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POLICY DEVELOPMENT

 
 
Policy Development and Studies Branch
 
 
   
Protection of Civilians Project  
 
   
Evaluation and Studies Project  
 
   
Gender Equality Project  

 

Policy Development and Studies Branch


POLICY DEVELOPMENT AND STUDIES BRANCH
Planned Staffing Regular Budget Extra-budgetary Projects Total
Professional
4
10
3
175
General Service
-
6
1
7
Total
4
16
4
24
Staff costs (US$)
718,200
2,412,405
675,058
3,805,663
Non-staff costs (US$)
87,200
536,185
813,826
1,437,211
Total costs (US$)
805,400
2,948,590
1,488,884
5,242,874
Total requested (US$)
 
 
 
4,437,474

NEW YORK
Planned Staffing Regular Budget Extra-budgetary Projects Total
Professional
4
8
3
15
General Service
-
5
1
6
Total
4
13
4
21
Staff costs (US$)
718,200
1,865,042
675,058
3,258,300
Non-staff costs (US$)
87,200
487,595
813,826
1,388,621
Total costs (US$)
805,400
2,352,637
1,488,884
4,646,921
Total requested (US$)
 
 
 
3,841,521

GENEVA
Planned Staffing Regular Budget Extra-budgetary Projects Total
Professional
-
2
-
2
General Service
-
1
-
1
Total
-
3
-
3
Staff costs (US$)
-
547,363
-
547,363
Non-staff costs (US$)
-
48,590
-
48,590
Total costs (US$)
-
595,953
-
595,953
Total requested (US$)
 
 
 
595,953

In support of OCHA’s mission to mobilize and coordinate effective and principled humanitarian action in partnerships with national and international actors, the Policy Development and Studies Branch’s (PDSB) main role and mission is to: provide policy guidance and clarity on humanitarian issues; support effective humanitarian action by being relevant and operationally practical; and support OCHA’s role in the broader humanitarian community.

To achieve this mission, PDSB works to provide policy guidance and clarity on humanitarian issues and to develop policies and tools that improve the effectiveness and accountability of humanitarian action. In doing so, PDSB recognizes that policy support must be relevant and operationally practical in support of OCHA’s role within the humanitarian community.

To develop a humanitarian policy agenda, PDSB identifies emerging humanitarian trends and changes in the humanitarian environment and then works to develop common or harmonized policy positions among humanitarian agencies based on human rights, international law and humanitarian principles. PDSB engages with Member States and the various organs of the UN including ECOSOC, the General Assembly and the Security Council in order to promote greater recognition and application of humanitarian principles. To support the implementation of OCHA’s Strategic Plan and ongoing humanitarian reform initiatives, in 2006 PDSB will focus its efforts to promote the humanitarian agenda in the key areas described below.

To foster strategic and operational coherence, PDSB crafts practical policies, guidance and analytic tools for use in the field by humanitarian practitioners. It also develops aide memoirs and diagnostic tools for political actors, such as Member States and peacekeepers, to use during crisis management to help ensure consideration of key humanitarian concerns. Additionally, PDSB contributes to the development of training to ensure that staff and other actors in emergencies are aware of key humanitarian policies and methodologies and are able to apply them flexibly, but appropriately in varied contexts.

To improve accountability and effectiveness, PDSB initiates and manages a portfolio of reviews and studies for OCHA and its humanitarian partners. The focus of these evaluation activities is to promote not only internal but also sector-wide learning and accountability. Evaluation reports are broadly disseminated and incorporated into new policies, lessons learned document and action plans. In an effort to improve the results-orientation of OCHA, PDSB also assists the field and branches with designing and implementing results-based monitoring and evaluation systems.

As a result of a strategic planning exercise undertakenin mid-2005, PDSB has decided to focus its work in 2006 primarily on the development and implementation of the humanitarian reform initiatives (humanitarian response capacity, humanitarian coordination, humanitarian financing). Other issues that are highly relevant for PDSB’s work in 2006 are humanitarian access, maintaining humanitarian presence and security of humanitarian staff. To promote greater recognition and application of humanitarian principles in the work of the various organs of the UN, PDSB will step up its work during 2006 on the protection of civilians in armed conflict, good humanitarian donorship, and the mainstreaming of gender. The interpretation of international humanitarian law for the UN humanitarian system, civil-military relations, interaction with the International Criminal Court, negotiations with non-state groups, and disaster management/risk reduction are themes that PDSB will address as part of its stewardship within the humanitarian community. PDSB will also focus on better assisting and supporting the field with humanitarian policy guidance and practical advice to support the effectiveness of humanitarian action. In this regard, the Branch will provide direction on sexual exploitation and abuse, integrated missions, transition, gender issues, entry-exit strategies, disaster management, preparedness and risk reduction.

In 2006, PDSB will develop practical guidance and tools in line with two of OCHA’s four strategic priorities for 2006: 1) strengthening coordination support and tools through the development of a pragmatic humanitarian policy agenda in support of greater strategic and operational coherence at internal (field and branches) and external (IASC, donors, regional organizations) levels; and 2) strengthening information management and accountability tools, including financial tracking, assessment of the CAP and assessment of operational and technical gaps and capacity requirements.

Both priorities should contribute to achieving OCHA’s corporate goal of a more efficient, accountable and predictable response. Within these two priorities, and bearing in mind the current humanitarian reform efforts as well as ongoing policy work, PDSB will focus its work on five broad activity areas:

Activities:

  • Establish and/or consolidate partnerships to advance humanitarian policy issues through engagement with UN agencies and NGOs, Member States, intergovernmental bodies and regional organizations to improve understanding and implementation of humanitarian principles and policies.
  • Advance the humanitarian reform process by providing policy guidance and support for the development, implementation and promotion of humanitarian reform initiatives and the Good Humanitarian Donorship initiative.
  • Formulate and implement humanitarian policy by supporting the development of humanitarian policies and guidance both at headquarters and in the field with a special focus on gender-based violence, sexual exploitation, natural disasters and disaster reduction, protection of civilians, integrated missions, sanctions and early recovery.
  • Promote increased accountability and learning through focusing on improving inter-agency assessments, setting-up results-oriented monitoring and evaluation (M&E) systems for OCHA field offices and also for some CAP countries, and undertaking OCHA-specific and inter-agency evaluation activities on critical issues and the effectiveness of the humanitarian response provided.
  • Develop and set-up a reporting mechanism for the protection of civilians in armed conflict in partnership with OCHA field offices, branches, the IASC and ECHA.

Indicators:

  • Number and percent of clusters where PDSB policy guidance has been reflected.
  • The extent to which humanitarian reform proposals have been endorsed by OCHA’s stakeholders.
  • Number and percent of new resolutions that reflect OCHA’s policy position.
  • Number and percent of OCHA 2006 work plans incorporating gender (and other policy) equality issues.
  • Percentage of CAP M&E pilots with functioning strategic monitoring tools.
  • Percentage of adopted evaluation recommendations implemented.
  • Number and percent of field offices with reporting mechanism on protection of civilians in armed conflict.

 


Protection of Civilians Project


PROTECTION OF CIVILIANS PROJECT
Planned Staffing Regular Budget Extra-budgetary Projects Total
Professional
-
-
2
2
General Service
-
-
1
1
Total
-
-
3
3
Staff costs (US$)
-
-
416,177
416,177
Non-staff costs (US$)
-
-
337,192
337,192
Total costs (US$)
-
-
753,369
753,369
Total requested (US$)
 
 
 
753,369

This protection project plays a key role in PDSB’s efforts to support a humanitarian policy agenda and to foster strategic and operational coherence within the Secretariat, the IASC and amongst Member States. This entails enhancing the policy framework for protection of civilians in armed conflict by providing strategic coordination, advocacy and information management support at both headquarters and field level, at the latter in support of the Humanitarian Coordinator.

The growing understanding of the trend of armed conflict increasingly putting civilians at risk, being deliberate targets of violence, and the consequences in terms of human costs has prompted the identification of protection of civilians as a ‘humanitarian imperative’ of international concern. Two Security Council Resolutions on the subject, along with a multi-sectoral ‘Ten Point Platform’ of key issues of concern provide for a solid framework from which to promote humanitarian protection of civilians caught in armed conflict. They include issues such as: humanitarian access to vulnerable populations; effects of conflict on women and children; security for displaced persons and host communities; safety and security for humanitarian and associated personnel; impunity and compliance with international humanitarian, human rights and refugee law; disarmament, demobilization, reintegration and rehabilitation; and the Aide Memoire on Protection of Civilians in Armed Conflict, a diagnostic tool identifying 13 key areas and best practices of responses.

The project aims at creating a broader participation and support for the humanitarian protection of civilians in armed conflict agenda by reaching out to new constituents, developing material and tools and ensuring more effective field support.

Recognizing the regional implications of conflict and the importance of regional and other inter-governmental organizations, the project envisages the establishment of a network of interested organizations to develop joint workshops, trainings, frameworks and tools, such as custom made Aide Memoires.

The field response will further be strengthened through a series of country level workshops involving the national authorities, civil society representatives, UN agencies, including peacekeeping missions where applicable, regional organizations and other inter-governmental organizations, international NGOs and donors. Targeting key countries, the workshops aim at defining country specific policies and strategies that would ensure protection of civilians in armed conflict and post-conflict situations as well as provide the participants with tools to enhance their capacity to respond to protection needs and integrate protection considerations into all aspects of their work.

At the headquarters level, close cooperation with, particularly, the Department for Peacekeeping Operations, the Department for Political Affairs, and other agencies within the IASC framework as well as with the General Assembly, ECOSOC and the Security Council and Member States will continue. The humanitarian protection focused reporting mechanism being developed, to be rolled out to the field during 2006, provides the key organs of the United Nations with information about trends and development in terms of protection issues and will further enhance decision making within the UN system.

Indicators:

  • Number of regional and other inter-governmental organizations that have incorporated protection of civilians elements into their work.
  • Number of Member States incorporating protection of civilians elements into their national policies.
  • Number of field offices with established protection of civilians reporting mechanisms.
  • Number of participants in workshops and training events.

 


Evaluation and Studies Project


EVALUATION AND STUDIES PROJECT
Planned Staffing Regular Budget Extra-budgetary Projects Total
Professional
-
-
-
-
General Service
-
-
-
-
Total
-
-
-
-
Staff costs (US$)
-
-
-
-
Non-staff costs (US$)
-
-
406,800
406,800
Total costs (US$)
-
-
406,800
406,800
Total requested (US$)
 
 
 
406,800

This Project is OCHA’s principal vehicle for achieving greater accountability and improving the effectiveness of humanitarian action. The Project focuses on OCHA-specific evaluations but also works in cooperation with other agencies to promote sector-wide learning and accountability. In 2006, this Project will manage at least seven evaluation activities. These include, on an inter-agency or joint basis, an evaluation of a consolidated appeal (country to be determined), an evaluation of the Human Security Trust Fund, and the wrapping-up and dissemination of a system-wide evaluation of the coordination of the international response to the tsunami. OCHA-specific evaluation activities involve an ongoing review of OCHA’s training and capacity-building programs, a review of ReliefWeb following its redesign in 2005, a series of case studies to examine the Humanitarian Response Funds in several countries and a joint review with the Coordination and Response Division of OCHA’s exit strategies. The Project also plans to assist OCHA field offices, on a demand-driven basis, with the design of self-evaluation and lessons learned reviews as well as functioning as a help desk for monitoring and evaluation (M&E) queries by field staff.

Based on a review of OCHA’s internal monitoring and evaluation practices, which indicated the urgent need for strengthening existing practices, in 2006 the Project will focus on developing an M&E framework for OCHA, developing relevant guidelines and providing staff with training on developing results-oriented planning and M&E systems. Much of this training will be conducted in connection with other training events. At a system-wide level, the Project will support the IASC sub-working group in piloting a strategic monitoring and evaluation tool for the CAP in up to five countries.

Indicators:

  • Percentage of evaluation recommendations implemented at agency and inter-agency levels.
  • Percentage of evaluation reports meeting professional standards (in line with the standards set by the United Nations Evaluation Group).
  • Number and percent of OCHA field offices implementing new M&E modalities.

 


Gender Equality Project


FIELD SUPPORT SECTION
Planned Staffing Regular Budget Extra-budgetary Projects Total
Professional
-
-
1
1
General Service
-
-
-
-
Total
-
-
1
1
Staff costs (US$)
-
-
258,881
258,881
Non-staff costs (US$)
-
-
69,834
69,834
Total costs (US$)
-
-
328,715
328,715
Total requested (US$)
 
 
 
328,715

In 2005, OCHA employed its first senior gender adviser. As a result, OCHA’s policy on gender equality was issued, a review of the achievements in the implementation of OCHA’s 2005 action plan on gender was undertaken and a plan for 2006 was developed. Additionally, a network of OCHA gender focal points was initiated and a gender toolkit was compiled to support OCHA’s implementation of its policy. OCHA’s gender adviser, in tandem with the co-chair of WHO, increased support to the IASC Taskforce on Gender and Humanitarian Assistance, which produced the IASC “Guidelines for Gender-based Violence Interventions in Humanitarian Settings: Focusing on Prevention and Response to Sexual Violence in Emergencies”.

In 2006, this Project will aim to further consolidate the implementation of the policy on gender equality through the full realization of the gender action plan. In order to achieve this, OCHA staff need training on gender issues. The Project will, therefore, undertake the integration of gender concerns into OCHA’s Induction Package and OCHA-supported training efforts such as UNDAC and Emergency Field Coordination Training (EFTC). Additionally a gender equality self-instructional learning programme will be developed to complement the induction.

To support the capacity building of OCHA staff and humanitarian actors, a handbook on gender mainstreaming in humanitarian situations will be produced under the auspicious of the IASC Taskforce on Gender and Humanitarian Assistance. This handbook will provide guidance to field actors on how to undertake gender analysis, give concrete activities to ensure the needs and contributions of women, men, girls and boys are fully addressed and provide indicators to measure gender mainstreaming in an emergency.

The gender adviser will work closely with UN and NGO partners to field-test and provide training on the recently issued IASC Guidelines for Gender-based Violence Interventions in Humanitarian Settings. To support greater advocacy for programmes to address sexual violence in conflict affected countries, the gender adviser will work to support OCHA field offices and Humanitarian Coordinators to strengthen the coordination of multi-sectoral programmes to prevent and respond to sexual and gender-based violence in humanitarian situations.

To articulate the nexus between human rights, protection and gender, an expert group meeting will be held in 2006. This meeting will bring together leaders in each of these fields in order to build a common understanding and an agreed upon framework on the connection between gender, human rights and protection issues. The experts will also provide guidance and recommendations on key priorities for building the capacity of humanitarian actors to ensure complementarity between these three fields of work.

Indicators:

  • Number of OCHA field offices with a gender focal point, action plan and addressing gender issues in annual field workplans.
  • Percent of OCHA training programmes and development of gender equality learning programmes integrating gender issues.
  • Number and percent of CAPs with explicit mention of strategy to prevent and respond to gender-based violence.