OCHA in 2007
Activities and Extra-Budgetary Funding Requirements

Emergency Response Coordination


 

Emergency Services Branch


EMERGENCY SERVICES BRANCH

Planned Staffing Regular Budget Extra-budgetary Projects Total

Professional
6
4
13
23
General Service
1
4
7
12
Total
7
8
20
35

Staff costs (US$)
1,116,432
1,131,270
3,263,636
5,511,338
Non-staff costs (US$)
103,300
402,280
2,142,255
2,647,835
Total costs (US$)
1,219,732
1,533,550
5,405,891
8,159,173

Total requested (US$)
 
 
 
6,939,441

The Emergency Services Branch (ESB) is responsible for developing, mobilizing and coordinating the deployment of OCHA's international rapid response capacities to provide assistance to countries affected by natural disasters and other emergencies. ESB manages five major projects: the Field Coordination Support Services (FCSS) Project; the Civil-Military Coordination Section (CMCS) Project; the Logistics Support Unit (LSU) Project; the Environmental Emergencies Section (EES) Project; and the Surge Capacity Section (SCS) Project; each with distinctive mandates and tools for disaster response. ESB also oversees three Units dealing with information management and technology.

The Field Coordination Support Section (FCSS) manages the United Nations Disaster Assessment and Coordination (UNDAC) Team worldwide, acts as the Secretariat for the International Search and Rescue Advisory Group (INSARAG), and for the International Humanitarian Partnership and Asia-Pacific Humanitarian Partnership. The tools and services managed through FCSS are designed to support and enable OCHA to respond quickly and effectively to sudden-onset disasters. The secretariat function for INSARAG has led to a more coherent international search and rescue capacity worldwide.

The Civil-Military Coordination Section (CMCS) is responsible for ensuring appropriate coordination between civilian and military actors and the efficient mobilisation of Military and Civil Defence Assets (MCDA) for use in humanitarian emergencies. CMCS manages the UN Civil-Military Coordination (UN-CMCoord) training programme and coordinates UN Agency participation in major military exercises. It manages the OCHA Central Register of Disaster Management Capacities, with specific maintenance of the MCDA Directory. CMCS is custodian of the "Oslo" and "MCDA" Guidelines detailing the use of MCDA in support of UN humanitarian operations in natural, technological and environmental disasters and complex emergencies respectively.

The Logistics Support Unit (LSU) contributes to inter-agency discussions related to the logistical aspects of emergency relief other than military, such as customs facilitation, emergency sheltering, tracking of in-kind contributions, the setting up of common warehousing and other services, and the provision of in-kind assistance by governments or private donors. LSU is responsible for the timely mobilisation and delivery of emergency relief goods, mainly through the Humanitarian Response Depot (UNHRD) in Brindisi. During large-scale emergencies and disasters, LSU monitors logistics relief operations, issues regular reports on logistics bottlenecks, and provides advice or support on a number of logistics-related issues, in close interaction with UNJLC and the Logistics Clusters established during these emergencies.

The Environmental Emergencies Section (EES) is a collaborative arrangement between OCHA and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). EES is responsible for the rapid mobilization and coordination of emergency assistance to countries affected by disasters including chemical and oil spills, floods, forest fires, hurricanes and earthquakes, and complex emergencies with the potential for significant damage to human life, welfare and the environment. It assists countries to increase their environmental emergency response capacity and serves as Secretariat for the international Environmental Emergencies Partnership.

The Surge Capacity Section was transferred to ESB from CRD during the OCHA realignment exercise in late 2006. The Section mobilizes and coordinates the deployment of OCHA surge capacity resources to countries affected by major disasters/emergencies. It does this when response capacities of OCHA field structures, and those of the UN IASC Country Teams, are exceeded or specialized expertise is required. During the Section's transition, it inherited additional responsibilities, including the management of OCHA's Stand-by Partnership Program, Central Emergency Response Roster and relevant resource coordination and mobilization duties.

ESB also oversees three units in Geneva, which are functionally part of the Advocacy and Information Management Branch (AIMB), namely: ReliefWeb; the Integrated Regional Information Networks (IRIN); and the Information Technology Section.

In 2006, all Sections and tools (FCSS/UNDAC, CMCS/UN-CMCoord, LSU, EES, SCS) were mobilized and deployed in response to humanitarian emergency operations and as part of preparedness efforts. The UNDAC and UN-CMCoord training and exercise programmes expanded their world-wide regional partnerships. ESB also ensured full integration into the Cluster Approach during field deployments and with LSU as OCHA focal point for the Logistics and Emergency Shelter Clusters. Various ESB guidelines were updated and widely disseminated and a new Virtual OSOCC internet page with links to the Global Disaster Alert and Coordination System (GDACS) was launched.


Field Coordination Support Section

FIELD COORDINATION SUPPORT SECTION

Planned Staffing
Regular Budget
Extra-budgetary
Projects
Total

Professional
1
-
4
5
General Service
3
3
Total
1
-
7
8

Staff costs (US$)
135,300
-
1,110,639
1,245,939
Non-staff costs (US$)
577,995
577,995
Total costs (US$)
135,300
-
1,688,634
1,823,934

Total requested (US$)
 
 
 
1,688,634


UNDAC DEVELOPING COUNTRIES DEPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROJECT

Planned Staffing
Regular Budget
Extra-budgetary
Projects
Total

Professional
General Service
Total

Staff costs (US$)
Non-staff costs (US$)
923,380
923,380
Total costs (US$)
923,380
923,380

Total requested (US$)
 
 
 
923,380

The Field Coordination Support Section (FCSS) strengthens the mobilization and coordination capacity of OCHA during the emergency phase that follows a disaster and contributes to OCHA's role in boosting response preparedness in developing countries.

FCSS has four major functions: 1) to manage the UN Disaster Assessment & Coordination (UNDAC) system of international emergency management experts, with regional teams in Africa/Europe, the Americas and Asia-Pacific. UNDAC teams can be deployed within 12-48 hours following a sudden-onset disaster to assist governments in coordinating the international humanitarian response; 2) to act as secretariat for the International Search and Rescue Advisory Group (INSARAG), with regional groupings in Africa/Europe, the Americas and Asia-Pacific, coordinating all international urban search and rescue activities involving collapsed structures. This leads to a more coherent international search and rescue capacity worldwide; 3) to act as secretariat for the International Humanitarian Partnership (IHP) providing technical support modules for humanitarian missions, as well as the Asia-Pacific Humanitarian Partnership (APHP) which provides similar support in that region; and 4) to maintain the Virtual On-Site Operations Coordination Centre (V-OSOCC) which allows for real-time information exchange for emergency managers and provides the platform for the Global Disaster Alert and Coordination System (GDACS), integrating international on-line disaster information management systems under one umbrella.

FCSS maintains the UNDAC system as a primary tool for disaster response coordination, placing particular emphasis on capacity building in disaster-prone countries. FCSS works closely with OCHA Regional Disaster Response Advisors, Regional and Field Offices, and with government and non-governmental partners, to develop the UNDAC system, building awareness of its functions and capabilities, particularly amongst disaster-prone countries, and increasing the quality and diversity of the three regional teams in Africa/Europe, the Americas and Asia-Pacific. Annual induction courses in the three regions bring together emergency managers from different countries and backgrounds with a broad-range of experience and specializations, to be trained in the common methodology of the UNDAC system. Annual refresher courses update their skills. With technical support from the International and Asia-Pacific Humanitarian Partnerships and specialized NGOs such as MapAction and Telecoms sans Frontières, teams can be deployed within 12-48 hours to assist governments of disaster-affected countries to coordinate the international humanitarian response to a major sudden-onset disaster. The value-added component of the UNDAC system has increasingly been recognised by governments and responders alike, resulting in an increasing number of missions and high expectations. FCSS's challenge is to ensure the UNDAC system continues to deliver and is able to meet increasing demands placed upon it as a disaster response coordination tool.

The INSARAG network brings together urban search and rescue teams worldwide to develop common guidelines and methodologies in collapsed structure disasters. The UNDAC system is mandated to provide coordination during such emergencies and the on-line Virtual-OSOCC (On-Site Operations Coordination Centre) provides the primary real-time information exchange among responders. As the secretariat of INSARAG, FCSS strives to ensure adherence to the agreed international guidelines and procedures for deployment and, to that end, organizes international meetings, exercises and training activities within the three regional groupings. These activities have already led to more coherent international search and rescue capacity worldwide. FCSS's challenge is to build both awareness and adoption of the INSARAG guidelines and methodologies among regions, to share lessons learned and adapt practices accordingly, leading to improved response and coordination during international disasters involving collapsed structures.

Against this background, FCSS's key objectives for 2007 are as follows:

Improved tools and services (to adapt to humanitarian reform outcomes: FCSS will ensure the UNDAC system continues to develop in-line with Humanitarian Reform, while also strengthening in-country coordination in sudden-onset disasters so that it is recognised as a value-added component of the international humanitarian response system. Particular emphasis will be on strengthening OCHA's preparedness to respond to sudden-onset disasters and emergencies. UNDAC Standard Operating Procedures and training curriculum of the UNDAC Team will be revised to reflect the cluster approach. Capacity building for disaster prone countries will be emphasized and trainings will be designed to ensure the competent leadership of the UNDAC team on missions. FCSS will continue working on development of the INSARAG network and common standards for international search and rescue with the modification of the virtual OSOCC to serve as a platform for standardized information exchange. GDACS procedures and standards will be developed for disaster information exchange between affected countries and responders and GDACS network of stakeholders will be strengthened, building on the INSARAG network, with priority given to the inclusion of disaster-prone countries.

Increased and strengthened partnerships for humanitarian action: Awareness of the UNDAC and INSARAG systems will be increased, particularly in developing countries. Standby partnerships with new and non-traditional partners will be developed. FCSS will enhance its relationship with the International Humanitarian Partnership (IHP), as well as support the development of the Asia-Pacific Humanitarian Partnership (APHP) and the FCSS partnership with technical NGOs such as Map-Action and Telecoms Sans Frontières. FCSS will ensure increased availability of support modules from the IHP and APHP for technical and human resources to support OCHA in the field in sudden-onset disasters or humanitarian emergencies.

Key indicators for 2007
  • Number and percent of tools (or services) aligned with humanitarian reform priorities
  • Number of potential UNDAC team leaders that have completed the UNDAC Team Leaders training
  • Number of international urban search and rescue (USAR) and humanitarian response actors making use of V-OSOCC for exchange of operational information and coordination of response activities. Use of GDACS and V-OSOCC by international responders and affected countries during disasters and on-line simulation exercises
  • Number and percent of developing countries that are members in UNDAC and INSARAG mechanism; number of stand-by partnerships in place for the provision of temporary personnel; number of IHP/APHP support modules and staff deployed in support of OCHA


Surge Capacity Section


SURGE CAPACITY SECTION

Planned Staffing
Regular Budget
Extra-budgetary
Projects
Total

Professional
1
3
-
4
General Service
-
2
-
2
Total
1
5
-
6

Staff costs (US$)
163,104
763,455
-
763,455
Non-staff costs (US$)
-
238,430
-
238,430
Total costs (US$)
163,104
1,001,885
-
1,164,989

Total requested (US$)
 
 
 
1,001,885

The Surge Capacity Section (SCS) was created initially in the OCHA Coordination Response Division Geneva, to strengthen OCHA's internal ability for rapid deployment to crisis situations and to provide timely support to the OCHA field structures and IASC Country Teams. This decision was taken in response to a steady rise in humanitarian emergencies in numbers, size and complexity, which had often overstretched OCHA's and the international humanitarian system's field capacities, and in response to expectations of and in close consultation with OCHA's main stakeholders. Originally, the main role of the SCS was to support OCHA field structures, Humanitarian/ Resident Coordinators and Country Teams at the sudden onset or intensification of disaster/crisis, which was beyond the capacity of the IASC humanitarian country team, and to provide internal support within OCHA and UN humanitarian agencies headquarters as needed.

The capacity of OCHA and the international humanitarian community to respond quickly and professionally to both disasters and emergencies has been severely tested recently during, for example, the Indian Ocean Tsunami, the food crisis in the Sahel and the Horn of Africa, conflict in DRC, the ongoing Sudan crisis, exceptional hurricane season in the Caribbean region, the South Asia earthquake, Lebanon crisis, and Ethiopia floods. This proliferation of crises required a frequent deployment of the Surge Capacity Section staff to fill key coordination positions (including Indonesia, Niger and surrounding countries, Nepal, South Asia earthquake, Zimbabwe, DRC, Chad, Guinea Bissau); assist in establishing OCHA field offices and hubs or filling critical gaps (Eritrea, Indonesia, Nepal, Sahel countries, Pakistan, Lebanon, Niger, DRC); providing substantive advice to H/RC and UNCT on enhancing coordination mechanisms (Laos, Guinea Bissau, DRC, Zimbabwe, Lebanon, Timor-Leste, Ethiopia); promoting protection work (Sudan, DRC and Côte d'Ivoire); updating and drafting contingency plans (Iran, Nepal, Guinea Bissau, Laos, the Great Lakes Region, Pakistan, Serbia and Montenegro, Kosovo, Zimbabwe); preparing CAP documents (Liberia, Chad, Lebanon) and of course, providing support to CRD geographical desks at headquarters.

Within the framework of the OCHA realignment exercise in late 2006, a decision was taken to strengthen OCHA's surge and emergency response capability. The Surge Capacity Section was transferred from the Coordination Response Division to the Emergency Services Branch alongside OCHA's emergency response services. The Surge Capacity Section took on additional responsibilities, including: OCHA's Stand-by Partnership Programme, Central Emergency Response Roster and relevant response coordination and mobilization.

In 2007, the Surge Capacity Section's emergency officers will continue to be deployed to provide expert humanitarian response mobilization and coordination support for OCHA field structures, UN RC/HCs and IASC Country Teams, to facilitate emergency and preparedness needs assessments, to review capacities of the IASC CT to respond to the emergency, support the development of CAP or Flash Appeals and to provide experienced skills in contingency planning. In addition, the Section will take new responsibilities related to management of OCHA Stand-by Partnership Programmes, OCHA Central Emergency Response Roster and Emergency Response Fund. The Surge Capacity Section aims to address two critical challenges - strengthening in-country coordination and improving the coherence of a single OCHA-wide surge capacity system, including tools and services.

Against this background, the Surge Capacity Section's key objectives in 2007 are as follows:

Strengthened in-country coordination: SCS will focus on strengthened support for the Resident/Humanitarian Coordinators and OCHA field offices. Through the provision of rapid and professional advice, SCS will increase response and preparedness coordination capability of HC/RCs and UNCTs and promote the filling of gaps at the onset of a new crisis or the intensification of an existing crisis.

Improved coherence of surge capacity tools and services (to adapt to humanitarian reform outcomes): SCS will develop procedures and tools to increase the capacity for more uniformed OCHA response capacity that can scale up quickly. SCS will address key issues including the unpredictable and episodic nature of funding, the low priority given to such capacity by some stakeholders, the lack of prescreened qualified personnel, and insufficient preparedness. OCHA needs to review periodically its surge capacity (ideally, after each major crisis). SCS will ensure that OCHA has the capacity for rapid deployment of sufficient numbers of experienced coordination managers, specialized personnel covering all facets of OCHA's mandate, and appropriate operational equipment. It will also provide coordination capacity, logistical, administrative and financial management support.

Key indicators for 2007
  • Number of urgent crises in which SCS staff are deployed within 72 hours
  • Number of requests met by SCS staff in regard to filling critical staffing gaps in OCHA field offices
  • Number of staffing gaps filled through OCHA's Stand-by Partnership Programs

Civil Military Coordination Section


CIVIL MILITARY COORDINATION SECTION

Planned Staffing
Regular Budget
Extra-budgetary
Projects
Total

Professional
7
7
General Service
2
2
Total
9
9

Staff costs (US$)
1,470,948
1,470,948
Non-staff costs (US$)
391,715
391,715
Total costs (US$)
1,862,663
1,862,663

Total requested (US$)
 
 
 
1,862,663

The Civil Military Coordination Section (CMCS) is the focal point within the United Nations system for the efficient mobilisation of Military and Civil Defence Assets (MCDA) for use in humanitarian emergencies and for liaison with governments, international organizations, regional organizations and military/civil defence establishments deploying these assets. CMCS manages and conducts the UN Civil-Military Coordination (UN-CMCoord) training programme as well as pre-deployment training courses for military and civilian actors. It also coordinates UN Agency participation, and participates in major military exercises comprising significant humanitarian scenarios.

The Section is responsible for the overall management of the OCHA Central Register of Disaster Management Capacities, with specific maintenance of the MCDA Directory containing a list of Military and Civil Defence Assets and expertise.

CMCS acts as a facilitator and secretariat to the development of documents involving the broad international humanitarian community and is custodian of the Oslo and MCDA Guidelines detailing the use of MCDA in support of UN humanitarian operations in natural, technological and environmental disasters and complex emergencies. In view of the steady increase in military involvement and use of MCDA in humanitarian emergencies, CMCS ensures broader universal knowledge of UN-CMCoord by advocating for awareness and use of the Oslo and MCDA Guidelines, Field Handbook and IASC Reference Papers in all undertakings, with the UN-CMCoord Training and Exercise programmes as the main conduits.

CMCS works for the full implementation of the UN-CMCoord Officer Deployment Plan to ensure rapid and efficient deployment of well-trained and committed personnel to field operations, to demonstrate its added value as a humanitarian common service and secure ­further contributions of MCDA in case of emergency.

Against this background, CMCS's key objectives for 2007 are as follows:

Improved tools and services: CMCS will identify, mobilize and deploy MCDA in support of humanitarian operations and seek to increase the number of Member States contributing to the Central Register of Disaster Management Capacities/MCDA Directory. It will implement the UN-CMCoord Officer Deployment Plan with the establishment and use of a roster of qualified, trained and experienced candidates, to ensure timely response to requests for UN-CMCoord Officers in humanitarian field operations. It will undertake an internal audit of the Central Register of Disaster Management Capacities to assess user satisfaction, and ensure a formal assessment of UN-CMCoord missions through an established feedback mechanism of field operations and military exercises.

Shared policy positions on civil military coordination: CMCS will seek to ensure adherence to and full use of UN civil-military coordination guidelines, handbooks and reference documents by the humanitarian community in general and by UN-CMCoord Officers in particular.

Increased and strengthened partnerships for humanitarian action: CMCS will strengthen the UN-CMCoord concept through the development of a broader support base for UN-CMCoord training courses and military exercises (regional and national partners).

Key indicators for 2007
  • Number and percent of MCDA requests issued within three hours of receipt
  • Number of additional countries providing MCDA at the disposal of the United Nations through the Central Register of Disaster Management Capacities/ MCDA Directory
  • Number and percent of UN-CMCoord Officers deployed within 48 hours of request to natural disasters and complex emergencies, as a Humanitarian Common Service
  • Number and percent of deployed UN-CMCoord Officers that are fully conversant in the use of existent UN civil-military coordination guidelines, handbooks and reference documents
  • Number and percent of regional and national partners participating in UN-CMCoord training courses and military exercises


Logistics Support Unit


LOGISTICS SUPPORT UNIT

Planned Staffing
Regular Budget
Extra-budgetary
Projects
Total

Professional
1
1
General Service
2
2
Total
3
3

Staff costs (US$)
399,234
399,234
Non-staff costs (US$)
30,962
30,962
Total costs (US$)
430,196
430,196

Total requested (US$)
 
 
 
430,196

The Logistics Support Unit (LSU) coordinates logistics by closely interacting with the United Nations Joint Logistics Centre (UNJLC), and contributes to inter-agency discussions related to the non-military logistical aspects of emergency relief, such as customs facilitation, emergency sheltering, tracking of in-kind contributions, establishing common warehousing and other services, and the provision of in-kind assistance by governments or private donors. As OCHA's focal point for suppliers, it provides logistical support to the field and headquarters, particularly on transport issues. LSU is also responsible for the timely mobilisation and delivery of emergency relief goods, mainly through the management and immediate dispatch of the OCHA stock of basic non-food, non-medical relief items held at the Humanitarian Response Depot (UNHRD) in Brindisi, Italy. Although these stocks are not designed to provide relief in all emergency situations, they can, thanks to the support of the Governments of Italy, Norway and Luxembourg, facilitate the provision of emergency assistance and contribute to filling some of the most outstanding gaps.

During large-scale emergencies and disasters, LSU monitors logistics relief operations, issuing regular reports on logistics bottlenecks and other issues of concern, providing advice and support on logistics-related issues, including necessary relief items, customs concerns, and possible routes for deliveries. This is done in close interaction with UNJLC and the Logistics Clusters established during these emergencies.

Key challenges for LSU in 2007 will include enhanced implementation of the humanitarian reform in the field of logistics and emergency shelter; the development and enrichment of the services provided by LSU and an improved interaction with concerned partners within and outside OCHA. Given the small size of the unit, LSU is heavily dependent on external actors and partners such as UNOG for the procurement of relief items, WFP for the management of the OCHA stocks in the UNHRD and related dispatch arrangements, and UNJLC for the gathering and analysis of logistics information at field level. It is hoped that by early 2007, two additional approved posts will be in place and contribute to alleviating the unit's heavy workload.

Against this background, LSU's key objectives for 2007 are as follows:

Fully deployed, functioning and funded cluster system: LSU will ensure that OCHA is represented in Logistics and Emergency Shelter Cluster discussions.

Improved tools and services (to adapt to humanitarian reform outcomes): Cooperation with concerned partners on common inter-agency logistics projects will be enhanced. LSU will promote awareness on major logistics issues, particularly potential bottlenecks, during major emergencies and facilitate the provision of emergency relief.

Shared policy positions: LSU will work to ensure that common guidelines for emergency shelter assistance are developed.

Strengthened internal communication and transparency: The full structure of LSU will be implemented and awareness about LSU's services will be improved.

Key indicators for 2007
  • Number of countries aware of the "Model Agreements for Customs Facilitation"
  • Number of "Model Agreements" signed with interested Governments
  • Number of complaints received from the field or from donors
  • Number of requests for support for logistics issues received (from within or outside OCHA)
  • Number of policies agreed upon in the revision of the "Shelter after Disaster Guidelines"


Environmental Emergencies Section


ENVIRONMENTAL EMERGENCIES SECTION

Planned Staffing
Regular Budget
Extra-budgetary
Projects
Total

Professional
1
1
General Service
Total
1
1

Staff costs (US$)
282,815
282,815
Non-staff costs (US$)
218,203
218,203
Total costs (US$)
501,018
501,018

Total requested (US$)
 
 
 
501,018

The Environmental Emergencies Section (EES) is the integrated United Nations emergency response mechanism that provides assistance to countries facing environmental emergencies or natural disasters that have significant environmental impacts. EES is a collaborative arrangement between OCHA and the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP).

The Section mobilizes and coordinates urgent assistance to affected countries when specialized expertise is required or national or local capacities are exceeded. The EES assists countries affected by disasters including chemical and oil spills, floods, forest fires, hurricanes, earthquakes, complex emergencies and other crises with the potential for significant damage to the environment, human life and welfare. The EES project focuses in particular on the most urgent and life-threatening environmental aspects of such disasters.

The EES also supports national level response preparedness by helping countries to increase their environmental emergency response capacity. It does so through multi-stakeholder missions, working with countries to assess capacity, provide training and technical advice, and mobilize additional support where needed. Finally, EES provides a secretariat for the international Environmental Emergencies Partnership, which is a catalyst for practical projects that improve dialogue and collaboration between stakeholders.

Lack of internal capacity is the single biggest challenge for EES. The section operates on a skeleton staff of three professionals and has not grown sufficiently to meet increased demands from national governments for its services, nor is it adequately prepared to respond to the increase in multi-country emergencies such as the 2004 hurricanes, the Indian Ocean tsunami, or the Pakistan earthquake.

In the event of a major crisis like Lebanon, or during multi-country emergencies, EES can focus on only one emergency, and activities not related to the disaster must effectively cease. Moreover, a single large emergency can completely exhaust all financial resources. This does not allow for any flexibility or the continuation of important non-emergency projects, nor does it allow for a prudent margin of error in the event of multiple concurrent emergencies. EES is undertaking several initiatives to improve its effectiveness, including the Flash Environmental Assessment Tool. Although these are designed to achieve positive results, they do not address the fundamental need for more staff to enable EES to be fully prepared.

Against this background, EES's key objectives for 2007 are as follows:

Improve tools and services: In collaboration with partners, EES will develop and pilot the Flash Environmental Assessment tool. This tool will be made available to national governments to help identify the environmental impacts of disasters.

Improve response preparedness: EES will develop and pilot a methodology for enhanced environmental emergency capacity building missions. The missions will strengthen the ability of the international system to respond to environmental dimensions of disasters by expanding the number of environmental experts. These experts will be available to assess and act upon the acute environmental impacts of natural disasters.

Improved, publicly profiled analysis of global and country humanitarian trends and issues: EES will ensure that international dialogue related to environmental emergencies is strengthened by the meeting of the international Advisory Group on Environmental Emergencies, a key EES accountability mechanism.

Key indicators for 2007
  • Flash Environmental Assessment tool has been field tested in at least one disaster and results/lessons learned incorporated into tool design by September 2007
  • Number of countries in which the tool for response preparedness has been tested by June 2007
  • Number of additional environmental experts nominated by governments for UNDAC roster who have received induction training
  • Level of satisfaction as expressed through a survey with tools and services provided by EES