Sri Lanka

Sri Lanka Common Humanitarian Action Plan (September-December) 2006

10 October 2006

The renewed and spiralling levels of open warfare in the North and the East have shattered the fragile cease-fire causing grave humanitarian consequences including significant civilian casualties and new displacement. Persisting hostilities, albeit localised to some areas of the country, as well as the failure to implement the Cease Fire Agreement (CFA), do not allow hopes for an easy return to normalcy.

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Common Humanitarian Action Plan (CHAP) for Sri Lanka 2007

Colombo
12 January 2007

By December 2006, upheavals of violence and periods of intense confrontation at local level became a recurring reality.  The Ceasefire Agreement (CFA) is under severe strain.  As none of the signatories have formally renounced their commitment, the CFA is technically still valid and exists as an agreement albeit frequently violated.  But the future outlook gives further reason for serious concern, with the non-state actor publicly stating (November 27) that the peace process was defunct. 

Mid-Year Review of the Common Humanitarian Action Plan (CHAP) for Sri Lanka 2007

Colombo
17 July 2007

CHANGES IN CONTEXT AND HUMANITARIAN CONSEQUENCES

Common Humanitarian Action Plan for Sri Lanka 2008

Colombo
22 February 2008

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Mid-Year Review of the Common Humanitarian Action Plan for Sri Lanka 2008

Colombo
16 July 2008

Mid-Year Review of the Common Humanitarian Action Plan for Sri Lanka 2009

Colombo
21 July 2009

Common Humanitarian Action Plan for Sri Lanka 2009

Colombo
12 February 2009

Sri Lanka Joint Plan of Assistance to the Northern Province (JPA) 2012

Colombo
5 April 2012

Humanitarian Context:

Mid-Year Review of the Common Humanitarian Action Plan for Sri Lanka 2010

Colombo
14 July 2010
Common Humanitarian Action Plan: 30 November 2009

One year after Sri Lanka’s conflict ended, significant progress has been made on releases and returns from camps for internally displaced people (IDPs).  Large-scale efforts are underway to re-establish essential services and livelihoods throughout the former conflict-affected areas in an effort to increase the sustainability of returns.  At the same time, assistance needs to continue for the 60,000 IDPs still in camps, as well as for the 68,000 accommodated with host families, most of whom have limited access to assistance and services. 

FTS links
FTS Homepage
FTS Appeal Page

Lien ReliefWeb
Country Page

Common Humanitarian Action Plan for Sri Lanka 2010

Colombo
30 November 2009

FTS links
FTS Homepage
FTS Appeal Page

Lien ReliefWeb
Country Page

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