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ADVOCACY AND INFORMATION MANAGEMENT

 
 
Advocacy and Information Management Branch
 
 
Advocacy Section
 
 
Information Analysis Section
 
 
Information and Communications Technology Section
 

 

Advocacy Section


ADVOCACY SECTION
Planned Staffing Regular Budget Extra-budgetary Projects Total
Professional
3
6
-
9
General Service
1
3
-
4
Total
4
9
-
13
Staff costs (US$)
635,592
1,526,334
-
2,161,926
Non-staff costs (US$)
39,800
368,945
-
408,745
Total costs (US$)
675,392
1,895,279
-
2,570,671
Total requested (US$)
 
 
 
1,895,279

NEW YORK
Planned Staffing Regular Budget Extra-budgetary Projects Total
Professional
2
4
-
6
General Service
1
2
-
3
Total
3
6
-
9
Staff costs (US$)
428,496
942,976
-
1,371,472
Non-staff costs (US$)
39,800
305,100
-
344,900
Total costs (US$)
468,296
1,248,076
-
1,716,372
Total requested (US$)
 
 
 
1,248,076

GENEVA
Planned Staffing Regular Budget Extra-budgetary Projects Total
Professional
1
2
-
3
General Service
-
1
-
1
Total
1
3
-
4
Staff costs (US$)
207,096
583,358
-
790,454
Non-staff costs (US$)
-
63,845
-
63,845
Total costs (US$)
207,096
647,203
-
854,299
Total requested (US$)
 
 
 
647,203

Advocacy is an indispensable tool for mobilizing political and financial support for humanitarian action. Speaking up on behalf of the civilians affected by disasters and emergencies is at the heart of OCHA’s mandate. To this end, OCHA seeks to create awareness of humanitarian issues among a wide range of audiences with the goal of raising the necessary political and financial support for humanitarian relief and giving voice to the voiceless.

OCHA’s Advocacy and Public Information Section (APIS), located in New York, and the Advocacy and External Relations Section (AERS), located in Geneva, assist and support the Emergency Relief Coordinator, Humanitarian Coordinators and other parts of OCHA in advocating for effective and principled humanitarian action at the global, regional and country levels. Both APIS and AERS promote advocacy on key humanitarian issues and work for the inclusion of humanitarian concerns in UN decisions and communications, as well as with Member States in their decision-making processes. They also ensure regular contacts between OCHA and the media, Member States, NGOs and academic institutions and support other OCHA branches in advocacy to various fora including regional organizations, the UN Security Council and General Assembly and other international and regional bodies critical to successful humanitarian action and response.

OCHA’s first ever corporate advocacy strategy now outlines guiding principles, goals and results, as well as identifying key organizational priorities, including attracting attention to neglected crises, access to and protection of civilians, preparedness and response to natural disasters and strengthening the humanitarian identity. In 2006, APIS will roll-out the strategy, working with other HQ branches and sections, field and regional offices, and selected UN country teams to develop and implement humanitarian advocacy strategies and action plans. This will be done by direct support, as well as by building the capacity of key staff for advocacy work through training and the publication of guidelines and other support materials.

In 2006, APIS and AERS will continue their extensive outreach to international, regional and non-traditional media, as well as their support to the ERC and other senior OCHA officials to advocate for issues of humanitarian concern. This will be done through increasing op-eds on humanitarian issues and interviews with the ERC, other senior OCHA officials, and OCHA public information (PI) officers with major media world-wide. APIS and AERS will similarly continue to provide critical PI support for sudden onset natural disasters and complex emergencies, as was the case in last year’s Indian Ocean Tsunami, Niger, Darfur, the South Asia Earthquake, and the Central American hurricane crises.

APIS will further bolster PI surge capacity through the activation and expansion of OCHA’s first ever PI surge capacity roster, made up of an initial 21 United Nations PI experts from OCHA HQ and field offices, the Office for the Spokesman of the Secretary-General and the UN Department of Public Information. A PI emergency communications portable kit, field guidelines and a policy on administrative procedures for deployment will ensure that emergency PI staff are deployable for periods of up to four weeks. APIS will also finalize memoranda of understanding with selected Member States to ensure longer term PI capacity is available following the initial deployment.

In addition, APIS will finalize an advocacy and PI preparedness and early response model tested initially in Latin America (natural disasters) and West Africa (escalating conflict Côte D’Ivoire) and build on and expand new partnerships with organizations such as the International Peace Academy and selected international NGOs for joint advocacy activities.

Also in 2006, APIS will continue to make OCHA Online a major advocacy platform by exploiting its interactive features to host discussions on humanitarian issues and building on current donor solicitation mechanisms. OCHA Online and other OCHA web platforms will continue to highlight neglected emergencies, emerging crises and natural disasters.

AERS will continue its work with European institutions and European-based regional organizations to promote the coordinating role of OCHA in humanitarian crises, including the implementation of the Humanitarian Response Review. The section will also ensure a structured and regular dialogue with members of the G-77 in Geneva, as well as key partners among the European NGO and academic communities. Partnerships with the private sector will be further strengthened within the overall framework as currently developed.

APIS and AERS will also continue to strengthen and expand advocacy partnerships and support to regional organizations, the private sector, policy-making organizations, INGOs and academic institutions.

Activities:

  • Promote and implement OCHA’s advocacy strategy through briefings, development of support material and guidelines and by working with OCHA HQ entities, field offices and selected UN country teams.
  • Facilitate cooperation between OCHA and regional bodies, including the AU, ECOWAS, the EU Council Secretariat, the Council of Europe, the European Parliament and the CIS.
  • Develop partnerships with European based private companies and foundations as well as World Economic Forum.
  • Promote the use of the field advocacy manual and PI handbook and develop additional templates for information collection and dissemination.
  • Develop joint advocacy messages on natural disasters, complex emergencies and other humanitarian priorities with a broad range of partners and actors, including UN agencies, other UN departments, intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations and the private sector.
  • Support to OCHA field offices, including in arranging media opportunities in conjunction with ERC and other senior OCHA officials’ travel.
  • Support the Office of the Spokesman for the Secretary-General with regular inputs for daily briefings and the drafting of statements by the Secretary-General on humanitarian issues.
  • Conduct extensive media outreach by arranging media opportunities and interviews for the ERC and other senior OCHA officials, op-eds and press releases, and conducting media interviews and information briefings.
  • Conduct expanded outreach with target advocacy communities through speeches by the ERC and other senior officials.

Indicators:

  • Number of requests for interviews and briefings from the ERC, other senior OCHA officials and OCHA’s public information officers.
  • Number of requests from the private sector for contributions/partnerships to the overall UN relief efforts.
  • Increased and timely deployment of PI officers to sudden on-set crises.
  • Increased coverage of neglected emergencies, major natural disasters, complex emergencies and emerging crises by major international and regional media, including those in the Middle East and Africa.
  • Increase in the number and duration of user sessions of OCHA Online.
  • Increase in the number and type of media publications and public information materials produced, including op-eds, press releases, inputs to OSSG, and the number of advocacy campaigns conducted.