Revision of the Cluster 2006 - Appeal for Improving Humanitarian Response Capacity

18 July 2006

The Humanitarian Reform Agenda aims to dramatically enhance humanitarian response capacity, predictability, accountability and partnership. It represents an ambitious effort by the international humanitarian community to reach more beneficiaries, with more comprehensive, needs-based relief and protection, in a more effective and timely manner. While the real impact of this effort can only ultimately be measured in the field, obviously the overall reform package necessitates an initial investment of additional resources at the headquarters level to take on new responsibilities and strengthen capacity.

The reform package has four main objectives:

1.     Sufficient humanitarian response capacityand enhanced leadership, accountability and predictability in nine ‘gap’ sectors/areas of response (ensuring trained staff, adequate commonly-accessible stockpiles, surge capacity, agreed standards and guidelines);

2.     Adequate, timely and flexible humanitarian financing (including through the Central Emergency Response Fund;

3.     Improved humanitarian coordination and leadership (More effective Humanitarian Coordinator (HC) system, more strategic leadership and coordination at the inter-sectoral and sectoral levels);

4.    Moreeffective partnerships between United Nations (UN) and non-UN humanitarian actors.


The Cluster leadership approach is one element of the reform package and is designed to contribute to objectives 1,3 and 4. It aims to strengthen overall response capacity as well as the effectiveness of the response in five key ways:

·         First, the approach aims to ensure sufficient global capacity is built up and maintained in nine key gap sectors/areas ofresponse, with a view to ensuring timely and effective responses in new crises: Camp Coordination and Camp Management (CCCM); Early Recovery; Emergency Shelter; Emergency Telecommunications; Health; Logistics; Nutrition; Protection; and Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH);

·         Second, the approach identifies predictable leadership in the nine key gap sectors/areas ofresponse. Cluster leads are responsible for ensuring response capacity is in place and that assessment, planning and response activities are carried out in collaboration with partners and in accordance with agreed standards and guidelines. Cluster leads also act as the “provider of last resort”, in line with the Inter-Agency Standing Committee (IASC) Generic ToR for Cluster Leads;

·         Third, the approach is designed around the concept of ‘partnerships’ (i.e. ‘Clusters’) between UN agencies, the Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement, international organisations and Non-Governmental Organisations (NGOs). Partners work together towards agreed common humanitarian objectives both at the global level (preparedness, standards, tools, stockpiles and capacity-building) and at the field level (assessment, planning, delivery and monitoring). Partnerships facilitate improved inter-agency complementarity by maximising resources;

·         Fourth, the approach strengthens accountability. Cluster leads are accountable, at the global level, to the Emergency Relief Coordinator (ERC) for building up a more predictable and effective response capacity in line with IASC agreements. At the field level, in addition to their normal institutional responsibilities, Cluster leads are accountable to HCs for fulfilling agreed roles and responsibilities for Cluster leadership, such as those listed in the IASC Generic ToR for Cluster Leads;

·         Fifth, the approach should help to improve strategic field-level coordination and prioritisation in specific sectors/areas of response by placing responsibility for leadership and coordination of these issues with the competent operational agency.

 

The Cluster Appeal for 2006: Update

Nine Cluster working groups have been meeting regularly at the headquarters level since July 2005 to map capacity gaps at the global level, and to elaborate and implement action plans to address these gaps. The Cluster Appeal, launched in March 2006, consolidates the budgets for each of the nine Clusters’ global-level capacity building requirements. Field-level costs associated with implementing the approach have been or will be incorporated into revisions of the consolidated appeals and into flash appeals for new emergencies. The resources identified in the Cluster Appeal represent the priority requirements needed to address capacity gaps identified by each Cluster working group, which cannot be covered by existing or previously mobilised resources. All nine Clusters require initial investment at the headquarters level in order to initiate systemic improvements, leading to enhanced capacity, accountability, partnership and predictability, and an improved response on the ground. A Cluster Appeal for 2007 is planned, but it is expected that by 2008, global costs will be incorporated into agencies’ regular programmes and budgets. The total global Cluster resource requirements (revised as of June) for 2006 are U$ 38,753,194[1]. To date, the appeal is 16.2% funded. The present update aims to provide an overview of each Cluster’s progress to date, priority needs, key indicators and benchmarks, funding modalities and the impact of under-funding.

 

FINANCIAL SUMMARY as of 23 June 2006

 

Global Cluster Name

Original Requirements

Revised Requirements    at 23 June *

Commitments/ Contributions        at 23 June

% Covered

Outstanding

Requirements at 23 June

Uncommitted pledges

 

($)

($)

($)

 

($)

 

Camp Coordination and Camp Management

3,660,000

3,498,965

1,088,000

31.0%

2,410,965

37,500

Early Recovery

2,415,000

2,235,000

320,000

14.0%

1,915,000

306,000

Emergency Shelter

1,691,000

1,288,573

160,000

12.0%

1,128,573

17,500

Emergency Telecommunications

6,700,000

6,700,000

1,685,347

25.0%

5,014,653

800,000

Health

4,250,000

4,250,000

559,000

13.0%

3,691,000

590,000

Logistics

9,052,980

9,052,980

639,000

7.0%

8,413,980

1,342,000

Nutrition

5,440,276

5,440,276

690,000

13.0%

4,750,276

757,000

Protection

3,120,000

2,927,400

320,000

11.0%

2,607,400

35,000

Water, Sanitation and Hygiene

3,360,000

3,360,000

800,000

24.0%

2,560,000

115,000

Cluster not yet specified

 

 

 

 

 

8,585,347

Grand Total

39,689,256

38,753,194

6,261,347

16.2%

32,491,847

12,585,347

*Budget lines that have changed since the Appeal was issued in March are indicated in bold in the above two tables.

 

CLARIFICATIONS

Appeal Requirements: The reduced grand total for the Cluster Appeal reflects reductions proposed, after the Cluster Appeal was issued, by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) in their requirements for the four Clusters they lead. The other revisions noted above arise from clarifications obtained on funding channels, i.e. the Emergency Shelter total is now appealed for by four agencies (rather than UNHCR only), the Emergency Telecommunications total is appealed for by three agencies (rather than the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) only) and the Protection total is appealed for by three agencies (rather than UNHCR only).

Objectives/indicators/benchmarks: In the following one page updates on each Cluster’s ongoing funding needs and priorities, the sections entitled ‘key objectives for 2006’ and ‘key indicators and benchmarks for 2006’ list those objectives, indicators and benchmarks that each Cluster had hoped to achieve at the global level had the Cluster received full funding for 2006 early in the year. As such, in most cases, output will be significantly affected by the fact that almost no funding has been forthcoming to date.

Emergency Shelter: The Emergency Shelter component of the Cluster Appeal 2006 covers capacity-building efforts to fill shelter response gaps in conflict-affected displacement situations. The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC), which has offered to provide leadership to the broader humanitarian community to consolidate best practice, map capacity and gaps and lead coordinated response to shelter needs in natural disasters, anticipates launching a separate appeal for its shelter leadership role later this year. In the meantime, the IFRC is currently increasing shelter stockpiles in Panama, Dubai and Kuala Lumpur.

Cluster Partners:On the following pages, participants in each of the global-level Cluster working groups are listed in alphabetical order. 

Concerning specifically the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC):  Although the ICRC can be neither a cluster lead nor a cluster member, as this would necessarily entail accountability to the UN system, coordination with the ICRC will be carried out to the extent necessary in order to achieve an efficient operational complementarity and a strengthened humanitarian response for people affected by armed conflict and other situations of violence. For this reason, ICRC participates as an observer in many of the Cluster working group meetings at the headquarters (HQ) level.



[1]All Dollar figures in this document are United States dollars.  Funding for this appeal should be reported to the Financial Tracking Service (FTS, fts@un.org), which will display its requirements on the CAP 2006 page.  

 

Document History

18 July 2006

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