Pakistan: Rebuilding the lives of displaced families

5 June, 2012
SHID provides vaccination for livestock in Mohmand Agency, Federally Administered Tribal Area (FATA). Credit: SHID/ Iftikhar Khan
SHID provides vaccination for livestock in Mohmand Agency, Federally Administered Tribal Area (FATA). Credit: SHID/ Iftikhar Khan

Security operations in Pakistan’s Federally Administered Tribal Area (FATA) since 2008 have uprooted thousands of families from their homes and villages to seek refuge in neighbouring Khyber Pakhtunkwa. Many of these people have returned to their villages after spending months or years away, but not all of them have been able to restart their lives. 

Eighty-year-old Shalla Khan and his family recently returned home after spending four months in Nahqi camp just a few miles outside Mohmand Agency, one of the eight agencies of FATA. When they returned, they discovered that all their belongings including crops and livestock had been destroyed or stolen, leaving them without any way to rebuild their lives.        
 
“We lost all our belongings, our savings, our livestock and our cooking utensils,” explained Shalla Khan. “The wheat crop was completely destroyed and my house was damaged by to the heavy fighting. We had to leave with only the clothes on our back; we were in fear for our lives.”
 
In an effort to help families like the Khans, a local NGO, the Society for Human and Institutional Development (SHID), launched a project to help people rebuild their livelihoods and the damaged infrastructure with funding from the OCHA-managed Emergency Response Fund. In Mohmand Agency’s Safi district, aid workers from SHID met with the local communities and worked with them to find solutions to their needs.  
 
Shalla Khan and his 17-member family including children and grandchildren not only benefitted from the project but also helped SHID identify the most vulnerable families who needed help most. SHID gave these families goats and cows, seeds and animal fodder as well as vaccination and de-worming medications for the livestock.    
 
Today, the Khan family makes a steady income from selling milk to the local community. 
 
“I’m now able to send my grandchildren to school,” Shalla Khan said. “My sons are now earning enough to meet the daily needs of our family. My family and I are really happy.”
 
Reporting by OCHA Pakistan 
 
 
 
 
 

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