OCHA in 2007
Activities and Extra-Budgetary Funding Requirements

policy development


 

Policy Development and Studies Branch


PDSB – CONSOLIDATED

Planned Staffing
Regular Budget
Extra-budgetary
Projects
Total

Professional
4
11
2
17
General Service
-
5
2
7
Total
4
16
4
24

Staff costs (US$)
738,720
2,718,983
588,749
4,046,452
Non-staff costs (US$)
92,300
638,450
823,205
1,553,955
Total costs (US$)
831,020
3,357,433
1,411,954
5,600,407

Total requested (US$)
 
 
 
4,769,387


 

PDSB – NEW YORK

Planned Staffing
Regular Budget
Extra-budgetary
Projects
Total

Professional
4
9
2
15
General Service
-
4
2
6
Total
4
13
4
21

Staff costs (US$)
738,720
2,075,968
588,749
3,403,437
Non-staff costs (US$)
92,300
477,990
823,205
1,393,495
Total costs (US$)
831,020
2,553,958
1,411,954
4,796,932

Total requested (US$)
 
 
 
3,965,912


 

PDSB – GENEVA

Planned Staffing
Regular Budget
Extra-budgetary
Projects
Total

Professional
-
2
-
2
General Service
-
1
-
1
Total
-
3
-
3

Staff costs (US$)
-
643,015
-
643,015
Non-staff costs (US$)
-
160,460
-
160,460
Total costs (US$)
-
803,475
-
803,475

Total requested (US$)
 
 
 
803,475

The Policy Development and Studies Branch (PDSB) has as its main role and mission to provide policy guidance and clarity on humanitarian issues; support effective humanitarian action by being operationally relevant and practical; and support OCHA's role in the broader humanitarian community, particularly its mission to mobilize and coordinate effective and principled humanitarian action in partnership with national and international actors.

In 2007, PDSB will focus on three key areas: developing a humanitarian policy agenda; fostering strategic and operational coherence; and improving accountability and effectiveness.

To develop a humanitarian policy agenda, PDSB identifies emerging trends and changes in the humanitarian environment and then works to develop common or harmonized policy positions among humanitarian agencies based on human rights, international law and humanitarian principles. PDSB engages with Member States and UN bodies including the Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC), the General Assembly and the Security Council, and humanitarian and academic partners in order to promote greater recognition and application of humanitarian principles.

To foster strategic and operational coherence, PDSB crafts practical policies, guidance and analytical tools for use in the field by humanitarian practitioners. It also develops aide memoirs and diagnostic tools for political actors, such as Member States and peacekeepers, to use during crisis management to help ensure consideration of key humanitarian concerns. Additionally, PDSB contributes to the development of training to ensure staff and other actors in emergencies are aware of key humanitarian policies and methodologies and are able to apply them flexibly, and appropriately, in varied contexts.

To improve accountability and effectiveness, PDSB initiates and manages a portfolio of reviews and studies for OCHA and its humanitarian partners. The focus of these evaluation activities is to promote internal and sector-wide learning and accountability. Evaluation reports are broadly disseminated and incorporated into new policies, lessons learned documents and action plans. In an effort to improve the results-orientation of OCHA, PDSB also assists the field and branches with designing and implementing results-based monitoring and evaluation systems.

Against this background, PDSB's key objectives for 2007 are as follows:

Strengthened humanitarian reform through policy guidance: PDSB will provide policy support and guidance materials to the cluster working groups (IASC) and the CERF Secretariat and Advisory Board as well as a guidance note on the modalities of the Humanitarian Community Partnership teams. PDSB will ensure standardized training for OCHA staff and peacekeepers, and the establishment of a roster/surge capacity for policy expertise.

Strengthened in-country coordination: PDSB will ensure the following: two country level protection workshops, four country reviews of integrated missions in relation to humanitarian presence and principles; a review of the effectiveness of the HC training; a mapping study of humanitarian and human rights action to enhance protection; an internal review of OCHA's policy on civil-military coordination and a review paper to enhance relief-development synergies in slow-onset disasters. In support of the CAPs, PDSB will produce new guidelines and training, provide analysis on the reflection of critical policy issues in CAPs, and develop standardized appeal projects for critical issues such as gender and M&E.

Improved, and publicly profiled, analysis of global and country humanitarian trends and issues, including those relevant to IDPs: PDSB will promote the roll-out of the protection information mechanism in three pilot countries, a POC database, and the development of an internal global IDP monitoring and reporting instrument and three country-specific POC/IDP strategies.

Shared policy positions through strengthened partnerships: PDSB will develop policy papers on under-funded crises, targets for low-profile crises, contribute to developing IASC policies on gender, the elderly, and on HIV/AIDS. PDSB will support improved policy dialogue on disasters within existing inter-governmental and inter-agency processes, work with regional organizations on POC; develop country-specific civil military/civil policy guidance, and review the use of military assets.

Greater incorporation of risk reduction into humanitarian strategies: PDSB will develop disaster preparedness indicators and provide policy guidance in this area.

Key Indicators for 2007
  • Percent of PDSB-developed policy recommendations incorporated into humanitarian reform programmes
  • Degree of satisfaction (survey) expressed by key stakeholders with guidelines developed by PDSB
  • World Humanitarian Report concept endorsed by key stakeholders by end 2007
  • Number and percent of partners agreeing to adopt proposed policy positions
  • Adoption of disaster preparedness indicators by IASC by end 2007
OCHA's work on HIV/AIDS in humanitarian action

75% of the global burden (38.8 million) of HIV infection is found in countries affected by complex and protracted crises. OCHA is focusing on mainstreaming into humanitarian programmes actions that address HIV, concentrating on three areas of concern:

  • Complex Emergencies: Advocating for, and providing coordination support to help ensure that populations in emergency settings are able to access HIV prevention, care and treatment services.
  • Protracted Emergencies: Ensuring linkages between humanitarian action to address acute needs and development programs to address chronic needs.
  • Sudden onset disasters: Integrating HIV considerations, as required, in emergency response to reduce risk of increased HIV susceptibility and AIDS vulnerability.

In late 2006, OCHA engaged its first HIV/AIDS Advisor to help define OCHA's role in the global fight against HIV and to develop policies and tools to guide OCHA HQ, regional and country activities. In 2007, OCHA and UNAIDS are committed to developing a strategic framework for the coordination of HIV support in emergency settings. OCHA will also develop an HIV workplace program for OCHA staff.

 


Protection of Civilians Project


PROTECTION OF CIVILIANS PROJECT

Planned Staffing
Regular Budget
Extra-budgetary
Projects
Total

Professional
-
-
1
1
General Service
-
-
1
1
Total
-
-
2
2

Staff costs (US$)
-
-
278,550
278,550
Non-staff costs (US$)
-
-
340,695
340,695
Total costs (US$)
-
-
619,245
619,245

Total requested (US$)
 
 
 
619,245

The protection of civilians in armed conflict remains a central part of the Policy Development and Studies Branch (PDSB) efforts to support the humanitarian policy agenda and foster strategic and operational coherence within the Secretariat, the IASC and Member States.

Increasingly, many crises around the world can be described as protection crises, characterized less by dire emergency need and more by violations of human rights and attacks against civilian populations. The protection of civilians in armed conflict is a 'humanitarian imperative' that remains a principal international concern. On behalf of the humanitarian community, the Emergency Relief Coordinator continues to brief the Security Council on a six month basis with a Secretary-General's report submitted every 18 months. In 2006, a third thematic resolution on the protection of civilians in armed conflict was adopted by the Security Council, complementing two prior resolutions and strengthening the overall protection framework. In 2007, the Protection of Civilians Project will focus on strengthening the implementation of these resolutions and enhancing protection response to safeguard civilians caught in conflict. The Ten Point Platform of key issues of concern, presented to the Security Council in December 2003, remains relevant today and will continue to provide a solid basis on which to promote the protection of civilians in armed conflict. The Project will also engage more closely with the Member State Support Group and members of the Security Council to develop a clearer strategy for engaging Member States to advance the protection agenda.

In 2007 the project will continue to encourage broader participation and support for the humanitarian protection of civilians in armed conflict by reaching out to new constituents, principally regional and other inter-governmental organizations, and developing guidance and tools to ensure more effective field support.

A workshop is planned for early 2007, to consolidate the consultative network of regional organizations already established, and set the agenda for establishing a common set of standards for regional organizations on the protection of civilians in armed conflict.

In collaboration with other partners and country teams, work will also continue on strengthening field response through country level workshops. In 2006 a roundtable session on the peacekeeping mission in Côte d'Ivoire was convened, followed by a protection of civilians workshop. This approach will continue to be applied in 2007 with a possible focus on Afghanistan. The country workshops aim to bring together national authorities, representatives of civil society, international NGOs, UN Agencies, peacekeeping missions, regional organizations, and donors. With a country focus, the workshops aim to define country policies and strategies to strengthen the protection of civilians in post-conflict situations as well as provide participants with tools to enhance their capacity to respond to protection needs and integrate protection considerations into all aspects of their work.

Against this background, the Protection of Civilians Project's key objectives for 2007 are as follows:

Shared policy positions (in pursuit of a common humanitarian understanding and messaging): Emphasis will be placed on strengthening protection response and implementation of already developed protection frameworks. A policy instruction on protection has been formulated for OCHA field offices and efforts will be made to ensure that all OCHA offices receive sufficient guidance and have the capacity to support the work of the protection cluster at the field level.

More coherent and sharpened advocacy on humanitarian issues and principles: The project will work with DPKO and IASC colleagues to develop clearer guidance on the role of peacekeepers and other actors in peacekeeping missions. It will also work closely with Member States to strengthen the implementation of the protection of civilians Security Council resolutions by mobilizing the Member States Support Group on the Protection of Civilians in Armed Conflict. Emphasis will also be placed on updating and promoting the use of existing tools such as the Aide Memoire.

Improved, and publicly profiled, analysis of global and country humanitarian trends and issues: The project will continue developing an enhanced information mechanism on the protection of civilians in armed conflicts. Stronger links will be made with academic institutions and the focus will be placed on rolling out a basic methodology to enhance information gathering on protection related issues. This will complement existing mechanisms already established at the field level and will be developed in line with IASC's information management strategy.

Key Indicators for 2007
  • Number of advocacy events on the protection of civilians in armed conflict held in collaboration with NGOs & Member States
  • Number of Regional Organisations engaged in the Protection of Civilians Consultative Network
  • Number of OCHA field offices with established protection of civilians reporting mechanisms

 


Evaluation and Studies Section Project


EVALUATION AND STUDIES SECTION

Planned Staffing
Regular Budget
Extra-budgetary
Projects
Total

Professional
-
-
-
-
General Service
-
-
-
-
Total
-
-
-
-

Staff costs (US$)
-
-
-
-
Non-staff costs (US$)
-
-
411,885
411,885
Total costs (US$)
-
-
411,885
411,885

Total requested (US$)
 
 
 
411,885

The Evaluation and Studies Section Project (ESS) is responsible for the management of a portfolio of evaluations and reviews, including lessons learned. These are undertaken on cross-cutting, thematic and country-specific issues and, at times, are conducted in collaboration with other UN agencies and members of the IASC. The ESS also contributes to corporate reporting (e.g. Annual Report, UN report, ECOSOC reporting) and is the depository for institutional learning.

The Section strives to balance the systematic planning of on-going evaluation initiatives which are expected to contribute to OCHA-wide learning and increased organizational effectiveness, with the ad-hoc planning of unforeseen initiatives that require a timely response, such as real-time evaluations. The work plan therefore must remain flexible to allow for additional evaluation activities and the re-prioritization of activities when necessary. The ESS also seeks to strengthen OCHA-specific and system-wide monitoring and evaluation (M&E) systems capacity but faces major challenges related to field and headquarter capacity and lack of effective data coming out of emergency settings. This challenge can only be addressed by a system-wide effort and collaboration, which ESS is spearheading. Finally, institutional knowledge learning and sharing is not systematized and easily accessible to all staff. The ESS therefore needs to work in collaboration with other parts of OCHA as well as agency partners to build internal and external knowledge sharing networks.

Against this background, ESS's key objectives for 2007 are as follows:

Strengthened implementation of humanitarian reform: ESS will conduct two external reviews of the CERF and the cluster approach, an internal review of UNDAC and two inter-agency evaluations; a consolidated appeal with focus on tools and humanitarian reform issues; and participation in a system-wide evaluation by the UN Evaluation Group (UNEG) on the overall UN's performance in Uganda. OCHA's role here will be to ensure that humanitarian issues, including those related to the reform, are addressed by this system-wide evaluation.

Improved tools and services: ESS will focus on the development of a standardized M&E component for flash appeals and consolidated appeals, the setting-up of an M&E surge capacity; the piloting of the CAP strategic monitoring and evaluation tool in three countries, and a CAP evaluation.

More coherent and sharpened advocacy on humanitarian issues and principles: ESS will ensure the recommendations made in the synthesis report of the Tsunami Evaluation Coalition (TEC) are promoted and discussed at the appropriate fora, leading to implementation. Together with IASC partners, ESS will be co-organizing a West African meeting of ALNAP (Active Learning Network for Accountability and Performance in Humanitarian Action) to bring together various partners to discuss critical issues for the region.

Improving management practices: ESS will organize at least two systematic and focused internal lesson learning reviews (LLRs) of new large-scale emergency responses. It will conduct follow-ups and trend-reviews on the implementation of previous LLRs.

Key indicators for 2007
  • Number and percent of evaluation recommendations that are implemented
  • Number and percent of new CAPs and Flash Appeals that contain the new standardized M&E component
  • Number of agencies that have agreed to implement TEC recommendations
  • Percent of lesson learning review implementations that are implemented

 


Gender Equality Project


GENDER EQUALITY PROJECT

Planned Staffing
Regular Budget
Extra-budgetary
Projects
Total

Professional
-
-
1
1
General Service
-
-
1
1
Total
-
-
2
2

Staff costs (US$)
-
-
310,199
310,199
Non-staff costs (US$)
-
-
70,625
70,625
Total costs (US$)
-
-
380,824
380,824

Total requested (US$)
 
 
 
380,824

The Gender Advisory Team of OCHA (GAT) is responsible for mainstreaming gender concerns into OCHA's core mandate and supporting the implementation of OCHA's Policy on Gender Equality and its supporting Plan of Action. Facilitating gender mainstreaming throughout the IASC, including in all aspects of the humanitarian reform, is a major area of concentration for OCHA's Gender Equality Project.

In 2006, OCHA led the IASC through the development of a Five Point Strategy to strengthen gender mainstreaming in humanitarian action. The first initiative of this strategy - the development of gender standards - drove the production of the IASC Gender Handbook for Humanitarian Action: Women, Girls, Boys and Men, Different Needs - Equal Opportunities. The IASC Gender Handbook lays the foundation for updating the IASC's policy on gender equality in 2007 and provides sector-specific guidance to humanitarian actors on how to mainstream gender issues into humanitarian action.

In 2007, OCHA will report on progress made implementing its gender action plan 2005-2006, and will put together a 2007-2008 plan encompassing OCHA's field and headquarters offices. This new gender action plan will place particular focus on strengthening OCHA's support to mainstreaming gender issues as a cross-cutting theme in cluster approach as well as enhancing partnership building between and among all humanitarian actors.

Against this background, GAT's key objectives for 2007 are as follows:

Improved tools and services: The GAT will ensure that the Handbook on gender standards is rolled out to the field. It will be translated into Arabic, French, Russian and Spanish and accompanied by a CD-Rom with related resource materials. The Handbook will provide indicator checklists to measure the implementation of gender mainstreaming in an emergency. The GAT will also promote the deployment of gender advisors in emergencies. This initiative will develop a ready pool of trained gender experts to be deployed to a humanitarian crisis on short notice. These experts could be deployed as an "inter-agency" gender advisor providing gender expertise to Humanitarian Coordinators or as agency specific gender advisors. The gender pool will be trained on how to facilitate gender mainstreaming in a humanitarian situation.

Greater engagement and coordination with national and international NGOs: The GAT will promote capacity building of humanitarian actors on gender issues through the development of an e-learning interactive training course similar to the UN Basic Security Training. Because a majority of humanitarian actors never receive training or are deployed to an emergency with short start-up times, a CD-Rom or internet-based learning course on gender would enable staff to learn gender basics and how to operationalise gender concerns in emergencies. The Gender Learning Programme could be used by all partners as a basic entry-level training. The Gender Handbook will provide the foundation for this effort. The GAT will also build partnerships for increased predictability of gender programming in crisis. When Flash Appeals or CAPs are prepared gender issues are not always included. More concerted effort is needed to create a programmatic approach which includes projects that incorporate gender concerns and in some cases are specific efforts to support women/girls. Consultations with NGO partners will be held to prepare project "templates" and agree on standards to incorporate gender activitities in funding appeals.

Strengthened in-country coordination: The GAT will promote the use of sex & age disaggregated data for decision-making. Many Security Council and Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) resolutions call for the disaggregation of data by age and sex, although this does not often happen. A more convincing argument is needed as well as more practical guidance to decision-makers at field and HQ levels in order to demonstrate how data disaggregated by age and sex is more effective in understanding populations affected by crisis and to what degree women's, men's, boys' and girls' needs are being met in an emergency. A thorough review of recent emergency responses will be undertaken to determine the use of sex and age disaggregated data for decision making. This combined with solid examples of how data - both disaggregated and not - makes a difference in the way a humanitarian situation is understood, will be presented in a user-friendly tool for Humanitarian Coordinators and others.

Key Indicators for 2007
  • Percentage of OCHA field offices with gender action plans and report on annual implementation
  • Percentage of OCHA offices supporting the creation of gender networks in the field and supporting them to use and roll out the IASC Gender Handbook
  • Establishment of the Gender Roster in 2007; number of gender advisors deployed