Haiti: US$231 million needed for 2012, as people continue to cope with aftermath of earthquake, storms and cholera

1 December, 2011
Port-au-Prince, Haiti (12 Aug 2010) - Residents remove rubble from their collapsed house in the area of Delmas 32. UN Stabilization Mission in Haiti is working in cooperation with international and national agencies in order to clear roads that are been blocked by piles of rubble around Port au Prince. Credit: MINUSTAH/Marco Dormino
Port-au-Prince, Haiti (12 Aug 2010) - Residents remove rubble from their collapsed house in the area of Delmas 32. UN Stabilization Mission in Haiti is working in cooperation with international and national agencies in order to clear roads that are been blocked by piles of rubble around Port au Prince. Credit: MINUSTAH/Marco Dormino

Almost two years after the devastating earthquake of January 2010, Haiti is showing signs of progress, but hundreds of thousands of people still need help, the UN’s Humanitarian Coordinator (HC) Nigel Fisher has warned.

Speaking to reporters in New York and Geneva ahead of the 2012 appeal launch for Haiti, Mr. Fisher said investment in recovery efforts and long-term development were the solution to many of the problems the country faces today.  

These efforts, however, “take time and the humanitarian crisis is not yet over,” Mr. Fisher said, highlighting a number of critical challenges still facing in the country.

Over half a million people still live in camps for the internally displaced, making them vulnerable to new natural disasters such as hurricanes and floods.  

Within the last two years, a cholera epidemic claimed more than 6,700 lives, and rising food and fuel prices have threatened hundreds of thousands of Haitians with malnutrition and economic hardship.

Next year, US$231 million will be required to address immediate unmet needs and carry out longer-term projects. More than $53 million will go towards providing better shelter and managing existing camps. Health, sanitation and hygiene projects will require some $68 million to carry out life-saving prevention and vaccination campaigns.    

Haiti’s progress needed to be put in context, Mr. Fisher added. For example, almost 50 percent of the earthquake debris, equivalent to five million cubic metres, had been cleared in two years. By contrast, it took more than five years to remove 1.3 million cubic meters in Aceh, following the 2004 tsunami.  

While half a million people still live in camps, that marks a two-thirds reduction since the height of displacement immediately following the earthquake.

The 2012 Consolidated Appeals Process (CAP) for Haiti and several other countries will be officially launched in Geneva on 14 December 2011.

More>>  Download the Appeal document (PDF)

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