Security continues to hamper humanitarian access

28 March, 2011
Each day, hundreds of people who have crossed into Tunisia from Libya arrive at a transit camp near the border. Credit: OCHA/David Ohana
Each day, hundreds of people who have crossed into Tunisia from Libya arrive at a transit camp near the border. Credit: OCHA/David Ohana

Hostilities continue in certain parts of Libya while coalition forces enforce the no-fly zone. Opposition forces reportedly gained control of the cities of as Lanuf, Uqayla, Brega and Ajdabiya, along the central coast of Libya. The security situation continues to limit humanitarian access to Libya and the ability of actors to respond to needs. As security dynamics shift, a reduction in fighting is conducive to increased
access by humanitarian actors to conflict areas and an improved capacity to intervene. Some actors have already returned to work in the east of Libya in and around Benghazi, where opposition forces are in control.

No widespread, urgent humanitarian needs have been reported by partners in Benghazi, although further
assessments are required to determine specific needs. Health partners such as the World Health Organisation (WHO) and International Medical Corps (IMC) continue to provide life-saving medicine, personnel, and medical equipment to populations in Libya and along the borders at transit camps.

According to International Organization of Migration (IOM) as of 26 March, at least 376,485 people have left Libya. They include at least 190,700 to Tunisia; 154,140 to Egypt; 15,647 to Niger; 9,987 to Algeria; 3,200 to Chad and 2,800 to Sudan. The UN and humanitarian actors are actively reviewing security conditions on the ground and it is expected that in a few days it will be possible to determine next steps, thus paving the way for increased humanitarian activities in zones affected by conflict where feasible and required.

More>> OCHA Situation Report#17 [English]

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