Humanitarian Financing

2011 was a particularly difficult year for Eastern Africa, with parts of Somalia, Kenya, Ethiopia and Djibouti struggling to cope with one of the worst crises in recent history. Thousands of people lost their lives and millions their livelihoods as a result of drought and conflict. The world responded en masse when images of starving children entered their living rooms. Close to 3.5 Billion US Dollars were raised for the Horn of Africa Crisis. This is double the amount raised in 2010, when US Dollar 1.7 Billion was raised for humanitarian response.
 
Somalia received the most assistance ( Billion) following the famine declaration in July 2011. The other top two recipients of humanitarian funds were Ethiopia  ( million) and Kenya ( million).

 

EA Country Humanitarian Funding Received in 2011
(x million $)
CERF Funding Received in 2011
(x million $)
Burundi 40 4
Djibouti 41 6.1
Eritrea 8.5 --
Ethiopia 822 46.5
Kenya 644 22.7
Rwanda 12.6 --
Somalia 1,300 53
South Sudan 476 22.8
Tanzania 28 --
Uganda 52 --
TOTAL 3,400 155.1
 
Ethiopia and Kenya also contributed to humanitarian action in the region. They donated and million respectively to support WFP operations in their own countries.   


CERF in Eastern Africa

The UN Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF) has allocated  million in 2011 to Eastern Africa, accounting for 36% of the total CERF allocation worldwide in 2011. CERF contributions in Eastern Africa constitute about 4% of the total funding received in the region in 2011.
 
Heeding the early warning signs of the impending crisis, in February 2011, Humanitarian Country Teams in the region prioritized million in CERF underfunded emergency allocations for drought-related interventions. At the height of the crisis in the second half of the year, another million was provided through CERF’s rapid response window. The food sector was the largest recipient of CERF funding in Eastern Africa, but the fund also supported live saving activities in the nutrition, health and WASH sector and supported the expansion of critical logistical services such as UNHAS during the height of the crisis.
 
Only Kenya and Djibouti are donors to the CERF, with each since the CERF’s inception.