FIELD OFFICES - ASIA

Field Offices - Asia (map)

Indonesia (map)

Between January and August 2007, Indonesia experienced 252 earthquakes at 5.0 or higher on the Richter scale. Other natural and man-made hazards, such as tsunamis, flash floods, mudslides, forest fires and droughts – along with the large population of 245 million unevenly distributed across the country – regularly lead to civilian casualties, population displacements, loss of livelihoods, property destruction and environmental damage. Indonesia has also recorded the largest number of avian influenza cases and deaths in the world, and the threat of human-tohuman transmission of the disease leading to a pandemic continues to be of concern.

Planned Staffing  
Professionals
3
National Officers
4
General service
4
United Nations Volunteers
1
Total
12
   
Total Costs  
Staff Costs
883,283
Non-Staff Costs
363,238
Total Requested (US$)
1,246,521

OCHA Indonesia will focus throughout 2008 on strengthening the preparedness and response capacities of the United Nations Country Team, the wider humanitarian community and relevant Government authorities. OCHA will continue to be instrumental in facilitating the provision of assistance to affected communities through donor-funded Emergency Response Fund (ERF) grants to NGOs. An inter-agency contingency plan for the country, prepared in early 2007, incorporated the cluster approach as its main response mechanism. With the enactment of a new Disaster Management Law, Indonesia has widened the spectrum of actors that need to be involved in disaster response, and this should result in the creation of a revamped disaster management agency for which OCHA will continue to be a key player in supporting and coordinating major inputs from the international community. During 2008, OCHA will expand its support to localized contingency plans and continue to monitor the situation across the country at a time when many ongoing humanitarian challenges persist, including: a hot mud volcano (active since May 2006) which has already displaced more than 13,000 people in East Java; unresolved population displacement and an incomplete recovery process in Maluku; volatility and insecurity in Central Sulawesi; humanitarian concerns in Papua; and pockets of malnutrition and poverty in other disaster-prone areas.

Key Objectives, Outputs and Indicators

A predictable and needs-based humanitarian financing system
Outputs Indicators
Use of CERF and ERF funds maximized to meet needs in a timely manner. Donors approached to support humanitarian activities, with particular focus on non-traditional donors. United Nations Agencies’ ability to respond to disasters effectively through the use of the cerf facilitated. Number of ERF projects approved. Number of NGOs implementing erf-funded activities. Number of donors providing in-kind or financial contributions.

Improved coordination structures at country, regional and international levels
Outputs Indicators
Global Humanitarian Platform initiatives at the country level supported and advocated for. Involvement of national and international NGOs in coordination mechanisms strengthened. Cluster approach implemented in the outbreak of new emergencies and disasters requiring international assistance. Number of workshops and level of attendance. number and decision-making level of NGOs participating in humanitarian discussions, planning, strategy development and assessments. Number and percentage of clusters implemented in new emergencies.

Greater incorporation of disaster risk reduction approaches and strengthened preparedness in humanitarian response
Outputs Indicators
Inter-agency contingency plan prepared and reviewed regularly. Development of contingency plan with Government counterparts supported at local levels. Cluster preparedness planning promoted among humanitarian stakeholders. Government supported in the training of contingency plan facilitators. Number of districts or provinces with contingency plans developed and updated. Number of contingency plan facilitators trained.

More strategic advocacy of humanitarian principles and issues
Outputs Indicators
Trainings and workshops on humanitarian reform, the Global Humanitarian Platform, international humanitarian law, civil–military coordination, gender mainstreaming in humanitarian situations, and capacity building delivered to local implementing parties, Government bodies and staff. Number of workshops conducted on related issues. Number of participants in workshops. Number of contingency plans and preparedness measures in place.

Strengthened information management based on common standards and best practices
Outputs Indicators
Capacity of Government institutions to respond to disasters and emergencies based on strengthened information management reinforced. Clusters in a specific emergency supported on information management issues. Information management products developed and in use for analysis. Information management support provided to Government partners. Percentage of OCHA staff time devoted to information management support to clusters.

 

Nepal (map)

The signing of the Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) between the Government of Nepal and the Communist Party of Nepal-Maoist (CPN-Maoist) on 21 November 2006 was the culmination of a year-long process of negotiation and the result of a successful ‘people’s movement’ that brought King Gyanendra’s 14 months of direct rule to an end in April 2006. Despite the CPA, the peace process faces major challenges. The interim Government is hampered by inter-party fighting following the withdrawal of the CPN-Maoist, leading to critical issues remaining unaddressed – including many related directly to the peace process such as the return of internally displaced persons (IDPs) and security sector reform. Elections were postponed twice and they are yet to be rescheduled in 2008.

A number of new armed groups have emerged that see themselves as marginalized from the peace process, notably the Terai-based groups in the southern part of the country. This new violence has increased inter-ethnic and religious tensions, leading to numerous deaths and cases of displacement. Local government institutions, which had gradually re-established themselves in much of the country following the signing of the CPA, have again been forced out of parts of some Terai districts because of insecurity.

Planned Staffing  
Professionals
5
National Officers
7
General service
15
United Nations Volunteers
-
Total
27
   
Total Costs  
Staff Costs
1,373,529
Non-Staff Costs
555,508
Total Requested (US$)
1,929,037

The humanitarian situation is characterized by food insecurity and chronic malnutrition, poor health indicators, IDPs, lack of protection, children associated with armed groups, refugees, landmines and the potential for natural disasters. There is an ongoing need for coordination and preparedness in the event of humanitarian consequences of further violence and major natural disasters. Efforts to address humanitarian needs are often hampered by access challenges.

OCHA will continue to work with United Nations Agencies, the United Nations Mission in Nepal, the Government of Nepal, donors and international and local NGOs to support common planning exercises for transition, contingency planning and disaster response. Sub-offices in Biratnagar and Nepalgunj facilitate local information gathering and sharing as well as coordination and advocacy activities to improve operational space, protection of IDPs and disaster preparedness and mitigation.

Key Objectives, Outputs and Indicators

Improved coordination structures at country, regional and international levels
Outputs Indicators
Sector/cluster operational plans and rapid response capacity developed. Disaster management team expanded to include Government and NGO representatives. Number of sector/cluster operational plans developed. Number of disaster management team action points followed up.

Greater incorporation of disaster risk reduction approaches and strengthened preparedness in humanitarian response
Outputs Indicators
Systems for early warning established and maintained. Inter-agency contingency plans updated. Access, security and displacement monitored with partners. Actor mapping and scenario building updated. Number of simulation exercises held.

A strategy enabling seamless transition and early recovery
Outputs Indicators
Transition strategy developed and agreed upon with Government, United Nations Agencies and donors by mid year. Number of OCHA activities conducted with local partners. Early recovery components incorporated into planning process.

Action-oriented analysis of humanitarian trends and emerging policy issues
Outputs Indicators
Interactive context-mapping products and monitoring tools developed, where appropriate in partnership with the World Food Programme (Vulnerability Analysis and Mapping field monitors). Situation updates and thematic reports disseminated widely. Number of monthly maps on security, access, strikes and blockades produced. Number of thematic maps and reports generated (with the World food Programme). Number of OCHA situation and thematic reports produced. Number of report recipients.

More strategic advocacy of humanitarian principles and issues
Outputs Indicators
Information sharing on access and operational space increased. Advocacy and negotiation for access and operational space continued. Number of networks and agencies regularly sharing information on operational space. Access to some of the previously ‘difficult’ areas secured.

 

Sri Lanka (map)

In 2008, the context in Sri Lanka will continue to be characterized by a highly politicized, protracted complex emergency, which has endured for over 25 years. At the same time, the country is prone to natural disasters, including periodic devastating monsoon floods and the potential for another tsunami. During 2006–07, the country’s recovery from the 2004 tsunami was hampered in the north and east by recurrent fighting and violence that will continue to impact negatively on populations, exacerbating the humanitarian situation in the coming year.

Although hostilities in 2007 remained localized, non-compliance with the 2002 Ceasefire Agreement, as well as statements by both the Government and the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam (LTTE), foreshadows a continuation and indeed worsening of the conflict in the north. Military operations in eastern Sri Lanka during the first half of 2007 resulted in new displacements, peaking at 160,000 in April. By late 2007, over 100,000 internally displaced persons (IDPs) were able to return home with the support of humanitarian and early recovery organizations. Despite some improvement in the security situation in the east, social tensions and security challenges are expected to continue, impeding progress towards peace and stability.

In 2008, the international aid community, including OCHA, will complement Government efforts to address humanitarian needs, facilitate early recovery programmes and continue to advocate for the protection of vulnerable civilians – in particular IDPs and children. The context for humanitarian work remains difficult, and there is a need to establish greater mutual trust and confidence with the Government.

The IASC Country Team, which is the established and recognized structure for in-country humanitarian coordination in Sri Lanka, includes representatives of all international stakeholders as members, standing invitees or observers. The Consultative Committee for Humanitarian Assistance (CCHA) and its five sub-committees also ensure coordination with the Government.

Planned Staffing  
Professionals
11
National Officers
-
General service
41
United Nations Volunteers
-
Total
52
   
Total Costs  
Staff Costs
2,570,764
Non-Staff Costs
835,085
Total Requested (US$)
3,405,849

In 2008, OCHA Sri Lanka will continue to provide wide-ranging support to the United Nations Resident Coordinator/Humanitarian Coordinator (RC/HC), the United Nations Country Team and the IASC Country Team, as well as to United Nations focal points in the districts, through a field office in Colombo and six sub-offices. It also acts as the Secretariat of the IASC Country Team.

Key Objectives, Outputs and Indicators

Improved coordination structures at country, regional and international levels
Outputs Indicators
Strategic IASC response plans (Common Humanitarian Action Plan, Contingency Plan) prepared, endorsed by Government and implemented. Support to the RC/HC and United Nations focal points provided. Established and ad hoc coordination mechanisms in the field and at the national level maintained. Full range of regularly updated information products provided to stakeholders. Cooperation with Government authorities strengthened through increased liaison. Number of sub-offices staffed and providing coordination support to the humanitarian community. Number of updated information products disseminated on a regular basis. strategic response plans agreed to and implemented.

More strategic advocacy of humanitarian principles and issues
Outputs Indicators
Compliance with the Guiding Principles on Internal Displacement, other humanitarian principles and laws ensured. Number of information brochures and leaflets disseminated. Number of trainings and meetings on humanitarian principles held for local authorities, the military, civil groups and NGOs. Systematized reporting on non-adherence to the Guiding Principles on Humanitarian Operations in place and followed up at ccha, with violations registered/ documented.

A common approach to needs assessments and impact evaluation
Outputs Indicators
Database of assessments established that will serve as a ‘survey of surveys’. Programme Coordination Team operational gap matrix regularly updated. Inter-Agency Steering Committee on assessments established in Sri Lanka with OCHA in the lead. Tools developed to better monitor humanitarian deliveries. Number of assessments recorded in the survey of surveys. Number of times the Programme Coordination Team matrix is distributed, updated and issues/gaps resolved. Number of inter-agency assessments performed. Number of tools developed and endorsed at the country level.

 

Timor-Leste (map)

In September of 2002, after over 400 years of occupation, the Democratic Republic of Timor-Leste became a United Nations Member State. In April and May 2006, renewed violence erupted in Dili with violent clashes and massive population displacements – prompting an urgent need for emergency response coordination and the assistance of international peacekeeping forces. In late August 2006, a new United Nations Integrated Mission in Timor-Leste (UNMIT) was established.

Timor-Leste is a country in transition. Following presidential elections in April 2007 and parliamentary elections in June, the country’s political leadership has been realigned, and changes in the composition of the Government present some challenges to stability. Following the announcement of the new Constitutional Government in early August, security conditions deteriorated largely in the country’s eastern half, with hundreds of houses burned and attacks carried out on the United Nations and international aid workers and facilities.

Planned Staffing  
Professionals
3
National Officers
-
General service
3
United Nations Volunteers
1
Total
7
   
Total Costs  
Staff Costs
383,635
Non-Staff Costs
211,762
Total Requested (US$)
595,397

The humanitarian situation is currently characterized by the prolonged displacement of an estimated 100,000 people (10 per cent of the population). The solution to the internally displaced person (IDP) situation is highly dependent on lasting political stability and dialogue, an enabling environment for institutional and legal reforms, development opportunities, and law and order. Addressing these issues in order of priority, including appropriate socialization and public communication processes, will pave the way for durable solutions. At the same time, the humanitarian community will identify patterns of food insecurity among populations in IDP camps and neighbouring communities in order to develop appropriate intervention strategies. There is a general consensus that the policy framework needs to shift from a culture of assistance to one of national accountability, and from emergency aid to recovery and development.

It was initially intended that OCHA would hand over its responsibilities to UNMIT and UNDP by June 2007; however, given the sustained humanitarian needs and on strong recommendation from the Deputy Special Representative of the Secretary-General/Humanitarian Coordinator among other factors, in March 2007 it was decided that OCHA would maintain a limited presence in Timor-Leste into 2008 in support of the UNMIT Integrated Humanitarian Unit. Although OCHA’s actual withdrawal will depend on the evolution of the situation on the ground, OCHA’s mid-year review and the capacity of the Government, the United Nations system, humanitarian partners, the private sector and civil society to absorb residual humanitarian challenges, OCHA Timor-Leste’s strategic priorities have been planned around a phasing down and handing over of responsibilities.

Key Objectives, Outputs and Indicators

A predictable and needs-based humanitarian financing system
Outputs Indicators
Humanitarian financing mechanisms implemented and managed according to needs (Consolidated Appeals Process, Transitional Appeal, CERF) in coordination with the international compact and the United Nations Development Assistance Framework – supporting residual emergency funding requirements and promoting integrated planning for recovery. Percentage of appropriate financing mechanisms submitted and launched.

Strengthened OCHA emergency response capacity
Outputs Indicators
OCHA’s operational contingency plan for surge deployments and logistics support after OCHA’s withdrawal established. Contingency plan endorsed by relevant OCHA stakeholders.

A strategy enabling seamless transition and early recovery
Outputs Indicators
Coordination support mechanisms handed over to relevant partners. Policy decisions related to recovery and transition are brought to the attention of, and receive feedback from, senior management (OCHA headquarters and the Resident Coordinator/Humanitarian Coordinator). Benchmarks for OCHA’s exit established and met. an agreement for joint strategic planning and handover of OCHA’s functions reached. Percentage of support coordination mechanisms handed over to partners. Number of policy decisions made on recovery and transition. Percentage of benchmarks met.

Strengthened information management based on common standards and best practices
Outputs Indicators
Strategy developed and benchmarks established for the handover of information management functions to relevant partners. Strategy agreed to and benchmarks met.