwe, provincial-level South Africa)

5 common humanitarian action plans (Madagascar, Mozambique, Zambia, Swaziland, Lesotho)

1 national development plan (Madagascar)
 
  Regional Office for West Africa ROWA facilitated contingency planning workshops in Burkina Faso, Mauritania, Senegal and Guinea Bissau and provided technical support to Togo and Cape Verde in the developing and updating of their contingency plans. In May, emergency focal points from the regional offices of OCHA, UNICEF and WFP developed an inter-agency emergency simulation exercise package. ROWA, in cooperation with the Pandemic Influenza Contingency project, identified where support was required in terms of each country’s AHI preparedness and response plan. It also reviewed the region’s overall response capacities in order to update the AHI contingency plans for the United Nations system.  
  Inter-agency contingency plans, including regional plans, regularly updated 12 out of 17 countries regularly updated their contingency plans

2 regional inter-agency contingency plans (Guinea+6 and Côte d’Ivoire+5) were regularly updated
 
  Regional Disaster Response Adviser for the Pacific In 2007, the Office of the RDRA led Disaster Management Team (DMT) meetings and participated in PEMTAG. OCHA participated as an observer in the National Disaster Response Exercise in the Cook Islands in April, which tested the coordination and response capacities of government agencies following a sudden-onset disaster (cyclone). In cooperation with UNICEF and the DMT, a 2-day Disaster Preparedness Workshop was held in Vanuatu in March to discuss the rollout of DMT preparedness and coordination activities at the country level.  
  Number of countries finalizing disaster response standard operating procedures/plans 3 (Fiji, Cook Islands, Samoa); plan for Solomon Islands ongoing  
  Percentage of requests for disaster preparedness and response consultations fulfilled 100%  
  Number of United Nations Country Teams with joint preparedness activities with NDMOs The 2 United Nations Country Teams (Fiji and Samoa) have a finalized preparedness plan and a DMT in place  
  Regional Disaster Response Adviser for Central Asia The strengthening of partnerships for disaster risk reduction in the region got underway as a result of strong donor programmes (particularly ECHO’s disaster preparedness programme [DIPECHO] and the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation) and the activities of the ISDR office in Dushanbe. Due to the late opening of the RDRA Office, OCHA’s involvement with this was limited in 2007.  
         
  Field Offices  
  Iran Number of community-based disaster preparedness pilot projects designed and implemented 2  
  Number of national partner organizations trained in humanitarian preparedness 12  
  Nepal Percentage of contingency plans finalized and endorsed by participants of contingency plan review Contingency plans were still being finalized

Preparedness activities began (incorporating standard rapid assessment formats, response capacity mapping)
 
  Papua New Guinea Development of integrated, multi-sectoral AHI contingency plans at the central and provincial levels by end 2007 National Influenza Preparedness Pandemic Plan was approved and began to be operationalized at the national level  
  Number of United Nations staff trained on the updated pandemic contingency plan 7 staff members (from UNDP, UNICEF, WHO, OCHA and UNHCR) attended 1 contingency planning workshop and 1 national contingency planning exercise  
  Sri Lanka Detailed work plan on facilitation on disaster preparedness implemented by IASC Country Team members led by UNDP and OCHA Staffing limitations and competing priorities with the escalation conflict limited progress in this area  
  Sudan Number of national authority personnel trained to better respond to disasters and emergencies 10 state Emergency Response Teams were trained in Southern Sudan from the Government of South Sudan, the United Nations and NGOs  
  Number and coverage of contingency planning exercises 10 state contingency plans were developed with the Government of South Sudan, the United Nations and NGOs  
         
  2.6 Improved coordination and monitoring of IDP issues  
  Headquarters  
  Displacement and Protection Support Services Percentage of recommendations on how to deal with remaining gaps addressed in the inter-agency response to internal displacement addressed by IASC With the establishment of the Protection Cluster Working Group, this task was transferred to the work of the cluster

DPSS assisted OCHA staff from the Eastern and Central Africa region, as well as Iraq, oPt, Chad and the Central African Republic to identify solutions to address remaining IDP response gaps
 
         
  Field Offices  
  Central African Republic IDP protection monitoring frameworks developed UNHCR (as cluster lead) developed and implemented an IDP protection and monitoring strategy, together with other relevant organizations  
  Chad Number and percentage of IASC Country Team members having agreed to implement the strategy proposed to address the needs of the IDPs All 25 members (100%) of the IASC Country Team members agreed to implement the strategy (scheduled for 2008)  
  Democratic Republic of the Congo Number of provinces utilizing standardized procedures and tools 4  
  Draft national legislation on IDPs initiated Discussions began with Congolese authorities on the development of national IDP legislation  
  Nepal National IDP Policy established by the beginning of 2007 National IDP Policy established in February, awaiting Cabinet approval  
         
  2.7 Increased and strengthened partnerships for humanitarian action  
  Headquarters  
  Advocacy and Information Management Branch  
  Advocacy and Public Information Section Number of requests for advocacy meetings with the IASC and other NGO forums and organizations 12 OCHA/United Nations/InterAction meetings held

Key NGOs, including World Vision, consulted

3 campaigns participated in with partners (2 on sexual violence, 1 on cluster munitions)
 
  ReliefWeb ReliefWeb continued to build relationships with partners at a range of conferences, seminars and meetings. Training sessions were conducted with the New York Times, United Nations News, OCHA entities and PreventionWeb. ReliefWeb also took part in public information trainings, deployment training for the OSOCC, GDACS stakeholders meetings and Humanitarian Information Centre trainings. Missions to Nairobi, Kinshasa and Bangkok included training sessions for staff in OCHA regional offices. Support to the United Nations Geographic Information Working Group Secretariat was provided through the Map Centre.  
  Number of editorial policies updated and published online A handbook of ReliefWeb’s editorial policies, guidelines and standard operating procedures was released in December  
  Information Technology Services ITS prepared a document for the International Telecommunications Union Study Group 2 for the assignment of special United Nations country codes for United Nations disaster relief activities – which was approved.  
  Percentage increase in the number of agreements with telecommunications service providers (agencies, private sector, NGOs) 1 United Nations long-term agreement was signed for satellite communications services  
         
  Emergency Services Branch  
  Civil–Military Coordination Section CMCS convened 18 CMCoord training courses and participated in the planning and execution of 18 large-scale military-sponsored simulation exercises involving military, humanitarian and regional actors prior to operational deployment, targeting senior military leaders and headquarters staff. CMCS, in cooperation with the Malaysian Ministry of Defence, organized and facilitated the second Asia-Pacific Conference on Military Assistance to Disaster Relief Operations. A UN-CMCoord Officer was deployed to Nairobi to identify and form linkages with humanitarian and military stakeholders in the region.  
  Number and percentage of regional and national partners participating in UN-CMCoord training courses and military exercises More than 80 Member States  
  Field Coordination and Support Section Awareness of the UNDAC/INSARAG systems was increased through a workshop for francophone West African countries. Relations and cooperation with governmental and technical support partners were further developed and the availability of support modules for UNDAC missions was increased.  
  Number and percentage of developing countries that are members of UNDAC and ISARAG mechanisms 51, or 41%  
  Number of IHP/APHP support modules and staff deployed in support of OCHA IHP supported 7 UNDAC missions; the Americas Support Module supported 1 mission; Telecoms sans Frontières supported 6 missions; MapAction supported 4 missions; DHL supported 1 mission; UNOSAT supported all missions  
  Humanitarian Reform Support Unit A core achievement of 2007 was the development and broad endorsement of the Principles of Partnership – which include equality, transparency, a result-oriented approach, responsibility and complementarity. Partners in the GHP have committed to adopting these principles in their operations and actions both at headquarters and in the field, and some have started rolling out the Principles at the field level (starting with Indonesia, Zimbabwe and Panama) to complement efforts already taking place as part of the humanitarian reform process.  
  Number of agreements achieved during 2007 GHP 3  
  OCHA Liaison Office in Brussels The Liaison Office facilitated discussions between NATO and OCHA about future cooperation on mission planning and training on humanitarian principles. It also discussed ways to cooperate in the response to disasters in order to avoid duplication with other relevant partners. Finally, the Office disseminated information on the revised Oslo and Military and Civil Defence Assets Guidelines as well as OCHA’s policies on the protection of civilians, disaster preparedness and response, and needs assessments.  
  Observer status at the Council of Europe in Strasburg achieved The Office was in the process of submitting a request to participate in relevant sessions of the parliamentary assembly in Strasburg  
  Crisis coordination mechanisms implemented The Office liaised with the European Union regarding preparations for a meeting on Crisis Coordination Arrangements  
         
  Regional Offices and Regional Disaster Response Advisers  
  Regional Office for Latin America and the Caribbean ROLAC ensured the greater participation of humanitarian partners in inter-agency projects, which allowed for better information sharing, joint action and humanitarian advocacy.  
  Number of active partners in the humanitarian informationsharing network (RedHum) More than 60 regional organization  
  Number of journalists trained on humanitarian principles in inter-agency workshops (including the Red Cross movement and NGOs) Organization of workshops was reassessed; instead, material was presented during other journalists’ workshops and an information management workshop was held in Nicaragua with participants from the United Nations and NGOs  
  Regional Office for the Middle East, North Africa and Central Asia ROMENACA strengthened humanitarian partnerships between organizations across the region, including: the OIC in Saudi Arabia; the League of Arab States in Egypt; and the regional Humanitarian Forum headed by Islamic Relief. Robust contacts were made with the Qatar Authority for Charitable Activities and the Libyan Agency for Relief and Humanitarian Assistance. Regional initiatives and workshops were conducted and supported in collaboration with Red Crescent societies. The Middle East and North African Disaster Preparedness and Response Advisory Group also held 2 retreats in 2007 to further consolidate United Nations Agencies’ activities, and for the first time these were attended by representatives of the IFRC and the broader NGO community.  
  Number of new partnership agreements and affiliations by end 2007 No formal agreements; however, significant progress was made in strengthening existing partnerships and developing new contacts  
  Regional Disaster Response Adviser for the Pacific The RDRA Office facilitated the development of an Inter-Agency Contingency Plan for Pandemic Preparedness, and held a 1-day simulation exercise in collaboration with ROAP and the UNICEF Regional Office at which United Nations Heads of Agencies and administrative and operational staff had the opportunity to discuss preparedness and response measures in a pandemic situation and test the contingency plan. OCHA participated in a FRANZ simulation exercise in Wellington, New Zealand, in September which aimed at strengthening cooperation and clarifying the roles of partners in the event of an emergency response in the Pacific.  
  Number of inter-agency coordination groups functioning 4 (Pandemic Preparedness, Disaster Management Team, Information Management, PEMTAG)  
         
  Goal 3 A More Effective and Efficient Organization  
  3.1 Improved management practices    
  Headquarters      
  Advocacy and Information Management Branch  
  Field Information Services Improved management and internal communication was demonstrated by FIS’s adherence to performance appraisal cycles, the development of policy materials and standard operational procedures, and its proactive participation in intranet developments to improve internal communications.  
  Number of standard operating procedures, policies and guidelines developed, and percentage approved by the branch chief/senior management team ‘Operational Guidance on Responsibilities of Cluster/Sector Leads and OCHA in Information Management’ were produced

Consultations with humanitarian partners on Humanitarian Information Centres (HICs) led to revised terms of reference for HICs in October

2 organization-wide policies and standards on information management were approved
 
  ReliefWeb ReliefWeb formalized its internal policies, guidelines and standard operating procedures in 2007. It also strengthened its early response capacity by establishing a standard operating procedure for weekend monitoring of emergencies. Staff turnover was 64%, creating a significant challenge in ReliefWeb’s recruitment and training of new staff.  
  Percentage increase in email subscriptions and in postings of trainings and vacancies Email subscriptions were up by 20%, vacancy notices up by 30%, notification of training events up by 500%  
         
  External Relations and Support Mobilization Branch  
  Donor and External Relations Section Progress was made in consolidating the development of the OCHA Contributions Tracking (OCT) system, which is designed to make information on donor pledges and contributions available online, and improve timely reporting to donors. In 2007, DERS completed Phase I of the system and granted access to it to a number of staff to elicit feedback on its usability. A number of training events were organized to brief Administrative Office staff and OCHA staff in New York on its use, and a user manual was produced.  
  Number of OCHA staff who have accessed the OCT system in the first half of 2007 Access was limited because of technical complications in the start-up phase  
  Pandemic Influenza Contingency Although an OCHA ‘global’ pandemic contingency plan was not in place by the end of the year, contingency plans for business continuity were completed for United Nations headquarters in New York and Geneva, and a draft OCHA New York business continuity plan was prepared (work on a similar plan for OCHA in Geneva was begun but not completed).

While all 7 PIC regional planning officers were deployed by early 2007 (with most integrated into OCHA regional offices), 2 moved to other positions and new recruitments were only completed at the end of the year.
 
  Number and percentage of OCHA offices in compliance with United Nations Pandemic Preparedness Guidelines Contingency plans for pandemics were established in 19 OCHA field offices  
  Staff Development and Learning Section Staff shortages meant that the enhancement of management skills and development of a specialized training programme for OCHA heads of offices was delayed (to be further explored in 2008). However, SDLS identified United Nations-required management development training courses and will invite staff to participate in 2008.  
  Number of staff surveyed six months post workshop that confirmed learning is being applied effectively in their day-to-day work None  
         
  3.4 Effective human resource planning and management  
  Headquarters  
  Executive Office/ Administrative Office Guidelines were provided on completing cost plans, which assisted headquarters and field offices to estimate costs more accurately for staff and non-staff components. Although progress was made with the cost plan process, improvement is still needed.

OCHA’s recruitment processes remain labor-intensive; however, the time taken for the initial screening process was improved and some staff were deployed by reassignment. EO/AO faced a number of external problems that caused delays in staff deployment, including the procurement of visas, security clearances and releases from their employers. As the multiple duty station vacancies system moves to roster vacancy management, the number of days it takes to deploy staff is expected to decrease, meeting the target time frame.
 
  Percentage of recruitments completed within three months of closing of vacancy announcement Approximately 32% at 3 months; approximately 30% at 6 months  
  Number of field offices with access to United Nations regulations, rules and practices 100%; all field offices now have access to the Office for Human Resources Management Handbook and other relevant guidelines on the Intranet  
  Staff Development and Learning Section Learning focal points were established in OCHA headquarters and field offices to liaise with SDLS on learning needs and communicate learning activities and opportunities to staff in their respective locations. A training group was also established at headquarters for sharing learning resources, providing technical support and coordinating learning components across OCHA.  
  Number of learning managers identified, established and trained Focal points in each unit established  
  IRIN IRIN restructured its operations to achieve greater flexibility and efficiency, scaled down offices where required, and made better use of human resources.  
  Greater editorial direction from Nairobi office and an integrated newsroom The Nairobi newsroom was restructured and an editor-in-chief appointed in October  
         
  3.5 Strengthened accountability mechanisms based on measurable indicators and results  
  Headquarters  
  Executive Office/ Administrative Office A team made up of staff from AO and ITS evaluated several field offices’ systems (as well as that of other United Nations Agencies for comparison). The team recommended adoption of the ProFi system (developed by UNODC). Although still under discussion, it is envisaged that implementation of the ProFi system or another similar system will contribute to raising OCHA’s compliance rate.  
  Percentage compliance rate and audit reports reflecting improved administrative controls and practices A mechanism to track the compliance rate was not implemented due to a lack of resources (a number of key positions were vacant) in administration  
         
  3.7 More predictable and adequate funding  
  Headquarters  
  External Relations and Support Mobilization Branch  
  Donor and External Relations Section The revised requirements for voluntary donor contributions for activities detailed in OCHA in 2007 were US$ 169 million. US$ 139 million was received from donors, covering 83 per cent of revised requirements.  
  Target for Budgetary Cash Reserve Fund (BCRF) reached early in the year; funds allocated as advances in 2006 replenished Target of US$ 30 million for BCRF was not reached; by end 2007 the Fund amounted to US$ 17 million with an additional contribution from Sweden and two allocations from unearmarked donor contributions (the US$ 12 million advanced in 2006 was fully replenished)  
  Amount and percentage of contributions received from new donors and private partners US$ 784,073  
  Number of countries meeting requirements for OCHA Donor Support Group (ODSG) membership 1 donor (the Government of Spain) was requested to join the ODSG after having met the criteria for several years in a row