OCHA in 2007
Activities and Extra-Budgetary Funding Requirements

Executive Management


 

Implementation of the Humanitarian Reform Initiative


HUMANITARIAN REFORM SUPPORT UNIT

Planned Staffing
Regular Budget
Extra-budgetary
Projects
Total

Professional
4
4
General Service
1
1
Total
5
5

Staff costs (US$)
1,185,201
1,185,201
Non-staff costs (US$)
270,409
270,409
Total costs (US$)
1,455,610
1,455,610

Total requested (US$)
1,455,610


The Humanitarian Reform Support Unit (HRSU) was established in July 2006 to support implementation of all aspects of the reform. The Humanitarian Reform Agenda aims to dramatically enhance humanitarian response capacity, predictability, accountability and partnership. It is an ambitious effort by the international humanitarian community to reach more beneficiaries, with more comprehensive, needs-based relief and protection, in a more effective and timely manner.

OCHA has a unique role to play in driving forward the process of Humanitarian Reform at both the field and headquarters levels. The HRSU focuses on: working with relevant stakeholders to clarify and develop needed policy and operational guidance; managing an effective communications and outreach campaign to all stakeholders; supporting practical field implementation through outreach and training for OCHA field staff, HC/RCs, and agency colleagues; and working closely with other humanitarian reform initiatives, including the CERF Secretariat and Strengthening of the HC System Project.

In addition, HRSU continues to provide the IASC WG and Principals with substantive updates on reform implementation and to identify strategic issues that require decisions and actions.

Following a July 2006 'UN-non UN' meeting, it was agreed that a Global Humanitarian Platform take place annually for three years, and a 'Steering Committee' is working to formulate principles of partnerships and to pilot Humanitarian Community Partnership Teams in three selected countries. Key partners for the HRSU include Humanitarian Coordinators, Country Teams, the NGO community both at field and global level, Global Cluster Leads, the IASC and the donor community.

The diversity within the humanitarian community makes it challenging to conduct outreach to key partners while maintaining momentum, soliciting continued engagement of partners, and ensuring that OCHA takes on the 'stewardship' role initially outlined by the ERC.

Against this background, HRSU's key objectives for 2007 are as follows:

Fully deployed, functioning and funded cluster system: HRSU will facilitate a review of global capacity building in 2006 and ensure the launch of the new Global Cluster Appeal for 2007; regional workshops will be organized based on requests and the results of workshops conducted in 2006. HRSU will deploy support missions to countries upon request, as well as to new emergencies to guide implementation of the cluster approach. Training programmes will be adapted and new ones developed in line with the reform, and practical guidance will be provided to OCHA colleagues, especially regarding implementation at the field level.

Strengthened in-country coordination: HRSU will provide guidance both through missions and from headquarters on the establishment of inclusive humanitarian country teams, as well as on the realignment of coordination structures for countries that are implementing or have yet to implement the cluster system. HRSU will also ensure that training for Humanitarian Coordinators and cluster leads is adjusted in line with humanitarian reform developments, provide advice to senior management on coordination issues, and work within the IASC to resolve issues that may impede the successful implementation of humanitarian reform.

More coherent and sharpened advocacy on humanitarian issues and principles: HRSU will ensure the functioning of a Humanitarian Reform Website and the production of regular newsletters and other communication products. The Unit will also ensure that progress on humanitarian reform is communicated to all stakeholders.

Increased and strengthened partnerships for humanitarian action: HRSU will have adequate measures in place to ensure follow-up to the 'UN-non UN' dialogue meeting of July 2006, including additional preparatory meetings/gatherings to ensure a successful outcome to the second annual meeting to be held in 2007.

Key Indicators for 2007
  • Number of regional and country level cluster workshops conducted; percent of Global Cluster Appeal funded; number of new emergencies responded to by utilizing cluster approach
  • Number of training programmes incorporating new reform elements; extent to which recommendations made by HRSU missions are implemented; percent of field operations with inclusive humanitarian country teams; number of Cluster Coordinators trained
  • Number and average duration of daily hits to HRSU website
  • Number of agreements achieved during 2007 Global Humanitarian Platform

 

Strengthening of the Humanitarian Coordinator System


 

STRENGTHENING OF THE HC SYSTEM

Planned Staffing
Regular Budget
Extra-budgetary
Projects
Total

Professional
2
2
General Service
2
2
Total
4
4

Staff costs (US$)
588,748
588,748
Non-staff costs (US$)
784,220
784,220
Total costs (US$)
1,372,968
1,372,968

Total requested (US$)
0


There is a strong consensus among the humanitarian and donor communities that the humanitarian response system needs to be strengthened. Coordination structures need to be improved to support the more effective delivery of humanitarian assistance during emergencies, stronger strategic planning and better execution of transition and recovery programs. All humanitarian actors agree that the role of the Humanitarian Coordinator (HC) is essential to the success of a humanitarian operation and there is a need to ensure the HC has the necessary knowledge and experience for the task.

A long-term Action Plan on Strengthening the Humanitarian Coordinator System was approved at the IASC Principles Meeting in April 2006. The work necessary in this area was agreed upon by all IASC Members and a group has been established within the IASC to ensure progress in this area. As work on the Action Plan progresses, it has become clear that a more structured support system within OCHA is required to facilitate the IASC dialogue and implement the Action Plan, including the components of induction, training and selection, and to manage the Pool of Humanitarian Coordinators.

Therefore, a Humanitarian Coordinator Support Secretariat (HC Secretariat) will be established to support the evolution and management of the HC Pool and to facilitate other HC strengthening functions at headquarters level. The staff of the HC Secretariat will work in close cooperation with the IASC Secretariat, the OCHA Staff Development and Learning Section (SDLS) and the Humanitarian Reform Support Unit (HRSU). It is envisaged that the staff of the HC Secretariat will be based both in Geneva and in New York and that the HC Secretariat will be of an initial three-year duration.

Against this background, the HC Secretariat's key objective for 2007 is as follows:

Strengthened in-country coordination: The HC Secretariat will focus on selection, induction training and support to HCs and field-based coordination structures through developing and delivering training for HCs and organizing workshops specifically geared toward Resident Coordinators (RCs) on humanitarian and emergency relief issues. The Secretariat will also support a cluster/sector lead component of the training program, to be managed by the HRSU in close consultation with IASC partners and with support from SDLS.

Key Indicators for 2007
  • Number of Resident Coordinators participating in humanitarian and emergency response tools workshops
  • Number of trained HCs in pool; number of HCs ready to deploy
  • Number of people completing coordination training program for HCs, RCs and senior humanitarian and emergency response staff